at and t iphone

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Apple iPhone X - 256GB - Space Gray (AT&T) A1901 (GSM) at the best online prices at eBay! Here are the best deals on the iPhone 12 available right now on Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile, or unlocked at Apple.com. I can almost hear Oprah shouting the many competing offers from all the carriers — AT&T, T-Mobile, and Verizon — as soon as the Apple “.

At and t iphone -

A round-up of the top AT&T deals for Black Friday & Cyber Monday, featuring all the best offers on Apple Watch, Samsung Galaxy smartwatches & more

BOSTON, November 26, 2021--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Black Friday & Cyber Monday AT&T deals are here. Find the top offers on AT&T wireless smartphones. Links to the latest deals are listed below.

Best AT&T Phone Deals:

  • Get AT&T Unlimited Plus Prepaid plans at the lowest price ever - just $50/mo. plus taxes

  • Get $250 in bill credits + a free wireless charging pad when you bring your own phone to AT&T - online only

  • Save up to 50% off on the Google Pixel 6 and 6 Pro on AT&T - check the latest discounts on AT&T plans for the Google Pixel 6 or 6 Pro with trade in options

  • Save up to $800 off on the latest Google Pixel smartphones at AT&T - Get the Pixel 6, Pixel 6 Pro, Pixel 5 or Pixel 4a 5G devices with batteries that will last more than 24 hours

  • Save up to 75% off on the latest Samsung Galaxy S21, S20, Note20 & more Galaxy phones at AT&T - check out the latest savings on Galaxy S 21, S20, Note 20, Z Fold2 & more top models with trade in

  • Save up to $800 on the Samsung Galaxy Z Fold3 5G phone at AT&T - choose from 256 GB and 512 GB models in Phantom Black, Phantom Green, and Phantom Silver colors

  • Save on the Samsung Galaxy Z Flip3 5G phone at AT&T - check live prices on AT&T subscriptions with this waterproof Galaxy phone that can multitask 2 apps at a time

  • Save on the Google Pixel 5 at AT&T- the Google Pixel 5 comes with 5G speed, a camera that takes ultrawide photos, and a battery that can last 48 hours

  • Save on the latest Motorola smartphones at AT&T - check the latest deals on the Motorola moto g stylus & Motorola one 5G

Best AT&T iPhone Deals:

  • Save up to 90% off on Apple iPhones at AT&T - Black Friday deals are here! Check the latest deals including the Apple iPhone XS from $1/month, trade-ins on a wide range of Apple iPhones, and more deals

  • Save up to $1,000 on the Apple iPhone 13, 13 Pro, 12, 12 mini & 12 Pro at AT&T - Black Friday deals are here! Check the best deals on the iPhone 13, iPhone 13 Pro, iPhone 12 Pro Max and iPhone 12 mini including trade-ins

  • Save up to 25% off on the iPhone 12 (64GB, 128GB & 256GB) at AT&T - available in Purple, Blue, White, Green, and Red colors

  • Save up to 50% off on the iPhone 12 mini at AT&T

  • Save on the Apple iPhone 11, 11 Pro & 11 Pro Max at AT&T - Black Friday deals are here! See the latest deals on Apple iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max at AT&T, including trade-ins

  • Save on the Apple iPhone SE (2020) at AT&T - Check the latest deals from AT&T on the Apple iPhone SE, including trade-ins

  • Save on the iPhone XR 64GB at AT&T - also available with an AT&T installment plan

  • Save on the iPhone XS at ATT.com - get the 64GB iPhone XS for $1/mo. for 30 months with eligible wireless plans and installment agreement

More AT&T Deals:

  • Get AT&T Unlimited Plus Prepaid plans at the lowest price ever - just $50/mo. plus taxes

  • Order AT&T Fiber online and get a $200 reward card or a smart home bundle worth nearly $350 at ATT.com - Redemption req’d. W/Internet 300M+. Must enter promo code GET200 or SMARTHOME at checkout. Ltd. availability/areas.

  • Save up to $330 off on the latest Apple Watch Series 7, 6, SE & more top models at AT&T - click the link for the latest deals on Apple Watches including Apple Watch 7, SE, Nike SE, Series 6 and Nike Series 6 models

  • Save on the latest Samsung Galaxy smartwatches at ATT.com - buy one get one free on the Galaxy Watch 4 (when you buy on an installment plan)

  • Save up to $200 off on the Microsoft Surface Go 2 at ATT.com

  • Save up to 50% off on the Lenovo 300e Chromebook at AT&T

  • Save on Apple iPads at AT&T - check out deals on the latest models including the iPad 9th Gen, iPad mini 2021, and iPad Pro

  • Save up to 50% off on Samsung Galaxy tablets at ATT.com - check the latest deals on a wide range of Samsung Galaxy tablets including the Tab S5E, Tab S7, and Tab S7 Fe

Best Cell Phone Deals:

  • Save up to 80% on a wide range of Samsung Galaxy, iPhone, Pixel, LG & more top-rated smartphones at AT&T.com - check out the latest deals on flagship & budget-friendly smartphones from Apple iPhone, Samsung Galaxy, Google Pixel, OnePlus & more top brands, including trade in options

  • Save up to $1,000 on Xfinity’s best mobile deal of the year at Xfinity.com - plus enjoy $200 off on top-rated 5G handsets

  • Save up to 60% off on Apple iPhone (13, 12, SE), Pixel 6, Galaxy S21 & more flagship smartphones at Verizon.com - check Verizon’s live trade in deals on a wide range of top-rated smartphones

  • Save up to 65% on a wide range of prepaid & no contract Apple iPhones, Samsung Galaxy & more Android phones at BoostMobile.com - check live prices on top-rated 2021 flagship phone models

  • Save up to 63% on a wide range of prepaid & no contract phones at StraightTalk.com - check the latest deals on the iPhone 13 Pro, iPhone 13, Galaxy A10e and more top-rated phones

In need of some more deals? We recommend checking Walmart’s Black Friday & Cyber Monday deals and Amazon’s Black Friday & Cyber Monday page to view hundreds more deals at the moment. Saver Trends earns commissions from purchases made using the links provided.

About Saver Trends: Saver Trends research and share online sales news. As an Amazon Associate and affiliate Saver Trends earns from qualifying purchases.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211125005579/en/

Contacts

Andy Mathews ([email protected])

Источник: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/t-black-friday-cyber-monday-035500598.html

Want to save the Earth? Then don’t buy that shiny new iPhone

On Tuesday, Apple released its latest phone – the iPhone 13. Naturally, it was presented with the customary breathless excitement. It has a smaller notch (eh?), a redesigned camera, Apple’s latest A15 “bionic” chipset and a brighter, sharper screen. And, since we’re surfing the superlative wave, the A15 has nearly 15bn transistors and a “six-core CPU design with two high-performance and four high-efficiency cores”.

Wow! But just one question: why would I buy this Wundermaschine? After all, two years ago I got an iPhone 11, which has been more than adequate for my purposes. That replaced the iPhone 6 I bought in 2014 and that replaced the iPhone 4 I got in 2010. And all of those phones are still working fine. The oldest one serves as a family backup in case someone loses or breaks a phone, the iPhone 6 has become a hardworking video camera and my present phone may well see me out.

