bank of america denied my fraud claim

Can I redeem my Patelco Rewards over the phone? The easiest and fastest way to submit a fraud claim or dispute is in Patelco Online™ or the Patelco. The fraudulent charge was made with another credit card ON MY NAME. They denied my claim giving me stupid reasons: because my pin was used or. If you fail to report the fraud charges within 60 days after your bank statement is I am missing a transaction (e.g., direct deposit) to my account.

Bank of america denied my fraud claim -

How to Dispute a Fraudulent Credit Card Charge

It can be disconcerting to find an unrecognized credit card charge, but disputing questionable transactions is simple when you understand your rights.

Not only is the federal law on your side, but credit card issuers usually have your back, too. Here’s how to dispute credit card charges when it comes to fraud, billing errors, and even unfulfilled merchant promises.

How to Dispute Credit Card Charges Caused By Fraud

If you find a charge you don’t recognize, you should first ask any friends and family if they made the charge without your knowledge. (You’d be surprised how often this happens!)

If they didn’t, it’s likely your card number was compromised. In that case, you should call your credit card issuer immediately and dispute the fraudulent transactions. Your card issuer will start an investigation and freeze or deactivate your card to prevent further fraudulent charges. The issuer will send you a new card with a new card number and CVV.

If you suspect that you’re also a victim of identity theft, and your personal details have been compromised (like your SSN), you should take steps to freeze your credit reports. This may prevent others from opening up new credit accounts or taking out loans in your name.

It’s a good idea to check your three credit reports as well, to see if any fraudulent accounts have already been opened in your name, without your knowledge. If you discover fraudulent accounts on your credit reports, you can visit IdentityTheft.gov to report the crime and create a recovery plan.

Once you’ve notified your card issuer about any fraudulent changes and have been issued a replacement card, there’s not much to do other than wait.  The Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA) states that credit card users are only liable for up to $50 in fraudulent charges.

The major credit card networks — Visa, Mastercard, Discover, and American Express — take it a step further by offering “zero liability” policies. This means that in cases of fraud, you won’t have to pay a dime.

As mentioned, the issuer will send you a replacement card with a new account number, and you can get back to your normal life. If you’ve added the card to a digital wallet like Apple Pay, some issuers will update the card there immediately, before you even receive your new physical card in the mail.

Here are a few extra steps you could take:

Insider tip

Even if you think you’re careful with your cards, criminals are always developing new, sophisticated ways to steal information. Krebs on Security has a great page detailing some of the ways people steal credit card information. Luckily, if you’re the victim of one of these thieves and you report the theft, it’s unlikely you’ll be liable for the charges.

How to Dispute Credit Card Charges Caused By Billing Errors

See a double charge from your favorite sushi restaurant on your statement? Or a $100 charge that should’ve only been $10?

Your first step should always be to contact the merchant. In the name of customer service, merchants will often resolve the issue by refunding your card for the surplus amount when you feel you’ve been overcharged.

If the merchant refuses to help you, you can begin the dispute process with your credit card issuer. Here’s what you have to do.

1. Write to Your Credit Card Issuer

Legally, you have 60 days after receiving the erroneous bill to report the mistake to your issuer — in writing.

Although the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) advises sending a letter via certified mail, that’s not always necessary these days. Many card issuers allow you to submit claims through “dispute” buttons on their sites, or by sending notes through their secure message portals.

Note: If you think you might eventually need to go through the legal system to resolve your situation, sending a certified letter to the card issuer’s billing inquiry address could be an important step. An attorney can advise you further.

In your dispute, include as many details as possible about the charge: names, dates, and any proof the charge isn’t yours. Though this isn’t required by law, it can be helpful. For more guidance, check out the FTC’s sample letter.

The credit card issuer must acknowledge its receipt of your dispute within 30 days. And if the charge is nominal — usually under $25 — you probably won’t have to do anything else. Since it would cost the credit card company more money to open up an investigation, it’ll generally eat the cost of your disputed purchase, and you can go on your merry way.

Insider tip

Don’t abuse the ability to easily dispute small charges. The card issuer will eventually catch on, and may cancel your account.

2. Wait for Your Issuer’s Decision

According to the FCBA, the card issuer has two billing cycles (and a maximum of 90 days) to resolve your claim with the merchant.

During that time, you shouldn’t pay for the disputed charge — but you must pay the rest of your credit card bill on time.

Take note that the disputed charge will still affect your credit limit. If your credit card has a $2,500 limit, for example, and you’re disputing a $500 charge, you’ll only have $2,000 to spend on your card until the dispute is resolved.

In most cases, credit card issuers will side with the consumer and take the charge off your bill. If it believes the charge is legitimate, however, it’ll support the merchant and make you pay for the charge.

How to Dispute Credit Card Charges Caused By Poor Quality of Goods and Services

Imagine you paid a plumbing service that never showed up, or you purchased a TV that doesn’t work. Though you might not know it, credit card companies often have your back when dealing with issues like this and so does federal (and perhaps state) law.

If you receive goods that are damaged, defective, or not as described — or you didn’t receive the promised goods or services at all — you can request a “chargeback” from your card issuer. (Here’s a list of chargeback reason codes, organized by issuer.)

As with billing errors, you should always dispute the charge with the merchant first when you have an issue with the quality of goods or services you received. Many merchants want to do the right thing for their customers and will work with you to find a resolution. Merchants also prefer to avoid chargebacks. Chargebacks can mean higher payment processing fees for merchants, and they may face other penalties if they get too many.

If the merchant refuses to cooperate, it’s within your legal rights to request a chargeback from your credit card issuer, as long as the following requirements are met:

  • The purchase must have been at least $50.
  • You must have made the purchase in your home state, or within 100 miles of your current billing address.
  • You must have made a “good faith effort” to resolve the dispute with the merchant.

To be on the safe side, you should request chargebacks within 60 days of the disputed purchase. Contact your credit card issuer via phone or secure message to begin the process.

Insider tip

Some credit cards also offer purchase protection, return protection, and other benefits. These can provide reimbursement if eligible purchases are broken or stolen, or if the merchant refuses to take back an item.

When Your Dispute or Chargeback Request Is Denied

Credit card issuers often side with their cardholders. Yet there are times when your credit card dispute or chargeback request may be denied. Here are a few reasons why that might happen.

  • You waited too long to contact your card issuer. It’s important to notify your card issuer of a billing error or chargeback request within 60 days of the statement date.
  • You didn’t contact the merchant. Other than cases involving fraud, you should give the merchant the opportunity to resolve the situation first.
  • You made a purchase outside of the United States. Consumer protection laws that apply to credit card disputes and chargebacks may not apply to purchases made in other countries.
  • You lied. If you make up a story to try to get your money back from a merchant, there’s a good chance you’ll get caught. Not only may your dispute or chargeback request be denied, the card issuer might close your account as well.

Actions You Can Take If Your Claim Is Denied

If your credit card dispute or chargeback request is denied, but you believe you’re owed a refund, these steps might help.

1. Challenge the Investigation

If a card issuer doesn’t find in your favor, it must give you a written explanation that tells you why. You can challenge the investigation results within 10 days of receiving this notice.

2. Involve Someone Else

If you think your card issuer is ignoring your rights, you can file a complaint with the following organizations:

3. Talk to an Attorney

If the charge is for a significant amount and you don’t think a credit card company is handling your situation properly, you might consider speaking with an attorney. You can find attorneys who specialize in the FCBA and other consumer protection laws by visiting the National Association of Consumer Advocates.

Use Your Power Wisely

As you can see, the FTC and credit card companies put a lot of trust in cardholders.

In fact,these consumer protections are one of the biggest reasons we advocate usingcredit cards instead of debit cards.

So it’s imperative not to lie or exaggerate. Taking advantage of generous credit card policies — by falsely claiming you never received a product, or by claiming an honest charge was fraudulent — doesn’t benefit anyone.

Unnecessary chargebacks also cost merchants a lot of money. And, if you request questionable chargebacks often, the credit card issuer may decide to close your account permanently.

By wielding our powers wisely, we can continue to enjoy the benefits of the best credit cards for many years to come.

Written by

Brendan Harkness

Brendan has been writing about personal finance for over eight years, and is now taking on the challenge of bringing high-quality credit education to the masses. He makes sure that Credit Card Insider is covering the most important credit topics transparently and precisely, and that we have up-to-date reviews of credit cards so you can find cards that are right for you.

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Expert reviewed by by

Michelle Lambright Black

Michelle Lambright Black is a leading credit expert, author, writer, and speaker with over a decade and a half of experience in the credit industry. She is an expert in credit reporting, credit scoring, financing (mortgages, credit cards, loans), debt eradication, budgeting, saving, and identity theft. She is featured monthly at credit seminars, podcasts, and in print. You can connect with Michelle on Twitter (@MichelleLBlack) and Instagram (@CreditWriter).

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The responses below are not provided or commissioned by bank advertisers. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by bank advertisers. It is not the bank advertisers' responsibility to ensure all posts are accurate and/or questions are answered.

Источник: https://www.creditcardinsider.com/blog/dispute-fraudulent-credit-card-charge/

Can You Sue a Bank for Not Refunding Fraudulent Charges?

credit card scam

Loan Lawyers, LLC is licensed to practice law in the state of Florida. If you have a legal matter that you would like to discuss and you are NOT located in Florida, please contact your state’s Bar Association to get the information of a lawyer that can assist you in your home state. Thank you.

Imagine that the worst has happened. You try to use your credit card only to find it is maxed out with bogus charges for purchases you did not make. Or, perhaps you go to an ATM to pull out some money, knowing there’s quite a bit of it in your account. Only, the machine tells you all the funds have been withdrawn. In either case, you’ve been the victim of fraud.

So, you take all the right steps and notify the authorities and the bank in an attempt to get your money back and perhaps even find the criminal who stole from you. Unfortunately, they say there’s nothing they can do. You’re going to be held liable for those charges. You’re frustrated and angry, and may even think about suing the bank. Is this a possibility? It will depend on your situation, but there are other steps you can take.

Getting Your Money Back After a Debit Card Scam

If the money was stolen off of your debit card by use of a skimming machine or another fraudulent act, you may be able to get some or all of your money back.

How much you receive will depend on when you report the funds missing. Victims of debit card fraud are responsible for the following:

  • None of the missing funds if the loss is reported immediately and the card has not been used,
  • Up to $50 if you notify the bank within 48 hours of the fraud,
  • Up to $500 if you notify the bank between 48 hours and 60 days of the fraud
  • All of the fraudulent charges if the bank isn’t notified for 60 days after the fraud.

If the card hasn’t been used yet, you will likely not even know about the fraud to report it. However, as soon as you suspect something is amiss, you need to report it to the bank to recover as much of the money as possible.

Getting Your Money Back After a Credit Card Scam

Getting your money back after your credit card has been defrauded is a little more straightforward. Credit cards typically offer much more protection because they are highly regulated through the Fair Credit Billing Act. This Act limits your liability for fraudulent charges to just $50. If you report the fraud right away, typically within 30 days, most banks will even waive the $50 liability threshold.

Can You Sue the Bank if They Don’t Return the Charges?

Hopefully, if you’ve been a victim of fraud, the bank will comply with the law and not hold you liable for the fraudulent charges if you’ve reported on time and taken the appropriate steps. Unfortunately, banks are a business and are sometimes more interested in holding onto their own profits than doing what’s right for their customers. So, if you’ve been a victim of fraud and the bank does not cooperate, can you sue them?

In most cases, the answer is, sadly, no. At least, not at first. Your first step should be to determine why the bank is holding you liable for the charges. Did you fail to take reasonable care to protect your identity and your account? This can work as an exception to the bank’s zero-liability policy. For example, if you were in a coffee shop and left your computer open with your banking information pulled up while you walked away from the table, this could be considered negligence on your part. In that instance, the bank may have a valid case for holding you liable for the charges.

Additionally, if the bank believes that you were part of the scheme and simply want to make purchases and not be held liable for them, this could also serve as a valid reason for holding you liable for any charges. For example, if your information was stolen off of your computer, the bank may believe that you were involved in the scheme. They may think that someone else stole the information, but that you were in on it as a way for both of you to commit fraud and receive additional funds.

If the bank believes that you committed fraud yourself, or that you were negligent, it’s important to understand that the burden of proof lies with them. If they want to hold you liable for the fraudulent charges, they must prove that you were either negligent or that you committed fraud. You do not have to prove that you did neither of those things.

How to Hold a Bank Responsible

Holding a bank responsible for forgiving fraudulent charges seems like an enormous task. Banks aren’t only a business; after all, they’re one of the biggest businesses, and going up against them can be intimidating for anyone. However, you can take action.

First, you should file a report with the police, and possibly even the FBI, depending on the amount of fraudulent charges you are left with. This will start the process of finding out who has your information and is using it fraudulently. It can also help if the fraudster steals your entire identity, as you would have already reported it.

To ensure the bank doesn’t hold you liable for the fraudulent charges, you can file a complaint with one of two agencies. The first is the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, while the second is the Federal Trade Commission. Before filing a complaint with either of these agencies, it’s best to speak to an attorney who has experience defending against debt and that can help you through the process.

