north america continent map

Create your own map of north america continent maps geography ks1 black and white rgb themed poster, display banner, bunting, display lettering, labels. Download unlimited PowerPoint templates, charts and graphics for your presentations with our annual plan. DOWNLOAD. Slide Tags: GPSNorth AmericaPowerPoint Maps. Map A map of the whole continent of America, divided into North and South and West Indies with a copius table fully shewing the several possessions of each.

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North America Countries, Capital and Currency -- (उत्तरी अमेरिका) -- North America Map :: Continent

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Map of North America continent political

Map of North America continent political

Printable map (jpeg/pdf) and editable vector map of North America continent political showing countries, capitals and physical features. The printable option includes two file formats: XL resolution JPEG photo and PDF. The JPEG is extremely large: 20 in (60 cm) wide - 300dpi. The PDF is non-layered, has no editable text, but is scalable to any size without loss of quality. The vector option will you get a vector map that is extensively layered, editable and accurate. A vector map can easily be scaled up or down to any size you want without loss of quality. Every map feature is selectable and editable. Text is real text. File formats included are AI, EPS and PDF (JPEG XL resolution also included). As part of our support when you buy this map, you can always contact us to retrieve yet another file format. This map comes with a royalty-free license. It means you can use it for personal and commercial use.

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Источник: https://www.onestopmap.com/north-america-continent/north-america-continent-127/

North America is one of the four parts of the American continent (the others are Central America, Antilles and South America). It includes Canada (the 2nd largest country in area in the world), the United States (3rd largest), and Mexico. North America also includes Greenland, the largest island, as well as the small French overseas department of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon (made up of small islands in the Atlantic Ocean).

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Источник: http://www.maps-world.net/north-america.htm

New Seismic Map of North America Reveals a Continent Under Tremendous Stress

A car is trapped following an earthquake in Anchorage, Alaksa, in 2018.

Scientists have compiled the most comprehensive map yet of tectonic stress magnitudes across North America, highlighting regions most vulnerable to earthquakes.

The map and associated study, published today in Nature Communications, showcase the dynamic subterranean forces at play on a continental scale.

Writing in their paper, the authors of the new study, Jens-Erik Lund Snee, a postdoctoral fellow with the U.S. Geological Survey, and Mark Zoback, a geophysicist at Stanford University, say it’s “the first comprehensive view of the relative principal stress magnitudes throughout North America.”

The new map incorporates thousands of horizontal stress orientations, revealing the directionality of high-pressure zones within the continent’s crust. This allowed them to pinpoint seismic hotspots across North America.

Geologists and other scientists will be able to use this work for various modeling studies, but it also serves the practical purpose of alerting jurisdictions to seismic risks. Incredibly, the new maps don’t just highlight areas prone to earthquakes—they also reveal the types of earthquakes these places can expect.

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The new seismic stress map of North America.

In addition to highlighting previously known earthquake risks (especially in California, New Mexico, and Texas), the map includes areas made susceptible to earthquakes on account of human activity, namely fracking (Oklahoma and Texas—we’re looking at you). This information could consequently be used to inform energy companies about the hazards of drilling in certain areas and to attempt to mitigate risks.

“If you know an orientation of any fault and the state of stress nearby, you know how likely it is to fail and whether you should be concerned about it in both naturally triggered and industry-triggered earthquake scenarios,” explained Lund Snee in a press release. “We’ve detailed a few places where previously published geodynamic models agree very well with the new data, and others where the models don’t agree well at all.”

To create the map, the researchers amassed over 2,000 stress orientations taken across North America, of which 300 are brand new. These measurements were taken from boreholes—long, narrow shafts drilled into the ground for geophysical analysis. The authors also assessed faults based on a locality’s prior earthquake history. This provided for a highly granular view of the seismic situation at local levels, but also across the entire North American continent.

Looking at the map, the black lines show areas of maximum horizontal stress, and the black arrows indicate the directionality of the plates. Colors represent the style of faulting found in a particular region, in which bluish areas experience normal faulting (where the crust stretches horizontally), greenish-yellow areas experience strike-slip faulting (vertical fractures where blocks mostly move horizontally), and reddish areas experience reverse faulting (where fractures move atop another).

Each fault style produces its own distinctive shaking during an earthquake, highlighting another valuable aspect of this map, as Jack Baker, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford University, pointed out in the press release.

“In our hazards maps right now, in most places, we don’t have direct evidence of what kind of earthquake mechanisms could occur,” said Baker, who wasn’t involved in the new study. “It’s exciting that we have switched from this blind assumption of anything is possible to having some location-specific inferences about what types of earthquakes we might expect.”

The new research has already yielded some interesting findings. In the western U.S., for example, pronounced changes to stress types and orientations were seen across short distances, sometimes measured in tens of miles—a level of detail not exposed in previous maps.

Image for article titled New Seismic Map of North America Reveals a Continent Under Tremendous Stress

Another surprising finding has to do with relatively low rebound stresses seen across the continent. When the massive ice sheets melted at the end of the last ice age some 20,000 to 12,000 years ago, this unleashed a lot of pent-up seismic energy, a process that’s still ongoing. Or so scientists thought. The new research shows that postglacial rebound pressures are lower than those seen in crusts along faults.

“We see things we’ve never seen before that require geologic explanation,” said Zoback. “This will teach us new things about how the Earth works.”

EartherEarth Science

Источник: https://gizmodo.com/new-seismic-map-of-north-america-reveals-a-continent-un-1843020591

North America continent is in the northern hemisphere, surrounded by the Arctic Ocean in the north, the Atlantic Ocean in the east, the Caribbean Sea in the south, and the northern Pacific Ocean to the west.

North American Population: 579 million

North America Continent Area: 24.700.000 km2

It is the third largest continent after Asia and Africa and is the fourth most populous continent after Asia, Africa, and Europe.

North America Continent/Map of North America 1

It is located in the northern part of the land mass, also called the New World. North America’s only land link to South America is the narrow Panama Canal.

The continent can be divided into four major regions: from the Gulf of Mexico to the Canadian Arctic, Great Plains; Rocky Mountains, Great Basin, California and Alaska, geologically young, mountainous west; high in the northeast but relatively flat in the Canadian region; and the eastern region that includes the Appalachian Mountains and the Florida peninsula.

The only connection to South America is the Panama Canal. Thanks to this channel, the four sides of the North American Continent are actually sea/ocean waves. It is surrounded by the Arctic Ocean in the north, the Caribbean Sea in the South, the Atlantic Ocean in the East and the Pacific Ocean in the West.

Since it is spread over a large continent, different climate types are seen. Greenland is part of the continent. It is also rich in natural resources. There are iron ore and silver mines.

North American Countries List

North America Continent/Map of North America 2

Number of Countries in North America: There are 23 countries recognized by the United Nations. The number of lands dependent on other countries; 20 is.

COUNTRYCAPITAL
USAWashington D.C.
ANTIGUA AND BARBUDASaint John’s
BAHAMASNassau
BARBADOSBridgetown
BELIZEBelmopan
DOMINICAN REPUBLICSanto Domingo
DOMINICAN theRoseau
EL SALVADORSan Salvador
GRENADASaint George’s
GUATEMALAGuatemala
HAITIPort-au-Prince
HONDURASTegucigalpa
JAMAICAKingston
CANADAOttawa
COSTA RICASan José
CUBAHavana
MEXICANMexico
NICARAGUAManagua
PANAMAPanama
SAINT KITTS AND NEVISBasseterre
SAINT LUCIACastries
SAINT VINCENT AND GRENADINSKingstown
TRINIDAD AND TOBAGOPort of Spain
US VIRGIN ISLANDSCharlotte Amalie
NAVASSA ISLAND
PORTO RICOPorto Rico
ANGUILLAAnguilla
BERMUDABermuda
BRITAIN VIRGIN ISLANDSRoad town
CAYMAN ISLANDSCayman Islands
MONTSERRATPlymouth (de jure) / Brades (de facto)
TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDSCockburn Town
GREENLANDNuuk
CLIPPERTON ISLAND
GUADELOUPEBasse-Terre
MARTINIQUEFort-de-France
SAINT BARTHÉLEMYGustavia
SAINT MARTINMarigot
SAINT PIERER AND MIQUELONSaint Pierre
ARUBAOranjestad
CURACAOWillemstad
SINT MARTENPhilipsburg
BES ISLANDSKralendijk

History of North America

North America Continent/Map of North America 3

During the most severe period of the Ice Age, 34000-30000 BC, a significant part of the world’s water was in the form of large continental layers of ice. As a result, the Bering Sea was hundreds of meters lower than its current level, and a land bridge was formed between Asia and North America, called Beringia. It is believed to be about 1,500 kilometers in the widest period of Beringia. The region, which was a tundra with and without trees, was covered with grasses and other plants, which attracted large animals that the first people had hunted for.

The first to reach North America, they almost certainly did not know that they had set foot on a new continent. Probably, they had been hunting on the Siberian coast as their ancestors had done for thousands of years, and then they had crossed the land bridge.

After arriving in Alaska, the first North Americans crossed the passages between the glaciers and had to pass thousands of more years to reach the southern regions of the United States. The first evidence of life in North America continues to exist today. However, it can be proved that very few of them belong to an older than 12000 BC; For example, a hunting watch site located in the north of Alaska in the recent past may be from about these dates. The same can be said for carefully drawn arrowheads and some other objects found in the town of Clovis in New Mexico.

The presence of similar items in certain places in North and South America shows that the settlement of the Western Hemisphere (called the Western Hemisphere in the region formed by the islands of the North and South America and the surrounding islands) may have occurred in a large part of the settlement before 10,000 BC.

North America Continent/Map of North America 4

At that time, the mammoths began to disappear and their place was replaced by the bison, which first formed the main source of food and leather of the North Americans. Over time, due to overfishing and natural phenomena, many species of hunting animals have disappeared and increasingly began to create plants, nuts, and seeds as a source of nutrition for the first Americans. Increasingly, plant-gathering efforts for nutrients and primitive agriculture experiments emerged. In this regard, Native North Americans and/or Indians in the Central Mexico region have now been pioneered, and perhaps have grown corn, squash, and beans from 8000 BC. The knowledge and experience gained in this regard slowly spread to the north.

By 3000 BC, a primitive corn species had been cultivated in the river valleys of New Mexico. After that, the first signs of village life were seen around 300 BC.

Discovery of America

It is estimated that 2-18 million Indians lived here during the years when America was first discovered by the Europeans. Most of the inhabitants of the continent are expected to lose their lives as destructive wars with Europeans and infectious diseases brought by newcomers to the continent.

North America Continent/Map of North America 5

The Indian community in North America was tied to the ground in all respects. Commitment to land and natural conditions was an integral part of religious beliefs. The life of the Indians was basically based on clan and coexistence, and the children were given more freedom and tolerance than they had in Europe at that time.

While some North American tribes developed a kind of hieroglyphic to preserve certain texts, the Native American culture was basically spoken and given great value to telling tales and dreams.

It is clear that there is a great deal of trade between the various groups, and there is strong evidence that neighboring tribes are widely engaged in both friendly and hostile formal relationships.

