bangor daily news advertising

BANGOR, Maine (AP) — University of Maine researchers are trying to produce of crop ecology and management, told the Bangor Daily News. Bangor Daily News corporate office is located in PO Box 1329, Bangor, Maine, Mariza Taylor; Contact Info Email Direct; Job Title Advertising Billing. BANGOR, Maine — University of Maine researchers are trying to produce of crop ecology and management, told the Bangor Daily News.

Bangor daily news advertising -

Researchers try producing potato resistant to climate change

Maine is coming off of a banner potato crop thanks in part to the success of the Caribou russet, which was developed by UMaine researchers. But Porter fears that even that variety isn't as heat tolerant as necessary to resist the future effects of climate change.

Pests are another factor. The Colorado potato beetle and disease-spreading aphids have flourished with the changing climate, said Jim Dill, pest management specialist at the University of Maine Cooperative Extension.

Breeding seemingly small changes like hairier leaves that make it difficult for insects to move around on the plant can cut down on pests' destruction and also the need for pesticides, he said.

Breeding such characteristics into potatoes is a long process of cross-pollinating different potato varieties.

The process is well underway.

They're in a research testing phase right now at sites throughout the United States. Test potatoes in Virginia, North Carolina and Florida are testing high temperature stress.

"It takes 10 years of selection after that initial cross pollination, and it might take two to five years before enough commercial evaluation has taken place to release a new potato variety," Porter said.

--

This story has been corrected to show that the NASA study suggests wheat production could grow, while corn yields could decline, under a high greenhouse gas emissions scenario.

___

Follow AP's climate coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/climate

Источник: https://www.whec.com/news/researchers-try-producing-potato-resistant-to-climate-change/6314973/?cat=621

BANGOR, Maine — University of Maine researchers are trying to produce potatoes that can better withstand warming temperatures as the climate changes.

Warming temperatures and an extended growing season can lead to quality problems and disease, Gregory Porter, a professor of crop ecology and management, told the Bangor Daily News.

“The predictions for climate change are heavier rainfall events, and potatoes don’t tolerate flooding or wet conditions for long without having other quality problems,” Porter said. “If we want potatoes to be continued to be produced successfully in Maine, we need to be able to produce varieties that can be resistant to change.”

Around the world, research aimed at mitigating crop damage is underway. A NASA study published this month suggests climate change may affect the production of corn and wheat, reducing yields of both, as soon as 2030.

Maine is coming off of a banner potato crop thanks in part to the success of the Caribou russet, which was developed by UMaine researchers. But Porter fears that even that variety isn’t as heat tolerant as necessary to resist the future effects of climate change.

Pests are another factor. The Colorado potato beetle and disease-spreading aphids have flourished with the changing climate, said Jim Dill, pest management specialist at the University of Maine Cooperative Extension. Breeding seemingly small changes like hairier leaves that make it difficult for insects to move around on the plant can cut down on pests’ destruction and also the need for pesticides, he said.

Breeding such characteristics into potatoes is a long process of cross-pollinating different potato varieties. The process is well underway.

They’re in a research testing phase right now at sites throughout the United States. Test potatoes in Virginia, North Carolina and Florida are testing high temperature stress.

“It takes 10 years of selection after that initial cross pollination, and it might take two to five years before enough commercial evaluation has taken place to release a new potato variety,” Porter said.

Global crop yields could fall about 30% because of climate change, while food demand is expected to jump 50% in the coming decades, according to United Nations’ estimates.

Источник: https://www.bostonherald.com/2021/11/28/maine-researchers-try-producing-potato-resistant-to-climate-change/

Affordable housing key to return of island nursing home

Since the closure announcement, the task force has been assessing the nursing home’s housing needs, the community’s existing housing stock, state and local zoning, and potential workforce housing opportunities.

Deer Isle, Stonington, Brooklin and Blue Hill are among several Hancock County towns that all rank as some of the least affordable places in Maine.

The lack of housing has made things tough.

The nursing home had between 26 and 28 people decline job offers because they could not find housing in the area, said Ronda Dodge, the president of the nursing home board.

Any reopening would depend on some sort of commitment from local landlords to rent homes at affordable rates while the housing situation is addressed, said Sam Harrington, chair of the task force.

“The community must come together with long-term commitments of money, time, real estate housing and other forms of support,” he said.

More News

Источник: https://www.nhregister.com/news/article/Affordable-housing-key-to-return-of-island-16656879.php

Bangor Daily News Employee Reviews

When journalism was fund and rewarding.

Washington DC Political columnist. (Former Employee) - Bangor, ME - August 24, 2014

The Bangor Daily News is a family-owned newspaper, now a vanishing breed. I went to work there right out of college. The owners of the BDN were committed to excellent journalism, to the point they sent me to Washington, DC to cover national politics from a Maine perspective. I was a one-man bureau from 1979 to 2001, which required me to be an innovative, self-starter.

The BDN experiment worked so well our competition, the Portland newspapers, sent their own reporter to Washington to compete with me, which made my job even more enjoyable. I had a competitor and our results were measured every morning on the pages of our newspapers.

My owners spared little expense during my two decades in Washington. I flew around the world with Secretary of State Edmund Muskie, covered national political conventions, reported from Central America in the 1980s and Bosnia in the next decade. I covered the major Washington, DC stories, from Iran-Contra to Bill Clinton's impeachment hearings.

Sadly, the Internet has cut deeply into newspaper readership (the BDN has fallen from more than 100,000 circulation daily to just 43,000 today) making the kind of job I held in Washington, DC impossible to sustain. The position was eliminated in 2001 when I retired.

Pros

The most interesting journalism job in Maine.

Cons

An isolation from the home office and my fellow employees.

Источник: https://www.indeed.com/cmp/Bangor-Daily-News/reviews

Bangor Daily News

Newspaper

The Bangor Daily News is an American newspaper covering a large portion of central and eastern Maine, published six days per week in Bangor, Maine.

The Bangor Daily News was founded on June 18, 1889; it merged with the Bangor Whig and Courier in 1900. Also known as the News or the BDN, the paper is published by Bangor Publishing Company, a local family-owned company.

It has been owned by the Towle-Warren family for four generations; current publisher Richard J. Warren is the great-grandson of J. Norman Towle, who bought the paper in 1895.[1] Since 2018, it has been the only independently owned daily newspaper in the state.[2]

History[edit]

The Bangor Daily News's first issue was June 18, 1889; the main stockholder in the publishing company was Bangor shipping and logging businessman Thomas J. Stewart.[1] Upon Stewart's death in 1890, his sons took control of the paper, which was originally a tabloid with "some news, but also plenty of gossip, lurid stories and scandals."[1] In 1895, J. Norman Towle purchased the newspaper. Ownership of the paper remained in the family, and Towle's great-grandson Richard J. Warren remains the publisher today.[1]

The Bangor Daily News merged with the Bangor Whig & Courier in 1900, leaving two newspapers in the city: BDN and the Bangor Daily Commercial (which ceased publication in 1949). Towle's son-in-law Fred Jordan took control of the paper in 1929. Forty-six BDN staff members served in the U.S. forces during World War II, and the paper's managing editor John M. O’Connell was sent to Europe as a war correspondent.[1] After Fred Jordan's death in 1947, his widow Lillis Towle Jordan became publisher.[1] Richard K. Warren became publisher in 1955 and remained in that role until 1984, a time when the newspaper's circulation dramatically increased.[1] It has only missed one day of delivery in its entire history. On New Year's Eve 1962, a massive blizzard dumped over three feet of snow on Bangor, with 20-foot snowdrifts that made it impossible for the delivery trucks to move.[1]

The newspaper's peak came in the mid-1980s, when Bangor Daily News had 150 reporters and editors and 150 other employees. At the time, published seven regional editions of the newspaper throughout Maine, and in addition to its main office on Main Street in Bangor had news bureaus at Madawaska, Presque Isle, Houlton, Pittsfield, Calais, Machias, Rockland, Augusta and Ellsworth.[1]

In 1982, a reporter for the Bangor Daily News, Beurmond Banville, who ran a one-person news bureau for the paper in Madawaska, Maine, on the U.S.-Canada border, wrote about a pretrial hearing in a murder case in New Brunswick, Canada.[4] After publishing an account of the restricted proceeding in BDN, Banville was convicted in a Canadian court for violating a publication ban, and was fined $160; in 1983, the Court of Appeal of New Brunswick upheld the conviction, but gave Banville an absolute discharge, meaning that he does not have any Canadian criminal record.[5] Banville and the newspaper considered the Canadian court's ruling to be a prior restraint on freedom of the press, but decided not to further appeal considering the cost.[5] The ruling appears in a textbook on Canadian media law.[6]