That’s three phones in 11.5 years, so my “upgrade cycle” is roughly one iPhone every four years. From the viewpoint of the smartphone industry, which until now has worked on a cycle of two-yearly upgrades, I’m a dead loss. Which is strange, given that these phones don’t wear out, a fact that may be getting through to users. At any rate, they seem to be holding on to their phones for longer. And yet the manufacturers are still, like Apple, annually releasing new models that are generally just an incremental improvement on what went before rather than a great leap forward. Why?

Planned obsolescence may be good for phone companies but it’s bad for users’ wallets and even worse for the planet

There’s a name for this corporate disorder – “planned obsolescence”: deliberately ensuring that the current version of a given product will become out of date or useless within a known time period. As a marketing philosophy it goes back to the mid-1920s, when the US car industry reached saturation point and Alfred Sloan, the boss of General Motors, came up with a wheeze to keep punters buying new cars. He introduced annual cosmetic design changes – facelifts, if you like – to convince car owners to buy replacements each year. The cars themselves changed relatively little in their essence, but they looked different. Thus came about the baroque absurdities of American cars in the middle decades of the 20th century – all that chrome, outrageous colours, fins, whitewall tyres etc that you now only see in museums or in Cuba.

Planned obsolescence may be good for phone companies but it’s bad for users’ wallets and even worse for the planet, because it encourages people to treat their phones as disposable. No one really knows how much e-waste (electronic refuse) is generated every year, but one recent estimate put it at 53.6m metric tonnes in 2019. And as far as CO2 emissions are concerned, a 2018 Canadian university study estimated that building a new smartphone – and specifically, mining the rare materials inside them – accounts for 85% to 95% of the device’s total CO2 emissions for two years. That means, said one report, that “buying one new phone takes as much energy as recharging and operating a smartphone for an entire decade”.

So holding on to your existing phone would be good for your wallet and for the environment. It’s easier said than done, though, because the industry is not set up to facilitate retention and phones are not designed with ease of repair in mind. Just to give one example, try replacing the battery on a Samsung Galaxy S7. And then go and lie down in a darkened room while your partner asks what you thought you were doing with the hairdryer.

The basic problem is that modern smartphones are conceived as hermetically sealed, tightly integrated devices with, as the legal boilerplate puts it, “no user-serviceable components”. In some instances, any attempt by the user to open the case and get at the insides invalidates the warranty. This kind of design is, the industry maintains, the only way to do it.

But it isn’t. As I write, I have a Fairphone 3+ on the desk beside me. It’s a very capable, nicely designed, dual-sim Android phone. In just seconds, I snap off the back of the case with a fingernail and remove the battery. Other modules of the phone, including the camera, can be removed and replaced without elaborate tools or expertise. And once it’s done you snap the case shut and press the power button. And you can buy it online for £399. Over in the US, the Framework laptop has just come on to the market. It’s a thin, lightweight, high-performance 13.5in notebook that can be upgraded, customised and repaired in ways that no other notebook can. It’s even available as a kit of modules that users can change and assemble themselves, installing only the modules they want as plug-in units. Think of it as Lego for geeks.

And the moral of the story? Things don’t have to be the way they have been so far. And before you buy that shiny new smartphone ask yourself: do you (or the planet) really need it?

What I’ve been reading

Out of this world
Notes from the Metaverse isa really insightful essay by LM Sacasas on his Convivial Society blog about a current Silicon Valley obsession.

Step changes
The Messy Truth About Carbon Footprints is a great piece by Sami Grover on the Undark site.

Computer says no
“Automated recruitment software is mistakenly rejecting millions of viable job candidates” according to a disturbing report in the Verge by James Vincent on the “missing unemployed”.

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/sep/18/want-to-save-the-earth-then-dont-buy-that-shiny-new-iphone

The Curious Part Apple Didn't Talk About at the iPhone 13 Event and Why It's a Big Deal

On Tuesday, Apple rolled out a handful of products, including an updated iPad, a new iPad mini, the Apple Watch Series 7, and the iPhone 13 series. As has become the norm during the pandemic, the rollout came nicely packaged in a 78-minute virtual presentation that hit all of the highlights for each of the products. 

If you were looking forward to a new iPhone, especially, Apple had plenty to say about its battery life, and screen, and cameras. What Apple didn't say, however, is far more interesting to me. 

To be clear, there's a lot Apple didn't say. There are products that people were expecting that didn't get announced. There's also the App Store, which Apple didn't mention at all. 

The latter isn't much of a surprise considering the current scrutiny the company is facing over the control it exerts on developers. What is surprising is how the company talked (or didn't) about its pride and joy--its processors.

The new iPhones are powered by the A15, which you might expect would be an improvement over the A14. Except we don't really know much about how it will perform, because Apple isn't touting its performance. At least, not compared with that of the A14, it isn't.

That seems strange when you look at how Apple talked about its processors last year. I did just that, rewatching every Apple product announcement from last year, including WWDC. The differences might seem subtle, but they could actually say a lot about what comes next. 

Last year was what I think anyone who has been paying attention would call "the year of Apple Silicon." Despite a global pandemic and chip shortage, the company rolled out the A14, which it called at the time the "fastest chip ever in a smartphone," 

"Frankly, the competition is still playing catchup to our chips--not just from last year, but even from two years ago," said Kaiann Drance, Apple's VP of iPhone product marketing during the 2020 iPhone event.

Every device Apple announced since the middle of last year had a brand-new custom-designed processor that blew the previous version out of the water. The A14, Apple said, was capable of "challenging the performance of laptops."

That was true. Benchmarks showed that the A14 was faster than most laptops. That was a good thing, since the M1 processor is based on the same core architecture. That chip put its Intel and AMD competition to shame. You can now buy a sub-$1,000 MacBook Air that is faster and has longer battery life than just about any other laptop you can buy today. 

Apple compared the A15 with the "leading competitor," saying it was "up to 50 percent faster." That's exactly how it described the A14 last year--it was 50 percent faster than any other mobile processor. 

Besides, if the A14 is the fastest mobile processor, isn't it technically "the leading competitor"? I suspect the company meant the leading chip in an Android device--probably the Snapdragon 865 series. Again, the A14 was already 50 percent faster than that chip.

It invites the question: Is an iPhone 13 with an A15 going to represent a significant increase in performance over last year's models? The answer is sort of, but not really.

Leaked benchmarks (probably from review units) reveal that single-core performance on the A15 clocks in around 10 percent faster than the A14 using Geekbench. Multicore performance is slightly better, at 21 percent. That's not nothing, but it's also not close to the kind of generational leap we've seen in the past.

Then, there's the fact that Apple didn't even mention the processor in the Apple Watch Series 7. I asked, but Apple didn't have anything more to say about what is powering its new flagship wearable. That means it's not clear whether that device is getting a new processor at all. 