First Europeans

Europeans who first came to North America or had sound evidence of their arrival were Scandinavians traveling west from Greenland, where they established a settlement in 985.

The Scandinavian epics have stated that Viking sailors have discovered the Atlantic coast from North America to the Bahamas, but the aforementioned allegations have not been proven. In contrast, in 1963, certain Scandinavian house debris belonging to the period mentioned in L’Anse-aux-Meadows, north of Newfoundland, were found, thus confirming at least some of the claims put forward in Scandinavian epics.

Just five years after Christopher Columbus arrived ashore in the Caribbean, five years later, in 1497, the Venetian sailor John Cabot, commissioned by the King of England, set foot in Newfoundland. Cabot’s journey, though quickly forgotten, would serve as a basis for the British to claim North America over the years. The journey also paved the way for rich nests off the shores of Georgeyes Banks, and shortly thereafter, European and especially Portuguese fishermen began to arrive regularly.

In fact, Columbus never saw the continental United States; however, the Spanish colonies, which he helped establish, became the starting point for the first discovery journeys in the United States. The first of these travels began in 1513 and a group led by Juan Ponce de Leon landed on the Florida coast near the city of St. Augustine.

After the conquest of Mexico in 1522, the Spanish empowered their position in the Western Hemisphere. The following discoveries made contributions to what the Europeans know about so-called America, referring to the Italian Amerigo Vespucci, whose writings on the journey to the New World were read with great admiration. While the prospects for discovering a Northwest Pass going to Asia will only be completely lost after century, by 1529, reliable maps of the Atlantic coast stretching from Labrador to Tierra del Fuego were drawn.

During the conquest of Peru, Hernando De Soto, who had served under Francisco Pizzaro, is one of the most important Spanish expeditions. The de Soto group campaign began in Havana in 1539, landed in Florida, and pursued wealth through the Mississippi River across the southeastern United States.

North America Continent/Map of North America 6

While the Spanish were spreading from the south, the northern part of the United States of America was also better known by travelers such as Giovanni da Verrazano. Verrazano, a Florentine traveling on behalf of the French, saw land in North Carolina in 1524 and headed north along the Atlantic coast to the present-day Port of New York.

The great wealth flowing into Spain from the colonies in Mexico, Antilles, and Peru attracted great interest from other European states. Over time, the seafaring countries like England, to some extent, began to deal with the New World as a result of the successful plundering attacks of Francis Drake against Spanish treasure ships.

Declaration of Independence

Colonies have become widespread, and agriculture-based settlements have been established, until the Declaration of Independence adopted on July 4, 1776. Thanks to the settlements established in the port circles, the trade of agricultural products have been ensured and the power of the colonies has increased. In the following period, the dependence on England left its place entirely to the will of freedom.

Although the paper is based on the political philosophy of the French and the English Enlightenment, the effect of a work is particularly remarkable: the Second Review of John Locke on the Government. Locke addressed the concepts of British traditional rights and universalized them as the natural rights of people. The well-known introduction of the paper reflects Locke’s theory of government-related social-contract.

The success of the revolution gave Americans the opportunity to identify their ideals in a legal way as described in the Declaration of Independence and to remedy some of their complaints through state constitutions. Furthermore, on May 10, 1776, the Congress took a decision and proposed to the colonies to form new governments that would best ensure the happiness and safety of their voters. Some of them had already done so, and as a result, a year after the Declaration of Independence was published, all colonies, except three, accepted their constitution.

North America Facts

1. North America is the third largest continent in the world. And it is called “fertile soils”.

2. Dinosaur fossils found in North America are much more than those found on other continents.

3. The first European settlement to Greenland was provided by the Vikings.

4. Canada, where the population density is low, is one of the richest countries in the world.

North America Continent/Map of North America 7

5. Niagara Falls is one of the places you should visit if one day you go to Canada.

6. Churchill in Hudson Bay, also known as “the capital of polar bears” in the world.

Churchill in Hudson Bay, Manitoba, Canada, is flooded by thousands of polar bears every autumn. Waiting for the water to freeze polar bears can walk here easily.

7. Canada’s capital, Ottawa, means trading in the native language. It was named after an American tribe who lived in the region. Already the merchants were known as very famous traders.

8. The length of asphalt covered roads in the US is about 6.5 million kilometers.

9. Today, Spain is the first colonies to establish the land of the USA. The locals lived in this region. Christopher Columbus, who departed from Spain, reached land in 1492. In 1497-1499, Italian Amerigo Vespucci changed the course of history by proving the existence of a continent which he named after his travels and letters.

10. Those who introduced the chocolate to the Spanish conquistador were the Aztecs. In this way, it has spread to Europe.

Источник: https://www.mappr.co/thematic-maps/north-america-continent/

How many countries are there in North America?

If you research how many countries are there in North America, you’ll find that the number 23 keeps coming up. Well, I agree – there are 23 countries in the North American continent. 

In terms of the continents, the ‘New World’, aka the Americas, is divided up into North and South American continents. It can be a little confusing because what about Central America, and the Caribbean? I’ll explain that further down. In this article, I’m focussing on the Continent of North America, if you want to check out how many countries in South America you’re in luck because I’ve just posted that list too.

North America is the third largest continent on the planet and covers over 9,000,000 square miles. The answer to how many countries are there in North America is 23, plus there are also a few dependent territories, which don’t make the cut as they’re not officially countries (like the British Virgin Islands, or BVI, for example). If you’re also wondering how many countries are there in the world, read my blog post about that. The answer is 197 by the way!

Me Visiting every country in North America

From April 2016 to March  2017 I visited all 23 countries in North America. Starting in Mexico, and Overlanding all the way down to Panama. From there, I flew to Colombia to study Spanish for a couple of months in Medellin, and then started the overland process again, all the way down to Ushuaia where I took a boat to Antarctica. After that, I flew from Ushuaia to Guiana and began to visit every country in the Caribbean. Quite the adventure, believe me!

Havana Classic Car Tour

So there are 23 countries in North America? What are they?

I’m sure that you don’t need me to tell you that the ‘big 3’ in North America are Canada, USA and Mexico. Canada occupies the most amount of land and the USA has the largest population. From a continental perspective, North America also includes both the regions of Central America and the Caribbean islands too. So, let’s look at all the countries in North America on my list of 23. 

  1. Antigua and Barbuda (Caribbean)
  2. Bahamas (Caribbean)
  3. Barbados (Caribbean)
  4. Belize (Central America)
  5. Canada
  6. Costa Rica (Central America)
  7. Cuba (Caribbean – don’t visit Cuba without experiencing the Havana Classic Car tour, so much fun!)
  8. Dominica (Caribbean)
  9. Dominican Republic (Caribbean)
  10. ElSalvador (Central America)
  11. Grenada (Caribbean)
  12. Guatemala (Central America)
  13. Haiti (Caribbean)
  14. Honduras (Central America)
  15. Jamaica (Caribbean)
  16. Mexico
  17. Nicaragua (Central America)
  18. Saint Kitts and Nevis (Caribbean)
  19. Panama (Central America)
  20. SaintLucia (Caribbean)
  21. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (Caribbean)
  22. Trinidad and Tobago (Caribbean)
  23. United States of America 

Have a look for yourself here on the North America Countries Map:

How many countries in north america
How many countries make up North America

Why is Central America and the Caribbean counted as North America?

Prepare to be confused! Ok, sometimes people refer to North America and South America as Continental America, i.e together they are just 1 continent. However, most of the world use a 7 continent model, which means North and South America are broken up and considered as 2 separate continents, separating at the southern Panama border. With this in mind the 11 countries in Central America can’t be considered its own continent (it can be classed as a subcontinent since it lies within continental ‘America’). Equally then, geographically speaking, the Caribbean falls on top of the same tectonic plate as the rest of the North American countries listed, thereby including all of it within ‘North America’ too. 

If you’re curious about how many countries in the Caribbean specifically, the answer is 13! As well as 21 dependencies. You can read all about that in my blog post here. 

How many countries make up North America

Don’t Forget The 22 Dependent Territories In North America

If you’ve read some of my other articles then you’ll know all about territories that are dependencies of other countries. If you want to remind yourself about the definition of what a country is versus what a dependent territory is, then click here to read my simple explanation – you’ll soon see that it’s not easy to figure out what constitutes as a country. I know some people consider the following places countries, but unfortunately, they are not officially, or technically, countries!

The dependent territories in North America are:

  1. Anguilla (UK)
  2. Aruba (Netherlands)
  3. Bermuda (UK)
  4. Bonaire (Netherlands)
  5. British Virgin Islands (UK)
  6. Cayman Islands (UK)
  7. Clipperton Island (France)
  8. Curacao (Netherlands)
  9. Greenland (Denmark) – You maybe thought that Greenland was in Europe, but no, it’s in North America?
  10. Guadeloupe (France)
  11. Martinique (France)
  12. Montserrat (UK)
  13. Navassa Island (USA)
  14. Puerto Rico (USA)
  15. Saba (Netherlands)
  16. Saint Barthelemy (France)
  17. Saint Martin (France)
  18. Saint Pierre and Miquelon (France)
  19. Sint Eustatius (Netherlands)
  20. Sint Maarten (Netherlands)
  21. Turks and Caicos Islands (UK)
  22. US Virgin Islands (USA)

What’s Your Count of North America Countries?

I’m going to conclude that there are 23 countries in North America and 22 territories. How about you? It’d be interesting to hear what you guys think and also let me know how many of the 45 places above you’ve visited. Let me know what you’re thinking by popping your number in the comment section below along with your reasoning.

How many countries in North America?

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: North america continent map

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North America is one of the four parts of the American continent (the others are Central America, Antilles and South America). It includes Canada (the 2nd largest country in area in the world), the United States (3rd largest), and Mexico. North America also includes Greenland, the largest island, as well as the small French overseas department of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon (made up of small islands in the Atlantic Ocean).

More: Photos of North America

 

 

North America political

 

Arctic

 

Copyright © Geographic Guide - Maps World. North America Geography.

 

 

San Francisco

 

 

 

San Francisco, California.

 

Historical Map of USA

 

 

 

United States

 

Maps USA

 

Map US

 

British Columbia

 

Arctic Region Map

 

Niagara Falls

 

 

 

America Waldseemüller

 

 

 

 

Travel to Central America and Caribbean Sea

 

Maps Continents

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Источник: http://www.maps-world.net/north-america.htm

How many countries are there in North America?

If you research how many countries are there in North America, you’ll find that the number 23 keeps coming up. Well, I agree – there are 23 countries in the North American continent. 

In terms of the continents, the ‘New World’, aka the Americas, is divided up into North and South American continents. It can be a little confusing because what about Central America, and the Caribbean? I’ll explain that further down. In this article, I’m focussing on the Continent of North America, if you want to check out how many countries in South America you’re in luck because I’ve just posted that list too.

North America is the third largest continent on the planet and covers over 9,000,000 square miles. The answer to how many countries are there in North America is 23, plus there are also a few dependent territories, which don’t make the cut as they’re not officially countries (like the British Virgin Islands, or BVI, for example). If you’re also wondering how many countries are there in the world, read my blog post about that. The answer is 197 by the way!