Richard J. Warren succeeded his father as editor in 1984; five years later, the newspaper moved its printing plant from Bangor to a new printing plant in Hampden (which was closed in 2013 and sold in 2015).[1]

The newspaper was an early adopter of a policy against running tobacco advertising. As of 1993, the Bangor Daily News was one of fewer than twenty American newspapers that declined to accept ads for tobacco products.[7]

The newspaper launched its Web presence in 1997 at bangornews.com, later moving to bangordailynews.com in the 2000s.[1] From 1997 to 2001, BDN acted as an Internet service provider in addition to a newspaper, working with two local, small telecommunications companies to provide dial-up Internet access to a few thousand people in Maine.[1]

BDN adopted an aggressive "digital-first" publishing strategy,[1] and became the most-read online news source in the state; in 2011, the Portland Press Herald outsold BDN in print copies by a few thousand papers on an average weekday, but BDN's website had more than 100,000 unique visitors than the Press Herald's website.[8]

In 2008, the paper's editorial page director, Todd Benoit, was appointed BDN's director of new media; he later became BDN's president and chief operating officer.[1] In 2014, Richard J. Warren became publisher of the newspaper.[1] The company that owns and operates the newspaper, Bangor Publishing Co., expanded through acquisitions of Bangor Metro magazine (2014), Madawaska's St. John Valley Times (2015), and Fort Kent's Fiddlehead Focus (2016).[1] The company also owns several weekly newspapers in Maine: the Presque IsleStar-Herald, CaribouAroostook Republican and News, Dover-FoxcroftPiscataquis Observer, Houlton Pioneer Times, and Greater Bangor The Weekly.[9]

In 2011 and 2012, BDN established the partnerships The Maine Campus (the independent student newspaper at the University of Maine) and The Free Press (the student newspaper at the University of Southern Maine) through the BDN media partners program. The program involves a content-sharing agreement as well as training and Web hosting services provided by BDN to the student newspapers.[10][11]

In 2011, BDN hired an additional reporter to cover Greater Portland and reassigned another reporter to cover the southern mid-coast of Maine. Editor-in-chief Mike Dowd also named editorial-page editor Susan Young as "managing editor for investigative reporting and new initiatives" and appointed Tom Groening as editorial-page editor.[12]

The Bangor Daily News and The Quoddy Tides sought records under the Maine Freedom of Access Act of closed-door tribal councils of the Passamaquoddy Tribe relating to a proposed $500 million liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal on tribal land at the Pleasant Point Reservation.[13] A Maine court decided that the newspapers were not entitled to the records because the tribal officials' negotiations with the Oklahoma-based LNG developer were undertaken in the reservation's capacity as "a profit-making business rather than municipal governance" and were therefore not subjected to the Freedom of Access Act.[13] The Maine Supreme Judicial Court unanimously affirmed the ruling in 2006.[13] In 2013, Bangor Daily News reporters submitted a public records request to Maine's state government for public information that included the names and addresses of the holders of concealed-weapon permits. The request, made in furtherance of newsgathering, prompted a fierce uproar, and the newspaper dropped the request.[14]

In 2018, Bangor Daily News became the state's only independently owned daily newspaper in the state, after MaineToday Media, owned by Reade Brower, acquired additional newspapers in Maine. MaineToday now owns the seven of Maine's eight daily newspapers: the Portland Press Herald and Maine Sunday Telegram, the Times Record of Brunswick, the Journal Tribune of Biddeford, the Kennebec Journal in Augusta, the Morning Sentinel in Waterville, and the Coastal Journal in Bath.[2] Although Brower's company does not own BDN, it does provide printing services for BDN.[15]

As of 2020, about half of BDN's journalists were based in Bangor, with the other half spread across Maine.[16]

Editorial stance[edit]

The Bangor Daily News's editorial stance has traditionally leaned toward conservatism and the Republican Party, in contrast to the Portland Press Herald, which was regarded as having a more liberal, pro-Democratic editorial stance.[17] It historically endorsed Republican candidates for office,[18] such as Barry Goldwater in the 1964 presidential election,[19] but has also sometimes endorsed Democratic candidates.[18] In the 1974 Maine gubernatorial election, the Bangor Daily News endorsed independent candidateJames B. Longley: "The newspaper had always endorsed Republicans, so backing an independent was stunning."[20] The endorsement was a major boost to Longley's candidacy.[20] The paper also backed independent candidate Herman "Buddy" Frankland[17] and Republican Susan Collins.[21]

BDN's editorial board endorsed Republican George W. Bush in the 2000 presidential election, but endorsed Democrat John Kerry over Bush in the 2004 presidential election.[22] In 2008, BDN endorsed Democrat Barack Obamafor president, Republican Susan Collins for Senate, and Democrats Mike Michaud and Chellie Pingree for Maine's congressional seats.[23] The paper's editorial board also endorsed Obama for reelection in 2012 over Republican challenger Mitt Romney.[24]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcdefghijklmnopEmily Burnham (June 18, 2019). "Tabloid origins, war correspondent and the only day no papers were delivered: A 130-year history of the Bangor Daily News". Bangor Daily News.
  2. ^ abBob Keyes (March 23, 2018). "Press Herald owner Reade Brower will buy newspapers in Biddeford and Brunswick". The Portland Press Herald.
  3. ^Cole Land Transportation Museum
  4. ^Jonathan Friendly, Maine Newspaper Tests Canadian Court Curb, New York Times (March 4, 1982).
  5. ^ abReporter's Conviction Upheld, Reuters (January 19, 1983).
  6. ^ Robert Martin & Stuart Adam, Sourcebook of Canadian Media Law (2d. ed: Carlton University Press, 1994), pp. 335-41.
  7. ^William Glaberson, Seattle Times Places a Ban on Tobacco Advertisements, New York Times (July 5, 1993).
  8. ^Al Diamon (June 17, 2011). "Media Mutt: Bangor Daily Dominates Online News". Down East. Archived from the original on June 23, 2011.
  9. ^Julia Bayly (November 14, 2015). "Bangor Daily News owner acquires St. John Valley Times". Bangor Daily News.
  10. ^BDN launches partnership with The Maine Campus newspaper, Bangor Daily News (December 9, 2011).
  11. ^The Free Press teams up with the Bangor Daily News, Free Press (April 9, 2013).
  12. ^Al Diamon (August 9, 2011). "Media Mutt: The Bangor Daily News Beefs Up". Down East. Archived from the original on March 18, 2012.
  13. ^ abcMaine Court Rejects Newspapers' Bid for Tribal Records, Editor & Publisher (May 9, 2006).
  14. ^Maine: Uproar Over Request for Gun Permit Data, Reuters (February 15, 2013).
  15. ^Casey Kelly, The man behind Maine's unparalleled consolidation of local news, Columbia Journalism Review (September 6, 2018).
  16. ^"Staff Directory". Bangor Daily News. April 19, 2020.
  17. ^ abChristian P. Potholm, This Splendid Game: Maine Campaigns and Elections, 1940-2002 (Lexington Books: 2004), p. 9.
  18. ^ abRichard J. Powell, "A Campaign About Campaign Discourse: Maine's Second District in Running on Empty? Political Discourse in Congressional Elections (eds: Louis Sandy Maisel & Darrell M. West: Rowman & Littlefield, 2004), p. 121.
  19. ^United Press International (October 25, 1964).
  20. ^ abDouglas Rooks, Statesman: George Mitchell and the Art of the Possible (Down East Books, 2016), p. 119.
  21. ^Christian P. Potholm, This Splendid Game: Maine Campaigns and Elections, 1940-2002 (Lexington Books: 2004), p. 197.
  22. ^Greg Mitchell, Daily Endorsement Tally: A Handful of Pickups for Each, but a Bigger Handful for Kerry, Editor & Publisher (October 27, 2004).
  23. ^Endorsements 2008 — Editorials, Bangor Daily News (October 31, 2008).
  24. ^Obama should serve four more years, Bangor Daily News (October 26, 2012).