Why does it matter? Because Apple Silicon has become one of the company's strongest differentiators. More important, the A15 isn't a chip just for smartphones. It also now powers the iPad mini, and the next Apple Silicon for the Mac will almost certainly use the same core architecture. 

That means that the performance of the A15 says a lot more about whether Apple can continue to advance its chip designs, or whether it made a huge leap last year, only to wring out smaller, incremental changes moving forward. 

That's a big deal, and not because the A15 isn't powerful enough for the iPhone. I'm sure it is. It's a big deal because the A15 is likely the foundation for whatever comes after the M1, the chip powering the newest Macs and the iPad Pro. 

Last year, it was clear that Apple was raising expectations. There were even concerns that it might have raised them too high, leaving people to be let down if it couldn't deliver. This year, the opposite seems to be the case. 

Apple is most definitely not trying to raise expectations for the A15 or, later, the M2. The problem is, if Apple feels like it has to keep expectations at a reasonable level, what does that say about its chip roadmap? 

One of the challenges of making the kind of massive leap in performance and efficiency that the M1 chip brought to the Mac and the iPad Pro is that it makes it a lot harder to continue that trajectory. That's true of every form of success, really. The more you grow, the harder it is to maintain that pace. 

The thing is, in Apple's case, it has had a massive advantage over all of its competition because of its ability to seemingly do what its competition couldn't. It's just not clear if that's still the case. 

Источник: https://www.inc.com/jason-aten/apples-iphone-13-event-a15-processor-details-missing.html

Black Friday AT&T deals — best sales in 2021

RSS

Tom's Guide is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more

By Louis Ramirez

Today's best Black Friday AT&T deals

Black Friday AT&T deals are in full swing, and you can really reduce the cost of getting a new phone by shopping through the wireless carrier. AT&T's Black Friday deals are highlighted by savings on the top flagships, in addition to attractive deals on select midrange phones. This is the perfect time to get a phone from the carrier.

You can get everything from the iPhone 13 to the Galaxy Z Flip 3 at no cost, assuming you've got a trade-in. Other deals simply require you to sign up for an unlimited data plan with AT&T. But the great thing about Black Friday AT&T deals is that they're available to both current customers and people switching to the carrier.

To help you find the right phone, we're keeping track on every Black Friday AT&T deal that's worth your attention. Whether you're team Android or looking for the least-expensive iPhone, here are the best cheap deals right now. Plus, make sure to check out our guide to the best AT&T plans. 

Top 5 Black Friday AT&T deals today

Black Friday AT&T deals — best sales right now

iPhone

Android

What is AT&T's best unlimited data plan?

The best unlimited data plan at AT&T is not necessarily the cheapest. We like the AT&T Unlimited Elite Plan, which costs $85/month for a single line of data, because the perks are too good to pass up. The plan features truly unlimited data — other AT&T plans will slow your speeds down if you go over 50GB or if there's traffic on the network. You'll also get 40GB of hotspot data and — best of all — access to the HBO Max streaming service. You can even watch movies in 4K Ultra HD when available.

Unlimited and Prepaid AT&T phone deals

As deals editor at Tom’s Guide, Louis is constantly looking for ways to avoid paying full price for the latest gadgets. With over 10 years of deals-hunting experience, Louis price checks against multiple retailers and searches high and low for the best deals to bring readers. A born-and-bred New Yorker, Louis is also an avid swimmer and marathoner. His work has appeared on Gizmodo, CNET, and Time Out New York.

Источник: https://www.tomsguide.com/deals/black-friday-atandt-deals

The best AT&T phone deals for November 2021: free iPhones, discounts, and more

RSS

TechRadar is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more

We're rounding up all the best AT&T deals right here onto one page - including the very latest Apple iPhone 13 devices. Yes - it's that time of the year and we've got not one, not two, but four new Apple flagships to check out at AT&T. Of course, if you're not looking for iPhones then that's all good; we've got the best AT&T deals on Android devices right here too.

AT&T deals are especially good if you're adding new lines or switching carriers. With these offers, you can often save hundreds of dollars of the retail price of a new phone, and sometimes you can even get the phone for free. AT&T might not have quite the coverage Verizon does, but with these discounts and the generally cheaper pricing of its plans, your savings can start to add up.

Generally, AT&T deals entail purchasing the phone on an installment plan and getting a data plan at a specific level (like AT&T's Unlimited Starter plan), then AT&T will give you monthly rebates toward the value of the phone. So, to get the maximum value from these deals, you'll want to be ready to stick with AT&T for the long haul - 30 months in fact, at which point you'll have received the full discount.

So, keep those details in mind as we guide you through all the best AT&T phone deals. We'll help you find the best savings on iPhones, Android phones, 5G phones, and even some accessories to go alongside them.

Want to do see what other carriers are offering? See this week's best cell phone deals. Alternatively, read more about Verizon with this week's best AT&T plans and our recommendations for the best AT&T phones.

The best AT&T deals available today

AT&T iPhone deals

AT&T Android deals

AT&T prepaid phone deals

AT&T free phone deals

  • See all the free phone deals
Источник: https://www.techradar.com/sg/deals/the-best-att-deals
iphone-13-pro-max-cnet-2021-review-42

We all know the drill. As Apple's annual fall event draws close, many of us start to check in on our previous two-year smartphone plan to see if we're eligible for an upgrade in September. After all, the newest phone is only the newest phone for so long. Even for discerning shoppers like me, it takes serious willpower to resist the lure of a purple iPhone or 1TB of storage.

Mobile carriers have long persuaded many of us to upgrade our smartphones every two years, offering two-year contracts linked to free or low-cost phone upgrades to keep the two-year upgrade cycle going. That feeling of ponying up just a couple hundred dollars (or less) for the newest, fanciest phone available has helped perpetuate the rise of the de facto two-year phone upgrade. Case in point: AT&T and Verizon marketed a "free" iPhone 12 last year for customers who buy unlimited plans and commit to a multiyear deal. And the trade-in deals were even better this year for the iPhone 13.

But even though that might still be the norm in the US, a routine upgrade isn't a thing for much of the world. 

I was born and raised in developing Asia, a region where buying a smartphone is financially unattainable for hundreds of millions of people, much less a two-year upgrade. In India, the average person needs to save two months' salary to buy the cheapest available smartphone, according to a survey published by the Alliance for Affordable Internet last August. From my perspective, the trend of routinely upgrading a phone every two years when it doesn't change that much is a privilege, one that reminds me of the stark income equality gap as well as the ever-increasing digital divide globally.

Read more:Billions of people still can't afford smartphones: That's a major problem

Beyond that, and perhaps more tangibly, I think we should consider the environmental cost of purchasing a new phone. You've read the headlines: Climate change is accelerating at rapid speed. Countries around the world keep setting new records for the highest temperatures. There are more climate-related disasters than ever before, arctic caps are melting and biodiversity is disappearing faster than we can save it. What, exactly, happens to all those discarded phones over time? Does all that plastic ever fully decompose? 

screenshot-2021-07-07-at-1-39-03-pm.png

Read more:Apple is opening up its world of iPhone recycling

Consumer electronics are responsible for tonnes of e-waste annually, which in turn contributes to the climate crisis. Experts have warned about how e-waste disposal contributes to climate change due to the chemicals released when the waste is burned, some of which are equivalent to carbon dioxide.