Call Our Florida Debt Defense Lawyers Today

Dealing with your own debt is hard enough. You shouldn’t have to deal with a debt that someone else incurred in your name, too. If you’ve been the victim of fraud, particularly if the bank is holding you liable for those charges, call our Fort Lauderdale debt defense lawyers today. At Loan Lawyers, we know the responsibility that banks have to uphold your rights and to not hold you responsible for fraudulent charges. Call us today at (954) 523-HELP (4357) to schedule your free consultation so we can get started on your case.

Loan Lawyers has helped over 5,000 South Florida homeowners and consumers with their debt problems, we have saved over 2,000 homes from foreclosure, eliminated more than $100,000,000 in mortgage principal and consumer debt, and have recovered over $10,000,000 on behalf of our clients due to bank, loan servicer, and debt collector violations. Contact us for a free consultation and find out more about our money-back guarantee on credit card debt buyer lawsuits, and how we may be able to help you.

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Loan Lawyers, LLC

Loan Lawyers is made up of experienced consumer rights attorneys who use every available resource to develop comprehensive debt solution strategies. Our goal is to take on those burdens, resolve those problems, and allow our clients to sleep soundly knowing they are on the path to a better future.

Источник: https://www.fight13.com/can-you-sue-a-bank-for-not-refunding-fraudulent-charges

4 Steps To Take If Your Card Is Declined

You are standing at the cash register after a long day and the cashier tells you your credit card was declined. It can cause an array of emotions—frustration, fear and confusion.

Depending on your mindset, you may feel more or less equipped to take on the challenge. And while there can be a variety of reasons your card was declined there are 4 simple steps to follow.

1. Take a Deep Breath

There are a lot of dynamics that arise with a declined credit card. You or the cashier may feel added pressure depending on the length of the line behind you. Remind yourself that many of the people around you have probably had the same experience. Take a breath and consider your options.

While it is frustrating and inconvenient, in many cases, your card may be declined for your protection. This warning may be easily reconciled. If you have another means of payment, you may want to use it to complete your transaction.

If another form of payment is available to you, consider using another option. Let the cashier know if you plan to step out of line and try to resolve the issue immediately or if you will come back to complete the purchase later.

2. Review Your Card Info

When Ordering Online

Double check that all of your information was entered correctly. Transposing numbers is an easy mistake to make. If you are using a card on file, double check the card number and CVV security code against the actual card. Make sure you are using the zip code tied to your billing information.

If you received a replacement card or recently moved, you may need to update your card number or the billing information.

Check the Card Expiration Date

While this step may seem obvious, some credit card providers send renewal cards very close to the expiration date. Most people are not tuned into their upcoming card expiration dates, and it may have caught you by surprise. If your card is past the expiration date, it is no longer valid. In the moment, you will need to complete the purchase with a different method of payment.

When you get home, check your mail to determine if a new card was received. If not, contact customer service to ask that a new card be sent to you.

3. Contact Customer Service

Before your anxiety rises, contact the customer service phone number listed on the back of your card. There are a number of easily resolved reasons your card may have been declined.

If you recently activated your card and this is the first use, it is possible the activation process was not fully completed. The card provider may to manually activate the card. Often your card is declined for your protection to prevent fraudulent purchases. In this case, your card provider may just need to verify your identity and authenticate your purchase.

Regardless of the reason your card was declined, contacting your card provider can give you clarity on the issue so that you can make informed progress toward a resolution.

4. Work With the Card Provider to Resolve the Issue

Suspected Fraud

If you are making a large purchase, especially one outside your normal shopping behavior, the transaction may be flagged as fraud potential. You may also trigger a fraud warning if you are shopping out of the state or the country or if you’re using a card for the first time in a long while.

Your card provider may call or text you to ask for purchase approval. If your card issuer does not contact you, calling customer service may allow you to resolve the issue immediately by verifying your identity and intention to make the flagged purchase.

Over Your Credit Limit

Depending on your card, your purchase may be declined if you are already over your credit limit or if this transaction would put you over it. While some cards allow you to exceed your credit limit, other credit providers may decline the transaction.

No one likes being inconvenienced, but being declined may actually save you money in fees. Some card providers charge an overdraft fee of $10 to $25 when you exceed your credit limit. In fact, the CARD Act allows you to opt out of over the limit speeding. Considering that you can be charged for each transaction over the limit, it may be a good warning to stop using this card.

If possible, you can make an early payment to reduce the balance and continue using that credit card. If the card has a low balance and you have strong credit, you can contact the provider and ask that they re-evaluate your credit limit. Note this may require that they pull your credit.

Even if you keep a relatively low balance on your card you may be declined for being over the limit. If you recently stayed in a hotel or rented a car, that merchant may have placed a security hold on your credit card to cover the cost of possible damages. Due to this hold, you may not have sufficient available funds to complete the transaction at the time.

Behind on Payments

When life gets busy, it can be easy to overlook a payment. Or if finances are tight, you may be prioritizing certain bills. Whatever the reason, if you get behind on a credit card payment, that issuer may limit your purchasing power. They may do this by notifying you in writing, but it’s possible that the limit is lowered before you receive notice.

You will need to catch up on payments or set up a payment plan. Once you make consistent payments, your issuer may restore regular card use. If you find yourself behind on payments contact your card issuer or reach out to a credit counselor for assistance.

Your Account Was Closed

Credit card companies can close accounts for a variety of reasons. If you have not used a card for a while and you do not carry a balance, the creditor may close your account due to inactivity. In this case, your creditor may be able to resolve the issue if your account is in good standing.

If your credit score has dramatically decreased since you opened your account, your card provider can close your account if you are now deemed a credit risk. Your card may also be declined if you were an authorized user on a credit card and the primary card holder has now removed your authorization.

No Other Payment Option

It happens. Sometimes you leave the house with only your ID and a credit card. If you find yourself in this situation weigh your options. Can a friend cover you? Can you leave your purchase, run home and come back later? In many cases the grocery store will hold your order, although you may need to put the ice cream back before it melts.

If these are not an option, speak calmly with the merchant about your options. Depending on the size of your purchase they may take your information or hold your ID and allow you to pay later, Make sure you are comfortable with the reputation of the establishment before leaving your ID.

Reducing Stress in the Future

There is no surefire way to avoid having your card declined. As long as there are computer glitches and credit fraud, you run the risk of being declined again. However, there are a few things you can do to reduce the chances of a declined card and to be prepared when it happens.

Set Up Credit Limit Notifications

Credit cards often allow you to tailor the notifications you receive. You can request a text or email update when you’ve reached a set percentage of your credit limit. It may also help your credit score. Experts recommend maintaining a balance of less than 30% of your credit limit. While this is not always possible, it is good to stay informed.

Update Your Contact Information

Make sure your cell phone is the primary number on the account. This allows you to verify your identification more easily when you call from the number on file If you are traveling internationally, ensure that your cell phone has an international voice and data plan.

Carry Back Up Payment Methods

Keep multiple payment methods on hand. It may be wise to carry a debit card as well as a secondary credit card. Also consider setting up a mobile payment app like Apple Pay or Google Pay. More and more merchants will accept payment from your cell phone so even if you leave your wallet at home you can complete a transaction.

Set up Travel Alerts

Update your card provider with your travel destination and dates. Make sure to give them contact information where you can be reached. You may also want to set up a PIN number before traveling. In some countries, unmanned terminals like those at gas stations often require a PIN. In these cases, if you do not have one, your card will not be accepted.

Stay On Top Of Your Payments

If you tend to have a lot going on, setting up automatic payments can ensure you do not get behind. If you know you are unable to make a timely payment, contact your card provider before your payment due date to discuss your options.

Bottom Line

A declined credit card is not the end of the world. If possible, pay for the purchase with another method and give yourself space to resolve the issue. There is no need to worry right away—reach out to customer service to get more information. There’s no need to worry about what the merchant is thinking, cards get declined for a lot of reasons and it happens more frequently than you may think.

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Источник: https://www.forbes.com/advisor/credit-cards/steps-to-take-if-your-card-is-declined/

(en español)

Customer support

Q: Who should I contact if I have questions about my card?
For questions about your debit card, contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955 which is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

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Receiving and activating your card

Q: When will I receive my debit card?
If you are eligible for unemployment benefits, you should receive your debit card by mail within 7-10 business days of applying or after you request to be switched to the card. The card is issued directly from KeyBank to the address on record at the time of the request. With your card, you will receive a welcome packet that includes instructions on how to use the card. If your card does not arrive after 10 days, contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955.

Q: How do I activate my card?
Your welcome packet from KeyBank will contain the debit card, instructions and a phone number to call to activate the card.

Q: How do I set up a PIN for my card?
You will be prompted to set your PIN when you call to activate your card. You can change your PIN by calling the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955 or you can do it on the Key2Benefits.com website.

Q: What will the envelope look like that will contain my debit card? What should I do if I do not receive my debit card?
For security, your card will come in a white, envelope with both an Employment Security Department and KeyBank Card Member Services/Sioux Falls SD return address.

Q: Where is my debit card/I haven't received my debit card?
It could take 7-10 business days from the time you requested the card to the time you receive it in the mail. If you have not received your card within 7-10 days after applying for unemployment benefits, you should do the following:

  • call the ESD Claims Center at 800-318-6022 (Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. except holidays) to make sure we have your correct address on file.
  • If the address on file is correct, then you should immediately contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955 to let them know you need to request a replacement card

Q: What happens to my debit card if it is mailed to the wrong address?
The card will be returned to the KeyBank debit card center. You must contact the ESD claims center at 800-318-6022 (Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. except holidays) or go online to your eServices account to update your address so the card will reach your new address.

It may take up to 3 business days for this information to update with KeyBank. You can then contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955 to request a new card be mailed to you. A replacement card will be issued to you. Please keep in mind due to mailing time it can take up to 7-10 days.

Q: Will the post office forward my debit card if I move and leave a forwarding address?
No. The card will be returned to the KeyBank Debit Card center.  You must first contact the ESD claims center at 800-318-6022 or go online to your eServices account to update your address.  You also need to contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955 and give them your updated address. Please keep in mind due to mailing time it can take up to 7-10 days to receive a new debit card.

Q: What should I do if my name is spelled wrong on my debit card?
Call the ESD claims center at 800-318-6022 to update the spelling of your name. You can continue to use your current debit card until you get the new one with the corrected name in the mail.  When you get your new card and activate it, the old card will then automatically be disabled.

Q: How long does my debit card remain valid? How long should I keep my card?
Your KeyBank prepaid debit card remains valid for three years (36 months). You should plan to keep your card until the expiration date of the card has passed – don’t throw it away!

Q: What if I file another unemployment claim in a year or two – will I still use the same debit card or will I get a new debit card each time I file a claim?You will not receive a new card each time you file unless the card has expired.  Your debit card is valid for three years (36 months), so you should keep your card in case you open another unemployment claim within that three year window.

Q: Why was there no money loaded on my debit card when I received it?  What should I do?
As soon as you filed your claim, your information was sent to KeyBank and they automatically generated and mailed as debit card to you.  If in the interim, ESD identified an issue with your claim money will not be loaded onto the card until issue is resolved.

  • Do not to throw the card away – as soon your issue is resolved, money will be loaded onto the card.
  • Call the ESD Claims Center at 800-318-6022 (Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. except holidays) for assistance in getting your claims issue resolved.

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Using the debit card

For Purchases

Q.  Where can I use the card to make purchases?
You can use the debit card to make purchases anywhere MasterCard debit cards are accepted. You can also use your card for online, phone and mail order purchases.

Q.  Do I select credit or debit on the merchant’s terminal when making a purchase?
Select “credit” to make a purchase. Select “debit” if you want to get cash back with your purchase - available at participating retailers. (You will have to enter your 4-digit PIN.)

Q: Can I use my card at a gas pump?
Yes. However, if you use your card to pay at the pump, a maximum hold may be placed on your account to initiate your transaction. This amount will be held until the actual transaction amount clears. If you don’t want funds held while waiting for the transaction to clear, pay the cashier for your gasoline purchase. Payments made directly to the cashier clear immediately for the actual transaction amount. Restaurants, hotels and car rental companies may place similar maximum holds on transactions. Refer to your card’s Terms and Conditions for additional information.

  
Obtaining cash

Q.  Where can I withdraw cash using my debit card without ATM fees
You can use your card to withdraw cash, without charge, at the following locations:

When you withdraw cash, funds are automatically deducted from your card balance.

Q. How do I find a KeyBank ATM?
You can locate the closest KeyBank ATM two ways:

Q.  How do I find an Allpoint ATM?
You can locate the closest Allpoint ATM two ways:

  • Online: Go to the Allpoint network locator site. You can type in an address, city or zip code and the closest Allpoint ATM locations are listed as well as displayed on a map. Links with directions to each location are also provided.
  • By phone: A voice-assisted ATM locator is available by calling 1-800-809-0308, Option 2.

Q: Can I receive cash back when using my debit card at retail locations?
Yes. You can choose to get cash back with no fee when you make a purchase at participating merchants, such as grocery and convenience stores.

Q: Is there a daily cash withdrawal limit from the debit card?

LIMIT DESCRIPTION

AMOUNT

ATM Withdrawal

$1500 per day

PIN point of sale cash back*

$2,500 per day

Cash (over the counter bank teller)

$7,000 per day

Purchase

$7,500 per day

* This is the total allowed by KeyBank. Individual retailers may have a lower limit. 