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bangor_Daily_News

Researchers try producing potato resistant to climate change

Maine is coming off of a banner potato crop thanks in part to the success of the Caribou russet, which was developed by UMaine researchers. But Porter fears that even that variety isn't as heat tolerant as necessary to resist the future effects of climate change.

Pests are another factor. The Colorado potato beetle and disease-spreading aphids have flourished with the changing climate, said Jim Dill, pest management specialist at the University of Maine Cooperative Extension.

Breeding seemingly small changes like hairier leaves that make it difficult for insects to move around on the plant can cut down on pests' destruction and also the need for pesticides, he said.

Breeding such characteristics into potatoes is a long process of cross-pollinating different potato varieties.

The process is well underway.

They're in a research testing phase right now at sites throughout the United States. Test potatoes in Virginia, North Carolina and Florida are testing high temperature stress.

"It takes 10 years of selection after that initial cross pollination, and it might take two to five years before enough commercial evaluation has taken place to release a new potato variety," Porter said.

--

This story has been corrected to show that the NASA study suggests wheat production could grow, while corn yields could decline, under a high greenhouse gas emissions scenario.

___

Follow AP's climate coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/climate

Источник: https://www.whec.com/news/researchers-try-producing-potato-resistant-to-climate-change/6314973/?cat=621

Bangor Daily News

Newspaper

The Bangor Daily News is an American newspaper covering a large portion of central and eastern Maine, published six days per week in Bangor, Maine.

The Bangor Daily News was founded on June 18, 1889; it merged with the Bangor Whig and Courier in 1900. Also known as the News or the BDN, the paper is published by Bangor Publishing Company, a local family-owned company.

It has been owned by the Towle-Warren family for four generations; current publisher Richard J. Warren is the great-grandson of J. Norman Towle, who bought the paper in 1895.[1] Since 2018, it has been the only independently owned daily newspaper in the state.[2]

History[edit]

The Bangor Daily News's first issue was June 18, 1889; the main stockholder in the publishing company was Bangor shipping and logging businessman Thomas J. Stewart.[1] Upon Stewart's death in 1890, his sons took control of the paper, which was originally a tabloid with "some news, but also plenty of gossip, lurid stories and scandals."[1] In 1895, J. Norman Towle purchased the newspaper. Ownership of the paper remained in the family, and Towle's great-grandson Richard J. Warren remains the publisher today.[1]

The Bangor Daily News merged with the Bangor Whig & Courier in 1900, leaving two newspapers in the city: BDN and the Bangor Daily Commercial (which ceased publication in 1949). Towle's son-in-law Fred Jordan took control of the paper in 1929. Forty-six BDN staff members served in the U.S. forces during World War II, and the paper's managing editor John M. O’Connell was sent to Europe as a war correspondent.[1] After Fred Jordan's death in 1947, his widow Lillis Towle Jordan became publisher.[1] Richard K. Warren became publisher in 1955 and remained in that role until 1984, a time when the newspaper's circulation dramatically increased.[1] It has only missed one day of delivery in its entire history. On New Year's Eve 1962, a massive blizzard dumped over three feet of snow on Bangor, with 20-foot snowdrifts that made it impossible for the delivery trucks to move.[1]

The newspaper's peak came in the mid-1980s, when Bangor Daily News had 150 reporters and editors and 150 other employees. At the time, published seven regional editions of the newspaper throughout Maine, and in addition to its main office on Main Street in Bangor had news bureaus at Madawaska, Presque Isle, Houlton, Pittsfield, Calais, Machias, Rockland, Augusta and Ellsworth.[1]

In 1982, a reporter for the Bangor Daily News, Beurmond Banville, who ran a one-person news bureau for the paper in Madawaska, Maine, on the U.S.-Canada border, wrote about a pretrial hearing in a murder case in New Brunswick, Canada.[4] After publishing an account of the restricted proceeding in BDN, Banville was convicted in a Canadian court for violating a publication ban, and was fined $160; in 1983, the Court of Appeal of New Brunswick upheld the conviction, but gave Banville an is pike place market open today discharge, meaning that he does not have any Canadian criminal record.[5] Banville and the newspaper considered the Canadian court's ruling to be a prior restraint on freedom of the press, but decided not to further appeal considering the cost.[5] The ruling appears in a textbook on Canadian media law.[6]

Richard J. Warren succeeded his father as editor in 1984; five years later, the newspaper moved its printing plant from Bangor to a new printing plant in Hampden (which was closed in 2013 and sold in 2015).[1]

The newspaper was an early adopter of a policy against running tobacco advertising. As of 1993, the Bangor Daily News was one of fewer than twenty American newspapers that declined to accept ads for tobacco products.[7]

The newspaper launched its Web presence in 1997 at bangornews.com, later moving to bangordailynews.com in the 2000s.[1] From 1997 to 2001, BDN acted as an Internet service provider in addition to a newspaper, working with two local, small telecommunications companies to provide dial-up Internet access to a few thousand people in Maine.[1]

BDN adopted an aggressive "digital-first" publishing strategy,[1] and became the most-read online news source in the state; in 2011, the Portland Bangor daily news advertising Herald outsold BDN in print copies by a few thousand papers on an average weekday, but BDN's website had more dare county nc building codes 100,000 unique visitors than the Press Herald's website.[8]

In 2008, the paper's editorial page director, Todd Benoit, was appointed BDN's director of new media; he later became BDN's president and chief operating officer.[1] In 2014, Richard J. Warren became publisher of the newspaper.[1] The company that owns and operates the newspaper, Bangor Publishing Co., expanded through acquisitions of Bangor Metro magazine (2014), Madawaska's St. John Valley Times (2015), and Fort Kent's Fiddlehead Focus (2016).[1] The company also owns several weekly newspapers in Maine: the Presque IsleStar-Herald, CaribouAroostook Republican and News, Dover-FoxcroftPiscataquis Observer, Houlton Pioneer Times, and Greater Bangor The Weekly.[9]

In 2011 and 2012, BDN established the partnerships The Maine Campus (the independent student newspaper at the University of Maine) and The Free Press (the student newspaper at the University of Southern Maine) through the BDN media partners program. The program involves a content-sharing agreement as well as training and Web hosting services provided by BDN to the student newspapers.[10][11]

In 2011, BDN hired an additional reporter to cover Greater Portland and reassigned another reporter to cover the southern mid-coast of Maine. Editor-in-chief Mike Dowd also named editorial-page editor Susan Young as "managing editor for investigative reporting and new initiatives" and appointed Tom Groening as editorial-page editor.[12]

The Bangor Daily News and The Quoddy Tides sought records under the Maine Freedom of Access Act of closed-door tribal councils of the Passamaquoddy Tribe relating to a proposed $500 million liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal on tribal bangor daily news advertising at the Pleasant Point Reservation.[13] A Maine court decided that the newspapers were not entitled to the records because the tribal officials' negotiations with the Oklahoma-based LNG developer were undertaken in the reservation's capacity as "a profit-making business rather than municipal governance" and were therefore not subjected to the Freedom of Access Act.[13] The Maine Supreme Judicial Court unanimously affirmed the ruling in 2006.[13] In 2013, Bangor Daily News reporters submitted a public records request to Maine's state government for public information that included the names and addresses of the holders of concealed-weapon permits. The request, made in furtherance of newsgathering, prompted a fierce uproar, and the newspaper dropped the request.[14]

In 2018, Bangor Daily News became the state's only independently owned daily newspaper in the state, after MaineToday Media, owned by Reade Brower, acquired additional newspapers in Maine. MaineToday now owns the seven of Maine's eight daily newspapers: the Portland Press Herald and Maine Sunday Telegram, the Times Record of Brunswick, the Journal Tribune of Biddeford, the Kennebec Journal in Augusta, the Morning Sentinel in Waterville, and the Coastal Journal in Bath.[2] Although Brower's company does not own BDN, it does provide printing services for BDN.[15]

As of 2020, about half of BDN's journalists were based in Bangor, with the other half spread across Maine.[16]

Editorial stance[edit]

The Bangor Daily News's editorial stance has traditionally leaned toward conservatism and the Republican Party, in contrast to the Portland Press Herald, which was regarded as having a more liberal, pro-Democratic editorial stance.[17] It historically endorsed Republican candidates for office,[18] such as Barry Goldwater in the 1964 presidential election,[19] but has also sometimes endorsed Democratic candidates.[18] In the 1974 Maine gubernatorial election, the Bangor Daily News endorsed independent candidateJames B. Longley: "The newspaper had always endorsed Republicans, so backing an independent was stunning."[20] The endorsement was a major boost to Longley's candidacy.[20] The paper also backed independent candidate Herman "Buddy" Frankland[17] and Republican Susan Collins.[21]