For years, developed countries like the US have shipped recyclable waste overseas for processing. Although that is now beginning to change, there are real costs. iPhones contain toxic materials like lead and mercury, for instance, which can harm the environment and people if disposed of improperly. And often e-waste isn't properly managed. In Southern China, there is a town called Guiyu that has become known as the world's biggest graveyard for America's electronic junk, and synonymous among environmentalists with toxic waste. The UN's 2020 Global E-waste Monitor report found that the world dumped a record 53.6 million tonnes of e-waste last year, of which the US is the world's second-largest contributor to e-waste, dumping 6.9 million tonnes.

Read more:I paid $69 to replace my iPhone battery: Here's what happened

While Apple is committed to a net zero supply chain by 2030, it's tough to argue that there's a better alternative to lower carbon consumption than less consumption. After all, Apple says the iPhone 12's end-to-end supply chain emits 70 kilograms of carbon to the atmosphere. If even 1 million people waited that extra year, we could save 70,000,000 kilograms of carbon from going into the air in a year. Imagine if it was 10 million or 100 million. It's something to think about before making that upgrade. 

The smartphone upgrade cycle has gotten longer

Even with the enticing deals offered by carriers, the upgrade cycle has seemingly lengthened. In recent years, several reports show how Americans and Europeans are more than happy to hold on to their phones for longer periods of time. In fact, in 2019 smartphone upgrades hit record lows at two of the biggest US carriers, Verizon and AT&T. Carriers like T-Mobile and Verizon seem to have responded to this by offering month-to-month plans, which offer more flexibility and options, indicating a potential departure from the "norm" of a two-year phone upgrade. 

Barring big-picture factors like the struggling global economy amid the ongoing pandemic as well as our increased mindfulness over the environment, I think this trend is persisting for a confluence of reasons. Phones today are receiving software, and therefore security, updates for longer. For instance, 2015's iPhone 6S is compatible with iOS 15, potentially dampening desires for a bi-yearly upgrade.

In addition to all this, smartphone innovation has hit a plateau, and the industry bears the hallmarks of one that's maturing: slowing smartphone sales growth along with the slower evolution of what we need, what we want and so forth. There are no big surprises here: Today's phones are getting more nice-to-have refinements rather than the awe-inspiring innovation seen just three or four years ago.

Discover the latest news and best reviews in smartphones and carriers from CNET's mobile experts.

Decreasing technological gap

Up until a couple of years ago, smartphone manufacturers had us sitting on the edge of our seats, waiting for the next design refresh. But that's not as much the case anymore. With the iPhone 12 series, 5G was probably its buzziest feature -- one that understandably ended up triggering an upgrade supercycle. But the most exciting thing for many of us at CNET was MagSafe, which is hardly new. Apple's proprietary technology, allowing you to magnetically snap on attachments, was first introduced some 15 years ago with the first-gen MacBook Pro. It was then reintroduced for the iPhone 12.

Galaxy S21 vs. iPhone 12 camera compare

When you look at what changed from the iPhone 11, you'll see the usual suspects on your list: 5G, OLED screen, new design. Admittedly there are a few more things you won't see everywhere, such as MagSafe and the Ceramic Shield, but nothing extra-special to truly write home about. Personally, the last time I was blown away by an iPhone reveal was back in 2017 when Apple introduced the iPhone X, which set new design standards for the modern-day iPhone. The iPhone X did away with the physical home button and chunky bezels of its predecessors and made way for a sleek, futuristic device that inspired the iPhone 12 family. Also, for the first time with Apple, we were able to unlock an iPhone with Face ID, Apple's facial recognition technology.

Looking at the iPhone 13, the narrative sounds familiar. We knew it wouldn't get a major technical upgrade (though that didn't stop us from wishing). While we appreciate the upgrades Apple did give the phone (a smaller notch, a larger battery and a faster screen refresh rate), the iPhone 13 is "not radically different," according to CNET's Patrick Holland. Plus a number of these new iPhone features, like the 120Hz screen, currently exist on Android phones, reinforcing the notion of a decreasing technological gap in the smartphone landscape. Apple itself says the life-cycle of a typical iPhone is now three years. So the company times its new releases accordingly: We get a major redesign every three years, not two, with more minor updates in between. 

Look no further than the glitziest non-Apple flagship launch of this year for clues: Samsung's Galaxy S21 family. Here the standout change wasn't made to the hardware or software, but perhaps to its least interesting feature: its price tag. The S21 lineup has a starting price of $800 (£769, AU$1,249), which is $200 less than last year's $1,000 Galaxy S20, making for an enticing deal. 

Apart from that, major differences between the S21 and last year's S20 were mostly incremental. I remember having to pore over the specs sheet to spot salient differences as I covered Samsung's virtual Unpacked event. Refinements were made to the usual suspects, including the processor, software and 5G. This might have been part of Samsung's response to the global coronavirus pandemic, but again it lends credence to the notion of that decreasing technological gap. It was also interesting to note the items Samsung dropped from the S21 flagship family to meet that lowered price. We said goodbye to expandable storage, bundled earphones and most notoriously the in-box charger, as Samsung followed in Apple's lead -- apparently in the name of the environment. 

Read more: Here's what we know so far about Samsung's Galaxy S22

Let's also take a moment to consider the question: What makes the S21 an attractive buy? Chances are, a great camera, fast performance, battery longevity and a crisp display with narrow bezels are at the top of your list. But the truth is 2019's Galaxy S10 boasts all those features. Heck, even the Galaxy S7 from five years ago did. My point is yearly changes have become too incremental to compel most people to upgrade with urgency, especially given the backdrop of rising smartphone prices.

samsung-galaxy-zflip

Are we at peak phone?

I'm not discounting foldable phones. Samsung and Huawei have made undeniable technological progress, and their bendy handsets have dramatically altered the way smartphones are used and could represent the future of the industry. But folding phones are far from the mainstream. Phone manufacturers and carriers in the US have moved the most innovative devices to a price that's simply beyond reach for most people. For instance, the Galaxy Fold 3 starts at $1,800 (£1,599, AU$2,499) and Huawei's Mate X2, available in China for now, costs nearly $3,000 ($2,800, £1,985, AU$3,640 converted). Until these prices hit price parity with, say, the iPhone 12 Pro or Pro Max, foldable phones are likely to remain a niche product.

Smartphone innovation has stagnated, and this is not a knock against the consumer electronics companies or the tech giants that design them. Maybe we've reached peak smartphone, and this is as far as it needs to go. It could well be part of the reason why the race to upgrade your phones is slowing.

Источник: https://www.cnet.com/tech/mobile/getting-a-new-iphone-every-2-years-is-making-less-sense-than-ever/

Black Friday AT&T deals — best sales in 2021

RSS

Tom's Guide is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more

By Louis Ramirez

Today's best Black Friday AT&T deals

Black Friday AT&T deals are in full swing, and you can really reduce the cost of getting a new phone by shopping through the wireless carrier. At and t iphone Black Friday deals are highlighted by savings on the top flagships, in addition to attractive deals on select midrange phones. This is the perfect time to get a phone from the carrier.