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How money gets loaded onto your debit card

Q: How will I know when funds are loaded to my card?
You may self-enroll in optional text or email alerts to inform you when funds are added to your account and when you have a low or negative balance. To enroll in the alerts, login to your account on the Key2Benefits.com website.

Q: Can I load money onto my card?
No. Only the Employment Security Department can add funds to your debit card.

Q: Who should I contact if I have questions about the amount loaded on my card?
If you question the amount loaded on to your card, you should call the ESD claims center at 800-318-6022 (Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. except holidays) . KeyBank can’t answer questions about how much you should have received in benefits.

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Transferring funds

Q: Can I transfer funds from my debit card to a personal checking or savings account?
Yes. You can transfer some or all of your balance to a personal checking or savings account through the Key2Benefits.com website.  Once your transfer is made, it can take up to 2 business days for the funds to actually be credited to your checking or savings account, and the transfer cannot be canceled once entered.

Q: Can I transfer money onto the debit card from cash or another bank account?
No, the card is a single-source funded card and can only be funded by Washington Employment Security Department.

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Managing your card/transactions

Q: Can my card be overdrawn?
Since the debit card is a prepaid card and not a credit card, KeyBank ensures that you may only transact up to the available balance on the card so you do not find yourself in a negative balance situation.

Q: Can I check my balance and access my transaction history?
You can check your balance and view your transaction history online at the Key2Benefits.com website. You can also check your balance for free at any in-network ATM or call the customer support number provided with your card.

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Additional cards

Q: Can I request a second debit card for use by a family member?
No. This card is specific to the person who is eligible for unemployment benefits.

Q: Can I walk into a KeyBank branch and get a temporary card?
No. KeyBank branches do not have temporary debit cards.

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Replacing debit cards

Q: What should I do if my card is lost, damaged or stolen?
Contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955.

Q: If I lose my card can I go into a KeyBank branch to order a replacement card?
If a card is lost, damaged or stolen you need to contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955.  KeyBank branches do not have the ability to replace cards.

Q: If I lose my card, am I charged for a new card?
No, there is no fee for a standard card replacement which is sent first class via the U.S. postal service.  (Expedited 2-day delivery (FedEx, UPS) carries a $12.00 cost.)

Q: Is the card “frozen” if I misplace or lose my card?
You can temporarily suspend your card to prevent spending while you look for the card by calling the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955.  If a replacement card is ultimately required, the old card cannot be reactivated once it has been replaced.

Q: Can I go into a KeyBank branch and get a temporary debit card?
No, KeyBank branches do not have temporary debit cards.

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Privacy questions

Q: Do Employment Security staff have access to my debit card number?
No. Only KeyBank and the cardholder have access to that information.

Q: What is KeyBank’s privacy policy ensuring that my private information will not be shared with third parties or that I will not receive any unsolicited advertising?
The KeyBank privacy policy is provided in the packet you get when you first receive your debit card. 

Q.  Can collection agencies garnish wages from my KeyBank debit card?
The KeyBank debit card is not a bank account. The state of Washington garnishes your benefit payment for required child support and IRS payments owed before we release your payment—whether by check, debit card or direct deposit. Other entities may not garnish your debit card once the payment is loaded.

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Источник: https://esd.wa.gov/unemployment/debit-card-FAQ

What to do when your bank won’t refund fraudulent charges

Dear Your Business Credit,

I have a small business credit card and recently had a lot of fraud charges.

I always had my cards in possession but the thief was able to get my numbers to make fraudulent online purchases even after the card was newly replaced. The bank over the phone said the claim was denied due to unusual fraud scenario, i.e. the card was used fraudulently even after the card was replaced.

The rep told me she didn’t hear back from the merchants but she was denying the claims. The rep also indicated that the three-digit security code was used on the transaction. However, upon calling PayPal, that wasn’t the case. (One of the charges was from PayPal and even the address was not complete).

I emailed to request a thorough investigation of the claims but received denial letters. On the denial letter, there is no breakdown of the charges and no proof of the investigation detail. Wouldn’t I be at least entitled to see details of the orders that were fraudulently charged (address, phone number/email and items ordered)?

I reported those charges as soon as I received an alert (I had alert setup whenever a charge is made).

I had filed with IdentityTheft.gov and just filed with CFPB.

I would like to know what my right is. Can I bring the bank to small claims court? I don’t want to pay for something that was fraudulent. But if I don’t pay for it, I will start to accumulate late charges and it will damage my credit.  What should I do? Any advice will be greatly appreciated! – Kate

Dear Kate,

It is a shame that a bank would make you jump through hoops like this when you are the victim of a fraud.

As to what you can do to protect yourself, I ran your question past Brian J. Crow, managing partner and co-president of TCA A Better Way, a firm that helps banks address their compliance obligations.

Your rights are governed somewhat by whether you used a consumer card or a business card.

As Crow noted, consumer credit cards are governed by the Truth in Lending Act and enforced by the CFPB via Regulation Z.

“If a financial institution investigates an assertion of a billing error and concludes that no error occurred Section 1026.13(f) requires that the creditor provide copies of documentary evidence upon receipt of a request from the consumer,” Crow wrote to me in an email.

Generally speaking, an investigation must occur within 10 business days, or 20 business days if an account has been open less than 30 days, according to the CFPB. The bank must correct an error within one billing day after the determination a billing error has occurred.

Check out all the answers from our credit card experts.

Ask Elaine a question.

Will you get your money back?

You may, but it’s no guarantee.

Under Regulation Z, if a creditor has conducted a “reasonable” investigation and determines that no billing error occurred or a different billing error took place than the one that was asserted, the creditor must mail or deliver the consumer an explanation that explains why the creditor believes the billing error the consumer has alleged is incorrect and, upon request, furnish copies of documentary evidence of the consumer’s indebtedness.

A reasonable investigation, according to Regulation Z, may include seven elements, including reviewing the purchases in comparison to the cardholder’s purchasing patterns, reviewing where purchases were delivered in relation to where the consumer normally shops and comparing any signature slips to the consumer’s signature. For the full list, check out the section of Regulation Z titled “Reasonable investigation.”

If the creditor has determined a different billing error occurred, it must correct the billing error and credit the consumer’s account with any disputed amount and related finance or other charges.

All told, the issue must be resolved within 45 days.

See related: How to dispute a credit card purchase

What if you used a commercial card?

Regulation Z does not apply to commercial accounts unless they have fewer than 10 employees, as noted in 1026.12(b)(5), Crow wrote.

If the card issuer has issued 10 or more credit cards for use by your employees, the business and the credit card issuer are allowed to agree to higher liability limits than those provided for in Regulation Z, he went on to explain.

“In other words, for business accounts, the cardholder agreement is the governing document under contract law rather than the Truth in Lending Act or Regulation Z,” he explained. “Often business agreements will include clauses which place liability on the business if the creditor suspects that the business was negligent in safeguarding card information (which the credit may conclude because of the proximity of the alleged fraud compared to the issuance of a new card) or it may have clauses that place full liability on the business regardless of how the charges occurred.”

It’s important to read the fine print to see what you agreed to.

“The business owner should carefully review the card agreement and may also request the assistance of legal counsel to determine if the creditor violated the cardholder agreement in any way,” Crow wrote. “While the business owner is free to sue the creditor for breach of contract, I’d recommend escalating the complaint through the appropriate channels of management.

“Since this complaint involves a business and not a consumer account, the CFPB may or may not provide assistance, but filing that complaint with the creditor’s primary regulator was also an appropriate step,” he added.

See related: How to dispute fraudulent charges on a corporate credit card

Bottom line

With issues like this, sometimes persistence can go a long way. If the dollar amount of the fraud is substantial, it’ll be worth it to put in the effort, given all the work you’ve already done. Good luck!

Editorial Disclaimer

The editorial content on this page is based solely on the objective assessment of our writers and is not driven by advertising dollars. It has not been provided or commissioned by the credit card issuers. However, we may receive compensation when you click on links to products from our partners.

Elaine Pofeldt writes the Your Business Credit column for CreditCards.com, answering a question every week about small business and credit. Pofeldt is a journalist who specializes in entrepreneurship and careers, contributing to publications such as CNBC, Forbes, Money, and many others. She is the author of “The Million-Dollar, One-Person Business,” a look at how solo entrepreneurs are scaling to seven-figure revenue without hiring employees. She is a former senior editor at Fortune Small Business magazine and co-founder of www.200kfreelancer.com, a website for independent professionals.

Источник: https://www.creditcards.com/credit-card-news/bank-wont-refund-fraud-charges/

Is the Bank Obligated to Refund Stolen Money From My Debit Card?

Banks are typically obligated to refund money so long as the customer follows fraud reporting procedures.

Image Credit: Nastco/iStock/Getty Images

Debit cards offer consumers the convenience of paying for items immediately without having to carry cash. However, if thieves get a consumer's debit card number, they can wreak havoc with a customer's finances by draining his bank account through fraudulent purchases. In most cases, banks offer debit fraud protection and must refund the money as long as the customer follows the bank's fraud reporting procedures in a timely manner.

Risk When Using Debit Cards

When using a debit card, the money is automatically and immediately withdrawn from your checking account. If you report a fraudulent transaction, the bank must replace the money; however, you may find yourself without funds until it does so. In contrast, if someone makes fraudulent charges on your credit card, you can dispute the charge prior to paying the bill.

Debit Fraud Protection Time Frame

Banks may take up to two weeks to refund stolen money after you report the theft. The policy as to how quickly stolen money is replaced differs from bank to bank. Some banks may replace the money as soon as the theft is reported, while others wait until they have completed an investigation and verified that charges are indeed fraudulent. When you're a victim of debit card fraud, this can send you into a spiral of overdraft fees and declined auto-payments you'll also have to contend with and you may have to cover some of these payments while your case is being investigated by your bank.

Liability for Fraudulent Charges

Federal law limits your liability for fraudulent charges using your debit card to $50. To take advantage of this law, you must report the fraudulent charges within two business days of the charge. After two business days, your liability goes up to $500. If you do not report the theft for more than 60 days after receiving your statement, the bank has no obligation to refund your money at all.

Because of this, it is vital to keep an eye on your transactions and accounts to ensure you catch any stolen money on your debit account as soon as possible.

How to Limit Your Liability

Many banks allow you to check your balance online. By making a habit of doing so daily, you can limit your liability. If you do not recognize a charge on your online statement, call the merchant to try to find out more about the charge. If you do not recognize the charge after taking this step, call your bank's 800 number immediately and report the fraudulent charge.

Ask your bank to cancel your debit card and issue you a new one to stop thieves from continuing to use your account.

When you sign up for a debit card, ask your bank about how to enroll in fraud protection programs. Some banks automatically freeze your account and require you to verify charges if you spend over a certain amount or spend money in an unusual location such as a different state.

Источник: https://www.sapling.com/7737008/bank-stolen-money-debit-card

4 Steps To Take If Your Card Is Declined

You are standing at the cash register after a long day and the cashier tells you your credit card was declined. It can cause an array of emotions—frustration, fear and confusion.

Depending on your mindset, you may feel more or less equipped to take on the challenge. And while there can be a variety of reasons your card was declined there are 4 simple steps to follow.

1. Take a Deep Breath

There are a lot of dynamics that arise with a declined credit card. You or the cashier may feel added pressure depending on the length of the line behind you. Remind yourself that many of the people around you have probably had the same experience. Take a breath and consider your options.

While it is frustrating and inconvenient, in many are avocados good or bad for you, your card may be declined for your protection. This warning may be easily reconciled. If you have another means of payment, you may want to use it to complete your transaction.

If another form of payment is available to you, consider using another option. Let the cashier know if you plan to step out of line and try to bank of america denied my fraud claim the issue immediately or if you will come back to complete the purchase later.

2. Review Your Card Info

When Ordering Online

Double check that all of your information was entered correctly. Transposing numbers is an easy mistake to make. If you are using a card on file, double check the card number and CVV security code against the actual card. Make sure you are using the zip code tied to your billing information.

If you received a replacement card or recently moved, you may need to update your card number or the billing information.

Check the Card Expiration Date

While this step may seem obvious, some credit card providers send renewal cards very close to the expiration date. Most people are not tuned into their upcoming card expiration dates, and it may have caught you by surprise. If your card is past the expiration date, it is no longer valid. In the moment, you will need to complete the purchase with a different method of payment.

When you get home, check your mail to determine if a new card was received. If not, contact customer service to ask that a new card be sent to you.

3. Contact Customer Service

Before your anxiety rises, contact the customer service phone number listed on the back of your card. There are a number of easily resolved reasons your card may have been declined.

If you recently activated your card and this is the first use, it is possible the activation process was not fully completed. The card provider may to manually activate the card. Often your card is declined for your protection to prevent fraudulent purchases. In this case, your card provider may just need to verify your identity and authenticate your purchase.

Regardless of the reason your card was declined, contacting your card provider can give you clarity on the issue so that you can make informed progress toward a resolution.

4. Work With the Card Provider to Resolve the Issue

Suspected Fraud

If you are making a large purchase, especially one outside your normal shopping behavior, the transaction may be flagged as fraud potential. You may also trigger a fraud warning if you are shopping out of the state or the country or if you’re using a card for the first time in a long while.

Your card provider may call or text you to ask for purchase approval. If your card issuer does not contact you, calling customer service may allow you to resolve the issue immediately by verifying your identity and intention to make the flagged purchase.