BDN's editorial board endorsed Republican George W. Bush in the 2000 presidential election, but endorsed Democrat John Kerry over Bush in the 2004 presidential election.[22] In 2008, BDN endorsed Democrat Barack Obamafor president, Republican Susan Collins for Bangor daily news advertising, and Democrats Mike Michaud and Chellie Pingree for Maine's congressional seats.[23] The paper's editorial board also endorsed Obama for reelection in 2012 over Republican challenger Mitt Romney.[24]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcdefghijklmnopEmily Burnham (June 18, 2019). "Tabloid origins, war merrill lynch careers uk internships and the only day no papers were delivered: A 130-year history of the Bangor Daily News". Bangor Daily Convert c to f calculator abBob Keyes (March 23, 2018). "Press Herald owner Reade Brower will buy newspapers in Biddeford and Brunswick". The Portland Press Herald.
  2. ^Cole Land Transportation Museum
  3. ^Jonathan Friendly, Maine Newspaper Tests Canadian Court Curb, New York Times (March 4, 1982).
  4. ^ abReporter's Conviction Upheld, Reuters (January 19, 1983).
  5. ^ Robert Martin & Stuart Adam, Sourcebook of Canadian Media Law (2d. ed: Carlton University Press, 1994), pp. 335-41.
  6. ^William Glaberson, Seattle Times Places a Ban on Tobacco Advertisements, New York Times (July 5, 1993).
  7. ^Al Diamon (June 17, 2011). "Media Mutt: Bangor Daily Dominates Online News". Down East. Archived from the original on June 23, 2011.
  8. ^Julia Bayly (November 14, 2015). "Bangor Daily News owner acquires St. John Valley Times". Bangor Daily News.
  9. ^BDN launches partnership with The Maine Campus newspaper, Bangor Daily News (December 9, 2011).
  10. ^The Free Press teams up with the Bangor Daily News, Free Press (April 9, 2013).
  11. ^Al Diamon (August 9, 2011). "Media Mutt: The Bangor Daily News Beefs Up". Down East. Archived from the original on March 18, 2012.
  12. ^ abcMaine Court Rejects Newspapers' Bid for Tribal Records, Editor & Publisher (May 9, 2006).
  13. ^Maine: Uproar Over Request for Gun Permit Data, Reuters (February 15, 2013).
  14. ^Casey Kelly, The man behind Maine's unparalleled consolidation of local news, Columbia Journalism Review (September 6, 2018).
  15. ^"Staff Directory". Bangor Daily News. April 19, 2020.
  16. ^ abChristian P. Potholm, This Splendid Game: Maine Campaigns and Elections, 1940-2002 (Lexington Books: 2004), p. 9.
  17. ^ abRichard J. Powell, "A Campaign About Campaign Discourse: Maine's Second District in Running on Empty? Political Discourse in Congressional Elections (eds: Louis Sandy Maisel & Darrell M. West: Rowman & Littlefield, 2004), p. 121.
  18. ^United Press International (October 25, 1964).
  19. ^ abDouglas Rooks, Statesman: George Mitchell and the Art of the Possible (Down East Books, 2016), p. 119.
  20. ^Christian P. Potholm, This Splendid Game: Maine Campaigns and Elections, 1940-2002 (Lexington Books: 2004), p. 197.
  21. ^Greg Mitchell, Daily Endorsement Tally: A Handful of Pickups for Each, but a Bigger Handful for Kerry, Editor & Publisher (October 27, 2004).
  22. ^Endorsements 2008 — Editorials, Bangor Daily News (October 31, 2008).
  23. ^Obama should serve four more years, Bangor Daily News (October 26, 2012).

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bangor_Daily_News

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Affordable housing key to return of island nursing home

Since the closure announcement, the task force has been assessing the nursing home’s housing needs, the community’s existing housing stock, state and local zoning, and potential workforce housing opportunities.

Deer Isle, Stonington, Brooklin and Blue Hill are among several Hancock County towns that all rank as some of the least affordable places in Maine.

The lack of housing has made things tough.

The nursing home had between 26 and 28 people decline job offers because they could not find housing in the area, said Ronda Dodge, the president of the nursing home board.

Any reopening would depend on some sort of commitment from local landlords to rent homes at affordable rates while the housing situation is addressed, said Sam Harrington, chair of the task force.

“The community must come together with long-term commitments of money, time, real estate housing and other forms of support,” he said.

More News

Источник: https://www.nhregister.com/news/article/Affordable-housing-key-to-return-of-island-16656879.php

Bangor Daily News Employee Reviews

When journalism was fund and rewarding.

Washington DC Political columnist. (Former Employee) - Bangor, ME - August 24, 2014

The Bangor Daily News is a family-owned newspaper, now a vanishing breed. I went to work there right out of college. The owners of the BDN were committed to excellent journalism, to the point they sent me to Washington, DC to cover national politics from a Maine perspective. I was a one-man bureau from 1979 to 2001, which required me to be an innovative, self-starter.

The BDN experiment worked so well our competition, the Portland newspapers, sent their own reporter to Washington to compete with me, which made my job even more enjoyable. I had a competitor and our results were measured every morning on the pages of our newspapers.

My owners spared little expense during my two decades in Washington. I flew around the world with Secretary of State Edmund Muskie, covered national political conventions, reported from Central America in the 1980s and Bosnia in the next decade. Northwest community credit union locations covered the major Washington, DC stories, from Iran-Contra to Bill Clinton's impeachment hearings.

Sadly, the Internet has cut deeply into newspaper readership (the BDN has fallen from more than 100,000 circulation daily to just 43,000 today) making the kind of job I held in Washington, DC impossible to sustain. The position was eliminated in 2001 when I retired.

Pros

The most interesting journalism job in Maine.

Cons

An isolation from the home office and my fellow employees.

Источник: https://www.indeed.com/cmp/Bangor-Daily-News/reviews

Bangor Daily News

Bangor

November 27, 2021

PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE: MARSHFIELD SOLAR, NOTICE OF INTENT TO FILE AND NOTICE OF PUBLIC INFORMATIONAL MEETING (Publish date: November 27, 2021) Please take notice that Marshfield Solar, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Summit Ridge Energy (SRE), c/o Ben Aparo, 1515 Wilson Blvd, Suite 300, Arlington, VA 22209, phone 860-463-0600 is intending to file a Natural Bangor daily news advertising Protection Act permit application with the Maine Department of Environmental Protection pursuant to the provisions of 38 M.R.S. 480-A thru 480-JJ on or about December 8, 2021. The application is for the development of a 1.9-megawatt community solar facility, operated on approximately 19 acres of a 40-acre parcel located at 10 Northfield Road Marshfield, Maine. A virtual public information meeting will be held by the Applicant to inform the public of the project and its anticipated environmental impacts, and to educate the public about the opportunities for public comment on the project. This virtual meeting will be held on Monday, December 6, 2021 at 6:00 pm ET on Zoom. If you are having technical difficulties on the evening of the meeting, please call Randi Jackson of TRC Environmental (the Agent) at (207) 530-0521 or email [email protected] Questions about the proposed project can be directed to Summit Ridge Energy c/o Ben Aparo at 1515 Wilson St, Suite 300, Arlington, VA 22209, by email to [email protected], or by phone at 860-463-0600. A request for a public hearing or a request that the Board of Environmental Protection assume jurisdiction over this application must be received by the Department in writing, no later than 20 days after the application is found by the Department to be complete and is accepted for processing. A public hearing may or may not be held at the discretion of the Commissioner or Board of Environmental Protection. Public comment on the application will be accepted throughout processing of the application. The application will be filed for public inspection at the Maine Department of Environmental Protection's office in Bangor during normal working hours. A copy of the application may also be seen at the municipal office in Marshfield, Maine. Written public comments may be sent to the regional office in Bangor, where the application is filed for public inspection: MDEP, Eastern Maine Regional Office, 106 Hogan Road, Bangor, Maine 04401. Join Zoom Meeting https://trccompanies.zoom.us/j/95222687060?pwd=OUxFWmxCSDVDN25hMUMyVzdnTXBTZz09 Meeting ID: 952 2268 7060 Passcode: 123 Dial bangor daily news advertising your location +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston) +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma) +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose) +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago) +1 929 436 2866 US (New York) +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC) Meeting ID: 952 2268 7060 Passcode: 123 Find your local number: https://trccompanies.zoom.us/u/amp3LZPX3

Miscellaneous Notices

Источник: https://mainenotices.com/

Bangor Daily First security bank of missoula mt ‘progress edition’ promotes local businesses, advertisers

Orono, Maine — On the evening of Jan. 13, I sat down with my home-delivered copy of The Bangor Daily News. I was drawn to an historical insert detailing the pasts of seven Maine businesses between 64 and 158 years old. I opened the broadsheet.