You can get everything from the iPhone 13 to the Galaxy Z Flip 3 at no cost, assuming you've got a trade-in. Other deals simply at and t iphone you to sign up for an unlimited data plan with AT&T. But the great thing about Black Friday AT&T deals is that they're available to both current customers and people switching to the carrier.

To help you find the right phone, we're keeping track on every Black Friday AT&T deal that's worth your attention. Whether you're team Android or looking for the least-expensive iPhone, here are the best cheap deals right now. Plus, make sure to check out our guide to the best AT&T plans. 

Top 5 Black Friday AT&T deals today

Black Friday AT&T deals — best sales right now

iPhone

Android

What is AT&T's best unlimited data plan?

The best unlimited data plan at AT&T is not necessarily the cheapest. We like the AT&T Unlimited Elite Plan, which costs $85/month for a single line of data, because the perks are too good to pass up. The plan features truly unlimited data — other AT&T plans will slow your speeds down if you go over 50GB or if there's traffic on the network. You'll also get 40GB of hotspot data and — best of all — access to the HBO Max streaming service. You can even watch movies in 4K Ultra HD when available.

Unlimited and Prepaid AT&T phone deals

As deals editor at Tom’s Guide, Louis is constantly looking for ways to avoid paying full price for the latest gadgets. With over 10 years of deals-hunting experience, Louis price checks against multiple retailers and searches high and low for the best deals to bring readers. A born-and-bred New Yorker, Louis is also an avid swimmer and marathoner. His work has appeared on Gizmodo, CNET, and Time Out New York.

Источник: https://www.tomsguide.com/deals/black-friday-atandt-deals

Can AT&T Trace a Lost Apple iPhone?

Losing your iPhone can be distressing and costly; you not only have to suspend your service and purchase a new mobile phone, but if your information isn't backed up, you lose important information, including phone numbers and business contacts. If AT&T is your carrier, the company offers two services that might help you trace your misplaced iPhone. In addition to AT&T tracking services, other third-party applications can help track down your iPhone. Any tracking software must be installed before the iPhone is lost.

Family Map

AT&T's FamilyMap is most commonly used by parents who use the application to track their children's whereabouts. However, you can use FamilyMap to locate your lost or stolen iPhone. All AT&T iPhones are installed with Assisted GPS, which uses GPS satellites to locate cell phones. To activate FamilyMap's location services, you must register via AT&T and install the application. At the time of publication, FamilyMap costs about $10 a month to register up to two iPhones and about $15 to register up to five homes for sale by owner jackson tn Numbers

Each iPhone has a unique 15- or 17-digit identification code referred to as the International Mobile Equipment Number. You can look up your IMEI number through "Settings" on your iPhone. From "Settings," tap "General" and "About" and scroll down to see your IMEI code. Your phone bill and online billing account should also include your IMEI number). IMEIs can be used to report a misplaced iPhone as well as to track the iPhone's location. To do both, contact AT&T and tell the operator your IMEI number. The operator inputs the code into the Equipment Identity Register, which then traces whether your iPhone is registered to another account. The one caveat to using the IMEI to locate your iPhone is that AT&T cannot release the information to you due to privacy laws. However, if you file a report, the police can retrieve this information.

Find My iPhone

In addition to AT&T, Apple provides its own tracking service. Find My iPhone is an application available for download via Apple's iTunes. At the time of publication, Find My iPhone is compatible with iPhone 3GS, iPhone4, iPhone 4S and iPhone 5 and requires iOS 5.0 or higher. This free tracking service offered by Apple includes location services that track your iPhone on a map via iCloud. You can use the service to lock your lost or stolen device and erase any personal data on the iPhone remotely. For Find My iPhone to work, your phone must be powered on and connected to the Internet. You must also have activated your free iCloud account.

Other Third-Party Apps

Outside of AT&T services and Apple's Find My iPhone, several third-party apps help trace the location of your iPhone. GadgetTrak provides services to locate your phone and also snaps an image of fnbo direct full site person who stole it. The app's programming makes it impossible to delete GadgetTrak from the stolen iPhone. IHound is another third-party app that remotely erases any important personal data and locks your iPhone. It also includes location-tracking services. At the time of publication, GadgetTrak costs $3.99 to subscribe. IHound is free to download but charges $3.99 for a three-month subscription fee and about $11 for yearlong subscription.

References

Writer Bio

Jason Cristiano Ramon holds a doctorate in political science and a master's degree in philosophy. He has taught political science in China.

Источник: https://itstillworks.com/can-att-trace-lost-apple-iphone-19128.html
iphone-13-pro-max-cnet-2021-review-42

We all know the drill. As Apple's annual fall event draws close, many of us start to check in on our previous two-year smartphone plan to see if we're eligible for an upgrade in September. After all, the newest phone is only the newest phone for so long. Even for discerning shoppers like me, it takes serious willpower to resist the lure of a purple iPhone or 1TB of storage.

Mobile at and t iphone have long persuaded many of us to upgrade our smartphones every two years, offering two-year contracts linked to free or low-cost phone upgrades to keep the two-year upgrade cycle going. That feeling of ponying up just a couple hundred dollars (or tarrant county jail release for the newest, fanciest phone available has helped perpetuate the rise of the de facto two-year phone upgrade. Case in point: AT&T and Verizon marketed a "free" iPhone 12 last year for customers who buy unlimited plans and commit to a multiyear deal. And the trade-in deals were even better this year for the iPhone 13.

But even though that might still be the norm in the US, a routine upgrade isn't a thing for much of the world. 

I was born and raised in developing Asia, a region where at and t iphone a smartphone is financially unattainable for hundreds of millions of people, much less a two-year upgrade. In India, the average person needs to save two months' salary to buy the cheapest available smartphone, according to a survey published by the Alliance for Affordable Internet last August. From my perspective, the trend of routinely upgrading a phone every two years when it doesn't change that much is a privilege, one that reminds me of the stark income equality gap as well as the ever-increasing digital divide globally.

Read more:Billions of people still can't afford smartphones: That's a major problem

Beyond that, and perhaps more tangibly, I think we should consider the environmental cost of purchasing a new phone. You've read the headlines: Climate change is accelerating at rapid speed. Countries around the world keep setting new records for the highest temperatures. There are more climate-related disasters than ever before, arctic caps are melting and biodiversity is disappearing faster than we can save it. What, exactly, happens to all those discarded phones over time? Does all that plastic ever fully decompose? 

screenshot-2021-07-07-at-1-39-03-pm.png

Read more:Apple is opening up its world of iPhone recycling

Consumer electronics are responsible for tonnes of e-waste annually, which in turn contributes to the climate crisis. Experts have warned about how e-waste disposal contributes to climate change due to the chemicals released when the waste is burned, some of which are equivalent to carbon dioxide.