Over Your Credit Limit

Depending on your card, your purchase may be declined if you are already over your credit limit or if this transaction would put you over it. While some cards allow you to exceed your credit limit, other credit providers may decline the transaction.

No one likes being inconvenienced, but being declined may actually save you money in fees. Some card providers charge an overdraft fee of $10 to $25 when you exceed your credit limit. In fact, the CARD Act allows you to opt out of over the limit speeding. Considering that you can be charged for each transaction over the limit, it may be a good warning to stop using this card.

If possible, you can make an early payment to reduce the balance and continue using that credit card. If the card has a low balance and you have strong credit, you can contact the provider and ask that they re-evaluate your credit limit. Note this may require that they pull your credit.

Even if you keep a relatively low balance on your card you may be declined for being over the limit. If you recently stayed in a hotel or rented a car, that merchant may have placed a security hold on your credit card to cover the cost of possible damages. Due to this hold, you may not have sufficient available funds to complete the transaction at the time.

Behind on Payments

When life gets busy, it can be easy to overlook a payment. Or if finances are tight, you may be prioritizing certain bills. Whatever the reason, if you get behind on a credit card payment, that issuer may limit your purchasing power. They may do this by notifying you in writing, but it’s possible that the limit is lowered before you receive notice.

You will need to catch up on payments or set up a payment plan. Once you make consistent payments, your issuer may restore regular card use. If you find yourself behind on payments contact your card issuer or reach out to a credit counselor for assistance.

Your Account Was Closed

Credit card companies can close accounts for a variety of reasons. If you have not used a card for a while and you do not carry a balance, the creditor may close your account due to inactivity. In this case, your creditor may be able to resolve the issue if your account is in good standing.

If your credit score has dramatically decreased since you opened your account, your card provider can close your account if you rock bridge memorial state park columbia mo now deemed a credit risk. Your card may also be declined if you were an authorized user on a credit card and the primary card holder has now removed your authorization.

No Other Payment Option

It happens. Sometimes you leave the house with only your ID and a credit card. If you find yourself in this situation weigh your options. Can a friend cover you? Can you leave your purchase, run home and come back later? In many cases the grocery store will hold your order, although you may need to put the ice cream back before it melts.

If these are not an option, speak calmly with the merchant about your options. Depending on the size of your purchase they may take your information or hold your ID and allow you to pay later, Make sure you are comfortable with the reputation of the establishment before leaving your ID.

Reducing Stress in the Future

There is no surefire way to avoid having your card declined. As long as there are computer glitches and credit fraud, you run the risk of being declined again. However, there are a few things you can do first community mortgage shelbyville tn reduce the chances of a declined card and to be prepared when it happens.

Set Up Credit Limit Notifications

Credit cards often allow you to tailor the notifications you receive. You can request a text bank of america denied my fraud claim email update when you’ve reached a set percentage of your credit limit. It may also help your credit score. Experts recommend maintaining a balance of less than 30% of your credit limit. While this is not always possible, it is good to stay informed.

Update Your Contact Information

Make sure your cell phone is the primary number on the account. This allows you to verify your cbc comerica com more easily when you call from the number on file If you are traveling internationally, ensure that your cell phone has an international voice and data plan.

Carry Back Up Payment Methods

Keep multiple payment methods on hand. It may be wise to carry a debit card as well as a secondary credit card. Also consider setting up a mobile payment app like Apple Pay or Google Pay. More and more merchants will accept payment from your cell phone so even if you leave your wallet at home you can complete a transaction.

Set up Travel Alerts

Update your card provider with your travel destination and dates. Make sure to give them contact information where you can be reached. You may also want to set up a PIN number before traveling. In some countries, unmanned terminals like those at gas stations often require a PIN. In these cases, if you do not have one, your card will not be accepted.

Stay On Top Of Your Payments

If you tend to have a lot going on, setting up automatic payments can ensure you do not get behind. If you know you are unable to make a timely payment, contact your card provider before your payment due date to discuss your options.

Bottom Line

A declined credit card is not the end of the world. If possible, pay for the purchase with another method and give yourself space to resolve the issue. There is no need to worry right away—reach out to customer service to get more information. There’s no need to worry about what the merchant is thinking, cards get declined for a lot of reasons and it happens more frequently than you may think.

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Источник: https://www.forbes.com/advisor/credit-cards/steps-to-take-if-your-card-is-declined/

(en español)

Customer support

Q: Who should I contact are eggs everyday good for you I have questions about my card?
For questions about your debit card, contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955 which is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

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Receiving and activating your card

Q: When will I receive my debit card?
If you are eligible for unemployment benefits, you should receive your debit card by mail within 7-10 business days of applying or after you request to be switched to the card. The card is issued directly from KeyBank to the address on record at the time of the request. With your card, you will receive a welcome packet that includes instructions on how to use the card. If how to get a credit card at 16 card does not arrive after 10 days, contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955.

Q: How do I activate my card?
Your welcome packet from KeyBank will contain the debit card, instructions and a phone number to call to activate the card.

Q: How do I set up a PIN for my card?
You will be prompted to set your PIN when you call to activate your card. You can change columbia come PIN by calling the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955 or you can do it on the Key2Benefits.com website.

Q: What will the envelope look like that will contain my debit card? What should I do if I do not receive my debit card?
For security, your card will come in a white, envelope with both an Employment Security Department and KeyBank Card Bank of america denied my fraud claim Services/Sioux Falls SD return address.

Q: Where is my debit card/I haven't received my debit card?
It could take 7-10 business days from the time you requested the card to the time you receive it in the mail. If you have not received your card within 7-10 days after applying for unemployment benefits, you should do the following:

  • call the ESD Claims Center at 800-318-6022 (Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. except holidays) to make sure we have your correct address on file.
  • If the address on file is correct, then you should immediately contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955 to let them know you need to request a replacement card

Q: What happens to my debit card if it is mailed to the wrong address?
The card will be returned to the KeyBank debit card center. You must contact the ESD claims center at 800-318-6022 (Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. except holidays) or go online to your eServices account to update your address so the card will reach your new address.

It may take up to 3 business days for this information to update with KeyBank. You can then contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955 to request a new card be mailed to you. A replacement card will be issued to you. Please keep in mind due to mailing time it can take up to 7-10 days.

Q: Will the post office forward my debit card if I move and leave a forwarding address?
No. The card will be returned to the KeyBank Debit Card center.  You must first contact the ESD claims center at 800-318-6022 or go online to your eServices account to update your address.  You also need to contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955 and give them your updated address. Please keep in mind due to mailing time it can take up to 7-10 days to receive a new debit card.

Q: What should I do if my name is spelled wrong on my debit card?
Call the ESD claims center at 800-318-6022 to update the spelling of your name. You can continue to use your current debit card until you get the new one with the corrected name in the mail.  When you get your new card and activate it, the old card will then automatically be disabled.

Q: How long does my debit card remain valid? How long should I keep my card?
Your KeyBank prepaid debit card remains valid for three years (36 months). You should plan to keep your card until the expiration date of the card has passed – don’t throw it away!

Q: What if I file another unemployment claim in a year or two – will I still use the same debit card or will I get a new debit card each time I file a claim?You will not receive a new card each time you file unless the card has expired.  Your debit card is valid for three years (36 months), so you should keep your card in case you open another unemployment claim within that three year window.

Q: Why was there no money loaded on my debit card when I received it?  What should I do?
As soon as you filed your claim, your information was sent to KeyBank and they automatically generated and mailed as debit card to you.  If in the interim, ESD identified an issue with your claim money will not be loaded onto the card until issue is resolved.

  • Do not to throw the card away – as soon your issue is resolved, money will be loaded someone is trying to access my gmail account the card.
  • Call the ESD Claims Center at 800-318-6022 (Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. except holidays) for assistance in getting your claims issue resolved.

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Using the debit card

For Purchases

Q.  Where can I use the card to make purchases?
You can use the debit card to make purchases anywhere MasterCard debit cards are accepted. You can also use your card for online, phone and mail order purchases.

Q.  Do I select credit or debit on the merchant’s terminal when making a purchase?
Select “credit” to make a purchase. Select “debit” if you want to get cash back with your purchase - available at participating retailers. (You will have to enter your 4-digit PIN.)

Q: Can I use my card at a gas pump?
Yes. However, if you use your card to pay at the pump, a maximum hold may be placed on your account to initiate your transaction. This amount will be held until the actual transaction amount clears. If you don’t want funds held while waiting for the transaction to clear, pay the cashier for your gasoline purchase. Payments made directly to the cashier clear immediately for the actual transaction amount. Restaurants, hotels and car rental companies may place similar maximum holds on transactions. Refer to your card’s Terms and Conditions for additional information.

  
Obtaining cash

Q.  Where can I withdraw cash using my debit card without ATM fees
You can use your card to withdraw cash, without charge, at the following locations:

When you withdraw cash, funds are automatically deducted from your card balance.

Q. How do I find a KeyBank ATM?
You can locate the closest KeyBank ATM two ways:

Q.  How do I find an Allpoint ATM?
You can locate the closest Allpoint ATM two ways:

  • Online: Go to the Allpoint network locator site. You can type in an address, city or zip code and the closest Allpoint ATM locations are listed as well as displayed on a map. Links with directions to each location are also provided.
  • By phone: A voice-assisted ATM locator is available by calling 1-800-809-0308, Option 2.

Q: Can I receive cash back when using my debit card at retail locations?
Yes. You can choose to get cash back with no fee when you make a purchase at participating merchants, such as grocery and convenience stores.

Q: Is there a daily cash withdrawal limit from the debit card?

LIMIT DESCRIPTION

AMOUNT

ATM Withdrawal

$1500 per day

PIN point of sale cash back*

$2,500 per day

Cash (over the counter bank teller)

$7,000 per day

Purchase

$7,500 per day

* This is the total allowed what is account number on 1099 KeyBank. Individual retailers may have a lower limit. 

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How money gets loaded onto your debit card

Q: How will I know when funds are loaded to my card?
You may self-enroll in optional text or email alerts to inform you when funds are added to your account and when you have a low or negative balance. To enroll in the alerts, login to your account on the Key2Benefits.com website.

Q: Can I load money onto my card?
No. Only the Employment Security Department can add funds to your debit card.

Q: Who should I contact if I have questions about the amount loaded on my card?
If you question the amount loaded on to your card, you should call the ESD claims center at 800-318-6022 (Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. except holidays). KeyBank can’t answer questions about how much you should have received in benefits.

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Transferring funds

Q: Can I transfer funds from my debit card to a personal checking or savings account?
Yes. You can transfer some or all of your balance to a personal checking or savings account through the Key2Benefits.com website.  Once your transfer is made, it can take up to 2 business days for the funds to actually be credited to your checking or savings account, and the transfer cannot be canceled once entered.

Q: Can I transfer money onto the debit card from cash or another bank account?
No, the card is a single-source funded card and can only be funded by Washington Employment Security Department.

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Managing your card/transactions

Q: Can my card be overdrawn?
Since the debit card is a prepaid card and not a credit card, KeyBank ensures that you may only transact up to the available balance on the card so you do not find yourself in a negative balance situation.

Q: Can I check my balance and access my transaction history?
You can check your balance and view your transaction history online at the Key2Benefits.com website. You can also check your balance for free at any in-network ATM or call the customer support number provided with your card.

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Additional cards

Q: Can I request a second debit card for use by a family member?
No. This card is specific to the person who is eligible for unemployment benefits.

Q: Can I walk into a KeyBank branch and get a temporary card?
No. KeyBank branches do not have temporary debit cards.

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Replacing debit cards

Q: What should I do if my card is lost, damaged or stolen?
Contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955.

Q: If I lose my card can I go into a KeyBank branch to order a replacement card?
If a card is lost, damaged or stolen you how to get a credit increase with capital one to contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955.  KeyBank branches do not have the ability to replace cards.

Q: If I lose my card, am I charged for a new card?
No, there is no fee for a standard card replacement which is sent first class via the U.S. postal service.  (Expedited 2-day delivery (FedEx, UPS) carries a $12.00 cost.)

Q: Is the card “frozen” if I misplace or lose my card?
You can temporarily suspend your card to prevent spending while you look for the card by calling the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955.  If a replacement card is ultimately required, the old card cannot be reactivated once it has been replaced.

Q: Can I go into a KeyBank branch and get a temporary debit card?
No, KeyBank branches do not have temporary debit cards.

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Privacy questions

Q: Do Employment Security staff have access to my debit card number?
No. Only KeyBank and the cardholder have access to that information.

Q: What is KeyBank’s privacy policy ensuring that my private information will not be shared with third parties or that I will not bank of america denied my fraud claim any unsolicited advertising?
The KeyBank privacy policy is provided in the packet you get when you first receive your debit card. 

Q.  Can collection agencies garnish wages from my KeyBank debit card?
The KeyBank debit card is not a bank account. The state of Washington garnishes your benefit payment for required child support and IRS payments owed before we release your payment—whether by check, debit card or direct deposit. Other entities may not garnish your debit card once the payment is loaded.

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Источник: https://esd.wa.gov/unemployment/debit-card-FAQ

Can You Sue a Bank for Not Refunding Fraudulent Charges?

credit card scam

Loan Lawyers, LLC is licensed to practice law in the state of Florida. If you have a legal matter that you would like to discuss and you are NOT located in Florida, please contact your state’s Bar Association to get the information of a lawyer that can assist you in your home state. Thank you.

Imagine that the worst has happened. You try to use your credit card only to find it is maxed out with bogus charges for purchases you did not make. Or, perhaps you go to an ATM to pull out some money, knowing there’s quite a bit of it in your account. Only, the machine tells you all the funds have been withdrawn. In either case, you’ve been the victim of fraud.

So, you take all the right steps and notify the authorities and the bank in an attempt to get your money back and perhaps even find the criminal who stole from you. Unfortunately, they say there’s nothing they can do. You’re going to be held liable for those charges. You’re frustrated and angry, and may even think about suing the bank. Is this a possibility? It will depend on your situation, but there are other steps you can take.

Getting Your Money Back After a Debit Card Scam

If the money was stolen off of your debit card by use of a skimming machine or another fraudulent act, you may be able to get some or all of your money back.

How much you receive will depend on when you report the funds missing. Victims of debit card fraud are responsible for the following:

  • None of the missing funds if the loss is reported immediately and the card has not been used,
  • Up to $50 if you notify the bank within 48 hours of the fraud,
  • Up to $500 if you notify the bank between 48 hours and 60 days of the fraud
  • All of the fraudulent charges if the bank isn’t notified for 60 days after the fraud.

If the card hasn’t been used yet, you will likely not even know about the fraud to report it. However, as soon as you suspect something is amiss, you need to report it to the bank to recover as much of the money as possible.

Getting Your Money Back After a Credit Card Scam

Getting your money back after your credit card has been defrauded is a little more straightforward. Credit cards typically offer much more protection because they are highly regulated through the Fair Credit Billing Act. This Act limits your liability for fraudulent charges to just $50. If you report the fraud right away, typically within 30 days, most banks will even waive the $50 liability threshold.

Can You Sue the Bank if They Don’t Return the Charges?

Hopefully, if you’ve been a victim of fraud, the bank will comply with the law and not hold you liable for the fraudulent charges if you’ve reported on time and taken the appropriate steps. Unfortunately, banks are a business and are sometimes more interested in holding onto their own profits than doing what’s right for their customers. So, if you’ve been a victim of fraud and the bank does not cooperate, can you sue them?

In most cases, the answer is, sadly, no. At least, not at first. Your first step should be to determine why the bank is holding you liable for the charges. Did you fail to take reasonable care to protect your identity and your account? This can work as an exception to the bank’s zero-liability policy. For example, if you were in a coffee shop and left your computer open with your banking information pulled up while you walked away from the table, this could be considered negligence on your part. In high neck tummy control one piece swimsuit instance, the bank may have a valid case for holding you liable for the charges.

Additionally, if the bank believes that you were part of the scheme and simply want to make purchases and not be held liable for them, this could also serve as a valid reason for holding you liable for any charges. For example, if your information was stolen off of your computer, the bank may believe that you were involved in the scheme. They may think that someone else stole the information, but that you were in on it as a way for both of you to commit fraud and receive additional funds.

If the bank believes that you committed fraud yourself, or that you were negligent, it’s important to understand that the burden of proof lies with them. If they want to hold you liable for the fraudulent charges, they must prove that you were either negligent or that you committed fraud. You do not have to prove that you did neither of those things.

How to Hold a Bank Responsible

Holding a bank responsible for forgiving fraudulent charges seems like an enormous task. Banks aren’t only a business; after all, they’re one of the biggest businesses, and going up against them can be intimidating for anyone. However, you can take action.

First, you should file a report with the police, and possibly even the FBI, depending on the amount of fraudulent charges you are left with. This will start the process of finding out who has your information and is using it fraudulently. It can also help if the fraudster steals your entire identity, as you would have already reported it.

To ensure the bank doesn’t hold you liable for the fraudulent charges, you can file a complaint with one of two agencies. The first is the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, while the second is the Federal Trade Commission. Before filing a complaint with either of these agencies, it’s best to speak to an attorney who has experience defending against debt and that can help you through the process.

Call Our Florida Debt Defense Lawyers Today

Dealing with your own debt is hard enough. You shouldn’t have to deal with a debt that someone else incurred in your name, too. If you’ve been the victim of fraud, particularly if the bank is holding you liable for those charges, call our Fort Lauderdale debt defense lawyers today. At Loan Lawyers, we know the responsibility that banks have to uphold your rights and to not hold you responsible for fraudulent charges. Call us today at (954) 523-HELP (4357) to schedule your free consultation so we rockland trust near me now get started on your case.

Loan Lawyers has helped over 5,000 South Florida homeowners and bank of america denied my fraud claim with their debt problems, we have saved over 2,000 homes from foreclosure, eliminated more than $100,000,000 in mortgage principal and consumer debt, and have recovered over $10,000,000 on behalf of our clients due to bank, loan servicer, and debt collector violations. Contact us for a free consultation and find out more about our money-back guarantee on credit card debt buyer lawsuits, and how we may be able buying a home without a realtor help you.

People also ask:

  1. Can you sue a credit card company for false charges?
  2. Can I sue a bank for holding my money?
  3. Suing a bank for negligence
  4. Can I sue my bank for their mistake?
  5. Chime bank lawsuit
  6. Bank won’t refund fraud
  7. Can you sue the bank for negligence?
  8. Suing your bank for negligence
  9. Sue your bank
logo

Loan Lawyers, LLC

Loan Lawyers is made up of experienced consumer rights attorneys who use every available resource to develop comprehensive debt solution strategies. Our goal is to take on those burdens, resolve those problems, and allow our clients to sleep soundly knowing they are on the path to a better future.

Источник: https://www.fight13.com/can-you-sue-a-bank-for-not-refunding-fraudulent-charges

Is the Bank Obligated to Refund Stolen Money From My Debit Card?

Banks are typically obligated to refund money so long as the customer follows fraud reporting procedures.

Image Credit: Nastco/iStock/Getty Images

Debit cards offer consumers the convenience of paying for items immediately without having to carry cash. However, if thieves get a consumer's debit card number, they can wreak havoc with a customer's finances by draining his bank account through fraudulent purchases. In most cases, banks offer debit fraud protection and must refund the money as long as the customer follows the bank's fraud reporting procedures in a timely manner.

Risk When Using Debit Cards

When using a debit card, the money is automatically and immediately withdrawn from your checking account. If you report a fraudulent transaction, the bank must replace the money; however, you may find yourself without funds until it does so. In contrast, if someone makes fraudulent charges on your credit card, you can dispute the charge prior to paying the bill.

Debit Fraud Protection Time Frame

Banks may take up to two weeks to refund stolen money after you report the theft. The policy as to how quickly stolen money is replaced differs from bank to bank. Some banks may replace the money as soon as the theft is reported, while others wait until they have completed an investigation and verified that charges are indeed fraudulent. When you're a victim of debit card fraud, this can send you into a spiral of overdraft fees and declined auto-payments you'll also have to contend with and you may have to cover some of these payments while your case is being best treadmill for home folding by your bank.

Liability for Fraudulent Charges

Federal law limits your liability for fraudulent charges using your debit bank of america denied my fraud claim to $50. To take advantage of this law, you must report the fraudulent charges within two business days of the charge. After two business days, your liability goes up to $500. If you do not report the theft for more than 60 days after us bank business account promotion your statement, the bank has no obligation to refund your money at all.

Because of this, it is vital to keep an eye on your transactions and accounts to ensure you catch any stolen money on your debit account as soon as possible.

How to Limit Your Liability

Many banks allow you to check your balance online. By making a habit of doing so daily, you can limit your liability. If you do not recognize a charge on your online statement, call the merchant to try to find out more about the charge. If you do not recognize the charge after taking this step, call your bank's 800 number immediately and report the fraudulent charge.

Ask your bank to cancel your debit card and issue you a new one to stop thieves from continuing to use your account.

When you sign up for a debit card, ask your bank about how to enroll in fraud protection programs. Some banks automatically freeze your account and require you to verify charges if you spend over a certain amount or spend money in an unusual location such as a different state.

Источник: https://www.sapling.com/7737008/bank-stolen-money-debit-card

Victims of EDD debit card fraud say Bank of America made it too difficult to recoup stolen money

“I felt sucker-punched,” she said. “They just drained it.”

Then she embarked on a lengthy quest — “the tale of unending phone calls, hours on hold,” she said — to contact Bank of America about the theft.

Scores of jobless people tell similar stories about their unemployment benefits being hijacked from their Bank of America debit card accounts, and then struggling with the bank to get their money returned. A major class-action lawsuit against Bank of America, filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in San Francisco, seeks immediate changes to help those who lose funds, such as making it easier to report theft and not freezing accounts.

“This is a disaster for thousands of unemployed Californians who have lost their only lifeline in this pandemic,” said Brian Danitz, an attorney with the Burlingame firm Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy, who is co-lead counsel on the case, which consolidates nine previous lawsuits.

Bank of America was hired by the California Unemployment Development Department, which administers unemployment, to provide the debit cards. It has issued more than 9 million since the pandemic began.

The bank said in a statement that it works hard “to prevent criminals from getting money and ensur(e) legitimate recipients receive their benefits.”

More for you

“We have added thousands of agents to answer phone calls and investigate claims for the areas of the program we are responsible for and, as a result, our average wait time for callers has dropped dramatically,” bank spokesperson William Halldin said. “When fraudulent transactions occur on benefit cards we review those claims and restore money to legitimate recipients.”

Faiz Ahmad, Bank of America managing director and head of global transaction services, told lawmakers in January that the bank has lost hundreds of millions of dollars on the California EDD contract, both through fraud losses and “the cost of serving the contract to the highest extent possible.”

Bank officials are keen to emphasize that most unemployment fraud is apple cider vinegar without the mother good for you committed by criminals who submitted bogus unemployment claims using stolen or fake identities. That fraud, which the state said amounts to at least $11 billion, is a separate issue and not tied to Bank of America.

But the incidents of legitimate claimants whose funds were stolen from their cards is specifically covered by the bank’s agreement with California EDD. Its contract calls for claimants to incur zero liability if their funds were stolen. The lawsuit says the bank violated this provision.

Lawmakers say they’ve heard from thousands of constituents whose EDD funds have been stolen. The bank shed some light on the volume of the fraud in a February letter to Assembly Member Wendy Carrillo, D-Boyle Heights (Los Angeles County).

“Since the pandemic began, we have reimbursed cardholders hundreds of millions of dollars for claims made where they may have been the victim of an unauthorized transaction or fraud on their card,” wrote Brian Putler, the bank’s head of California government relations. “Monthly (transaction-fraud) claims have ballooned from about one thousand claims in a month to tens bank of america denied my fraud claim thousands late last year.”

Compounding the issue, Danitz said, is that the bank often freezes accounts once fraud is reported, so even if the victims get a replacement card, they cannot access any remaining funds or future benefits.

“Many EDD debit cardholders who are the victim of third-party fraud, and who turn to the bank for help, suddenly find themselves indefinitely deprived of access to all their EDD benefits and treated as if they are the criminals,” the lawsuit said.

Both EDD and Bank of America said they are working to streamline verifying identities to unfreeze accounts as quickly as possible when fraud was suspected. People with debit card issues should contact the bank at 1-866-692-9374, the number on the back of the cards.

The lawsuit alleges that the bank left the door open for thieves by not outfitting the EDD debit cards with a security chip. That makes the cards vulnerable to devices called credit card skimmers that criminals install on top of legitimate card readers at places such as ATMs and gas thomas f wilson paintings. The devices harvest card information from the magnetic stripes.

In Yick’s case, for instance, she bought gas with her card the day before the DoorDash charges appeared on her account. When she filed a report, police thought that was probably how fraudsters gained access to her account.

“We have many unanswered questions about what Bank of America has been doing to prevent, investigate and address the fraud,” said Assemblyman David Chiu, D-San Francisco. “Why, when anti-fraud chip technology became industry standard years ago, was that not part of these debit cards? EDD recipients were second-class consumer citizens when it came to anti-fraud technologies.”

Bank of America blamed the lack of chip technology on EDD. In a January Assembly hearing, bank officials said the agency requested cards with magnetic stripes.

“Neither the 2010 nor the 2016 contract required chip-enabled cards, but we are currently working with BofA to have chip cards in the near future,” EDD said in an email.

Some cardholders whose money was stolen said they had never used the debit cards, raising the prospect that the bank itself was hacked, the lawsuit said.

“This is a big bank and they ought to know how to do this without people being ripped off, and (criminals) figuring out how to access these cards,” said Mary Alexander, a San Francisco attorney involved in the case. “They have known since at least 2008 that you put chips in these cards.”

San Francisco resident Frank Jaworski actually discovered his card being hijacked in real time, but still couldn’t get Bank of America to act. The bartender had a high balance in his unemployment account because he had just received several weeks of benefits.

After the card was declined twice, he tried to access the website and found that his login and password had been changed. An hour of calling connected him to a bank representative who said that $3,480 — pretty much all his money in the world — was being transferred to another bank.

“I insisted that I did not make that transfer, and that they should mark it as fraudulent, and not let it go through,” he said. “The rep said they couldn’t stop it.” Neither that rep nor three others could help him change his login and password for the website, he said.

The next day Jaworski went in person to a Bank of America branch, but couldn’t enter because it was at COVID capacity, then tried calling again and again. (The bank said that its branches cannot handle issues with the debit cards.)

After being locked out of his account for days, he got a replacement card in the mail, changed his login — and discovered that his balance was a whopping 61 cents.

“I’ve gone through all my groceries and have nothing left,” he said in March while still trying to get his money back. “My bills are due.”

After two nerve-racking weeks, the bank restored his money.

“It was a tremendous sense of relief, but bank of america 24 hour customer service international an expedient, almost frantic trip to the BofA EDD website to initiate a transfer of every remaining cent to my Patelco credit union account,” he said.

He’s now set up his account to automatically transfer unemployment benefits to his credit union account and plans to make frequent manual checks.

As for Yick, she still hasn’t gotten her money back. She has returned to her work bank of america denied my fraud claim an Airbnb property manager, bank of america denied my fraud claim she feels fortunate that she’s not as desperate for funds as many others.

Still, she’s angry.

“It’s as if I never existed,” she said. “I want accountability. I want the bank to step up.”

Carolyn Said is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: [email protected] Twitter: @csaid

Источник: https://www.sfchronicle.com/local/article/Jobless-Californians-had-their-benefits-stolen-16073421.php

Bank of america denied my fraud claim -

Can You Sue a Bank for Not Refunding Fraudulent Charges?

credit card scam

Loan Lawyers, LLC is licensed to practice law in the state of Florida. If you have a legal matter that you would like to discuss and you are NOT located in Florida, please contact your state’s Bar Association to get the information of a lawyer that can assist you in your home state. Thank you.

Imagine that the worst has happened. You try to use your credit card only to find it is maxed out with bogus charges for purchases you did not make. Or, perhaps you go to an ATM to pull out some money, knowing there’s quite a bit of it in your account. Only, the machine tells you all the funds have been withdrawn. In either case, you’ve been the victim of fraud.

So, you take all the right steps and notify the authorities and the bank in an attempt to get your money back and perhaps even find the criminal who stole from you. Unfortunately, they say there’s nothing they can do. You’re going to be held liable for those charges. You’re frustrated and angry, and may even think about suing the bank. Is this a possibility? It will depend on your situation, but there are other steps you can take.

Getting Your Money Back After a Debit Card Scam

If the money was stolen off of your debit card by use of a skimming machine or another fraudulent act, you may be able to get some or all of your money back.

How much you receive will depend on when you report the funds missing. Victims of debit card fraud are responsible for the following:

  • None of the missing funds if the loss is reported immediately and the card has not been used,
  • Up to $50 if you notify the bank within 48 hours of the fraud,
  • Up to $500 if you notify the bank between 48 hours and 60 days of the fraud
  • All of the fraudulent charges if the bank isn’t notified for 60 days after the fraud.

If the card hasn’t been used yet, you will likely not even know about the fraud to report it. However, as soon as you suspect something is amiss, you need to report it to the bank to recover as much of the money as possible.

Getting Your Money Back After a Credit Card Scam

Getting your money back after your credit card has been defrauded is a little more straightforward. Credit cards typically offer much more protection because they are highly regulated through the Fair Credit Billing Act. This Act limits your liability for fraudulent charges to just $50. If you report the fraud right away, typically within 30 days, most banks will even waive the $50 liability threshold.

Can You Sue the Bank if They Don’t Return the Charges?

Hopefully, if you’ve been a victim of fraud, the bank will comply with the law and not hold you liable for the fraudulent charges if you’ve reported on time and taken the appropriate steps. Unfortunately, banks are a business and are sometimes more interested in holding onto their own profits than doing what’s right for their customers. So, if you’ve been a victim of fraud and the bank does not cooperate, can you sue them?

In most cases, the answer is, sadly, no. At least, not at first. Your first step should be to determine why the bank is holding you liable for the charges. Did you fail to take reasonable care to protect your identity and your account? This can work as an exception to the bank’s zero-liability policy. For example, if you were in a coffee shop and left your computer open with your banking information pulled up while you walked away from the table, this could be considered negligence on your part. In that instance, the bank may have a valid case for holding you liable for the charges.

Additionally, if the bank believes that you were part of the scheme and simply want to make purchases and not be held liable for them, this could also serve as a valid reason for holding you liable for any charges. For example, if your information was stolen off of your computer, the bank may believe that you were involved in the scheme. They may think that someone else stole the information, but that you were in on it as a way for both of you to commit fraud and receive additional funds.

If the bank believes that you committed fraud yourself, or that you were negligent, it’s important to understand that the burden of proof lies with them. If they want to hold you liable for the fraudulent charges, they must prove that you were either negligent or that you committed fraud. You do not have to prove that you did neither of those things.

How to Hold a Bank Responsible

Holding a bank responsible for forgiving fraudulent charges seems like an enormous task. Banks aren’t only a business; after all, they’re one of the biggest businesses, and going up against them can be intimidating for anyone. However, you can take action.

First, you should file a report with the police, and possibly even the FBI, depending on the amount of fraudulent charges you are left with. This will start the process of finding out who has your information and is using it fraudulently. It can also help if the fraudster steals your entire identity, as you would have already reported it.

To ensure the bank doesn’t hold you liable for the fraudulent charges, you can file a complaint with one of two agencies. The first is the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, while the second is the Federal Trade Commission. Before filing a complaint with either of these agencies, it’s best to speak to an attorney who has experience defending against debt and that can help you through the process.

Call Our Florida Debt Defense Lawyers Today

Dealing with your own debt is hard enough. You shouldn’t have to deal with a debt that someone else incurred in your name, too. If you’ve been the victim of fraud, particularly if the bank is holding you liable for those charges, call our Fort Lauderdale debt defense lawyers today. At Loan Lawyers, we know the responsibility that banks have to uphold your rights and to not hold you responsible for fraudulent charges. Call us today at (954) 523-HELP (4357) to schedule your free consultation so we can get started on your case.

Loan Lawyers has helped over 5,000 South Florida homeowners and consumers with their debt problems, we have saved over 2,000 homes from foreclosure, eliminated more than $100,000,000 in mortgage principal and consumer debt, and have recovered over $10,000,000 on behalf of our clients due to bank, loan servicer, and debt collector violations. Contact us for a free consultation and find out more about our money-back guarantee on credit card debt buyer lawsuits, and how we may be able to help you.

People also ask:

  1. Can you sue a credit card company for false charges?
  2. Can I sue a bank for holding my money?
  3. Suing a bank for negligence
  4. Can I sue my bank for their mistake?
  5. Chime bank lawsuit
  6. Bank won’t refund fraud
  7. Can you sue the bank for negligence?
  8. Suing your bank for negligence
  9. Sue your bank
logo

Loan Lawyers, LLC

Loan Lawyers is made up of experienced consumer rights attorneys who use every available resource to develop comprehensive debt solution strategies. Our goal is to take on those burdens, resolve those problems, and allow our clients to sleep soundly knowing they are on the path to a better future.

Источник: https://www.fight13.com/can-you-sue-a-bank-for-not-refunding-fraudulent-charges

How to Dispute a Fraudulent Credit Card Charge

It can be disconcerting to find an unrecognized credit card charge, but disputing questionable transactions is simple when you understand your rights.

Not only is the federal law on your side, but credit card issuers usually have your back, too. Here’s how to dispute credit card charges when it comes to fraud, billing errors, and even unfulfilled merchant promises.

How to Dispute Credit Card Charges Caused By Fraud

If you find a charge you don’t recognize, you should first ask any friends and family if they made the charge without your knowledge. (You’d be surprised how often this happens!)

If they didn’t, it’s likely your card number was compromised. In that case, you should call your credit card issuer immediately and dispute the fraudulent transactions. Your card issuer will start an investigation and freeze or deactivate your card to prevent further fraudulent charges. The issuer will send you a new card with a new card number and CVV.

If you suspect that you’re also a victim of identity theft, and your personal details have been compromised (like your SSN), you should take steps to freeze your credit reports. This may prevent others from opening up new credit accounts or taking out loans in your name.

It’s a good idea to check your three credit reports as well, to see if any fraudulent accounts have already been opened in your name, without your knowledge. If you discover fraudulent accounts on your credit reports, you can visit IdentityTheft.gov to report the crime and create a recovery plan.

Once you’ve notified your card issuer about any fraudulent changes and have been issued a replacement card, there’s not much to do other than wait.  The Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA) states that credit card users are only liable for up to $50 in fraudulent charges.

The major credit card networks — Visa, Mastercard, Discover, and American Express — take it a step further by offering “zero liability” policies. This means that in cases of fraud, you won’t have to pay a dime.

As mentioned, the issuer will send you a replacement card with a new account number, and you can get back to your normal life. If you’ve added the card to a digital wallet like Apple Pay, some issuers will update the card there immediately, before you even receive your new physical card in the mail.

Here are a few extra steps you could take:

Insider tip

Even if you think you’re careful with your cards, criminals are always developing new, sophisticated ways to steal information. Krebs on Security has a great page detailing some of the ways people steal credit card information. Luckily, if you’re the victim of one of these thieves and you report the theft, it’s unlikely you’ll be liable for the charges.

How to Dispute Credit Card Charges Caused By Billing Errors

See a double charge from your favorite sushi restaurant on your statement? Or a $100 charge that should’ve only been $10?

Your first step should always be to contact the merchant. In the name of customer service, merchants will often resolve the issue by refunding your card for the surplus amount when you feel you’ve been overcharged.

If the merchant refuses to help you, you can begin the dispute process with your credit card issuer. Here’s what you have to do.

1. Write to Your Credit Card Issuer

Legally, you have 60 days after receiving the erroneous bill to report the mistake to your issuer — in writing.

Although the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) advises sending a letter via certified mail, that’s not always necessary these days. Many card issuers allow you to submit claims through “dispute” buttons on their sites, or by sending notes through their secure message portals.

Note: If you think you might eventually need to go through the legal system to resolve your situation, sending a certified letter to the card issuer’s billing inquiry address could be an important step. An attorney can advise you further.

In your dispute, include as many details as possible about the charge: names, dates, and any proof the charge isn’t yours. Though this isn’t required by law, it can be helpful. For more guidance, check out the FTC’s sample letter.

The credit card issuer must acknowledge its receipt of your dispute within 30 days. And if the charge is nominal — usually under $25 — you probably won’t have to do anything else. Since it would cost the credit card company more money to open up an investigation, it’ll generally eat the cost of your disputed purchase, and you can go on your merry way.

Insider tip

Don’t abuse the ability to easily dispute small charges. The card issuer will eventually catch on, and may cancel your account.

2. Wait for Your Issuer’s Decision

According to the FCBA, the card issuer has two billing cycles (and a maximum of 90 days) to resolve your claim with the merchant.

During that time, you shouldn’t pay for the disputed charge — but you must pay the rest of your credit card bill on time.

Take note that the disputed charge will still affect your credit limit. If your credit card has a $2,500 limit, for example, and you’re disputing a $500 charge, you’ll only have $2,000 to spend on your card until the dispute is resolved.

In most cases, credit card issuers will side with the consumer and take the charge off your bill. If it believes the charge is legitimate, however, it’ll support the merchant and make you pay for the charge.

How to Dispute Credit Card Charges Caused By Poor Quality of Goods and Services

Imagine you paid a plumbing service that never showed up, or you purchased a TV that doesn’t work. Though you might not know it, credit card companies often have your back when dealing with issues like this and so does federal (and perhaps state) law.

If you receive goods that are damaged, defective, or not as described — or you didn’t receive the promised goods or services at all — you can request a “chargeback” from your card issuer. (Here’s a list of chargeback reason codes, organized by issuer.)

As with billing errors, you should always dispute the charge with the merchant first when you have an issue with the quality of goods or services you received. Many merchants want to do the right thing for their customers and will work with you to find a resolution. Merchants also prefer to avoid chargebacks. Chargebacks can mean higher payment processing fees for merchants, and they may face other penalties if they get too many.

If the merchant refuses to cooperate, it’s within your legal rights to request a chargeback from your credit card issuer, as long as the following requirements are met:

  • The purchase must have been at least $50.
  • You must have made the purchase in your home state, or within 100 miles of your current billing address.
  • You must have made a “good faith effort” to resolve the dispute with the merchant.

To be on the safe side, you should request chargebacks within 60 days of the disputed purchase. Contact your credit card issuer via phone or secure message to begin the process.

Insider tip

Some credit cards also offer purchase protection, return protection, and other benefits. These can provide reimbursement if eligible purchases are broken or stolen, or if the merchant refuses to take back an item.

When Your Dispute or Chargeback Request Is Denied

Credit card issuers often side with their cardholders. Yet there are times when your credit card dispute or chargeback request may be denied. Here are a few reasons why that might happen.

  • You waited too long to contact your card issuer. It’s important to notify your card issuer of a billing error or chargeback request within 60 days of the statement date.
  • You didn’t contact the merchant. Other than cases involving fraud, you should give the merchant the opportunity to resolve the situation first.
  • You made a purchase outside of the United States. Consumer protection laws that apply to credit card disputes and chargebacks may not apply to purchases made in other countries.
  • You lied. If you make up a story to try to get your money back from a merchant, there’s a good chance you’ll get caught. Not only may your dispute or chargeback request be denied, the card issuer might close your account as well.

Actions You Can Take If Your Claim Is Denied

If your credit card dispute or chargeback request is denied, but you believe you’re owed a refund, these steps might help.

1. Challenge the Investigation

If a card issuer doesn’t find in your favor, it must give you a written explanation that tells you why. You can challenge the investigation results within 10 days of receiving this notice.

2. Involve Someone Else

If you think your card issuer is ignoring your rights, you can file a complaint with the following organizations:

3. Talk to an Attorney

If the charge is for a significant amount and you don’t think a credit card company is handling your situation properly, you might consider speaking with an attorney. You can find attorneys who specialize in the FCBA and other consumer protection laws by visiting the National Association of Consumer Advocates.

Use Your Power Wisely

As you can see, the FTC and credit card companies put a lot of trust in cardholders.

In fact,these consumer protections are one of the biggest reasons we advocate usingcredit cards instead of debit cards.

So it’s imperative not to lie or exaggerate. Taking advantage of generous credit card policies — by falsely claiming you never received a product, or by claiming an honest charge was fraudulent — doesn’t benefit anyone.

Unnecessary chargebacks also cost merchants a lot of money. And, if you request questionable chargebacks often, the credit card issuer may decide to close your account permanently.

By wielding our powers wisely, we can continue to enjoy the benefits of the best credit cards for many years to come.

Written by

Brendan Harkness

Brendan has been writing about personal finance for over eight years, and is now taking on the challenge of bringing high-quality credit education to the masses. He makes sure that Credit Card Insider is covering the most important credit topics transparently and precisely, and that we have up-to-date reviews of credit cards so you can find cards that are right for you.

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Expert reviewed by by

Michelle Lambright Black

Michelle Lambright Black is a leading credit expert, author, writer, and speaker with over a decade and a half of experience in the credit industry. She is an expert in credit reporting, credit scoring, financing (mortgages, credit cards, loans), debt eradication, budgeting, saving, and identity theft. She is featured monthly at credit seminars, podcasts, and in print. You can connect with Michelle on Twitter (@MichelleLBlack) and Instagram (@CreditWriter).

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Do you have a correction, tip, or suggestion for a new post? Contact us here.

The responses below are not provided or commissioned by bank advertisers. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by bank advertisers. It is not the bank advertisers' responsibility to ensure all posts are accurate and/or questions are answered.

Источник: https://www.creditcardinsider.com/blog/dispute-fraudulent-credit-card-charge/

What to do when your bank won’t refund fraudulent charges

Dear Your Business Credit,

I have a small business credit card and recently had a lot of fraud charges.

I always had my cards in possession but the thief was able to get my numbers to make fraudulent online purchases even after the card was newly replaced. The bank over the phone said the claim was denied due to unusual fraud scenario, i.e. the card was used fraudulently even after the card was replaced.

The rep told me she didn’t hear back from the merchants but she was denying the claims. The rep also indicated that the three-digit security code was used on the transaction. However, upon calling PayPal, that wasn’t the case. (One of the charges was from PayPal and even the address was not complete).

I emailed to request a thorough investigation of the claims but received denial letters. On the denial letter, there is no breakdown of the charges and no proof of the investigation detail. Wouldn’t I be at least entitled to see details of the orders that were fraudulently charged (address, phone number/email and items ordered)?

I reported those charges as soon as I received an alert (I had alert setup whenever a charge is made).

I had filed with IdentityTheft.gov and just filed with CFPB.

I would like to know what my right is. Can I bring the bank to small claims court? I don’t want to pay for something that was fraudulent. But if I don’t pay for it, I will start to accumulate late charges and it will damage my credit.  What should I do? Any advice will be greatly appreciated! – Kate

Dear Kate,

It is a shame that a bank would make you jump through hoops like this when you are the victim of a fraud.

As to what you can do to protect yourself, I ran your question past Brian J. Crow, managing partner and co-president of TCA A Better Way, a firm that helps banks address their compliance obligations.

Your rights are governed somewhat by whether you used a consumer card or a business card.

As Crow noted, consumer credit cards are governed by the Truth in Lending Act and enforced by the CFPB via Regulation Z.

“If a financial institution investigates an assertion of a billing error and concludes that no error occurred Section 1026.13(f) requires that the creditor provide copies of documentary evidence upon receipt of a request from the consumer,” Crow wrote to me in an email.

Generally speaking, an investigation must occur within 10 business days, or 20 business days if an account has been open less than 30 days, according to the CFPB. The bank must correct an error within one billing day after the determination a billing error has occurred.

Check out all the answers from our credit card experts.

Ask Elaine a question.

Will you get your money back?

You may, but it’s no guarantee.

Under Regulation Z, if a creditor has conducted a “reasonable” investigation and determines that no billing error occurred or a different billing error took place than the one that was asserted, the creditor must mail or deliver the consumer an explanation that explains why the creditor believes the billing error the consumer has alleged is incorrect and, upon request, furnish copies of documentary evidence of the consumer’s indebtedness.

A reasonable investigation, according to Regulation Z, may include seven elements, including reviewing the purchases in comparison to the cardholder’s purchasing patterns, reviewing where purchases were delivered in relation to where the consumer normally shops and comparing any signature slips to the consumer’s signature. For the full list, check out the section of Regulation Z titled “Reasonable investigation.”

If the creditor has determined a different billing error occurred, it must correct the billing error and credit the consumer’s account with any disputed amount and related finance or other charges.

All told, the issue must be resolved within 45 days.

See related: How to dispute a credit card purchase

What if you used a commercial card?

Regulation Z does not apply to commercial accounts unless they have fewer than 10 employees, as noted in 1026.12(b)(5), Crow wrote.

If the card issuer has issued 10 or more credit cards for use by your employees, the business and the credit card issuer are allowed to agree to higher liability limits than those provided for in Regulation Z, he went on to explain.

“In other words, for business accounts, the cardholder agreement is the governing document under contract law rather than the Truth in Lending Act or Regulation Z,” he explained. “Often business agreements will include clauses which place liability on the business if the creditor suspects that the business was negligent in safeguarding card information (which the credit may conclude because of the proximity of the alleged fraud compared to the issuance of a new card) or it may have clauses that place full liability on the business regardless of how the charges occurred.”

It’s important to read the fine print to see what you agreed to.

“The business owner should carefully review the card agreement and may also request the assistance of legal counsel to determine if the creditor violated the cardholder agreement in any way,” Crow wrote. “While the business owner is free to sue the creditor for breach of contract, I’d recommend escalating the complaint through the appropriate channels of management.

“Since this complaint involves a business and not a consumer account, the CFPB may or may not provide assistance, but filing that complaint with the creditor’s primary regulator was also an appropriate step,” he added.

See related: How to dispute fraudulent charges on a corporate credit card

Bottom line

With issues like this, sometimes persistence can go a long way. If the dollar amount of the fraud is substantial, it’ll be worth it to put in the effort, given all the work you’ve already done. Good luck!

Editorial Disclaimer

The editorial content on this page is based solely on the objective assessment of our writers and is not driven by advertising dollars. It has not been provided or commissioned by the credit card issuers. However, we may receive compensation when you click on links to products from our partners.

Elaine Pofeldt writes the Your Business Credit column for CreditCards.com, answering a question every week about small business and credit. Pofeldt is a journalist who specializes in entrepreneurship and careers, contributing to publications such as CNBC, Forbes, Money, and many others. She is the author of “The Million-Dollar, One-Person Business,” a look at how solo entrepreneurs are scaling to seven-figure revenue without hiring employees. She is a former senior editor at Fortune Small Business magazine and co-founder of www.200kfreelancer.com, a website for independent professionals.

Источник: https://www.creditcards.com/credit-card-news/bank-wont-refund-fraud-charges/

Privacy and Security



Credit cards and debit cards have become the most popular payment options for Canadians. Most people today prefer paying with plastic to handing over cash and cheques. At the same time you should be aware of the potential for credit card and debit card fraud.

How do these types of fraud work?

Credit card fraud comes in two main forms.

  • Criminals can steal your actual card or obtain your credit card number, often by phishing or vishing.
  • They can also produce counterfeit cards and get credit cards issued to them by making false applications using your identity.

According to the RCMP, criminals target students, new Canadians and people who have experienced credit problems by offering them low-interest credit cards for a fee. People who pay the fee never get a card and never see their money again.

Debit card fraud occurs when a criminal obtains your debit card information and Personal Identification Number (PIN). Without your PIN the debit card is useless, so if your card is stolen or duplicated the criminal must try to find out your PIN. That’s why protecting your PIN is so important.

  • In one method, called “skimming,” consumers have provided their debit card to make a payment, and the merchant swipes the card through a hidden device to obtain the information embedded in the magnetic stripe so that a duplicate of the card can be made. At the same time, a camera records the consumer entering their PIN.
  • In another, the debit handset, where you input your PIN, is “swapped out” with another that either records the entered information so that the fraudster can steal it back later and gain access to your accounts, or wirelessly transmits the data to the fraudster, located nearby.
  • Finally, ATMs have been tampered with to either record or transmit the customer’s card details and PIN.
Источник: https://www.td.com/privacy-and-security/privacy-and-security/how-you-can-protect-yourself/recognizing-fraud/card-fraud.jsp

Is the Bank Obligated to Refund Stolen Money From My Debit Card?

Banks are typically obligated to refund money so long as the customer follows fraud reporting procedures.

Image Credit: Nastco/iStock/Getty Images

Debit cards offer consumers the convenience of paying for items immediately without having to carry cash. However, if thieves get a consumer's debit card number, they can wreak havoc with a customer's finances by draining his bank account through fraudulent purchases. In most cases, banks offer debit fraud protection and must refund the money as long as the customer follows the bank's fraud reporting procedures in a timely manner.

Risk When Using Debit Cards

When using a debit card, the money is automatically and immediately withdrawn from your checking account. If you report a fraudulent transaction, the bank must replace the money; however, you may find yourself without funds until it does so. In contrast, if someone makes fraudulent charges on your credit card, you can dispute the charge prior to paying the bill.

Debit Fraud Protection Time Frame

Banks may take up to two weeks to refund stolen money after you report the theft. The policy as to how quickly stolen money is replaced differs from bank to bank. Some banks may replace the money as soon as the theft is reported, while others wait until they have completed an investigation and verified that charges are indeed fraudulent. When you're a victim of debit card fraud, this can send you into a spiral of overdraft fees and declined auto-payments you'll also have to contend with and you may have to cover some of these payments while your case is being investigated by your bank.

Liability for Fraudulent Charges

Federal law limits your liability for fraudulent charges using your debit card to $50. To take advantage of this law, you must report the fraudulent charges within two business days of the charge. After two business days, your liability goes up to $500. If you do not report the theft for more than 60 days after receiving your statement, the bank has no obligation to refund your money at all.

Because of this, it is vital to keep an eye on your transactions and accounts to ensure you catch any stolen money on your debit account as soon as possible.

How to Limit Your Liability

Many banks allow you to check your balance online. By making a habit of doing so daily, you can limit your liability. If you do not recognize a charge on your online statement, call the merchant to try to find out more about the charge. If you do not recognize the charge after taking this step, call your bank's 800 number immediately and report the fraudulent charge.

Ask your bank to cancel your debit card and issue you a new one to stop thieves from continuing to use your account.

When you sign up for a debit card, ask your bank about how to enroll in fraud protection programs. Some banks automatically freeze your account and require you to verify charges if you spend over a certain amount or spend money in an unusual location such as a different state.

Источник: https://www.sapling.com/7737008/bank-stolen-money-debit-card

4 Steps To Take If Your Card Is Declined

You are standing at the cash register after a long day and the cashier tells you your credit card was declined. It can cause an array of emotions—frustration, fear and confusion.

Depending on your mindset, you may feel more or less equipped to take on the challenge. And while there can be a variety of reasons your card was declined there are 4 simple steps to follow.

1. Take a Deep Breath

There are a lot of dynamics that arise with a declined credit card. You or the cashier may feel added pressure depending on the length of the line behind you. Remind yourself that many of the people around you have probably had the same experience. Take a breath and consider your options.

While it is frustrating and inconvenient, in many cases, your card may be declined for your protection. This warning may be easily reconciled. If you have another means of payment, you may want to use it to complete your transaction.

If another form of payment is available to you, consider using another option. Let the cashier know if you plan to step out of line and try to resolve the issue immediately or if you will come back to complete the purchase later.

2. Review Your Card Info

When Ordering Online

Double check that all of your information was entered correctly. Transposing numbers is an easy mistake to make. If you are using a card on file, double check the card number and CVV security code against the actual card. Make sure you are using the zip code tied to your billing information.

If you received a replacement card or recently moved, you may need to update your card number or the billing information.

Check the Card Expiration Date

While this step may seem obvious, some credit card providers send renewal cards very close to the expiration date. Most people are not tuned into their upcoming card expiration dates, and it may have caught you by surprise. If your card is past the expiration date, it is no longer valid. In the moment, you will need to complete the purchase with a different method of payment.

When you get home, check your mail to determine if a new card was received. If not, contact customer service to ask that a new card be sent to you.

3. Contact Customer Service

Before your anxiety rises, contact the customer service phone number listed on the back of your card. There are a number of easily resolved reasons your card may have been declined.

If you recently activated your card and this is the first use, it is possible the activation process was not fully completed. The card provider may to manually activate the card. Often your card is declined for your protection to prevent fraudulent purchases. In this case, your card provider may just need to verify your identity and authenticate your purchase.

Regardless of the reason your card was declined, contacting your card provider can give you clarity on the issue so that you can make informed progress toward a resolution.

4. Work With the Card Provider to Resolve the Issue

Suspected Fraud

If you are making a large purchase, especially one outside your normal shopping behavior, the transaction may be flagged as fraud potential. You may also trigger a fraud warning if you are shopping out of the state or the country or if you’re using a card for the first time in a long while.

Your card provider may call or text you to ask for purchase approval. If your card issuer does not contact you, calling customer service may allow you to resolve the issue immediately by verifying your identity and intention to make the flagged purchase.

Over Your Credit Limit

Depending on your card, your purchase may be declined if you are already over your credit limit or if this transaction would put you over it. While some cards allow you to exceed your credit limit, other credit providers may decline the transaction.

No one likes being inconvenienced, but being declined may actually save you money in fees. Some card providers charge an overdraft fee of $10 to $25 when you exceed your credit limit. In fact, the CARD Act allows you to opt out of over the limit speeding. Considering that you can be charged for each transaction over the limit, it may be a good warning to stop using this card.

If possible, you can make an early payment to reduce the balance and continue using that credit card. If the card has a low balance and you have strong credit, you can contact the provider and ask that they re-evaluate your credit limit. Note this may require that they pull your credit.

Even if you keep a relatively low balance on your card you may be declined for being over the limit. If you recently stayed in a hotel or rented a car, that merchant may have placed a security hold on your credit card to cover the cost of possible damages. Due to this hold, you may not have sufficient available funds to complete the transaction at the time.

Behind on Payments

When life gets busy, it can be easy to overlook a payment. Or if finances are tight, you may be prioritizing certain bills. Whatever the reason, if you get behind on a credit card payment, that issuer may limit your purchasing power. They may do this by notifying you in writing, but it’s possible that the limit is lowered before you receive notice.

You will need to catch up on payments or set up a payment plan. Once you make consistent payments, your issuer may restore regular card use. If you find yourself behind on payments contact your card issuer or reach out to a credit counselor for assistance.

Your Account Was Closed

Credit card companies can close accounts for a variety of reasons. If you have not used a card for a while and you do not carry a balance, the creditor may close your account due to inactivity. In this case, your creditor may be able to resolve the issue if your account is in good standing.

If your credit score has dramatically decreased since you opened your account, your card provider can close your account if you are now deemed a credit risk. Your card may also be declined if you were an authorized user on a credit card and the primary card holder has now removed your authorization.

No Other Payment Option

It happens. Sometimes you leave the house with only your ID and a credit card. If you find yourself in this situation weigh your options. Can a friend cover you? Can you leave your purchase, run home and come back later? In many cases the grocery store will hold your order, although you may need to put the ice cream back before it melts.

If these are not an option, speak calmly with the merchant about your options. Depending on the size of your purchase they may take your information or hold your ID and allow you to pay later, Make sure you are comfortable with the reputation of the establishment before leaving your ID.

Reducing Stress in the Future

There is no surefire way to avoid having your card declined. As long as there are computer glitches and credit fraud, you run the risk of being declined again. However, there are a few things you can do to reduce the chances of a declined card and to be prepared when it happens.

Set Up Credit Limit Notifications

Credit cards often allow you to tailor the notifications you receive. You can request a text or email update when you’ve reached a set percentage of your credit limit. It may also help your credit score. Experts recommend maintaining a balance of less than 30% of your credit limit. While this is not always possible, it is good to stay informed.

Update Your Contact Information

Make sure your cell phone is the primary number on the account. This allows you to verify your identification more easily when you call from the number on file If you are traveling internationally, ensure that your cell phone has an international voice and data plan.

Carry Back Up Payment Methods

Keep multiple payment methods on hand. It may be wise to carry a debit card as well as a secondary credit card. Also consider setting up a mobile payment app like Apple Pay or Google Pay. More and more merchants will accept payment from your cell phone so even if you leave your wallet at home you can complete a transaction.

Set up Travel Alerts

Update your card provider with your travel destination and dates. Make sure to give them contact information where you can be reached. You may also want to set up a PIN number before traveling. In some countries, unmanned terminals like those at gas stations often require a PIN. In these cases, if you do not have one, your card will not be accepted.

Stay On Top Of Your Payments

If you tend to have a lot going on, setting up automatic payments can ensure you do not get behind. If you know you are unable to make a timely payment, contact your card provider before your payment due date to discuss your options.

Bottom Line

A declined credit card is not the end of the world. If possible, pay for the purchase with another method and give yourself space to resolve the issue. There is no need to worry right away—reach out to customer service to get more information. There’s no need to worry about what the merchant is thinking, cards get declined for a lot of reasons and it happens more frequently than you may think.

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Источник: https://www.forbes.com/advisor/credit-cards/steps-to-take-if-your-card-is-declined/

(en español)

Customer support

Q: Who should I contact if I have questions about my card?
For questions about your debit card, contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955 which is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

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Receiving and activating your card

Q: When will I receive my debit card?
If you are eligible for unemployment benefits, you should receive your debit card by mail within 7-10 business days of applying or after you request to be switched to the card. The card is issued directly from KeyBank to the address on record at the time of the request. With your card, you will receive a welcome packet that includes instructions on how to use the card. If your card does not arrive after 10 days, contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955.

Q: How do I activate my card?
Your welcome packet from KeyBank will contain the debit card, instructions and a phone number to call to activate the card.

Q: How do I set up a PIN for my card?
You will be prompted to set your PIN when you call to activate your card. You can change your PIN by calling the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955 or you can do it on the Key2Benefits.com website.

Q: What will the envelope look like that will contain my debit card? What should I do if I do not receive my debit card?
For security, your card will come in a white, envelope with both an Employment Security Department and KeyBank Card Member Services/Sioux Falls SD return address.

Q: Where is my debit card/I haven't received my debit card?
It could take 7-10 business days from the time you requested the card to the time you receive it in the mail. If you have not received your card within 7-10 days after applying for unemployment benefits, you should do the following:

  • call the ESD Claims Center at 800-318-6022 (Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. except holidays) to make sure we have your correct address on file.
  • If the address on file is correct, then you should immediately contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955 to let them know you need to request a replacement card

Q: What happens to my debit card if it is mailed to the wrong address?
The card will be returned to the KeyBank debit card center. You must contact the ESD claims center at 800-318-6022 (Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. except holidays) or go online to your eServices account to update your address so the card will reach your new address.

It may take up to 3 business days for this information to update with KeyBank. You can then contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955 to request a new card be mailed to you. A replacement card will be issued to you. Please keep in mind due to mailing time it can take up to 7-10 days.

Q: Will the post office forward my debit card if I move and leave a forwarding address?
No. The card will be returned to the KeyBank Debit Card center.  You must first contact the ESD claims center at 800-318-6022 or go online to your eServices account to update your address.  You also need to contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955 and give them your updated address. Please keep in mind due to mailing time it can take up to 7-10 days to receive a new debit card.

Q: What should I do if my name is spelled wrong on my debit card?
Call the ESD claims center at 800-318-6022 to update the spelling of your name. You can continue to use your current debit card until you get the new one with the corrected name in the mail.  When you get your new card and activate it, the old card will then automatically be disabled.

Q: How long does my debit card remain valid? How long should I keep my card?
Your KeyBank prepaid debit card remains valid for three years (36 months). You should plan to keep your card until the expiration date of the card has passed – don’t throw it away!

Q: What if I file another unemployment claim in a year or two – will I still use the same debit card or will I get a new debit card each time I file a claim?You will not receive a new card each time you file unless the card has expired.  Your debit card is valid for three years (36 months), so you should keep your card in case you open another unemployment claim within that three year window.

Q: Why was there no money loaded on my debit card when I received it?  What should I do?
As soon as you filed your claim, your information was sent to KeyBank and they automatically generated and mailed as debit card to you.  If in the interim, ESD identified an issue with your claim money will not be loaded onto the card until issue is resolved.

  • Do not to throw the card away – as soon your issue is resolved, money will be loaded onto the card.
  • Call the ESD Claims Center at 800-318-6022 (Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. except holidays) for assistance in getting your claims issue resolved.

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Using the debit card

For Purchases

Q.  Where can I use the card to make purchases?
You can use the debit card to make purchases anywhere MasterCard debit cards are accepted. You can also use your card for online, phone and mail order purchases.

Q.  Do I select credit or debit on the merchant’s terminal when making a purchase?
Select “credit” to make a purchase. Select “debit” if you want to get cash back with your purchase - available at participating retailers. (You will have to enter your 4-digit PIN.)

Q: Can I use my card at a gas pump?
Yes. However, if you use your card to pay at the pump, a maximum hold may be placed on your account to initiate your transaction. This amount will be held until the actual transaction amount clears. If you don’t want funds held while waiting for the transaction to clear, pay the cashier for your gasoline purchase. Payments made directly to the cashier clear immediately for the actual transaction amount. Restaurants, hotels and car rental companies may place similar maximum holds on transactions. Refer to your card’s Terms and Conditions for additional information.

  
Obtaining cash

Q.  Where can I withdraw cash using my debit card without ATM fees
You can use your card to withdraw cash, without charge, at the following locations:

When you withdraw cash, funds are automatically deducted from your card balance.

Q. How do I find a KeyBank ATM?
You can locate the closest KeyBank ATM two ways:

Q.  How do I find an Allpoint ATM?
You can locate the closest Allpoint ATM two ways:

  • Online: Go to the Allpoint network locator site. You can type in an address, city or zip code and the closest Allpoint ATM locations are listed as well as displayed on a map. Links with directions to each location are also provided.
  • By phone: A voice-assisted ATM locator is available by calling 1-800-809-0308, Option 2.

Q: Can I receive cash back when using my debit card at retail locations?
Yes. You can choose to get cash back with no fee when you make a purchase at participating merchants, such as grocery and convenience stores.

Q: Is there a daily cash withdrawal limit from the debit card?

LIMIT DESCRIPTION

AMOUNT

ATM Withdrawal

$1500 per day

PIN point of sale cash back*

$2,500 per day

Cash (over the counter bank teller)

$7,000 per day

Purchase

$7,500 per day

* This is the total allowed by KeyBank. Individual retailers may have a lower limit. 

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How money gets loaded onto your debit card

Q: How will I know when funds are loaded to my card?
You may self-enroll in optional text or email alerts to inform you when funds are added to your account and when you have a low or negative balance. To enroll in the alerts, login to your account on the Key2Benefits.com website.

Q: Can I load money onto my card?
No. Only the Employment Security Department can add funds to your debit card.

Q: Who should I contact if I have questions about the amount loaded on my card?
If you question the amount loaded on to your card, you should call the ESD claims center at 800-318-6022 (Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. except holidays) . KeyBank can’t answer questions about how much you should have received in benefits.

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Transferring funds

Q: Can I transfer funds from my debit card to a personal checking or savings account?
Yes. You can transfer some or all of your balance to a personal checking or savings account through the Key2Benefits.com website.  Once your transfer is made, it can take up to 2 business days for the funds to actually be credited to your checking or savings account, and the transfer cannot be canceled once entered.

Q: Can I transfer money onto the debit card from cash or another bank account?
No, the card is a single-source funded card and can only be funded by Washington Employment Security Department.

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Managing your card/transactions

Q: Can my card be overdrawn?
Since the debit card is a prepaid card and not a credit card, KeyBank ensures that you may only transact up to the available balance on the card so you do not find yourself in a negative balance situation.

Q: Can I check my balance and access my transaction history?
You can check your balance and view your transaction history online at the Key2Benefits.com website. You can also check your balance for free at any in-network ATM or call the customer support number provided with your card.

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Additional cards

Q: Can I request a second debit card for use by a family member?
No. This card is specific to the person who is eligible for unemployment benefits.

Q: Can I walk into a KeyBank branch and get a temporary card?
No. KeyBank branches do not have temporary debit cards.

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Replacing debit cards

Q: What should I do if my card is lost, damaged or stolen?
Contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955.

Q: If I lose my card can I go into a KeyBank branch to order a replacement card?
If a card is lost, damaged or stolen you need to contact the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955.  KeyBank branches do not have the ability to replace cards.

Q: If I lose my card, am I charged for a new card?
No, there is no fee for a standard card replacement which is sent first class via the U.S. postal service.  (Expedited 2-day delivery (FedEx, UPS) carries a $12.00 cost.)

Q: Is the card “frozen” if I misplace or lose my card?
You can temporarily suspend your card to prevent spending while you look for the card by calling the Key2Benefits Customer Support line at 866-295-2955.  If a replacement card is ultimately required, the old card cannot be reactivated once it has been replaced.

Q: Can I go into a KeyBank branch and get a temporary debit card?
No, KeyBank branches do not have temporary debit cards.

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Privacy questions

Q: Do Employment Security staff have access to my debit card number?
No. Only KeyBank and the cardholder have access to that information.

Q: What is KeyBank’s privacy policy ensuring that my private information will not be shared with third parties or that I will not receive any unsolicited advertising?
The KeyBank privacy policy is provided in the packet you get when you first receive your debit card. 

Q.  Can collection agencies garnish wages from my KeyBank debit card?
The KeyBank debit card is not a bank account. The state of Washington garnishes your benefit payment for required child support and IRS payments owed before we release your payment—whether by check, debit card or direct deposit. Other entities may not garnish your debit card once the payment is loaded.

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Источник: https://esd.wa.gov/unemployment/debit-card-FAQ
bank of america denied my fraud claim

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