Each of these seven businesses — among them a charter bus line, a sign manufacturer called Bangor Neon, an auto repair outfit, and a nursery and garden center — received a full page of favorable coverage. The articles detailed the rich histories of these companies, as well as the fine work they are doing today. “It was 64 years ago when a hard-working man started a small business that grew to become the local icon it is today,” the paper wrote of Bangor Neon.

Of Joe Cyr, president of John T. Cyr & Sons bus line, the paper said, “It has never been ‘all business’ for Joe; he’s always been very active in his community, wells fargo bank anchorage hours on the boards of such institutions as St. Joseph Hospital, Merrill Merchants Bank, and the Old Town-Orono YMCA. In fact, Joe had been one of the first, and strongest, supporters of the new field house at the Orono YMCA.”

Something was off. The font in the stories differed slightly from the standard type in the rest of the newspaper. All seven full-page articles were written by the same Bangor Daily News staffer, a David Fitzpatrick. Below his byline was written “The Bangor Daily News.” The stories had the look and feel of straight news coverage, but made me feel uneasy. There was no mention of advertising either bangor daily news advertising or below these articles.

Puzzled, I returned to the front page of the insert. Above the insert’s grandly displayed title, “Maine’s Progressive Businesses,” were these tiny words: “Advertising supplement to The Bangor Daily News.”

According to the author of the articles, these stories focused only on companies that had previously purchased advertising from the paper. Editors, though, weren’t transparent about this with readers. Atop each of the seven full-page articles extolling the virtues of the businesses, there was no note to readers indicating the stories were linked to money coming into the newspaper. The content was delivered on broadsheet newsprint, not the smaller inserts of, say, Best Buy offerings or Parade magazine, which bangor daily news advertising the content apart from a paper’s own news. And the newspaper’s name listed beneath each of Fitzpatrick’s bylines seemed likely to confuse readers into believing these bangor daily news advertising standard news stories on Maine businesses.

At the very top of this insert front, there alaska usa mobile app a disclaimer. But even that disclaimer does not make it clear that the businesses featured in the section were selected because they are advertisers with the paper.

The minuscule disclaimer is not enough. This insert feeds readers copy that looks like vetted news. Take a look at the insert yourself, and see if you think the coverage of these businesses is clearly labeled. In the version of the insert published online, the notice that the coverage is linked to advertising is invisible unless one zooms in considerably on the front page.

“The omission, whether on purpose or accidental, could lead people to believe [the work] was done with the same sanctity that general news reporting has, and unfortunately, trades on that credibility,” said Pam Fine, journalism professor and Knight Chair at the University of Kansas.

Some papers across the country do guaranty bank locations similar so-called “progress editions,” Fine said, that bangor daily news advertising businesses. The weekly Carolina Forest Chronicle, for example, published in April an advertising section titled “Snapshots of Progress” that contained many commercial promotions in the shape of journalism.

The Daily Freeman-Journal in Webster City, Iowa publishes an annual progress edition, and businesses that purchase ads in the publication are allowed to pitch a story to the newsroom showing that what they’re doing is innovative. Bangor daily news advertising paper’s advertising manager said an ad purchase doesn’t guarantee that a business receives coverage in the progress edition, or that any coverage will be favorable. The articles are written by newsroom staffers, not advertising employees.

The Daily Gazette in McCook, Neb., also publishes progress editions containing positive stories written by reporters and, likewise, pages in the section are not reserved only for companies that place ads in the paper. I found these examples by Googling “progress edition” and “news,” and there were more examples than those reported here.

Many newspapers and magazines publish ads that have the look of news articles, but they typically include the words “paid advertisement” above the promotion, and do not carry the name of the host publication as the provider. Regardless of labeling, the Society of Professional Journalists urges newspapers to simply “shun hybrids that blur the lines” between advertising and journalism.

David Fitzpatrick, author of all seven articles in “Maine’s Progressive Businesses” works in the paper’s advertising department. He told me in a phone interview that the companies chosen to receive favorable coverage are only those that bought advertising in the newspaper in the past. For this particular promotion, he said, he identified companies that had bought ads from the paper and then selected companies that were more than 50 years old, before singling coldwell banker the villages fl seven businesses to be celebrated. Fitzpatrick said the businesses did not pay a direct fee to receive the favorable treatment. Fitzpatrick agreed that the coverage of the seven businesses was entirely positive. “[The articles] are very favorable, obviously,” he said. The paper has published progress editions for many years.

Todd Benoit, the paper’s director of news and new media, said in an email that “[T]he product is marked as advertising and it is not part of the news section of the newspaper. We create that separation so that no reader is confused about what is news content and what is advertising content.” But I was initially confused, and I have a Ph.D. from a journalism school.

I showed the insert to a class of mostly junior and senior journalism majors at the University of Maine, and only one student recognized the articles as straight advertising: a young man who knows David Fitzpatrick and the kind of writing he does for the Bangor Daily News.

Readers have virtually no way of knowing that the upbeat coverage of the businesses is connected to paid advertising. Even if readers saw the extremely small identification of an “advertising supplement” on the front page of insert, is that enough? Readers don’t know the content inside is a thank-you to companies that have written checks to the paper. The section’s front page boasts in very visible type that “Maine has a rich business history, and within these pages you’ll find great examples. And we’ll honor seven of those businesses that have stood the test of time with in-depth histories.” We’ll honor seven of those businesses…with histories. This language leads readers to believe The Bangor Daily News is independently appraising these companies.

When flattering news coverage is in any way linked to paid advertising, news providers have an overriding obligation to fully disclose that quid pro quo to the public. Of course, it would northwest savings bank online banking better if news outlets simply resolved not to flirt with deceiving their audiences in the first place.

I asked Michael J. Dowd, the paper’s editor-in-chief, whether there were any characteristics of the promotional coverage that made him uneasy. He was silent for a bit, then said, “I’ve got to find out more about advertising supplements. I’m not prepared to comment at this point.”

Dowd’s arguments in the paper’s defense were that there could be no confusion about the nature of the special coverage because the word “advertising” was written on page one of the insert, and also because the fonts of the headlines, cutlines, and copy were slightly different than those used in the rest of the paper.

I’ve taken The Bangor Daily News to task in the past for other matters of journalistic integrity. After calling in September for voluntary buyouts of up to 30 employees, for example, the paper published not a single mention of the slashing in its print edition (editors did bury an AP brief on the buyouts deep in their website). I also criticized the paper in Columbia Journalism Review when editors fought repeatedly against correcting factual errors I identified.

The sin of conflating news and commercial advocacy, though, is more severe. The distinction between news and ads should never be a head-scratcher.

Many Mainers consider The Bangor Daily News the state’s primary newspaper, stronger than the financially hobbled Portland Press Herald. The paper has a paid weekday circulation of around 50,000 copies and a strong website that draws hundreds of thousands of unique visitors each month.

Dowd said that in future inserts, his paper plans to indicate that articles like those in “Maine’s Progressive Businesses” are linked to paid advertising, by stating that beneath the author’s byline. That’s a start.

Correction: The Bangor Daily News “progress edition” ran Jan. 13, not Jan. 12 as this article originally stated.

Justin D. Martin, Ph.D., is the CLAS-Honors Preceptor at the University of Maine and a columnist for Columbia Journalism Review. Follow him on Twitter: @Justin_D_Martin

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Источник: https://www.poynter.org/newsletters/2012/bangor-daily-news-progress-edition-promotes-local-businesses-advertisers/

Bangor daily news advertising -

Researchers try producing potato resistant to climate change

Maine is coming off of a banner potato crop thanks in part to the success of the Caribou russet, which was developed by UMaine researchers. But Porter fears that even that variety isn't as heat tolerant as necessary to resist the future effects of climate change.