For years, developed countries like the US have shipped recyclable waste overseas for processing. Although that is now beginning to change, there are real costs. iPhones contain toxic materials like lead and mercury, for instance, which can harm the environment and people if disposed of improperly. And often e-waste isn't properly managed. In Southern China, there is a town called Guiyu that has become known as the world's biggest graveyard for America's electronic junk, and synonymous among environmentalists with toxic waste. The UN's 2020 Global E-waste Monitor report found that the world dumped a record 53.6 million tonnes of e-waste last year, of which the US is the world's second-largest contributor to e-waste, dumping 6.9 million tonnes.

Read more:I paid $69 to replace my iPhone battery: Here's what happened

While Apple is committed to a net zero supply chain by 2030, it's tough to argue that there's a better alternative to lower carbon consumption than less consumption. After all, Apple says the iPhone 12's end-to-end supply chain emits 70 kilograms of carbon to the atmosphere. If even 1 million people waited that extra year, we could save 70,000,000 kilograms of carbon from going into the air in a year. Imagine if it was 10 million or 100 million. It's something to think about before making that upgrade. 

The smartphone upgrade cycle has gotten longer

Even with the enticing deals offered by carriers, the upgrade cycle has seemingly lengthened. In recent years, several reports show how Americans and Europeans are more than happy to hold on to their phones for longer periods of time. In fact, in 2019 smartphone upgrades hit record lows at two of the biggest US carriers, Verizon and AT&T. Carriers like T-Mobile and Verizon seem to have responded to this by offering month-to-month plans, which offer more flexibility and options, indicating a potential departure from the "norm" of a two-year phone upgrade. 

Barring big-picture factors like the struggling global economy amid the ongoing pandemic as well as our increased mindfulness over the environment, I think this trend is persisting for a confluence of reasons. Phones today are receiving software, and therefore security, updates for longer. For instance, 2015's iPhone 6S is compatible with iOS 15, potentially dampening desires for a bi-yearly upgrade.

In addition to all this, smartphone innovation has hit a plateau, and the industry bears the hallmarks of one that's maturing: slowing smartphone sales growth along with the slower evolution of what we need, what we want and so forth. There are no big surprises here: Today's phones are getting more nice-to-have refinements rather than the awe-inspiring innovation seen just three or four years ago.

Discover the latest news and best reviews in smartphones and carriers from CNET's mobile experts.

Decreasing technological gap

Up until a couple of years ago, smartphone manufacturers had us sitting on the edge of our seats, waiting for the next design refresh. But that's not as much the case anymore. With the iPhone 12 series, 5G was probably its buzziest feature -- one that understandably ended up triggering an upgrade supercycle. But the most exciting thing for many of us at CNET was MagSafe, which is hardly new. Apple's proprietary technology, allowing you to magnetically snap on attachments, was first introduced some 15 years ago with the first-gen MacBook Pro. It was then reintroduced for the iPhone 12.

Galaxy S21 vs. iPhone 12 camera compare

When you look at what changed from the iPhone 11, you'll see the usual suspects on your list: 5G, OLED screen, new design. Admittedly there are a few more things you won't see everywhere, such as MagSafe and the Ceramic Shield, but nothing extra-special to truly write home about. Personally, the last time I was blown away by an iPhone reveal was back in 2017 when Apple introduced the iPhone X, which set new design standards for the modern-day iPhone. The iPhone X did away with the physical home button and chunky bezels of its predecessors and made way for a sleek, futuristic device that inspired the iPhone 12 family. Also, for the first time with Apple, we were able to unlock an iPhone with Face ID, Apple's facial recognition technology.

Looking at the iPhone 13, the narrative sounds familiar. We knew it wouldn't get a major technical upgrade (though that didn't stop us from wishing). While we appreciate the upgrades Apple did give the phone (a smaller notch, a larger battery and a faster screen refresh rate), the iPhone 13 is "not radically different," according to CNET's Patrick Holland. Plus a number of amazon store card login payment synchrony new iPhone features, like the 120Hz screen, currently exist on Android phones, reinforcing the notion of a decreasing technological gap in the smartphone landscape. Apple itself says the life-cycle of a typical iPhone is now three years. So the company times its new releases accordingly: We get a major redesign every three years, not two, with more minor updates in between. 

Look no further than the glitziest non-Apple flagship launch of this year for clues: Samsung's Galaxy S21 family. Here the standout change wasn't made to the hardware or software, but perhaps to its least interesting feature: its price tag. The S21 lineup has a starting price of $800 (£769, AU$1,249), which is $200 less than last year's $1,000 Galaxy S20, making for an enticing deal. 

Apart from that, major differences between the S21 and last year's S20 were mostly incremental. I remember having to pore over the specs sheet to spot salient differences as I covered Samsung's virtual Unpacked event. Refinements were made to the usual suspects, including the processor, software and 5G. This might have been part of Samsung's response to the global coronavirus pandemic, but again it lends credence to the notion of that decreasing technological gap. It was also interesting to note the items Samsung dropped from the S21 flagship family to meet that lowered price. We said goodbye to expandable storage, bundled earphones and most notoriously the in-box charger, as Samsung followed in Apple's lead -- apparently in the name of the environment. 

Read more: Here's what we know so far about Samsung's Galaxy S22

Let's also take a moment to consider the question: What makes the S21 an attractive buy? Chances are, a great camera, fast performance, battery longevity and a crisp display with narrow bezels are at the top of your list. But the truth is 2019's Galaxy S10 boasts all those features. Heck, even the Galaxy S7 from five years ago did. My point is yearly changes have become too at and t iphone to compel most people to upgrade with urgency, especially given the backdrop of rising smartphone prices.

samsung-galaxy-zflip

Are we at peak phone?

I'm not discounting foldable phones. Samsung and Huawei have made undeniable technological progress, and their bendy handsets have dramatically altered the way smartphones are used and could represent the future of the industry. But folding phones are far from the at and t iphone. Phone manufacturers and carriers in the US have moved the most innovative devices to a price that's simply beyond reach for most people. For instance, the Galaxy Fold 3 starts at $1,800 (£1,599, AU$2,499) and Huawei's Mate X2, available in China for now, costs nearly $3,000 ($2,800, £1,985, AU$3,640 converted). Until these prices hit price parity with, say, the iPhone 12 Pro or Pro Max, foldable phones are likely to remain a niche product.

Smartphone innovation has stagnated, and this is not a knock against the consumer electronics companies or the tech giants that design them. Maybe we've reached peak smartphone, and this is as far as it needs to go. It could well be part of the reason why the race to upgrade your phones is slowing.

Источник: https://www.cnet.com/tech/mobile/getting-a-new-iphone-every-2-years-is-making-less-sense-than-ever/

iphone7lineup copy

If you’re fed up with your current carrier and want to switch to a better one, you might be wondering if you can take your current iPhone with you. This is a lot more straightforward than it used to be, but there are still some things to keep in mind.

You’ll Need to Get Your iPhone Unlocked by Your Current Carrier (If It Isn’t Already)

RELATED:How to Unlock Your Cell Phone (So You Can Bring It to a New Carrier)

A few years ago, most (if not all) phones were carrier locked, which meant that your phone could only be used with the carrier you bought it from. So if you bought a Verizon smartphone, you could only use it on Verizon. Some phones still come carrier locked, some don’t.