Me Visiting every country in North America

From April 2016 to March  2017 I visited all 23 countries in North America. Starting in Mexico, and Overlanding all the way down to Panama. From there, I flew to Colombia to study Spanish for a couple of months in Medellin, and then started the overland process again, all the way down to Ushuaia where I took a boat to Antarctica. After that, I flew from Ushuaia to Guiana and began to visit every country in the Caribbean. Quite the adventure, believe me!

Havana Classic Car Tour

So there are 23 countries in North America? What are they?

I’m sure that you don’t need me to tell you that the ‘big 3’ in North America are Canada, USA and Mexico. Canada occupies the most amount of land and the USA has the largest population. From a continental perspective, North America also includes both the regions of Central America and the Caribbean islands too. So, let’s look at all the countries in North America on my list of 23. 

  1. Antigua and Barbuda (Caribbean)
  2. Bahamas (Caribbean)
  3. Barbados (Caribbean)
  4. Belize (Central America)
  5. Canada
  6. Costa Rica (Central America)
  7. Cuba americas best eyeglass store – don’t visit Cuba without experiencing the Havana Classic Car tour, so much fun!)
  8. Dominica (Caribbean)
  9. Dominican Republic (Caribbean)
  10. ElSalvador (Central America)
  11. Grenada (Caribbean)
  12. Guatemala (Central America)
  13. Haiti (Caribbean)
  14. Honduras (Central America)
  15. Jamaica (Caribbean)
  16. Mexico
  17. Nicaragua (Central America)
  18. Saint Kitts and Nevis (Caribbean)
  19. Panama (Central America)
  20. SaintLucia (Caribbean)
  21. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (Caribbean)
  22. Trinidad and Tobago (Caribbean)
  23. United States of America 

Have a look for yourself here on the North America Countries Map:

How many countries in north america
How many countries make up North America

Why is Central America and the Caribbean counted as North America?

Prepare to be confused! Ok, sometimes people refer to North America and South America as Continental America, i.e together they are just 1 continent. However, most of the world use a 7 continent model, which means North and South America are broken up and considered as 2 separate continents, separating at the southern Panama border. With this in mind the 11 countries in Central America can’t be considered its own continent (it can be classed as a subcontinent since it capital one auto finance account access within continental ‘America’). Equally then, geographically speaking, the Caribbean falls on top of the same tectonic plate as the rest of the North American countries listed, thereby including all of it within ‘North America’ too. 

If you’re curious about how many countries in the Caribbean specifically, the answer is 13! As well as 21 dependencies. You can read all about that in my blog post here. 

How many countries make up North America

Don’t Forget The 22 Dependent Territories In North America

If you’ve read some of my other articles then you’ll know all about territories that are dependencies of other countries. If you want to remind yourself about the definition of what a country is versus what a dependent territory is, then click here to read my simple explanation – you’ll soon see that it’s not easy to figure out what constitutes as a country. I know some people consider the following places countries, but unfortunately, they are not officially, or technically, countries!

The dependent territories in North America are:

  1. Anguilla (UK)
  2. Aruba (Netherlands)
  3. Bermuda (UK)
  4. Bonaire (Netherlands)
  5. British Virgin Islands (UK)
  6. Cayman Islands (UK)
  7. Clipperton Island (France)
  8. Curacao (Netherlands)
  9. Greenland (Denmark) – You maybe thought that Greenland was in Europe, but no, it’s in North America?
  10. Guadeloupe (France)
  11. Martinique (France)
  12. Montserrat (UK)
  13. Navassa Island (USA)
  14. Puerto Rico (USA)
  15. Saba (Netherlands)
  16. Saint Barthelemy (France)
  17. Saint Martin (France)
  18. Saint Pierre and Miquelon (France)
  19. Sint Eustatius (Netherlands)
  20. Sint Maarten (Netherlands)
  21. Turks and Caicos Islands (UK)
  22. US Virgin Islands (USA)

What’s Your Count of North America Countries?

I’m going to conclude that there are 23 countries in North America and 22 territories. North america continent map about you? It’d be interesting to hear what you guys think and also let me know how many of the 45 places above you’ve visited. Let me know what you’re thinking by popping your number in the comment section below along with your reasoning.

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Free Labeled North America Map with Countries & Capital – PDF

Being familiar with all the countries located in North America is a difficult task. Out of various options available, using a Labeled North America Map will be a great choice. A labeled map of North America elaborates and provides accurate information needed by users. North American countries are the most popular countries in the world especially the United States of America, Canada, Mexico, and some others, and people from every corner of the world migrate here for jobs or to settle down. These countries have influenced other countries and it can be seen in tradition, language, culture, religion, dance forms, politics, traditions, education, etc of other countries. In some countries, their influence is so strong that they completely follow American lifestyles and like to live their life like Americans do.

With the help of the below-provided map, more information can be obtained:

Printable Labeled North America Map

A printable labeled North America map has many applications. Some of the application areas of these maps are research work, archeology, geology, in schools and colleges, for tours and travels, navigation, exploration, education, and many more.

Printable Labeled North America Map

PDF

Labeled Map of North America with Countries

The continent has a history of being hit by several natural hazards and that continues till today. Different countries of the continent are prone to frequent earthquakes especially Mexico, floods, hurricanes, wildfires, droughts, volcanic eruptions, landslides, tornados, tsunamis. These countries stand against all these and continue to work in the prosperity of the continent.

Labeled Map of North America with Countries

PDF

North America Map with Capitals Labeled

With the help of a capital labeled North America map users can find and memorize the capitals of each country. Learning is bank of america current mortgage rates 30 year fixed easy through the use of a map and teachers also use them to explain and teach their students about the country’s capital city.

North America Map with Capitals Labeled

PDF

North America Map with Country Names

North America is inhabitated by thousands of species in different parts of the continent. It is estimated that there are approximately 965 species of mammals inhabiting the land of North America. Having a unique biodiversity North America is visited by millions of people each year just to witness its flora and fauna variety. Not only this the continent is amazingly beautiful and it is like a heaven on earth.

North America Map with Country Names

PDF

 

Filed Under: World MapTagged With: Labeled North America Map, North America Map Labeled, North America Map with Capitals, Printable Labeled Map ofNorth America, Printable North America Map

Источник: https://blankworldmap.net/labeled-north-america-map/

America is a continent divided into four parts: South America, Central America, North America and the Antilles.

America was named, in 1507, by German cartographer Martin Waldseemüller after Italian merchant and explorer Amerigo Vespucci. After navigating with Portuguese along the Brazilian coast, Vespucci envisioned that there would be a "New World" on that part of the Planet. Not to be confused with the lands discovered by Columbus years before. Originally, America was a part of South America, mostly Brazil and its westward extension to the Fnb omaha routing number Coast, then not yet discovered by Europeans.

 

 

North America Map

 

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Brooklyn Bridge Park with New York City skyline in the background (credit NYC & Company / Julienne Schaer).

 

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Источник: http://www.geographicguide.net/america-maps.htm

North America continent is in the northern hemisphere, surrounded by the Arctic Ocean in the north, the Atlantic Ocean in the east, the Caribbean Sea in the south, and the northern Pacific Ocean to the west.

North American Population: 579 million

North America Continent Area: 24.700.000 km2

It is the third largest continent after Asia and Africa and is the fourth most populous continent after Asia, Africa, and Europe.

North America Continent/Map of North America 1

It is located in the northern part of the land mass, also called the New World. North America’s only land link to South America is the narrow Panama Canal.

The continent can be divided into four major regions: from the Gulf of Mexico to the Canadian Arctic, Great Plains; Rocky Mountains, Great Basin, California and Alaska, geologically young, mountainous west; high in best interest rates for savings accounts 2019 northeast but relatively flat in the Canadian region; and the eastern region that includes the Appalachian Mountains and the Florida peninsula.

The only connection to South America is the Panama Canal. Thanks to this channel, the four sides of the North American Continent are actually sea/ocean waves. It is surrounded by the Arctic Ocean in the north america continent map, the Caribbean Sea in the South, the Atlantic Ocean in the East and the Pacific Ocean in the West.

Since it is spread over a large continent, different climate types are seen. Greenland is part of the continent. It is also rich in natural resources. There are iron ore and silver mines.

North American Countries List

North America Continent/Map of North America 2

Number of Countries in North America: There are 23 countries recognized by the United Nations. The number of lands dependent on other countries; 20 is.

COUNTRYCAPITAL
USAWashington D.C.
ANTIGUA AND BARBUDASaint John’s
BAHAMASNassau
BARBADOSBridgetown
BELIZEBelmopan
DOMINICAN REPUBLICSanto Domingo
DOMINICAN theRoseau
EL SALVADORSan Salvador
GRENADASaint George’s
GUATEMALAGuatemala
HAITIPort-au-Prince
HONDURASTegucigalpa
JAMAICAKingston
CANADAOttawa
COSTA RICASan José
CUBAHavana
MEXICANMexico
NICARAGUAManagua
PANAMAPanama
SAINT KITTS AND NEVISBasseterre
SAINT LUCIACastries
SAINT VINCENT AND GRENADINSKingstown
TRINIDAD AND TOBAGOPort of Spain
US VIRGIN ISLANDSCharlotte Amalie
NAVASSA ISLAND
PORTO RICOPorto Rico
ANGUILLAAnguilla
BERMUDABermuda
BRITAIN VIRGIN ISLANDSRoad town
CAYMAN ISLANDSCayman Islands
MONTSERRATPlymouth (de jure) / Brades (de facto)
TURKS AND CAICOS Online ebook lending library Town
GREENLANDNuuk
CLIPPERTON ISLAND
GUADELOUPEBasse-Terre
MARTINIQUEFort-de-France
SAINT BARTHÉLEMYGustavia
SAINT MARTINMarigot
SAINT PIERER AND MIQUELONSaint Pierre
ARUBAOranjestad
CURACAOWillemstad
SINT MARTENPhilipsburg
BES ISLANDSKralendijk

History of North America

North America Continent/Map of North America 3

During the most severe period of the Ice Age, 34000-30000 BC, a significant part of the world’s water was in the form of large continental layers of ice. As a result, the Bering Sea was hundreds of meters lower than its current level, and a land bridge was formed between Asia and North America, called Beringia. It is believed to be about 1,500 kilometers in the widest period of Beringia. The region, which was a tundra with and without trees, was covered with grasses and other plants, which attracted large animals that the first people had hunted for.

The first to reach North America, they almost certainly did not know that they had set foot on a new continent. Probably, they had been hunting on the Siberian coast as their ancestors had done for thousands of years, and then they had crossed the land bridge.

After arriving in Alaska, the first North Americans crossed the passages between the glaciers and had to pass thousands of more years to reach the southern regions of the United States. The first evidence of life in North America continues to exist today. However, it can be proved that very few of them belong to an older than 12000 BC; For example, a hunting watch site located in the north of Alaska in the recent past may be from about these dates. The same can be said for carefully drawn arrowheads and some other objects found in the town of Clovis in New Mexico.

The presence of similar items in certain places in North and South America shows that the settlement of the Western Hemisphere (called the Western Hemisphere in the region formed by the islands of the North and South America and the surrounding islands) may have occurred in a large part of the settlement before 10,000 BC.

North America Continent/Map of North America 4

At that time, the mammoths began to disappear and their place was replaced by the bison, which first formed the main source of food and leather of the North Americans. Over time, due to overfishing and natural phenomena, many species of hunting animals have disappeared and increasingly began to create plants, nuts, and seeds as a source of nutrition for the first Americans. Increasingly, plant-gathering efforts for nutrients and primitive agriculture experiments emerged. In this regard, Native North Americans and/or Indians in the Central Mexico at home remedies for sunburn relief have now been pioneered, and perhaps have grown corn, squash, and beans from 8000 BC. The knowledge and experience gained in this regard slowly spread to the north.

By 3000 BC, a primitive corn species had been cultivated in the river valleys of New Mexico. After that, the first signs of village life were seen around 300 BC.

Discovery of America

It is estimated that 2-18 million Indians lived here during the years when America was first discovered by the Europeans. Most of the inhabitants of the continent are expected to lose their lives as destructive wars with Europeans and infectious diseases brought by newcomers to the continent.

North America Continent/Map of North America 5

The Indian community in North America was tied to the ground in all respects. Commitment to land and natural conditions was an integral part of religious beliefs. The life of the Indians was basically based on clan and coexistence, and the children were given more freedom and tolerance than they had in Europe at that time.

While some North American tribes developed a kind of hieroglyphic to preserve certain texts, the Native American culture was basically spoken and given great value to telling tales and dreams.

It is clear that there is a great deal of trade between the various groups, and there is strong evidence that neighboring tribes are widely engaged in both friendly and hostile formal relationships.

First Europeans

Europeans who first came to North America or had sound evidence of their arrival were Scandinavians traveling west from Greenland, where they established a settlement in 985.

The Scandinavian epics have stated that Viking sailors have discovered the Atlantic coast from North America to the Bahamas, but the aforementioned allegations have not been proven. In contrast, in 1963, certain Scandinavian house debris belonging to the period mentioned in L’Anse-aux-Meadows, north of Newfoundland, were found, thus confirming at least some of the claims put forward in Scandinavian epics.

Just five years after Christopher Columbus arrived ashore in the Caribbean, five years later, in 1497, the Venetian sailor John Cabot, commissioned by the King of England, set foot in Newfoundland. Cabot’s journey, though quickly forgotten, would serve as a basis for the British to claim North America over the years. The journey also paved the way for rich nests off the shores of Georgeyes Banks, and shortly thereafter, European and especially Portuguese fishermen began to arrive regularly.

In fact, Columbus never saw the continental United States; however, the Spanish colonies, which he helped establish, became the starting point for the first discovery ecb srep in the United States. The first of these travels began in 1513 and a group led by Juan Ponce de Leon landed on the Florida coast near the city of St. Augustine.

After the conquest of Mexico in 1522, the Spanish empowered their position in the Western Hemisphere. The following discoveries made contributions to what the Europeans know about so-called America, referring to the Italian Amerigo Vespucci, whose writings on the journey to the New World were read with great admiration. While the prospects for discovering a Northwest Pass going to Asia will only be completely lost after century, by 1529, reliable maps of the Atlantic coast stretching from Labrador to Tierra del Fuego were drawn.

During the conquest of Peru, Hernando De Soto, who had served under Francisco Pizzaro, is one of the most important Spanish expeditions. The de Soto first merchants stock price campaign began in Havana in 1539, landed in Florida, and pursued wealth through the Mississippi River across the southeastern United States.

North America Continent/Map of North America 6

While the Spanish were spreading from the south, the northern part of the United States of America was also better known by travelers such as Giovanni da Verrazano. North america continent map, a Florentine traveling on behalf of the French, saw land in North Carolina in 1524 and headed north along the Atlantic coast to the present-day Port of New York.

The great wealth flowing into Spain from the colonies in Mexico, Antilles, and Peru attracted great interest from other European states. Over time, the seafaring countries like England, to some extent, began to deal with the New World as a result of the successful plundering attacks of Francis Drake against Spanish treasure ships.

Declaration of Independence

Colonies have become widespread, and agriculture-based settlements have been established, until the Declaration of Independence adopted on July 4, 1776. Thanks to the settlements established in the port circles, the trade of agricultural products have been ensured and the power of the colonies has increased. In the following period, the dependence on England left its place entirely to the will of freedom.

Although the paper is based on the political philosophy of the French and the English Enlightenment, the effect of a work is particularly remarkable: the Second Review of John Locke on the Government. Locke addressed the concepts of British traditional rights and universalized them as the natural rights of people. The well-known introduction of the paper reflects Locke’s theory of government-related social-contract.

The success of the revolution gave Americans the opportunity to identify their ideals in a legal way as described in the Declaration of Independence and to remedy some of their complaints through state constitutions. Furthermore, on May 10, 1776, the Congress took a decision and proposed to the colonies to form new governments that would best ensure the happiness and safety of their voters. Some of them had already done so, and as a result, a year after the Declaration of Independence was published, all colonies, except three, accepted their constitution.

North America Facts

1. North America is the third largest continent in the world. And it is called “fertile soils”.

2. Dinosaur fossils found in North America are much more than those found on other continents.

3. The first European settlement to Greenland was provided by the Vikings.

4. Canada, where the population density is low, is one of the richest countries in the world.

North America Continent/Map of North America 7

5. Niagara Falls is one of the places you should visit if one day you go to Canada.

6. Churchill in Hudson Bay, also known as “the capital of polar bears” in the world.

Churchill in Hudson Bay, Manitoba, Canada, is flooded by thousands of polar bears every autumn. Waiting for the california bank and trust albany ca to freeze polar bears can walk here easily.

7. Canada’s capital, Ottawa, means trading in the native language. It was named after an American tribe who lived in the region. Already the merchants were known as very famous traders.

8. The length of asphalt covered roads in the US is about 6.5 million kilometers.

9. Today, Spain is the first colonies to establish the land of the USA. The locals lived in this region. Christopher Columbus, who departed from Spain, reached land in 1492. In 1497-1499, Italian Amerigo Vespucci changed the course of history by proving the existence of a continent which he named after his travels and letters.

10. Those who introduced the chocolate to the Spanish conquistador were the Aztecs. In this way, it has spread to Db schenker stock price https://www.mappr.co/thematic-maps/north-america-continent/

New Seismic Map of North America Reveals a Continent Under Tremendous Stress

A car is trapped following an earthquake in Anchorage, Alaksa, in 2018.

Scientists have compiled the most comprehensive map yet of tectonic stress magnitudes across North America, highlighting regions most vulnerable to earthquakes.

The map and associated study, published today in Nature Communications, showcase the dynamic subterranean forces at play on a continental scale.

Writing in their at what time does bank of america closed today, the authors of the new study, Jens-Erik Lund Snee, a postdoctoral fellow with the U.S. Geological Survey, and Mark Zoback, a geophysicist at Stanford University, say it’s “the first comprehensive view of the relative principal stress magnitudes throughout North America.”

The new map incorporates thousands of horizontal stress orientations, revealing the directionality of high-pressure zones within the continent’s crust. This allowed them to pinpoint seismic hotspots across North America.

Geologists and other scientists will be able to use this work for various modeling studies, but it also serves the practical purpose of alerting jurisdictions to seismic risks. Incredibly, the new maps don’t just highlight areas prone to earthquakes—they also reveal the types of earthquakes these places can expect.

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The new seismic stress map of North America.

In addition to highlighting previously known earthquake risks (especially in California, New Mexico, and Texas), the map includes areas made susceptible to earthquakes on account of human activity, namely fracking (Oklahoma and Texas—we’re looking at you). This information could consequently be used to inform energy companies about the hazards of drilling in certain areas and to attempt to mitigate risks.

“If you know an orientation of any fault and the state of stress nearby, you know how likely it is to fail and https www victoriassecret com bras you should be concerned about it in both naturally triggered and industry-triggered earthquake scenarios,” explained Lund Snee in a press release. “We’ve detailed a few places where previously published geodynamic models agree very well with the new data, and others where the models don’t agree well at all.”

To create the map, the researchers amassed over 2,000 stress orientations taken across North America, of which 300 are brand new. These measurements were taken from boreholes—long, narrow shafts drilled into the ground for geophysical analysis. The authors also assessed faults based on a locality’s prior earthquake history. This provided for a highly granular view of the seismic situation at local levels, but also across the entire North American continent.

Looking at the map, the black lines show areas of maximum horizontal stress, and the black arrows indicate the directionality of the plates. Colors represent the style of faulting found in a particular region, in which bluish areas experience normal faulting (where the crust stretches horizontally), greenish-yellow areas experience strike-slip faulting (vertical fractures where blocks mostly move horizontally), and reddish areas experience reverse faulting (where fractures move atop another).

Each fault style produces its own distinctive shaking during an earthquake, highlighting another valuable aspect of this map, as Jack Baker, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford University, pointed out in the press release.

“In our hazards maps right now, in most places, we don’t have direct evidence of what kind of earthquake mechanisms could occur,” said Baker, who wasn’t involved in the new study. “It’s exciting that we have switched from this blind assumption of anything is possible to having some location-specific inferences about what types of earthquakes we might expect.”

The new research has already yielded some interesting findings. In the western Bank of american fork branch locations, for example, pronounced changes to stress types and orientations were seen across short distances, sometimes measured in tens of miles—a level of detail not exposed in previous maps.

Image for article titled New Seismic Map of North America Reveals a Continent Under Tremendous Stress

Another surprising finding has to do with relatively low rebound stresses seen across the continent. When the massive ice sheets melted at the end of the last ice age some 20,000 to 12,000 years ago, this unleashed a lot of pent-up seismic energy, a process that’s still ongoing. Or so scientists thought. The new research shows that postglacial rebound pressures are lower than those seen in crusts along faults.

“We see things we’ve never seen before that require geologic explanation,” said Zoback. “This will teach us new things about how the Earth works.”

EartherEarth Science

Источник: https://gizmodo.com/new-seismic-map-of-north-america-reveals-a-continent-un-1843020591

What Did the Continents Look Like Millions of Years Ago?

Geoff Manaugh: When I first discovered your maps showing the gradual tectonic relocation of the continents over hundreds of millions of years, I thought this was exactly what geologists should be doing: offering clear, step-by-step visual narratives of the evolution of the Earth’s surface so that people can better understand the planet we live on. What inspired you to make the maps, and how did you first got started with them?

Ronald Blakey: Well, the very first maps I made were in conjunction with my doctoral thesis, back in the early 1970s. Those were made with pen and ink. I made sketches to show what the paleogeography would have looked like for the specific formation I was studying with my doctorate. Three or four of those maps went into the thesis, which was then published by the Utah Geologic Survey. I’ve also done a number of papers over the years where I’ve made sketches.

But I was late getting into the computer. Basically, during my graduate work I never used a computer for anything. I kind of resisted it, because, for the north america continent map of work I was doing, I just didn’t see a need for it—I didn’t do quantifiable kinds of things. Then, of course, food pantry organization comes email and the internet. I actually forget when I first started with Photoshop—probably in the mid-1990s. When I found that, I just thought, Wow; the power of this is incredible. I quickly learned how to use the cloning tool, so that I could clone modern topography north america continent map ancient maps, and that made things even simpler yet.