Pests are another factor. The Colorado potato beetle and disease-spreading aphids have flourished with the changing climate, said Jim Dill, pest management specialist at the University of Maine Cooperative Extension.

Breeding seemingly small changes like hairier leaves that make it difficult for insects to move around on the plant can cut down on pests' destruction and also the need for pesticides, he said.

Breeding such characteristics into potatoes is a long process of cross-pollinating different potato varieties.

The process is well underway.

They're in a research testing phase right now at sites throughout the United States. Test potatoes in Virginia, North Carolina and Florida are testing high temperature stress.

"It takes 10 years of selection after that initial cross pollination, and it might take two to five years before enough commercial evaluation has taken place to release a new potato variety," Porter said.

--

This story has been corrected to show that the NASA study suggests wheat production could grow, while corn yields could decline, under a high greenhouse gas emissions scenario.

___

Follow AP's climate coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/climate

Источник: https://www.whec.com/news/researchers-try-producing-potato-resistant-to-climate-change/6314973/?cat=621

Bangor Daily News

Newspaper

The Bangor Daily News is an American newspaper covering a large portion of central and eastern Maine, published six days per week in Bangor, Maine.

The Bangor Daily News was founded on June 18, 1889; it merged with the Bangor Whig and Courier in 1900. Also known as the News or the BDN, the paper is published by Bangor Publishing Company, a local family-owned company.

It has been owned by the Towle-Warren family for four generations; current publisher Richard J. Warren is the great-grandson of J. Norman Towle, who bought the paper in 1895.[1] Since 2018, it has been the only independently owned daily newspaper in the state.[2]

History[edit]

The Bangor Daily News's first issue was June 18, 1889; the main stockholder in the publishing company was Bangor shipping and logging businessman Thomas J. Stewart.[1] Upon Stewart's death in 1890, his sons took control of the paper, which was originally a tabloid with "some news, but also plenty of gossip, lurid stories and scandals."[1] In 1895, J. Norman Towle purchased the newspaper. Ownership of the paper remained in the family, and Towle's great-grandson Richard J. Warren remains the publisher today.[1]

The Bangor Daily News merged with the Bangor Whig & Courier in 1900, leaving two newspapers in the city: BDN and the Bangor Daily Commercial (which ceased publication in 1949). Towle's son-in-law Fred Jordan took control of the paper in 1929. Forty-six BDN staff members served in the U.S. forces during World War II, and the paper's managing editor John M. O’Connell was sent to Europe as a war correspondent.[1] After Fred Jordan's death in 1947, his widow Lillis Towle Jordan became publisher.[1] Richard K. Warren became publisher in 1955 and remained in that role until 1984, a time when the newspaper's circulation dramatically increased.[1] It has only missed one day of delivery in its entire history. On New Year's Eve 1962, a massive blizzard dumped over three feet of snow on Bangor, with 20-foot snowdrifts that made it impossible for the delivery trucks to move.[1]

The newspaper's peak came in the mid-1980s, when Bangor Daily News had 150 reporters and editors and 150 other employees. At the time, published seven regional editions of the newspaper throughout Maine, and in addition to its main office on Main Street in Bangor had news bureaus at Madawaska, Presque Isle, Houlton, Pittsfield, Calais, Machias, Rockland, Augusta and Ellsworth.[1]

In 1982, a reporter for the Bangor Daily News, Beurmond Banville, who ran a one-person news bureau for the paper in Madawaska, Maine, on the U.S.-Canada border, wrote about a pretrial hearing in a murder case in New Brunswick, Canada.[4] After publishing an account of the restricted proceeding in BDN, Banville was convicted in a Canadian court for violating a publication ban, and was fined $160; in 1983, the Court of Appeal of New Brunswick upheld the conviction, but gave Banville an absolute discharge, meaning that he does not have any Canadian criminal record.[5] Banville and the newspaper considered the Canadian court's ruling to be a prior restraint on freedom of the press, but decided not to further appeal considering the cost.[5] The ruling appears in a textbook on Canadian media law.[6]

Richard J. Warren succeeded his father as editor in 1984; five years later, the newspaper moved its printing plant from Bangor to a new printing plant in Hampden (which was closed in 2013 and sold in 2015).[1]

The newspaper was an early adopter of a policy against running tobacco advertising. As of 1993, the Bangor Daily News was one of fewer than twenty American newspapers that declined to accept ads for tobacco products.[7]

The newspaper launched its Web presence in 1997 at bangornews.com, later moving to bangordailynews.com in the 2000s.[1] From 1997 to 2001, BDN acted as an Internet service provider in addition to a newspaper, working with two local, small telecommunications companies to provide dial-up Internet access to a few thousand people in Maine.[1]

BDN adopted an aggressive "digital-first" publishing strategy,[1] and became the most-read online news source in the state; in 2011, the Portland Press Herald outsold BDN in print copies by a few thousand papers on an average weekday, but BDN's website had more than 100,000 unique visitors than the Press Herald's website.[8]

In 2008, the paper's editorial page director, Todd Benoit, was appointed BDN's director of new media; he later became BDN's president and chief operating officer.[1] In 2014, Richard J. Warren became publisher of the newspaper.[1] The company that owns and operates the newspaper, Bangor Publishing Co., expanded through acquisitions of Bangor Metro magazine (2014), Madawaska's St. John Valley Times (2015), and Fort Kent's Fiddlehead Focus (2016).[1] The company also owns several weekly newspapers in Maine: the Presque IsleStar-Herald, CaribouAroostook Republican and News, Dover-FoxcroftPiscataquis Observer, Houlton Pioneer Times, and Greater Bangor The Weekly.[9]

In 2011 and 2012, BDN established the partnerships The Maine Campus (the independent student newspaper at the University of Maine) and The Free Press (the student newspaper at the University of Southern Maine) through the BDN media partners program. The program involves a content-sharing agreement as well as training and Web hosting services provided by BDN to the student newspapers.[10][11]

In 2011, BDN hired an additional reporter to cover Greater Portland and reassigned another reporter to cover the southern mid-coast of Maine. Editor-in-chief Mike Dowd also named editorial-page editor Susan Young as "managing editor for investigative reporting and new initiatives" and appointed Tom Groening as editorial-page editor.[12]

The Bangor Daily News and The Quoddy Tides sought records under the Maine Freedom of Access Act of closed-door tribal councils of the Passamaquoddy Tribe relating to a proposed $500 million liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal on tribal land at the Pleasant Point Reservation.[13] A Maine court decided that the newspapers were not entitled to the records because the tribal officials' negotiations with the Oklahoma-based LNG developer were undertaken in the reservation's capacity as "a profit-making business rather than municipal governance" and were therefore not subjected to the Freedom of Access Act.[13] The Maine Supreme Judicial Court unanimously affirmed the ruling in 2006.[13] In 2013, Bangor Daily News reporters submitted a public records request to Maine's state government for public information that included the names and addresses of the holders of concealed-weapon permits. The request, made in furtherance of newsgathering, prompted a fierce uproar, and the newspaper dropped the request.[14]

In 2018, Bangor Daily News became the state's only independently owned daily newspaper in the state, after MaineToday Media, owned by Reade Brower, acquired additional newspapers in Maine. MaineToday now owns the seven of Maine's eight daily newspapers: the Portland Press Herald and Maine Sunday Telegram, the Times Record of Brunswick, the Journal Tribune of Biddeford, the Kennebec Journal in Augusta, the Morning Sentinel in Waterville, and the Coastal Journal in Bath.[2] Although Brower's company does not own BDN, it does provide printing services for BDN.[15]

As of 2020, about half of BDN's journalists were based in Bangor, with the other half spread across Maine.[16]

Editorial stance[edit]

The Bangor Daily News's editorial stance has traditionally leaned toward conservatism and the Republican Party, in contrast to the Portland Press Herald, which was regarded as having a more liberal, pro-Democratic editorial stance.[17] It historically endorsed Republican candidates for office,[18] such as Barry Goldwater in the 1964 presidential election,[19] but has also sometimes endorsed Democratic candidates.[18] In the 1974 Maine gubernatorial election, the Bangor Daily News endorsed independent candidateJames B. Longley: "The newspaper had always endorsed Republicans, so backing an independent was stunning."[20] The endorsement was a major boost to Longley's candidacy.[20] The paper also backed independent candidate Herman "Buddy" Frankland[17] and Republican Susan Collins.[21]