If your phone is still locked to your carrier, you’ll need to take it in and have them unlock it for you. That allows you to use the phone on any other carrier…as long as your phone’s hardware is compatible with that carrier.

It Also Depends on Your iPhone Model

Different carriers use different cellular technology as well, so not every phone is necessarily compatible with every carrier.

RELATED:6 Reasons Why You Can't Move Your Cell Phone To Any Carrier You Want

AT&T, T-Mobile, and many global carriers use the GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) standard, while Verizon and Sprint use an older standard called CDMA (Code-Division Multiple Access). If your phone only supports one of those standards, you can’t take it to a carrier that uses the other. (You can’t use a GSM-only phone on Verizon, for example, but you can use it on AT&T and T-Mobile.)

The good news is that many phones today come with both CDMA and GSM chips inside, including some versions of the iPhone as far back as the iPhone 4. But not every iPhone has both chips.

The iPhone 6 and 6s, for example, were compatible with both standards. No matter where you bought your iPhone, you could bring it to another carrier as long as it was unlocked. This was true of the 6 Plus and 6s Plus united bay community credit union app well.

The iPhone 7, 8, X, XS, and XR are a bit different. There are two versions of each phone:

  • The Verizon and Sprint variants have CDMA and GSM chips on the inside, and can be taken to any other carrier as long as the phone is unlocked.
  • The AT&T and T-Mobile variants, however, only come at and t iphone a GSM chip. That means you can’t use an AT&T or T-Mobile iPhone on Verizon or Sprint, since those versions don’t have CDMA chips. (You can, however, take an AT&T iPhone to T-Mobile, or vice versa).

So if you’re buying an iPhone from AT&T or T-Mobile, make sure you plan on staying with one of those carriers.

If you’re planning on upgrading to the iPhone and want the freedom to move to any carrier, it would be best to get the Verizon model, since it comes factory unlocked on day one and it will work with any of the big four carriers in the US without a problem. Sprint’s iPhone model is the same way, but it must be remained locked to Sprint for a minimum of 50 days.

Lastly, the iPhone SE is similar to the other iPhones, as there are two models. There’s one that works with Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile, but there’s a different one that works with just Sprint. The former model can work on Sprint, but you won’t get full LTE speeds that Sprint offers. The iPhone SE has been discontinued, but it’s useful to keep this in mind in case you’re buying used.


It’s all a bit confusing, and the day when smartphones and carriers become much more simplified is the day when hell freezes over. Until then, we’ll have to wade through this mess, but hopefully this clears things up when you’re set to buy a new iPhone and want the best carrier freedom you can get.

Images by Apple, Darla Mack/Flickr

Источник: https://www.howtogeek.com/271333/can-i-bring-my-iphone-to-another-carrier/

Get a free iPhone 13 or iPhone 13 Pro with any AT&T unlimited plan

By Hilda Scott

Get a free iPhone 13 or iPhone 13 Pro from AT&T

Most free iPhone 13 trade-in deals require you to activate your phone on a select wireless plans. However, AT&T's free iPhone 13 deal works with each of its unlimited plans. 

Order now and you can get the $799 iPhone 13 for free from AT&T when you trade-in a eligible device. You must purchase the iPhone 13 on a qualifying installment agreement and activate or remain on one of AT&T's postpaid unlimited plans. 

Open to new and existing AT&T customers, this iPhone 13 deal is one of the best available.

The new iPhone 13 boasts a faster processor, better cameras and longer battery life than the iPhone 12. You get a 6.1-inch OLED display, Apple's new A15 Bionic chip, a 4-core GPU and up to 512GB of storage. If you prefer a smaller phone, Apple also offers the iPhone 13 mini with 5.4-inch display. 

As an alternative, you can get the $999 iPhone 13 Pro or iPhone 13 Pro Max for $1,099 from AT&T and save up to $1,000. You must trade-in an eligible device, buy the phone on a qualifying leasing plan and activate it on any AT&T unlimited postpaid plan.   

Apple's iPhone 13 Pro features a 6.1-inch OLED display with ProMotion, Apple A15 Bionic processor, 5-core GPU and up to 1TB of storage. The iPhone Pro Max affords you these same specs with a larger 6.70-inch OLED display. 

AT&T's iPhone 13 deals are for a limited time only, so be sure to get yourself one while you still can.

AT&T iPhone 13 deals

Hilda Scott uses her combined passion for gadgets and bargain shopping to bring you the best prices on all things tech. She has a bachelor’s degree in film and media studies from Hunter College and 11 years of tech and entertainment journalism. Her work has been featured on Tom’s Guide, iTechPost, Examiner.com, Parlemag, Enstars, and Latin Times. When she's not scouting for the best deals, Hilda’s catching up on her favorite TV shows and pro-wrestling matches. at and t iphone https://www.laptopmag.com/news/get-a-free-iphone-13-or-iphone-13-pro-with-any-atandt-unlimited-plan

Want to save the Earth? Then don’t buy that shiny new iPhone

On Tuesday, Apple released its latest phone – the iPhone 13. Naturally, it was presented with the customary breathless excitement. It has a smaller notch (eh?), a redesigned camera, Apple’s latest A15 “bionic” chipset and a brighter, sharper screen. And, since we’re surfing the superlative wave, the A15 has nearly 15bn transistors and a “six-core CPU design with two high-performance and four high-efficiency cores”.

Wow! But just one question: why would I buy this Wundermaschine? After all, two years ago I got an iPhone 11, which has been more than adequate for my purposes. That replaced the iPhone 6 I bought in 2014 and that replaced the iPhone 4 I got in 2010. And all of those phones are still working fine. The oldest one serves as a family backup in case someone loses or breaks a phone, the at and t iphone 6 has become a hardworking video camera and my present phone may well see me out.

That’s three phones in 11.5 years, so my “upgrade cycle” is roughly one iPhone every four years. From the viewpoint of the smartphone industry, which until now has worked on a cycle of two-yearly upgrades, I’m a dead loss. Which is strange, given that these phones don’t wear out, a fact that may be getting through to users. At any rate, they seem to be holding on to their phones for longer. And yet the manufacturers are still, like Apple, annually releasing new models that are generally just an incremental improvement on what went before rather than a great leap forward. Why?

Planned obsolescence may be good for phone companies but it’s bad for users’ wallets and even worse for the planet

There’s a name for this corporate disorder – “planned obsolescence”: deliberately ensuring that the current version of a given product will become out of date or useless within a known time period. As a marketing philosophy it goes back to the mid-1920s, when the US car industry reached saturation point and Alfred Sloan, the boss of General Motors, came up with a wheeze to keep punters buying new cars. He introduced annual cosmetic design changes – facelifts, if you like – to convince car owners to buy replacements each year. The cars themselves changed relatively little in their essence, but they looked different. Thus came about the baroque absurdities of American cars in the middle decades of the 20th century – all that chrome, outrageous colours, fins, whitewall tyres etc that you now only see in museums or in Cuba.