Another thing I started doing was putting these maps into presentations. There were something like five different programs back there, in the late ‘90s, but the only one that survived was PowerPoint—which is too bad, because it was far from the best of the programs. I was using a program called Astound, which was far superior, particularly in the transitions between screens. I could do simple animations. I could make the tectonic plates move, create mountain belts, and so forth.

I retired in May of 2009, but all of my early maps are now online. With each generation of maps that I’ve done, there has been a noted improvement over earlier maps. I find new techniques and, when you work with Photoshop as much as I do, you learn new ideas and you find ways to make things that were a little clumsy look more smooth.

Manaugh: Where do the data come from?

Blakey: It comes from various publications. You can get a publication and have that PDF open, showing what something looked like in the past, and work from that. Usually, what I’m working from are fairly simple sketches published in the literature. They’ll show a subduction zone and a series of violent arcs, or a collision zone. What I peoples bank customer service hotline is take this information and make it more pictorial.

If you create a series of maps in sequence, you can create them in such a way that certain geologic events, from one time slice to the next, to the next, to the next, will blend. It depends a lot on the scale of what you’re trying to show—the whole world versus just four or five states in the West.

Now, throughout the years from, let’s say, 2004 until I retired in 2009, I kept improving the website. I envisioned most of this as educational material, and I didn’t pay much attention to who used it, how they used it, and so forth. But, then, shortly before I retired, various book companies and museums—and, most recently, oil companies—have approached me. So I started selling these and I tried very diligently not to allow this to overlap with what I was doing for my teaching and my research at the University.

In the following long sequence of images, we see the evolution of the West Coast of North America, its state boundaries ghosted in for reference. Sea levels rise and fall; island chains emerge and collide; mountains form; inland seas proliferate and drain; and, eventually, modern-day California, Vancouver Island, and the Baja Peninsula take shape, among other north america continent map features. The time frame represented by these images is approximately 500 million years. All maps by Ron Blakey.

Nicola Twilley: What do the oil companies want them for?

Blakey: They’re my biggest customers now. Usually, the geologists at oil companies are working with people who know either much less geology than they do or, in some cases, almost no geology at all, yet they’re trying to convince these people that this is where they need to explore, or this is what they need to do next.

They find these maps very useful to show what the Devonian of North Dakota looked like, for example, which is a hot spot right now, with all the shales that they’re developing in the Williston Basin. What they suntrust bank hours on christmas eve is that I show what the area might have really looked like. This helps, particularly with people who have only a modest understanding of geology, particularly the geologic past.

Manaugh: What have been some of the most difficult regions or geological eras to map?

Blakey: The most difficult thing to depict is back in the Paleozoic and the Mesozoic. Large areas of the continent were flooded, deep into the interior.

During certain periods, like the Ordovician, the Devonian, and parts of the Jurassic—especially the Cretaceous—as much as two-thirds of the continents were underwater. But they’re still continents; they’re still continental crusts. They’re not oceans. The sea level was just high enough, with respect to where the landscape was at the time, that the area was flooded. Of course, this is a concept that non-geologists really have problems with, because they don’t understand the processes of how continents get uplifted and subside and erode and so forth, but this is one of the concepts that my maps show quite nicely: the seas coming in and retreating.

But it’s very difficult—I mean, there is no modern analog for a seaway that stretched from the Mackenzie River Delta in Canada to the Gulf of Mexico and that was 400 miles wide. There’s nothing like that on Earth today. But the styles of mountains have not dramatically changed over the last probably two billion years—maybe even longer than that. I don’t go back that far—I tend to stick with the last 600 million years or so—but the styles of mountains haven’t changed. The nature of island arcs hasn’t changed, as far as we know.

What has changed is the amount of vegetation on the landscape. My maps that are in the early part of the Paleozoic—the Cambrian and the Ordovician early part of the Silurian—tend to be drab-colored. Then, in the late Silurian and in the Devonian, when the land plants developed, I start bringing vegetation colors in. I try to show the broad patterns of climate. Not in detail, of course—there’s a lot of controversy about certain paleoclimates. But, basically, paleoclimates follow the same kinds of regimens that the modern climates are following: where the oceans are, where no way jose cantina equator is, where the mountain ranges are, and so forth.

That means you can make broad predictions about what a paleoclimate would have been based on its relationship to the equator or based on the presence or absence of nearby mountains. I use these kinds of principles to show more arid areas versus more humid areas.

The next three sequences show the evolution of the Earth's surface in reverse, from the present day to, at the very bottom, 600 million years ago, when nearly all of the planet's landmasses were joined together in the Antarctic. The first sequence shows roughly 90 million years of backward evolution, the continents pulling apart from one another and beginning a slow drift south. They were mapped using the Mollweide projection, and, in all cases, are by Ron Blakey.

Twilley: And you paint the arid area based on a contemporary analog?

Blakey: Right. I know the modern world reasonably well and I’ll choose something today that might have matched the texture and aridity of that older landscape.

I use a program called GeoMapApp that gives me digital elevation maps for anywhere in the world. Most recently, they have coupled it with what they call the “Blue Marble.” NASA has stitched together a bunch of satellite photos of the world in such a way that you can’t tell where one series of photos come in or another. It’s a fairly true-color representation of what Earth would look like from space. So this Blue Marble is coupled with the GeoMapApp’s digital elevation topography; you put the Blue Marble over it, and you use a little slider to let the topography show through, and it gives you a fairly realistic looking picture of what you’re looking for.

For example, if I’m working with a mountain range in the southern Appalachians for a Devonian map—well, the southern Appalachians, during the Devonian, were probably far enough away from the equator that it was in the arid belt. There are some indications of that, as well—salt deposits in the Michigan Basin and in parts of New York and so forth. Plus, there are red-colored sediments, which don’t prove but tend to indicate arid environments. This combination tells me that this part of the world was fairly arid. So I’m going to places like modern Afghanistan, extreme western China, northern Turkey, or other places where there are somewhat arid climates with mountain belts today. Then I clone the mountains from there and put them in the map.

But you have to know the geologic background. You have to know how the mountains were formed, what the grain of the mountains was. That’s not always easy, although there are ways of doing it. To know the grain of the mountains, you need to know where the hinterland and the center of the mountains were. You need to know where the foreland area is, so that you can show the different styles of mountains. You have to move from foreland areas—which tends to be a series of parallel ridges, usually much lower than the hinterlands—to the center and beyond.

I use this kind of information to pick the right kind of modern mountain to put back in the Devonian, based on what axis bank shares prices Devonian landscape probably had a good chance of looking like. Do we know for certain? Of course not. We weren’t around in the Devonian. But we have a good rock record and we have a lot of information; so we use that information and, then, voilà.

To give another example, let’s look at the Devonian period of the East Coast. The big European continent that we call Baltica collided with Greenland and a series of micro-continents collided further south, all the way down at least as far as New Jersey, if not down as far the Carolinas. We know that there are places on Earth today where these same kinds of collisions are taking place—in the Alps and Mediterranean region, and the Caucasus region, and so forth.

We can use the concept that, if two plates are colliding today to produce the Caucasus mountains, and if we look at the style of mountains that the Caucasus are, then it’s reasonable to think that, where Greenland and Baltica collided in the Silurian and the Devonian, the mountains would have had a similar style. So we can map that.

This second sequence shows the continents drifting apart, in reverse, from 105 million years ago to 240 million years ago. They were mapped using the Mollweide projection, and, in all cases, are by Ron Blakey.

north america continent map width="650">

Manaugh: That collision alone—Baltica and Greenland—sounds like something that would be extremely difficult to map.

Blakey: Absolutely. And it’s not a one-to-one relationship. You have to look at the whole pattern of how the plates collided, how big the plates were, and so forth.

Then there’s the question of the different histories of particular plates. So, for example, most of Scotland started out as North America. Then, when all the continents collided to form Pangaea, the first collisions took place in the Silurian-Devonian and the final collisions took place in the Pennsylvanian-Permian. By, say, 250 million years ago, most of the continents were together. Then, when they started to split apart in the Triassic and Jurassic—especially in the Triassic and Cretaceous—the split occurred in such a way that what had been part of North America was actually captured, if you will, by Europe and taken over to become the British Isles.

Scotland and at least the northern half of Ireland were captured and began to drift with Europe. On the other hand, North America picked up Florida—which used to be part of Gondwana—and so forth.

One of the things that is interesting is the way that, when mountains come together and then finally break up, they usually don’t break up the same way that they came together. Sometimes they do, but it has to do with weaknesses, stress patterns, and things like this. Obviously, all time is extremely relative, but mountains don’t last that long. A given mountain range that’s been formed by a simple collision—not that there’s any such thing as a simple collision—once that collision is over with, 40 or 50 million years after that event, there is only low-lying landscape. It may have even have split apart already into a new ocean basin.

But here’s the important part: The structure that was created by that collision is still there, even though the mountains have been worn down. It’s like when you cut a piece of wood: The grain is still inherited from when that tree grew. The pattern of the grain still shows where the branches were, and the direction of the tree’s growth in response to wind and sun and its neighbors. You can’t reconstruct the tree exactly from its grain, but, if you’re an expert with wood, you should be able to look and say: Here are the tree rings, and here’s a year where the tree grew fast, here’s a year where the tree grew slow, here’s where the tree grew branches, etc.

In a sense, as geologists, we’re doing the same things with rock structure. We can tell by the pattern of how the rocks are deformed which direction the forces came from. With mountains, you can tell the angle at which the plates collided. It’s usually very oblique. What that tends to do is complicate the geologic structure, because you not only get things moving one way, but you get things dragging the other way, as well. But we can usually tell the angle at which the plates hit.

Then, in many cases, based upon the nature of how the crust has been deformed and stacked up, we can tell the severity of the mountain range. It doesn’t necessarily mean that we can say, “Oh, this structure would have been a twenty-thousand-foot high mountain range.” It’s not that simple at all, not least of which because rocks can deform pretty severely without making towering mountains.

This final of the three global sequences shows the continents drifting apart, in reverse, from 260 million years ago to 600 million years ago. There was still nearly 4 billion years of tectonic evolution prior to where these maps begin. They were mapped using the Mollweide projection, and, in all cases, are by Ron Blakey.

Manaugh: Are you able to project these same tectonic movements and geological processes into the future and show what the Earth might look like in, say, 250 million years?

Blakey: I’ve had a number of people ask me about that, so I did make some global maps. I think I made six of them at about 50-million-year intervals. For the 15 to 100-million-year range, I think you can say they are fairly realistic. But, once you get much past 75 to 100 million years, it starts to get really, really speculative. The plates do strange things. I’ll give you just a couple of quick examples.

The Atlantic Ocean opened in the beginning of the Jurassic. The actual opening probably started off the coasts of roughly what is now Connecticut down to the Carolinas. That’s where the first opening started. So the central part of the Atlantic was the first part to open up. It opened up reasonably simply—but, again, I’m using the word simple with caution here.

The North Atlantic, meanwhile, didn’t open up until about 60 to 50 million years ago. When it opened up, it did a bunch of strange things. The first opening took place between Britain and an offshore bank that’s mostly submerged, called Rockall. Rockall is out in the Atlantic Ocean, northwest of Ireland—near Iceland—but it’s continental crust. That splitting process went on for, let’s say, 10 million years or so—I’m just going to talk in broad terms—as the ocean started opening up.

Then the whole thing jumped. A second opening began over between Greenland and North America, as Greenland and North America began to separate off. That lasted for a good 40 or 50 million years. That’s where you now get the Labrador Sea; that is actual ocean crust. So that was the Atlantic Ocean for 30 or 40 million years—but then it jumped again, this time over between Greenland and what is now the west coast of Europe. It started opening up over there, before it jumped yet again. There’s an island in the middle of the North Atlantic, way the heck up there, called Jan Mayen. At one time, it was actually part of Greenland. The Atlantic opened between it and Greenland and then shifted to the other side and made its final opening.

The following two sequences show the evolution of Europe from an Antarctic archipelago to a tropical island chain to the present-day Europe we know and recognize. The first sequence starts roughly 450 million years ago and continues to the Jurassic, 200 million years ago. All maps by Ron Blakey.

So it’s very jose hernandez mls. And that’s just the Atlantic Ocean.

The Northern Atlantic took at least five different paths before the final path was established, and it’s all still changing. In fact, the South Atlantic is actually even worse; it’s an even bigger mess. You’ve got multiple openings between southwest Africa and Argentina, plus Antarctica was up in there before it pulled away to the south.

These complications are what makes this stuff so interesting. If we look at events that we can understand pretty well over the last, let’s say, 150 or 200 million years of time—where we have a good indication of where the oceans were because we still have ocean crusts of that age—then we can extrapolate from that back to past times when oceans were created and destroyed. We can follow the rules that are going on today to see all of the oddities and the exceptions and so forth.

These are the kinds of things I try to keep track of when I’m making these maps. I’m always asking: What do we know? Was it a simple pull-apart process? There are examples where continents started to split across from one another, then came back together, then re-split in a different spot later on. That’s not just speculation—there is geologic evidence for this in the rock record.

For instance, the one continent that does not seem to be moving at all right now, relative to anything else, is Antarctica. It seems to be really fixed on the South Pole. That’s why some people think that everything will actually coagulate back towards the South Pole.

So, when it comes to extrapolating future geologies, things become very complicated very quickly. If you start thinking about the behavior of the north Atlantic, creating a projection based on what’s going on today north america continent map, at first, like a fairly simple chore. North America is going on a northwesterly path at only one or two centimeters a year. Europe is moving away, at almost a right angle, at about another centimeter a year. So the Atlantic is only opening at three centimeters a year; it’s one of the slowest-opening oceans right now.

Okay, fine—but what else is happening? The Caribbean is pushing up into the Atlantic and, off South America, there is the Scotia Arc. Both of those are growing. They’ve also identified what looks like a new island arc off the western Mediterranean region; that eventually would start to close the Atlantic in that area. Now you start to speculate: Well, these arcs will start to grow, and they’ll start to eat into the oceans, and subduct the crusts, and so forth.

Again, for the first 50, 75, or even 100 million years, you can say that these particular movements are fairly likely. But, once you get past that, you can still use geologic principles, but you’re just speculating as to which way the continents are going to go.

For instance, the one continent that does not seem to be moving at all right now, relative to anything else, is Antarctica. It seems to be really fixed on the South Pole. That’s why some people think that everything will actually coagulate back towards the South Pole. However, there are also a bunch of subduction zones today along southern Asia, and those are pretty strong subduction zones. Those are the ones that created the big tsunami, and all the earthquakes off of Indonesia and so forth. Eventually, those could pull either parts of Antarctica or all of Antarctica up toward them.

But I’m more interested in reconstructing the past than I am the future, so I’ve only played around with those five or six maps.

This second sequence, showing the next phase in the evolution of Europe, begins approximately 150 million years ago and extends to the present day. All maps by Ron Blakey.

Manaugh: To ground things a bit, we’re having this conversation in Flagstaff, on the Colorado Plateau, which seems like a great place to teach geology. National bank of central texas online wonder whether there might be another Colorado Plateau, so to speak, elsewhere in the world—something geologically similar to the extraordinary landscapes we see here that just hasn’t had the chance to emerge. Maybe the tectonics aren’t right, and it’s still just a crack, rather than a canyon, or maybe it’s covered in vegetation or ice so we can’t see it yet. Conversely, I’m curious if you might have found evidence of other great geological districts in the Earth’s past—lost Grand Canyons, other Arches National Parks—that have been lost to time. How could we detect those, and where are they?

Blakey: This is indeed a great place to teach geology. It’s a great place to live.

As for Colorado Plateau analogs—it’s an interesting question. There’s an area in South America that I’d say is fairly similar. It’s got a couple of famous national parks that I can't remember the name of. It’s a smaller version, but it’s very similar to the Colorado Plateau. It’s between the Andes and the Amazon basin, part of the general pampas region there, of South America. It even has similarly aged rocks. Parts of northern Africa would also be similar.

But you have to look at all the characteristics of the Plateau. No. 1: The rocks are flat. No. 2: The rocks have been uplifted. No. 3: The rocks are dissected by a major river system. No. 4: It’s a semi-arid climate. There are probably five or six defining characteristics in total, and I’ve heard many people say that there is no other place else on Earth that has all those characteristics in exactly the same way. But I went to an area in eastern Mauritania many years ago, where, for all the world, it looked like the Grand Canyon. It wasn’t as colorful, but it was a big, deep canyon.

In fact, the Appalachian Plateau would be somewhat similar, except it’s in a humid climate, which means the land has been shaped and formed differently. But the Appalachian plateau has flat-lying rocks; it’s dissected by some major rivers; it’s experienced uplift; and so forth.

The next two sequences of images, followed from left to right, top to bottom, illustrate the gradual evolution of the Colorado Plateau, where, in its modern-day incarnation, this interview with Ron Blakey took place (specifically, in Flagstaff, Arizona). The earliest map included here depicts the Proterozoic; the first sequence ends in the Triassic. All maps by Ron Blakey.

Twilley: I’m interested in the representational challenges you face when you decide to make a map, and, specifically, when you’re in Photoshop, what your most-used tools might be. I thought it was fascinating when you said that the cloning tool really changed how you make wauchula state bank mobile maps. What other techniques are important to you, in order to represent geological histories?

Blakey: Oh, the cloning tool is the most important, by far—at least when I’m actually painting. Of course, I use the outline tool to select areas, but, when I’m actually painting, it would be impossible to paint these different maps pixel by pixel. I couldn’t do it. Occasionally, I will actually hand-draw some things in the flatlands, where I want to put a river system, for example, but, at least for mountains and rugged terrain, I clone everything.

Some times, I’ll cut and paste. I’ll select an area in the GeoMapApp, I save it as a JPEG, and then I can select it and copy it and paste it in, and I can rotate and deform it a little bit. Are you familiar with the warp tool in Photoshop? I use that a lot, because you can change the shape of mountains a little. If you do it too dramatically, it really looks flaky. But, if you do it right, north america continent map still looks pretty realistic.

This second sequence, also showing the evolution of the Colorado Plateau, begins with the Triassic and ends roughly 5 million years ago—basically the present day, in geological terms. All maps by Ron Blakey.

Twilley: And do you have certain filters you rely on for particular geological effects?

Blakey: A little bit. I like to use the craquelure filter. It actually gives you little bumps and valleys and so forth. I use that especially for continental margins. Continental margins are anything but regular slopes, going down to the abyssal depths. They’re very irregular. There are landslides and all kinds of things going on there at the margins, so I add a little texture with craquelure.

It can be difficult to use, though, and it doesn’t work at really high resolutions—so, what I actually have to do some times, is that I will actually copy a part of my map, take it out, make it smaller, do the craquelure on it, and then blow it back up and paste it in again.

Dee Blakey, Ron's Wife: I think the other reason that he can do what he does is that he paints. That’s one of his paintings, that one over there. (Gestures above fireplace.)

Blakey: Well, I guess I should have said that right away, when you asked me why I got interested in this, because I am interested in the artistic aspect of geology. The artistic aspect of science, in general, but especially geology. Astronomy, for example, would be another field where artistic visualizations are useful—any time you’re trying to show things that can’t easily be visualized with something comparable here on present-day planet Earth, you have to use an artistic interpretation.

Anyway, I can’t explain it, but I understand color pretty well. I use the hue-saturation tool a lot. I’ll select an area and then I’ll feather it, let’s say, because you don’t want the edges to be sharp. I’ll feather it by 30, 40, 50 pixels. Then I'll take the the black keys shes long gone for hue saturation, where, if you go to the left, you make things redder and, if you go to the right, you make things greener. If I’ve got a landscape that looks a little too humid, I’ll just slide it slightly to amazon 800 customer service phone number left to make it a bit redder. You can also change the lightness and darkness when you do that. There’s also regular saturation. By killing the saturation, you can really kill the nature of a landscape quite a bit.

And I use hue saturation a lot. That took me a long time to master, because it’s really easy to screw things up with that tool. You start sliding things a little too far and, whoa—wait a minute! All of a sudden, you’ve got purple mountains.

Источник: https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/09/what-did-the-continents-look-like-millions-of-years-ago/279892/

North america continent map -

Map of North America continent political

Map of North America continent political

Printable map (jpeg/pdf) and editable vector map of North America continent political showing countries, capitals and physical features. The printable option includes two file formats: XL resolution JPEG photo and PDF. The JPEG is extremely large: 20 in (60 cm) wide - 300dpi. The PDF is non-layered, has no editable text, but is scalable to any size without loss of quality. The vector option will you get a vector map that is extensively layered, editable and accurate. A vector map can easily be scaled up or down to any size you want without loss of quality. Every map feature is selectable and editable. Text is real text. File formats included are AI, EPS and PDF (JPEG XL resolution also included). As part of our support when you buy this map, you can always contact us to retrieve yet another file format. This map comes with a royalty-free license. It means you can use it for personal and commercial use.

Our premium maps come with an unlimited license, even for commercial use. Simple and straighforward.

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Источник: https://www.onestopmap.com/north-america-continent/north-america-continent-127/

Most of us have a rough map of the world in our minds that we use any time we think about places. But these mental maps aren’t necessarily reliable. In fact, many of the maps in our heads share the same errors, some of which are quite large—and surprisingly resistant to correction.

For instance, we all know that South America is south of North America, of course. But you may be surprised by the fact that virtually the entire South American continent is east of Florida. There are lots of possible reasons for geographical misconceptions like this one, says cartographer John Nelson. Mental maps are necessarily simplifications, and Nelson suspects the misplaced Americas may be partly a result of their names. After all, it’s not called Southeast America.

Nelson’s father, who was a geography professor at Central Michigan University, wrote a paper about geographical misconceptions in 1992 with some of his colleagues and input from Nelson’s mother, a high-school geography teacher. “I actually remember them talking about this research paper over dinners when I was younger,” Nelson says. He recently revisited the paper and put together a story map that highlights three common misplacements mentioned in the paper, including the true longitudinal relationship between the Americas.

Misplaced Continents

a map of Africa

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Another commonly misplaced continent is Africa. North Americans tend to think of Africa as a located almost entirely in the southern hemisphere, similar to South America. But in reality, around two-thirds of Africa is north of the equator. “Africa actually extends northward to about the same latitude as Norfolk, Virginia,” the paper’s authors write.

Europe is also often placed much farther south on mental maps than it really is, appearing directly across the Atlantic from the contiguous United States. But it actually lines up better with Canada: Paris is further north than Montreal, Barcelona is at a similar latitude as Chicago, and Venice lines up with Portland, Oregon.

Nelson suspects that climate might play a role in this misconception. Western Europe is relatively warm for its latitude thanks to the Gulf Stream, which brings warmer water from the Gulf of Mexico across the Atlantic and gives Europe its so-called Mediterranean climate. The warmer temperatures are more similar to the climate of the lower 48 states than Canada’s.

the globe

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People also tend to keep their mental maps simple by aligning them with the four cardinal directions, according to the paper’s authors. So it’s easier for North Americans to think of Europe as due east and South America as due south.

Size Matters

Locations aren’t the only way our mental maps can be wrong; we also have misconceptions about the relative size of things. This may be due in part to the nature of two-dimensional maps. Flattening a three-dimensional globe onto a flat surface isn’t possible without some distortion. This is especially obvious for maps that use certain projections—ways of representing the Earth’s curved surface on a flat map—such as the popular Mercator projection, which could be found on many 20th-century classroom walls.

a map of earth

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Mercator maps distort the shape and relative size of continents, particularly near the poles. This is why Greenland appears to be similar in size to all of South America on Mercator maps, when in fact South America is more than eight times larger than Greenland.

While you may have already been aware of Greenland’s extreme exaggeration on some maps, other inconsistencies are more surprising. For example, Brazil isn’t that impressive on many maps, but in reality it’s bigger than the entire contiguous United States and almost as large as Canada. And Alaska, which is a giant on Mercator maps, is actually a little smaller than Libya.

a map of North America, with Brazil overlayed on top of it

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Thinking about the world in two-dimensions also distorts our ideas about how to get from one place to another, says geographer Anthony Robinson of Penn State University. If you draw a line on a flat map from Washington D.C. to Shanghai, China, the most direct route appears to be due west over the United States and the Pacific Ocean. But Robinson says he’s been on plenty of flights to Asia where people are surprised to hear the pilot say they’ll be flying over the North Pole. When looking at a globe instead of a flat map, it makes sense. “That's far and away the shortest way to get there,” Robinson says.

The Persistence of Memory

None of these geographic misconceptions would be surprising for a student to have on the first day of geography class, but even once we’ve learned the truth, the errors on our mental maps tend to persist. One reason for this may be that our conceptions of the world are basically summaries of the geography, says cartographer Dylan Moriarty, who is an interactive designer at the Wall Street Journal. The mental map is a simplification, similar to the the subway map of New York City, he says. “The approximation is just more useful and practical.”

the New York City Subway Map

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Our physical experience of the world may come into play as well, Robinson says. “I think it must have something to do with both the limits of our observable perception of space and time, and the fact that we are disrupting that constantly with technology and methods of transportation and things that compress those things and make them nonfactors.”

Whatever the reason, these mental map errors are so pervasive and stubborn that even professionals have them. A 1985 study of mental world maps found that geographers had the same misconceptions of the relative latitude of cities in North America and Europe as everyone else. Cartographers aren’t immune either. The “eastiness” of South America still surprises Nelson sometimes. “I really have to look again at a map and be like, is that really the case?” he says. “And sure enough it is.”

the cover of All Over the Map book

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Betsy Mason and Greg Miller are authors of the new illustrated book from National Geographic,All Over the Map. Followthe blogonTwitterandInstagram.

Источник: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/culture/article/all-over-the-map-mental-mapping-misconceptions

How many countries are there in North America?

If you research how many countries are there in North America, you’ll find that the number 23 keeps coming up. Well, I agree – there are 23 countries in the North American continent. 

In terms of the continents, the ‘New World’, aka the Americas, is divided up into North and South American continents. It can be a little confusing because what about Central America, and the Caribbean? I’ll explain that further down. In this article, I’m focussing on the Continent of North America, if you want to check out how many countries in South America you’re in luck because I’ve just posted that list too.

North America is the third largest continent on the planet and covers over 9,000,000 square miles. The answer to how many countries are there in North America is 23, plus there are also a few dependent territories, which don’t make the cut as they’re not officially countries (like the British Virgin Islands, or BVI, for example). If you’re also wondering how many countries are there in the world, read my blog post about that. The answer is 197 by the way!

Me Visiting every country in North America

From April 2016 to March  2017 I visited all 23 countries in North America. Starting in Mexico, and Overlanding all the way down to Panama. From there, I flew to Colombia to study Spanish for a couple of months in Medellin, and then started the overland process again, all the way down to Ushuaia where I took a boat to Antarctica. After that, I flew from Ushuaia to Guiana and began to visit every country in the Caribbean. Quite the adventure, believe me!

Havana Classic Car Tour

So there are 23 countries in North America? What are they?

I’m sure that you don’t need me to tell you that the ‘big 3’ in North America are Canada, USA and Mexico. Canada occupies the most amount of land and the USA has the largest population. From a continental perspective, North America also includes both the regions of Central America and the Caribbean islands too. So, let’s look at all the countries in North America on my list of 23. 

  1. Antigua and Barbuda (Caribbean)
  2. Bahamas (Caribbean)
  3. Barbados (Caribbean)
  4. Belize (Central America)
  5. Canada
  6. Costa Rica (Central America)
  7. Cuba (Caribbean – don’t visit Cuba without experiencing the Havana Classic Car tour, so much fun!)
  8. Dominica (Caribbean)
  9. Dominican Republic (Caribbean)
  10. ElSalvador (Central America)
  11. Grenada (Caribbean)
  12. Guatemala (Central America)
  13. Haiti (Caribbean)
  14. Honduras (Central America)
  15. Jamaica (Caribbean)
  16. Mexico
  17. Nicaragua (Central America)
  18. Saint Kitts and Nevis (Caribbean)
  19. Panama (Central America)
  20. SaintLucia (Caribbean)
  21. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (Caribbean)
  22. Trinidad and Tobago (Caribbean)
  23. United States of America 

Have a look for yourself here on the North America Countries Map:

How many countries in north america
How many countries make up North America

Why is Central America and the Caribbean counted as North America?

Prepare to be confused! Ok, sometimes people refer to North America and South America as Continental America, i.e together they are just 1 continent. However, most of the world use a 7 continent model, which means North and South America are broken up and considered as 2 separate continents, separating at the southern Panama border. With this in mind the 11 countries in Central America can’t be considered its own continent (it can be classed as a subcontinent since it lies within continental ‘America’). Equally then, geographically speaking, the Caribbean falls on top of the same tectonic plate as the rest of the North American countries listed, thereby including all of it within ‘North America’ too. 

If you’re curious about how many countries in the Caribbean specifically, the answer is 13! As well as 21 dependencies. You can read all about that in my blog post here. 

How many countries make up North America

Don’t Forget The 22 Dependent Territories In North America

If you’ve read some of my other articles then you’ll know all about territories that are dependencies of other countries. If you want to remind yourself about the definition of what a country is versus what a dependent territory is, then click here to read my simple explanation – you’ll soon see that it’s not easy to figure out what constitutes as a country. I know some people consider the following places countries, but unfortunately, they are not officially, or technically, countries!

The dependent territories in North America are:

  1. Anguilla (UK)
  2. Aruba (Netherlands)
  3. Bermuda (UK)
  4. Bonaire (Netherlands)
  5. British Virgin Islands (UK)
  6. Cayman Islands (UK)
  7. Clipperton Island (France)
  8. Curacao (Netherlands)
  9. Greenland (Denmark) – You maybe thought that Greenland was in Europe, but no, it’s in North America?
  10. Guadeloupe (France)
  11. Martinique (France)
  12. Montserrat (UK)
  13. Navassa Island (USA)
  14. Puerto Rico (USA)
  15. Saba (Netherlands)
  16. Saint Barthelemy (France)
  17. Saint Martin (France)
  18. Saint Pierre and Miquelon (France)
  19. Sint Eustatius (Netherlands)
  20. Sint Maarten (Netherlands)
  21. Turks and Caicos Islands (UK)
  22. US Virgin Islands (USA)

What’s Your Count of North America Countries?

I’m going to conclude that there are 23 countries in North America and 22 territories. How about you? It’d be interesting to hear what you guys think and also let me know how many of the 45 places above you’ve visited. Let me know what you’re thinking by popping your number in the comment section below along with your reasoning.

How many countries in North America?

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Источник: https://onestep4ward.com/how-many-countries-are-there-in-north-america/

North America is one of the four parts of the American continent (the others are Central America, Antilles and South America). It includes Canada (the 2nd largest country in area in the world), the United States (3rd largest), and Mexico. North America also includes Greenland, the largest island, as well as the small French overseas department of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon (made up of small islands in the Atlantic Ocean).

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Источник: http://www.maps-world.net/north-america.htm

Free Labeled North America Map with Countries & Capital – PDF

Being familiar with all the countries located in North America is a difficult task. Out of various options available, using a Labeled North America Map will be a great choice. A labeled map of North America elaborates and provides accurate information needed by users. North American countries are the most popular countries in the world especially the United States of America, Canada, Mexico, and some others, and people from every corner of the world migrate here for jobs or to settle down. These countries have influenced other countries and it can be seen in tradition, language, culture, religion, dance forms, politics, traditions, education, etc of other countries. In some countries, their influence is so strong that they completely follow American lifestyles and like to live their life like Americans do.

With the help of the below-provided map, more information can be obtained:

Printable Labeled North America Map

A printable labeled North America map has many applications. Some of the application areas of these maps are research work, archeology, geology, in schools and colleges, for tours and travels, navigation, exploration, education, and many more.

Printable Labeled North America Map

PDF

Labeled Map of North America with Countries

The continent has a history of being hit by several natural hazards and that continues till today. Different countries of the continent are prone to frequent earthquakes especially Mexico, floods, hurricanes, wildfires, droughts, volcanic eruptions, landslides, tornados, tsunamis. These countries stand against all these and continue to work in the prosperity of the continent.

Labeled Map of North America with Countries

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North America Map with Capitals Labeled

With the help of a capital labeled North America map users can find and memorize the capitals of each country. Learning is made easy through the use of a map and teachers also use them to explain and teach their students about the country’s capital city.

North America Map with Capitals Labeled

PDF

North America Map with Country Names

North America is inhabitated by thousands of species in different parts of the continent. It is estimated that there are approximately 965 species of mammals inhabiting the land of North America. Having a unique biodiversity North America is visited by millions of people each year just to witness its flora and fauna variety. Not only this the continent is amazingly beautiful and it is like a heaven on earth.

North America Map with Country Names

PDF

 

Filed Under: World MapTagged With: Labeled North America Map, North America Map Labeled, North America Map with Capitals, Printable Labeled Map ofNorth America, Printable North America Map

Источник: https://blankworldmap.net/labeled-north-america-map/

America is a continent divided into four parts: South America, Central America, North America and the Antilles.

America was named, in 1507, by German cartographer Martin Waldseemüller after Italian merchant and explorer Amerigo Vespucci. After navigating with Portuguese along the Brazilian coast, Vespucci envisioned that there would be a "New World" on that part of the Planet. Not to be confused with the lands discovered by Columbus years before. Originally, America was a part of South America, mostly Brazil and its westward extension to the Pacific Coast, then not yet discovered by Europeans.

 

 

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Brooklyn Bridge Park with New York City skyline in the background (credit NYC & Company / Julienne Schaer).

 

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Источник: http://www.geographicguide.net/america-maps.htm

North America continent is in the northern hemisphere, surrounded by the Arctic Ocean in the north, the Atlantic Ocean in the east, the Caribbean Sea in the south, and the northern Pacific Ocean to the west.

North American Population: 579 million

North America Continent Area: 24.700.000 km2

It is the third largest continent after Asia and Africa and is the fourth most populous continent after Asia, Africa, and Europe.

North America Continent/Map of North America 1

It is located in the northern part of the land mass, also called the New World. North America’s only land link to South America is the narrow Panama Canal.

The continent can be divided into four major regions: from the Gulf of Mexico to the Canadian Arctic, Great Plains; Rocky Mountains, Great Basin, California and Alaska, geologically young, mountainous west; high in the northeast but relatively flat in the Canadian region; and the eastern region that includes the Appalachian Mountains and the Florida peninsula.

The only connection to South America is the Panama Canal. Thanks to this channel, the four sides of the North American Continent are actually sea/ocean waves. It is surrounded by the Arctic Ocean in the north, the Caribbean Sea in the South, the Atlantic Ocean in the East and the Pacific Ocean in the West.

Since it is spread over a large continent, different climate types are seen. Greenland is part of the continent. It is also rich in natural resources. There are iron ore and silver mines.

North American Countries List

North America Continent/Map of North America 2

Number of Countries in North America: There are 23 countries recognized by the United Nations. The number of lands dependent on other countries; 20 is.

COUNTRYCAPITAL
USAWashington D.C.
ANTIGUA AND BARBUDASaint John’s
BAHAMASNassau
BARBADOSBridgetown
BELIZEBelmopan
DOMINICAN REPUBLICSanto Domingo
DOMINICAN theRoseau
EL SALVADORSan Salvador
GRENADASaint George’s
GUATEMALAGuatemala
HAITIPort-au-Prince
HONDURASTegucigalpa
JAMAICAKingston
CANADAOttawa
COSTA RICASan José
CUBAHavana
MEXICANMexico
NICARAGUAManagua
PANAMAPanama
SAINT KITTS AND NEVISBasseterre
SAINT LUCIACastries
SAINT VINCENT AND GRENADINSKingstown
TRINIDAD AND TOBAGOPort of Spain
US VIRGIN ISLANDSCharlotte Amalie
NAVASSA ISLAND
PORTO RICOPorto Rico
ANGUILLAAnguilla
BERMUDABermuda
BRITAIN VIRGIN ISLANDSRoad town
CAYMAN ISLANDSCayman Islands
MONTSERRATPlymouth (de jure) / Brades (de facto)
TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDSCockburn Town
GREENLANDNuuk
CLIPPERTON ISLAND
GUADELOUPEBasse-Terre
MARTINIQUEFort-de-France
SAINT BARTHÉLEMYGustavia
SAINT MARTINMarigot
SAINT PIERER AND MIQUELONSaint Pierre
ARUBAOranjestad
CURACAOWillemstad
SINT MARTENPhilipsburg
BES ISLANDSKralendijk

History of North America

North America Continent/Map of North America 3

During the most severe period of the Ice Age, 34000-30000 BC, a significant part of the world’s water was in the form of large continental layers of ice. As a result, the Bering Sea was hundreds of meters lower than its current level, and a land bridge was formed between Asia and North America, called Beringia. It is believed to be about 1,500 kilometers in the widest period of Beringia. The region, which was a tundra with and without trees, was covered with grasses and other plants, which attracted large animals that the first people had hunted for.

The first to reach North America, they almost certainly did not know that they had set foot on a new continent. Probably, they had been hunting on the Siberian coast as their ancestors had done for thousands of years, and then they had crossed the land bridge.

After arriving in Alaska, the first North Americans crossed the passages between the glaciers and had to pass thousands of more years to reach the southern regions of the United States. The first evidence of life in North America continues to exist today. However, it can be proved that very few of them belong to an older than 12000 BC; For example, a hunting watch site located in the north of Alaska in the recent past may be from about these dates. The same can be said for carefully drawn arrowheads and some other objects found in the town of Clovis in New Mexico.

The presence of similar items in certain places in North and South America shows that the settlement of the Western Hemisphere (called the Western Hemisphere in the region formed by the islands of the North and South America and the surrounding islands) may have occurred in a large part of the settlement before 10,000 BC.

North America Continent/Map of North America 4

At that time, the mammoths began to disappear and their place was replaced by the bison, which first formed the main source of food and leather of the North Americans. Over time, due to overfishing and natural phenomena, many species of hunting animals have disappeared and increasingly began to create plants, nuts, and seeds as a source of nutrition for the first Americans. Increasingly, plant-gathering efforts for nutrients and primitive agriculture experiments emerged. In this regard, Native North Americans and/or Indians in the Central Mexico region have now been pioneered, and perhaps have grown corn, squash, and beans from 8000 BC. The knowledge and experience gained in this regard slowly spread to the north.

By 3000 BC, a primitive corn species had been cultivated in the river valleys of New Mexico. After that, the first signs of village life were seen around 300 BC.

Discovery of America

It is estimated that 2-18 million Indians lived here during the years when America was first discovered by the Europeans. Most of the inhabitants of the continent are expected to lose their lives as destructive wars with Europeans and infectious diseases brought by newcomers to the continent.

North America Continent/Map of North America 5

The Indian community in North America was tied to the ground in all respects. Commitment to land and natural conditions was an integral part of religious beliefs. The life of the Indians was basically based on clan and coexistence, and the children were given more freedom and tolerance than they had in Europe at that time.

While some North American tribes developed a kind of hieroglyphic to preserve certain texts, the Native American culture was basically spoken and given great value to telling tales and dreams.

It is clear that there is a great deal of trade between the various groups, and there is strong evidence that neighboring tribes are widely engaged in both friendly and hostile formal relationships.

First Europeans

Europeans who first came to North America or had sound evidence of their arrival were Scandinavians traveling west from Greenland, where they established a settlement in 985.

The Scandinavian epics have stated that Viking sailors have discovered the Atlantic coast from North America to the Bahamas, but the aforementioned allegations have not been proven. In contrast, in 1963, certain Scandinavian house debris belonging to the period mentioned in L’Anse-aux-Meadows, north of Newfoundland, were found, thus confirming at least some of the claims put forward in Scandinavian epics.

Just five years after Christopher Columbus arrived ashore in the Caribbean, five years later, in 1497, the Venetian sailor John Cabot, commissioned by the King of England, set foot in Newfoundland. Cabot’s journey, though quickly forgotten, would serve as a basis for the British to claim North America over the years. The journey also paved the way for rich nests off the shores of Georgeyes Banks, and shortly thereafter, European and especially Portuguese fishermen began to arrive regularly.

In fact, Columbus never saw the continental United States; however, the Spanish colonies, which he helped establish, became the starting point for the first discovery journeys in the United States. The first of these travels began in 1513 and a group led by Juan Ponce de Leon landed on the Florida coast near the city of St. Augustine.

After the conquest of Mexico in 1522, the Spanish empowered their position in the Western Hemisphere. The following discoveries made contributions to what the Europeans know about so-called America, referring to the Italian Amerigo Vespucci, whose writings on the journey to the New World were read with great admiration. While the prospects for discovering a Northwest Pass going to Asia will only be completely lost after century, by 1529, reliable maps of the Atlantic coast stretching from Labrador to Tierra del Fuego were drawn.

During the conquest of Peru, Hernando De Soto, who had served under Francisco Pizzaro, is one of the most important Spanish expeditions. The de Soto group campaign began in Havana in 1539, landed in Florida, and pursued wealth through the Mississippi River across the southeastern United States.

North America Continent/Map of North America 6

While the Spanish were spreading from the south, the northern part of the United States of America was also better known by travelers such as Giovanni da Verrazano. Verrazano, a Florentine traveling on behalf of the French, saw land in North Carolina in 1524 and headed north along the Atlantic coast to the present-day Port of New York.

The great wealth flowing into Spain from the colonies in Mexico, Antilles, and Peru attracted great interest from other European states. Over time, the seafaring countries like England, to some extent, began to deal with the New World as a result of the successful plundering attacks of Francis Drake against Spanish treasure ships.

Declaration of Independence

Colonies have become widespread, and agriculture-based settlements have been established, until the Declaration of Independence adopted on July 4, 1776. Thanks to the settlements established in the port circles, the trade of agricultural products have been ensured and the power of the colonies has increased. In the following period, the dependence on England left its place entirely to the will of freedom.

Although the paper is based on the political philosophy of the French and the English Enlightenment, the effect of a work is particularly remarkable: the Second Review of John Locke on the Government. Locke addressed the concepts of British traditional rights and universalized them as the natural rights of people. The well-known introduction of the paper reflects Locke’s theory of government-related social-contract.

The success of the revolution gave Americans the opportunity to identify their ideals in a legal way as described in the Declaration of Independence and to remedy some of their complaints through state constitutions. Furthermore, on May 10, 1776, the Congress took a decision and proposed to the colonies to form new governments that would best ensure the happiness and safety of their voters. Some of them had already done so, and as a result, a year after the Declaration of Independence was published, all colonies, except three, accepted their constitution.

North America Facts

1. North America is the third largest continent in the world. And it is called “fertile soils”.

2. Dinosaur fossils found in North America are much more than those found on other continents.

3. The first European settlement to Greenland was provided by the Vikings.

4. Canada, where the population density is low, is one of the richest countries in the world.

North America Continent/Map of North America 7

5. Niagara Falls is one of the places you should visit if one day you go to Canada.

6. Churchill in Hudson Bay, also known as “the capital of polar bears” in the world.

Churchill in Hudson Bay, Manitoba, Canada, is flooded by thousands of polar bears every autumn. Waiting for the water to freeze polar bears can walk here easily.

7. Canada’s capital, Ottawa, means trading in the native language. It was named after an American tribe who lived in the region. Already the merchants were known as very famous traders.

8. The length of asphalt covered roads in the US is about 6.5 million kilometers.

9. Today, Spain is the first colonies to establish the land of the USA. The locals lived in this region. Christopher Columbus, who departed from Spain, reached land in 1492. In 1497-1499, Italian Amerigo Vespucci changed the course of history by proving the existence of a continent which he named after his travels and letters.

10. Those who introduced the chocolate to the Spanish conquistador were the Aztecs. In this way, it has spread to Europe.

Источник: https://www.mappr.co/thematic-maps/north-america-continent/

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