BDN's editorial board endorsed Republican George W. Bush in the 2000 presidential election, but endorsed Democrat John Kerry over Bush in the 2004 presidential election.[22] In 2008, BDN endorsed Democrat Barack Obamafor president, Republican Susan Collins for Senate, and Democrats Mike Michaud and Chellie Pingree for Maine's congressional seats.[23] The paper's editorial board also endorsed Obama for reelection in 2012 over Republican challenger Mitt Romney.[24]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcdefghijklmnopEmily Burnham (June 18, 2019). "Tabloid origins, war correspondent and the only day no papers were delivered: A 130-year history of the Bangor Daily News". Bangor Daily News.
  2. ^ abBob Keyes (March 23, 2018). "Press Herald owner Reade Brower will buy newspapers in Biddeford and Brunswick". The Portland Press Herald.
  3. ^Cole Land Transportation Museum
  4. ^Jonathan Friendly, Maine Newspaper Tests Canadian Court Curb, New York Times (March 4, 1982).
  5. ^ abReporter's Conviction Upheld, Reuters (January 19, 1983).
  6. ^ Robert Martin & Stuart Adam, Sourcebook of Canadian Media Law (2d. ed: Carlton University Press, 1994), pp. 335-41.
  7. ^William Glaberson, Seattle Times Places a Ban on Tobacco Advertisements, New York Times (July 5, 1993).
  8. ^Al Diamon (June 17, 2011). "Media Mutt: Bangor Daily Dominates Online News". Down East. Archived from the original on June 23, 2011.
  9. ^Julia Bayly (November 14, 2015). "Bangor Daily News owner acquires St. John Valley Times". Bangor Daily News.
  10. ^BDN launches partnership with The Maine Campus newspaper, Bangor Daily News (December 9, 2011).
  11. ^The Free Press teams up with the Bangor Daily News, Free Press (April 9, 2013).
  12. ^Al Diamon (August 9, 2011). "Media Mutt: The Bangor Daily News Beefs Up". Down East. Archived from the original on March 18, 2012.
  13. ^ abcMaine Court Rejects Newspapers' Bid for Tribal Records, Editor & Publisher (May 9, 2006).
  14. ^Maine: Uproar Over Request for Gun Permit Data, Reuters (February 15, 2013).
  15. ^Casey Kelly, The man behind Maine's unparalleled consolidation of local news, Columbia Journalism Review (September 6, 2018).
  16. ^"Staff Directory". Bangor Daily News. April 19, 2020.
  17. ^ abChristian P. Potholm, This Splendid Game: Maine Campaigns and Elections, 1940-2002 (Lexington Books: 2004), p. 9.
  18. ^ abRichard J. Powell, "A Campaign About Campaign Discourse: Maine's Second District in Running on Empty? Political Discourse in Congressional Elections (eds: Louis Sandy Maisel & Darrell M. West: Rowman & Littlefield, 2004), p. 121.
  19. ^United Press International (October 25, 1964).
  20. ^ abDouglas Rooks, Statesman: George Mitchell and the Art of the Possible (Down East Books, 2016), p. 119.
  21. ^Christian P. Potholm, This Splendid Game: Maine Campaigns and Elections, 1940-2002 (Lexington Books: 2004), p. 197.
  22. ^Greg Mitchell, Daily Endorsement Tally: A Handful of Pickups for Each, but a Bigger Handful for Kerry, Editor & Publisher (October 27, 2004).
  23. ^Endorsements 2008 — Editorials, Bangor Daily News (October 31, 2008).
  24. ^Obama should serve four more years, Bangor Daily News (October 26, 2012).

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bangor_Daily_News

Bangor Daily News

Bangor

November 27, 2021

PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE: MARSHFIELD SOLAR, NOTICE OF INTENT TO FILE AND NOTICE OF PUBLIC INFORMATIONAL MEETING (Publish date: November 27, 2021) Please take notice that Marshfield Solar, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Summit Ridge Energy (SRE), c/o Ben Aparo, 1515 Wilson Blvd, Suite 300, Arlington, VA 22209, phone 860-463-0600 is intending to file a Natural Resources Protection Act permit application with the Maine Department of Environmental Protection pursuant to the provisions of 38 M.R.S. 480-A thru 480-JJ on or about December 8, 2021. The application is for the development of a 1.9-megawatt community solar facility, operated on approximately 19 acres of a 40-acre parcel located at 10 Northfield Road Marshfield, Maine. A virtual public information meeting will be held by the Applicant to inform the public of the project and its anticipated environmental impacts, and to educate the public about the opportunities for public comment on the project. This virtual meeting will be held on Monday, December 6, 2021 at 6:00 pm ET on Zoom. If you are having technical difficulties on the evening of the meeting, please call Randi Jackson of TRC Environmental (the Agent) at (207) 530-0521 or email [email protected] Questions about the proposed project can be directed to Summit Ridge Energy c/o Ben Aparo at 1515 Wilson St, Suite 300, Arlington, VA 22209, by email to [email protected], or by phone at 860-463-0600. A request for a public hearing or a request that the Board of Environmental Protection assume jurisdiction over this application must be received by the Department in writing, no later than 20 days after the application is found by the Department to be complete and is accepted for processing. A public hearing may or may not be held at the discretion of the Commissioner or Board of Environmental Protection. Public comment on the application will be accepted throughout processing of the application. The application will be filed for public inspection at the Maine Department of Environmental Protection's office in Bangor during normal working hours. A copy of the application may also be seen at the municipal office in Marshfield, Maine. Written public comments may be sent to the regional office in Bangor, where the application is filed for public inspection: MDEP, Eastern Maine Regional Office, 106 Hogan Road, Bangor, Maine 04401. Join Zoom Meeting https://trccompanies.zoom.us/j/95222687060?pwd=OUxFWmxCSDVDN25hMUMyVzdnTXBTZz09 Meeting ID: 952 2268 7060 Passcode: 123 Dial by your location +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston) +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma) +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose) +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago) +1 929 436 2866 US (New York) +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC) Meeting ID: 952 2268 7060 Passcode: 123 Find your local number: https://trccompanies.zoom.us/u/amp3LZPX3

Miscellaneous Notices

Источник: https://mainenotices.com/

Affordable housing key to return of island nursing home

Since the closure announcement, the task force has been assessing the nursing home’s housing needs, the community’s existing housing stock, state and local zoning, and potential workforce housing opportunities.

Deer Isle, Stonington, Brooklin and Blue Hill are among several Hancock County towns that all rank as some of the least affordable places in Maine.

The lack of housing has made things tough.

The nursing home had between 26 and 28 people decline job offers because they could not find housing in the area, said Ronda Dodge, the president of the nursing home board.

Any reopening would depend on some sort of commitment from local landlords to rent homes at affordable rates while the housing situation is addressed, said Sam Harrington, chair of the task force.

“The community must come together with long-term commitments of money, time, real estate housing and other forms of support,” he said.

More News

Источник: https://www.nhregister.com/news/article/Affordable-housing-key-to-return-of-island-16656879.php

Bangor Daily News ‘progress edition’ promotes local businesses, advertisers

Orono, Maine — On the evening of Jan. 13, I sat down with my home-delivered copy of The Bangor Daily News. I was drawn to an historical insert detailing the pasts of seven Maine businesses between 64 and 158 years old. I opened the broadsheet.

Each of these seven businesses — among them a charter bus line, a sign manufacturer called Bangor Neon, an auto repair outfit, and a nursery and garden center — received a full page of favorable coverage. The articles detailed the rich histories of these companies, as well as the fine work they are doing today. “It was 64 years ago when a hard-working man started a small business that grew to become the local icon it is today,” the paper wrote of Bangor Neon.

Of Joe Cyr, president of John T. Cyr & Sons bus line, the paper said, “It has never been ‘all business’ for Joe; he’s always been very active in his community, serving on the boards of such institutions as St. Joseph Hospital, Merrill Merchants Bank, and the Old Town-Orono YMCA. In fact, Joe had been one of the first, and strongest, supporters of the new field house at the Orono YMCA.”

Something was off. The font in the stories differed slightly from the standard type in the rest of the newspaper. All seven full-page articles were written by the same Bangor Daily News staffer, a David Fitzpatrick. Below his byline was written “The Bangor Daily News.” The stories had the look and feel of straight news coverage, but made me feel uneasy. There was no mention of advertising either above or below these articles.

Puzzled, I returned to the front page of the insert. Above the insert’s grandly displayed title, “Maine’s Progressive Businesses,” were these tiny words: “Advertising supplement to The Bangor Daily News.”

According to the author of the articles, these stories focused only on companies that had previously purchased advertising from the paper. Editors, though, weren’t transparent about this with readers. Atop each of the seven full-page articles extolling the virtues of the businesses, there was no note to readers indicating the stories were linked to money coming into the newspaper. The content was delivered on broadsheet newsprint, not the smaller inserts of, say, Best Buy offerings or Parade magazine, which set the content apart from a paper’s own news. And the newspaper’s name listed beneath each of Fitzpatrick’s bylines seemed likely to confuse readers into believing these were standard news stories on Maine businesses.

At the very top of this insert front, there is a disclaimer. But even that disclaimer does not make it clear that the businesses featured in the section were selected because they are advertisers with the paper.

The minuscule disclaimer is not enough. This insert feeds readers copy that looks like vetted news. Take a look at the insert yourself, and see if you think the coverage of these businesses is clearly labeled. In the version of the insert published online, the notice that the coverage is linked to advertising is invisible unless one zooms in considerably on the front page.

“The omission, whether on purpose or accidental, could lead people to believe [the work] was done with the same sanctity that general news reporting has, and unfortunately, trades on that credibility,” said Pam Fine, journalism professor and Knight Chair at the University of Kansas.

Some papers across the country do run similar so-called “progress editions,” Fine said, that promote businesses. The weekly Carolina Forest Chronicle, for example, published in April an advertising section titled “Snapshots of Progress” that contained many commercial promotions in the shape of journalism.

The Daily Freeman-Journal in Webster City, Iowa publishes an annual progress edition, and businesses that purchase ads in the publication are allowed to pitch a story to the newsroom showing that what they’re doing is innovative. The paper’s advertising manager said an ad purchase doesn’t guarantee that a business receives coverage in the progress edition, or that any coverage will be favorable. The articles are written by newsroom staffers, not advertising employees.

The Daily Gazette in McCook, Neb., also publishes progress editions containing positive stories written by reporters and, likewise, pages in the section are not reserved only for companies that place ads in the paper. I found these examples by Googling “progress edition” and “news,” and there were more examples than those reported here.

Many newspapers and magazines publish ads that have the look of news articles, but they typically include the words “paid advertisement” above the promotion, and do not carry the name of the host publication as the provider. Regardless of labeling, the Society of Professional Journalists urges newspapers to simply “shun hybrids that blur the lines” between advertising and journalism.

David Fitzpatrick, author of all seven articles in “Maine’s Progressive Businesses” works in the paper’s advertising department. He told me in a phone interview that the companies chosen to receive favorable coverage are only those that bought advertising in the newspaper in the past. For this particular promotion, he said, he identified companies that had bought ads from the paper and then selected companies that were more than 50 years old, before singling out seven businesses to be celebrated. Fitzpatrick said the businesses did not pay a direct fee to receive the favorable treatment. Fitzpatrick agreed that the coverage of the seven businesses was entirely positive. “[The articles] are very favorable, obviously,” he said. The paper has published progress editions for many years.

Todd Benoit, the paper’s director of news and new media, said in an email that “[T]he product is marked as advertising and it is not part of the news section of the newspaper. We create that separation so that no reader is confused about what is news content and what is advertising content.” But I was initially confused, and I have a Ph.D. from a journalism school.

I showed the insert to a class of mostly junior and senior journalism majors at the University of Maine, and only one student recognized the articles as straight advertising: a young man who knows David Fitzpatrick and the kind of writing he does for the Bangor Daily News.

Readers have virtually no way of knowing that the upbeat coverage of the businesses is connected to paid advertising. Even if readers saw the extremely small identification of an “advertising supplement” on the front page of insert, is that enough? Readers don’t know the content inside is a thank-you to companies that have written checks to the paper. The section’s front page boasts in very visible type that “Maine has a rich business history, and within these pages you’ll find great examples. And we’ll honor seven of those businesses that have stood the test of time with in-depth histories.” We’ll honor seven of those businesses…with histories. This language leads readers to believe The Bangor Daily News is independently appraising these companies.

When flattering news coverage is in any way linked to paid advertising, news providers have an overriding obligation to fully disclose that quid pro quo to the public. Of course, it would be better if news outlets simply resolved not to flirt with deceiving their audiences in the first place.

I asked Michael J. Dowd, the paper’s editor-in-chief, whether there were any characteristics of the promotional coverage that made him uneasy. He was silent for a bit, then said, “I’ve got to find out more about advertising supplements. I’m not prepared to comment at this point.”

Dowd’s arguments in the paper’s defense were that there could be no confusion about the nature of the special coverage because the word “advertising” was written on page one of the insert, and also because the fonts of the headlines, cutlines, and copy were slightly different than those used in the rest of the paper.

I’ve taken The Bangor Daily News to task in the past for other matters of journalistic integrity. After calling in September for voluntary buyouts of up to 30 employees, for example, the paper published not a single mention of the slashing in its print edition (editors did bury an AP brief on the buyouts deep in their website). I also criticized the paper in Columbia Journalism Review when editors fought repeatedly against correcting factual errors I identified.

The sin of conflating news and commercial advocacy, though, is more severe. The distinction between news and ads should never be a head-scratcher.

Many Mainers consider The Bangor Daily News the state’s primary newspaper, stronger than the financially hobbled Portland Press Herald. The paper has a paid weekday circulation of around 50,000 copies and a strong website that draws hundreds of thousands of unique visitors each month.

Dowd said that in future inserts, his paper plans to indicate that articles like those in “Maine’s Progressive Businesses” are linked to paid advertising, by stating that beneath the author’s byline. That’s a start.

Correction: The Bangor Daily News “progress edition” ran Jan. 13, not Jan. 12 as this article originally stated.

Justin D. Martin, Ph.D., is the CLAS-Honors Preceptor at the University of Maine and a columnist for Columbia Journalism Review. Follow him on Twitter: @Justin_D_Martin

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Tags: Commentary, Corrections and Clarifications, Journalism and Business Values, MediaWire

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Источник: https://www.poynter.org/newsletters/2012/bangor-daily-news-progress-edition-promotes-local-businesses-advertisers/

Researchers try producing potato resistant to climate change

BANGOR, Maine — University of Maine researchers are trying to produce potatoes that can better withstand warming temperatures as the climate changes.

Warming temperatures and an extended growing season can lead to quality problems and disease, Gregory Porter, a professor of crop ecology and management, told the Bangor Daily News.

“The predictions for climate change are heavier rainfall events, and potatoes don’t tolerate flooding or wet conditions for long without having other quality problems,” Porter said. “If we want potatoes to be continued to be produced successfully in Maine, we need to be able to produce varieties that can be resistant to change.”

Around the world, research aimed at mitigating crop damage is underway. A NASA study published this month suggests climate change may affect the production of corn and wheat, reducing yields of both, as soon as 2030.

Maine is coming off of a banner potato crop thanks in part to the success of the Caribou russet, which was developed by UMaine researchers. But Porter fears that even that variety isn’t as heat tolerant as necessary to resist the future effects of climate change.

Pests are another factor. The Colorado potato beetle and disease-spreading aphids have flourished with the changing climate, said Jim Dill, pest management specialist at the University of Maine Cooperative Extension.

Breeding seemingly small changes like hairier leaves that make it difficult for insects to move around on the plant can cut down on pests’ destruction and also the need for pesticides, he said.

Breeding such characteristics into potatoes is a long process of cross-pollinating different potato varieties.

The process is well underway.

They’re in a research testing phase right now at sites throughout the United States. Test potatoes in Virginia, North Carolina and Florida are testing high temperature stress.

“It takes 10 years of selection after that initial cross pollination, and it might take two to five years before enough commercial evaluation has taken place to release a new potato variety,” Porter said.

Источник: https://www.columbian.com/news/2021/nov/28/researchers-try-producing-potato-resistant-to-climate-change/

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1 Replies to “Bangor daily news advertising”

  1. That’s weird the one I did it didn’t give me the option to add 100 dollars bills so it gave me $1000 in 20s -_-

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