Planned obsolescence may be good for phone companies but it’s bad for users’ wallets and even worse for the planet, because it encourages people to treat their phones as disposable. No one really knows how much e-waste (electronic refuse) is generated every year, but one recent estimate put it at 53.6m metric tonnes in 2019. And as far as CO2 emissions are concerned, a 2018 Canadian university study estimated that building a new smartphone – and specifically, mining the rare materials inside them – accounts for 85% to 95% of the device’s total CO2 emissions for two years. That means, said one report, that “buying one new phone takes as much energy as recharging and operating a smartphone for an entire decade”.

So holding on to your existing phone would be good for your wallet and for the environment. It’s easier said than done, though, because the industry is not set up to facilitate retention and phones are not designed with ease of repair in mind. Just to give one example, try replacing the battery on a Samsung Galaxy S7. And then go and lie down in a darkened room while your partner asks what you thought you were doing with the hairdryer.

The basic problem is that modern smartphones are conceived as hermetically sealed, tightly integrated devices with, as the legal boilerplate puts it, “no user-serviceable components”. In some instances, any attempt by the user to open the case and get at the insides invalidates the warranty. This kind at and t iphone design is, the industry maintains, the only way to do it.

But it isn’t. As I write, I have a Fairphone 3+ on the desk beside me. It’s a very capable, nicely designed, dual-sim Android phone. In just seconds, I snap off the back of the case with a fingernail and remove the battery. Other modules of the phone, including the camera, can be removed and replaced without elaborate tools or expertise. And once it’s done you snap the case shut and press the power button. And you can buy it online for £399. Over in the US, the Framework laptop has just come on to the market. It’s a thin, lightweight, high-performance 13.5in notebook that can be upgraded, customised and repaired in ways that no other notebook can. It’s even available as a kit of modules that users can change and assemble themselves, installing only the modules they want as plug-in units. Think of it as Lego for geeks.

And the moral of the story? Things don’t have to be the way they have been so far. And before you buy that shiny new smartphone ask yourself: do you (or the planet) really need it?

What I’ve been reading

Out of this world
Notes from the Metaverse isa really insightful essay by LM Sacasas on his Convivial Society blog about a current Silicon Valley obsession.

Step changes
The Messy Truth About Carbon Footprints is a great piece by Sami Grover on the Undark site.

Computer says no
“Automated recruitment software is mistakenly rejecting millions of viable job candidates” according to a disturbing report in the Verge by James Vincent on the “missing unemployed”.

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/sep/18/want-to-save-the-earth-then-dont-buy-that-shiny-new-iphone

You can now pre-order the iPhone 13—here's how to tell if Apple's upgrade program is worth it

Apple iPhone launch day is here, which means that millions of people are upgrading to the new iPhone 13. If that's you, you have a multitude of options for buying it, including the iPhone upgrade program, which starts at less than $40 per month.

First introduced in 2015, the upgrade program allows customers to pay for their iPhones in 24 monthly installments. For this year's iPhone lineup, that means the $699 iPhone 13 Mini with Apple Care coverage starts at $35.33 per month, while the larger $799 iPhone 13 starts at $39.50. The flagship iPhone 13 Pro starts at $49.91 per month and the larger iPhone 13 Pro Max starts at $54.08.

After making 12 payments, customers can either keep making payments until they own the phone outright or give their "old" phone back to Apple in exchange for the latest model. Once they do that, the 24-month payment period starts all over again.

Part of the reason Apple introduced the program was because it found itself with a massive customer base that was happy to keep their existing iPhones for several years, limiting the number of people who would buy a new phone each year. With the upgrade plan, which greatly reduces the financial barrier to entry, Apple hoped to lower the sticker shock of getting the latest phone.

"It begins to look like more of the traditional way of getting it through the carrier," Apple CEO Tim Cook told CNBC in 2019. "So you wind up getting an incredible new phone that's so much better than what you had for $20, $30 a month or so."

Here's how to decide whether the upgrade program is right for you.

What are the pros of Apple's iPhone upgrade program?

On top of giving you a top-of-the-line iPhone every year, the main draw of Apple's installment plan is its affordability. Though you are still paying off the full cost of the phone over the life of the contract, there is no triple-digit charge hitting your wallet all at once.

The program also offers a lot of convenience, with Apple making the return process easy by sending you a box and shipping label to return your old iPhone in. The retailer can also take it off your hands at an Apple Store.

Apple will accept the iPhone even if it has regular wear and tear, provided that it is still in working order. Considering that the condition of a phone has a large impact on its resale value, Apple's plan may be appealing to those people who are prone to dropping their devices or who don't like to keep their phones in cases.

And with Apple Care+ insurance — which includes hardware coverage and accident protection — factored into the pricing as a smaller monthly installment rather than as one lump sum that republic bank suriname online login as much as $199, you can lay out much less cash at once and still make sure at and t iphone protected.

What are the cons?

The main drawback to the upgrade program is that until you make all 24 payments, you don't own your iPhone. That means you can't resell it, give it away or do anything to it that would otherwise impact Apple's ability to one day sell it to another customer.

Your iPhone's resale value may be higher than 50% of the phone's price tag, particularly if you've taken good care of your device. If that's the case for you, when you trade it in for a newer model after paying half of it off, you're losing out on the additional resale value.

While amount you can save ranges from model to model and the condition your phone is in, the difference between doing the upgrade plan trade-in and freedom mortgage skip a payment your phone yourself could be as much as $75 or $100.

When asked to comment on what type of consumer the upgrade plan is best at and t iphone, an Apple spokesperson directed CNBC Make It to the company's press release on iPhone pre-orders.

The plan is also designed to keep you in Apple's ecosystem, which the company is constantly monetizing in the form of a growing number of subscription services including Apple TV+, Apple Music and Apple News+. By committing to iPhone long-term, you may be setting yourself up to spend more money with Apple moving forward.

"Ninety-seven percent of Apple customers, once they're on an iPhone, stay on an iPhone," Wedbush Securities analyst Dan Ives tells CNBC Make It. "This is all about Apple looking to get further entrenched into the consumer spending ecosystem."

What about similar offerings from AT&T, Verizon and other carriers?

You don't have to buy your phone directly through Apple. The major American carriers all have their own versions of an upgrade plan. While they are largely similar to Apple's plan, they don't offer Apple Care+ coverage.

Here's a look at a few versions from popular carriers.

  • AT&T: The carrier's installment plan has 36 monthly payments instead of 24, and like Apple, allows customers to upgrade once 50% of the device cost has been paid. AT&T charges a $5 monthly fee on top of the cost of the phone in exchange for the ability to upgrade.
  • Verizon: Verizon's plan requires customers to pay 50% of the iPhone's cost before upgrading.
  • T-Mobile: Customers who want the latest iPhones are offered 18-month contracts to pay off their phones and are required to make a down payment when they receive their device. The payment ranges from $100 to $150, depending on the model you select.

Which one is right for me?

Источник: https://www.cnbc.com/2021/09/17/is-apples-iphone-upgrade-program-worth-it.html
at and t iphone

1 Replies to “At and t iphone”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *