home remedy for sore tongue and throat

The bicarbonate salt content in baking soda is truly a magical cure for healing ulcers on the tongue. Make a paste using 2 tbsp baking soda in 3. planus can be managed with medications and home remedies. Symptoms Small, pale raised areas or bumps that form a lacy network on your tongue, gums. Mouth sores often go away in 7 to 14 days with no treatment. You can do the following at home to ease your child's symptoms: Give your child over-the-counter .

Related Videos

Canker Sores - How To Get Rid Of Canker Sores - Mouth Ulcer Treatment

Home remedy for sore tongue and throat -

Nothing spoils a meal quite like a canker sore you didn’t know you had. You bite into a Cajun chicken sandwich or snack on some chips and salsa and pain suddenly screams from a small ulcer inside your mouth.

These mouth ulcers, also called canker sores, can appear on the inner part of your lips, on the inner linings of your cheeks, on your tongue, under your tongue and even in your throat. They can be white, yellow or gray surrounded by a red rim. And they can be very painful any time you drink citrus juices, eat citrus fruit or eat spicy foods. 

While canker sores typically linger for one to two weeks, the good news is you can take steps on your own to lessen the pain and help the ulcers go away faster. Here are three ways to treat canker sores:

1 - Avoid spicy, citrus and acidic foods and drinks.

These can irritate the ulcers, make them more painful and delay their healing. Eat more bland foods and rinse your mouth with water after each snack and meal so food particles don’t irritate the ulcer.

2 - Use a salt or baking soda rinse.

Mix your own warm water rinse by adding either a half-teaspoon of salt and dissolving or adding one teaspoon of baking soda to a half cup of water. Gently swish the rinse around your mouth, spit out and repeat until the glass is empty. You can do this a few times each day, as needed.

3. Let ice chips dissolve in your mouth.

Do not chew on ice cubes or put an entire ice cube in your mouth at once. Use ice chips and let one slowly dissolve to numb the pain and reduce inflammation in your mouth. This is helpful for when you accidentally irritated the ulcer, such as by drinking or eating something acidic.

If you tend to get mouth ulcers frequently, you may want to talk to your doctor. Repeated canker sores may be caused by a vitamin deficiency, allergy or certain medications.

Источник: https://www.dentek.com/blog/201912/3-ways-treat-canker-sore

Mouth sores

There are different types of mouth sores. They can occur anywhere in the mouth including bottom of the mouth, inner cheeks, gums, lips, and tongue.

Mouth sores may be caused by irritation from:

  • A sharp or broken tooth or poorly fitting dentures
  • Biting your cheek, tongue, or lip
  • Burning your mouth from hot food or drinks
  • Braces
  • Chewing tobacco

Cold sores are caused by the herpes simplex virus. They are very contagious. Often, you will have tenderness, tingling, or burning before the actual sore appears. Cold sores most often begin as blisters and then crust over. The herpes virus can live in your body for years. It only appears as a mouth sore when something triggers it, such as:

  • Another illness, especially if there is a fever
  • Hormone changes (such as menstruation)
  • Stress
  • Sun exposure

Canker sores are not contagious. They may look like a pale or yellow ulcer with a red outer ring. You may have one, or a group of them. Women seem to get them more than men. The cause of canker sores is not clear. It may be due to:

  • A weakness in your immune system (for example, from the cold or flu)
  • Hormone changes
  • Stress
  • Lack of certain vitamins and minerals in the diet, including vitamin B12 or folate

Less commonly, mouth sores can be a sign of an illness, tumor, or reaction to a medicine. This can include:

Drugs that may cause mouth sores include aspirin, beta-blockers, chemotherapy medicines, penicillamine, sulfa drugs, and phenytoin.

Mouth sores often go away in 10 to 14 days, even if you do not do anything. They sometimes last up to 6 weeks. The following steps can make you feel better:

  • Avoid hot beverages and foods, spicy and salty foods, and citrus.
  • Gargle with salt water or cool water.
  • Eat fruit-flavored ice pops. This is helpful if you have a mouth burn.
  • Take pain relievers like acetaminophen.

For canker sores:

  • Apply a thin paste of baking soda and water to the sore.
  • Mix 1 part hydrogen peroxide with 1 part water and apply this mixture to the sores using a cotton swab.
  • For more severe cases, treatments include fluocinonide gel (Lidex), anti-inflammatory amlexanox paste (Aphthasol), or chlorhexidine gluconate (Peridex) mouthwash.

Over-the-counter medicines, such as Orabase, can protect a sore inside the lip and on the gums. Blistex or Campho-Phenique may provide some relief of canker sores and fever blisters, especially if applied when the sore first appears.

Acyclovir cream 5% can also be used to help reduce the duration of the cold sore.

To help cold sores or fever blisters, you can also apply ice to the sore.

You may reduce your chance of getting common mouth sores by:

  • Avoiding very hot foods or beverages
  • Reducing stress and practicing relaxation techniques like yoga or meditation
  • Chewing slowly
  • Using a soft-bristle toothbrush
  • Visiting your dentist right away if you have a sharp or broken tooth or poorly fitting dentures

If you seem to get canker sores often, talk to your provider about taking folate and vitamin B12 to prevent outbreaks.

To prevent cancer of the mouth:

  • DO NOT smoke or use tobacco.
  • Limit alcohol to 2 drinks per day.

Wear a wide-brimmed hat to shade your lips. Wear a lip balm with SPF 15 at all times.

Call your health care provider if:

  • The sore begins soon after you start a new medicine.
  • You have large white patches on the roof of your mouth or your tongue (this may be thrush or another type of infection).
  • Your mouth sore lasts longer than 2 weeks.
  • You have a weakened immune system (for example, from HIV or cancer).
  • You have other symptoms like fever, skin rash, drooling, or difficulty swallowing.

The provider will examine you, and closely check your mouth and tongue. You will be asked questions about your medical history and symptoms.

Treatment may include:

  • A medicine that numbs the area such as lidocaine to ease pain. (DO NOT use in children.)
  • An antiviral medicine to treat herpes sores. (However, some experts do not think medicine makes the sores go away sooner.)
  • Steroid gel that you put on the sore.
  • A paste that reduces swelling or inflammation (such as Aphthasol).
  • A special type of mouthwash such as chlorhexidine gluconate (such as Peridex).

Aphthous stomatitis; Herpes simplex; Cold sores

Daniels TE, Jordan RC. Diseases of the mouth and salivary glands. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 397.

Hupp WS. Diseases of the mouth. In: Kellerman RD, Rakel DP, eds. Conn's Current Therapy 2020. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier 2020:1000-1005.

Sciubba JJ. Oral mucosal lesions. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 89.

Updated by: Josef Shargorodsky, MD, MPH, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

Источник: https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003059.htm
Size: 3.2MB)

Источник: https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/side-effects/mouth-throat

Mouth Problems, Noninjury

Do you have a mouth problem?

A mouth problem can involve the lips, tongue, gums, teeth, or any of the tissue inside the mouth.

How old are you?

Less than 3 months

Less than 3 months

3 to 11 months

3 to 11 months

1 to 11 years

1 to 11 years

12 years or older

12 years or older

Are you male or female?

  • If you are transgender or nonbinary, choose the sex that matches the body parts (such as ovaries, testes, prostate, breasts, penis, or vagina) you now have in the area where you are having symptoms.
  • If your symptoms aren’t related to those organs, you can choose the gender you identify with.
  • If you have some organs of both sexes, you may need to go through this triage tool twice (once as "male" and once as "female"). This will make sure that the tool asks the right questions for you.

Do you have an injury to your mouth or teeth?

Yes

Injury to mouth or teeth

No

Injury to mouth or teeth

Do you have a toothache or a problem with your gums?

Yes

Toothache or gum problem

No

Toothache or gum problem

Is pain or soreness in the back of your mouth and throat your main concern?

Yes

Pain or soreness in back of mouth and throat is main concern

No

Pain or soreness in back of mouth and throat is main concern

Do you think your baby may be dehydrated?

Do you think you may be dehydrated?

Are you having trouble drinking enough to replace the fluids you've lost?

Little sips of fluid usually are not enough. You need to be able to take in and keep down plenty of fluids.

Yes

Unable to maintain fluid intake

No

Able to maintain fluid intake

Are you having trouble breathing (more than a stuffy nose)?

Yes

Difficulty breathing more than a stuffy nose

No

Difficulty breathing more than a stuffy nose

Is your tongue swollen?

Could you be having a severe allergic reaction?

This is more likely if you have had a bad reaction to something in the past.

Yes

Possible severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis)

No

Possible severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis)

Could you be having symptoms of a heart attack?

In some cases, a heart attack may cause a strange feeling in part of the face, such as the jaw.

Yes

Symptoms of heart attack

No

Symptoms of heart attack

Are you having trouble eating or swallowing?

Yes

Difficulty eating or swallowing

No

Difficulty eating or swallowing

Are you having trouble moving your tongue, chewing, or swallowing?

Yes

Difficulty moving tongue, chewing, or swallowing

No

Difficulty moving tongue, chewing, or swallowing

Did the problems with chewing and swallowing start suddenly?

Yes

Difficulty moving tongue, chewing, or swallowing started suddenly

No

Difficulty moving tongue, chewing, or swallowing started suddenly

Can you swallow food or fluids at all?

Yes

Able to swallow food or fluids

No

Unable to swallow food or fluids

Is there any pain?

Has the pain lasted for more than 2 days?

Yes

Pain for more than 2 days

No

Pain for more than 2 days

Do you think you may have a fever?

Are there red streaks leading away from the area or pus draining from it?

Do you have diabetes or a weakened immune system?

What weakens the immune system in an adult or older child may be different than in a young child or baby.

Yes

Diabetes or immune problem

No

Diabetes or immune problem

Do you have any sores in or around your mouth?

Yes

Sores in or around mouth

No

Sores in or around mouth

Does your child have any mouth sores that look like blisters?

Yes

Child has mouth sores that look like blisters

No

Child has mouth sores that look like blisters

Are you concerned that a new sore may have been caused by sexual contact?

Yes

New sore may be related to sexual contact

No

New sore may be related to sexual contact

Do you think you may have a fever?

Do you feel sick?

Do you often get mouth sores?

Yes

Often gets mouth sores

Is there a crusty, honey-colored drainage coming from the sore?

Yes

Crusty, honey-colored drainage from sores around mouth

No

Crusty, honey-colored drainage from sores around mouth

Is there a black or brown coating on your tongue?

Yes

Black or brown coating on tongue

No

Black or brown coating on tongue

Have you tried home treatment for the black coating on your tongue?

Yes

Tried home treatment for black coating on tongue

No

Tried home treatment for black coating on tongue

Are there white patches in the mouth?

Yes

White patches in mouth

Are you being treated for thrush?

Thrush is a yeast infection of the mouth and tongue.

Yes

Being treated for thrush

No

Being treated for thrush

Have the thrush symptoms:

Gotten worse?

Thrush symptoms have gotten worse

Stayed the same (not better or worse)?

Thrush symptoms have not changed

Started to get better?

Thrush symptoms are improving

Did you start treatment for thrush more than 4 days ago?

Yes

Thrush treatment for more than 4 days

No

Thrush treatment for more than 4 days

Do you think that a medicine could be causing the mouth problem?

Think about whether the problem started soon after you began using a new medicine or a higher dose of a medicine.

Yes

Medicine may be causing mouth problem

No

Medicine may be causing mouth problem

Are your lips or the inside of your mouth burning, tingling, or numb?

Yes

Burning, tingling, or numbness of mouth or lips

No

Burning, tingling, or numbness of mouth or lips

Do you have burning, tingling, or numbness all the time?

Yes

Burning, tingling, or numbness of mouth or lips is constant

No

Burning, tingling, or numbness of mouth or lips is constant

Has the burning, tingling, or numbness lasted for more than 3 days?

Yes

Burning, tingling, or numbness for more than 3 days

No

Burning, tingling, or numbness for more than 3 days

Does your breath have a fruity odor?

Have you had a metallic taste in your mouth for more than 3 days?

Yes

Metallic taste for more than 3 days

No

Metallic taste for more than 3 days

Are dentures or any other type of dental device (like a crown or filling, for instance) causing pain or discomfort?

Yes

Discomfort from dentures or other dental appliance

No

Discomfort from dentures or other dental appliance

Are the dentures or other dental appliance broken?

Yes

Broken dentures or dental appliance

No

Broken dentures or dental appliance

Do you think your mouth problem may be caused by grinding your teeth?

Yes

Problem caused by grinding teeth

No

Problem caused by grinding teeth

Have you had mouth problems for more than 2 weeks?

Yes

Mouth problems for more than 2 weeks

No

Mouth problems for more than 2 weeks

Many things can affect how your body responds to a symptom and what kind of care you may need. These include:

  • Your age. Babies and older adults tend to get sicker quicker.
  • Your overall health. If you have a condition such as diabetes, HIV, cancer, or heart disease, you may need to pay closer attention to certain symptoms and seek care sooner.
  • Medicines you take. Certain medicines, such as blood thinners (anticoagulants), medicines that suppress the immune system like steroids or chemotherapy, herbal remedies, or supplements can cause symptoms or make them worse.
  • Recent health events, such as surgery or injury. These kinds of events can cause symptoms afterwards or make them more serious.
  • Your health habits and lifestyle, such as eating and exercise habits, smoking, alcohol or drug use, sexual history, and travel.

Try Home Treatment

You have answered all the questions. Based on your answers, you may be able to take care of this problem at home.

  • Try home treatment to relieve the symptoms.
  • Call your doctor if symptoms get worse or you have any concerns (for example, if symptoms are not getting better as you would expect). You may need care sooner.

You can get dehydrated when you lose a lot of fluids because of problems like vomiting or fever.

Symptoms of dehydration can range from mild to severe. For example:

  • You may feel tired and edgy (mild dehydration), or you may feel weak, not alert, and not able to think clearly (severe dehydration).
  • You may pass less urine than usual (mild dehydration), or you may not be passing urine at all (severe dehydration).

Severe dehydration means:

  • Your mouth and eyes may be extremely dry.
  • You may pass little or no urine for 12 or more hours.
  • You may not feel alert or be able to think clearly.
  • You may be too weak or dizzy to stand.
  • You may pass out.

Moderate dehydration means:

  • You may be a lot more thirsty than usual.
  • Your mouth and eyes may be drier than usual.
  • You may pass little or no urine for 8 or more hours.
  • You may feel dizzy when you stand or sit up.

Mild dehydration means:

  • You may be more thirsty than usual.
  • You may pass less urine than usual.

Severe dehydration means:

  • The baby may be very sleepy and hard to wake up.
  • The baby may have a very dry mouth and very dry eyes (no tears).
  • The baby may have no wet diapers in 12 or more hours.

Moderate dehydration means:

  • The baby may have no wet diapers in 6 hours.
  • The baby may have a dry mouth and dry eyes (fewer tears than usual).

Mild dehydration means:

  • The baby may pass a little less urine than usual.

Many prescription and nonprescription medicines can cause mouth problems. A few examples are:

  • Antibiotics.
  • Some seizure medicines.
  • Medicines used to treat cancer (chemotherapy).
  • Steroid medicines.
  • Medicines used after organ transplant.

Symptoms of difficulty breathing can range from mild to severe. For example:

  • You may feel a little out of breath but still be able to talk (mild difficulty breathing), or you may be so out of breath that you cannot talk at all (severe difficulty breathing).
  • It may be getting hard to breathe with activity (mild difficulty breathing), or you may have to work very hard to breathe even when you’re at rest (severe difficulty breathing).

Severe trouble breathing means:

  • You cannot talk at all.
  • You have to work very hard to breathe.
  • You feel like you can't get enough air.
  • You do not feel alert or cannot think clearly.

Moderate trouble breathing means:

  • It's hard to talk in full sentences.
  • It's hard to breathe with activity.

Mild trouble breathing means:

  • You feel a little out of breath but can still talk.
  • It's becoming hard to breathe with activity.

Severe trouble breathing means:

  • The child cannot eat or talk because he or she is breathing so hard.
  • The child's nostrils are flaring and the belly is moving in and out with every breath.
  • The child seems to be tiring out.
  • The child seems very sleepy or confused.

Moderate trouble breathing means:

  • The child is breathing a lot faster than usual.
  • The child has to take breaks from eating or talking to breathe.
  • The nostrils flare or the belly moves in and out at times when the child breathes.

Mild trouble breathing means:

  • The child is breathing a little faster than usual.
  • The child seems a little out of breath but can still eat or talk.

Symptoms of a stroke may include:

  • Sudden numbness, tingling, weakness, or paralysis in your face, arm, or leg, especially on only one side of your body.
  • Sudden vision changes.
  • Sudden trouble speaking.
  • Sudden confusion or trouble understanding simple statements.
  • Sudden problems with walking or balance.
  • A sudden, severe headache that is different from past headaches.

Babies can quickly get dehydrated when they lose fluids because of problems like vomiting or fever.

Symptoms of dehydration can range from mild to severe. For example:

  • The baby may be fussy or cranky (mild dehydration), or the baby may be very sleepy and hard to wake up (severe dehydration).
  • The baby may have a little less urine than usual (mild dehydration), or the baby may not be urinating at all (severe dehydration).

Pain in adults and older children

  • Severe pain (8 to 10): The pain is so bad that you can't stand it for more than a few hours, can't sleep, and can't do anything else except focus on the pain.
  • Moderate pain (5 to 7): The pain is bad enough to disrupt your normal activities and your sleep, but you can tolerate it for hours or days. Moderate can also mean pain that comes and goes even if it's severe when it's there.
  • Mild pain (1 to 4): You notice the pain, but it is not bad enough to disrupt your sleep or activities.

Pain in children under 3 years

It can be hard to tell how much pain a baby or toddler is in.

  • Severe pain (8 to 10): The pain is so bad that the baby cannot sleep, cannot get comfortable, and cries constantly no matter what you do. The baby may kick, make fists, or grimace.
  • Moderate pain (5 to 7): The baby is very fussy, clings to you a lot, and may have trouble sleeping but responds when you try to comfort him or her.
  • Mild pain (1 to 4): The baby is a little fussy and clings to you a little but responds when you try to comfort him or her.

Symptoms of infection may include:

  • Increased pain, swelling, warmth, or redness in or around the area.
  • Red streaks leading from the area.
  • Pus draining from the area.
  • A fever.

To do home treatment for a black or coated tongue:

  • Brush your tongue daily with a soft-bristled toothbrush and toothpaste or a solution of 1 part hydrogen peroxide to 2 parts water.
  • Scrape the tongue with the edge of a spoon to remove the furry coating.
  • Do not use tobacco.

Bismuth products, such as Pepto-Bismol, can turn your tongue black. The black color will go away after you stop taking the medicine.

Sudden drooling and trouble swallowing can be signs of a serious problem called epiglottitis. This problem can happen at any age.

The epiglottis is a flap of tissue at the back of the throat that you can't see when you look in the mouth. When you swallow, it closes to keep food and fluids out of the tube (trachea) that leads to the lungs. If the epiglottis becomes inflamed or infected, it can swell and quickly block the airway. This makes it very hard to breathe.

The symptoms start suddenly. A person with epiglottitis is likely to seem very sick, have a fever, drool, and have trouble breathing, swallowing, and making sounds. In the case of a child, you may notice the child trying to sit up and lean forward with his or her jaw forward, because it's easier to breathe in this position.

Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) may include:

  • The sudden appearance of raised, red areas (hives) all over the body.
  • Rapid swelling of the throat, mouth, or tongue.
  • Trouble breathing.
  • Passing out (losing consciousness). Or you may feel very lightheaded or suddenly feel weak, confused, or restless.

A severe reaction can be life-threatening. If you have had a bad allergic reaction to a substance before and are exposed to it again, treat any symptoms as an emergency. Even if the symptoms are mild at first, they may quickly become very severe.

Symptoms of a heart attack may include:

  • Chest pain or pressure, or a strange feeling in the chest.
  • Sweating.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Nausea or vomiting.
  • Pain, pressure, or a strange feeling in the back, neck, jaw, or upper belly, or in one or both shoulders or arms.
  • Lightheadedness or sudden weakness.
  • A fast or irregular heartbeat.

For men and women, the most common symptom is chest pain or pressure. But women are somewhat more likely than men to have other symptoms, like shortness of breath, nausea, and back or jaw pain.

Certain health conditions and medicines weaken the immune system's ability to fight off infection and illness. Some examples in adults are:

  • Diseases such as diabetes, cancer, heart disease, and HIV/AIDS.
  • Long-term alcohol and drug problems.
  • Steroid medicines, which may be used to treat a variety of conditions.
  • Chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer.
  • Other medicines used to treat autoimmune disease.
  • Medicines taken after organ transplant.
  • Not having a spleen.

Certain health conditions and medicines weaken the immune system's ability to fight off infection and illness. Some examples in children are:

  • Diseases such as diabetes, cystic fibrosis, sickle cell disease, and congenital heart disease.
  • Steroid medicines, which are used to treat a variety of conditions.
  • Medicines taken after organ transplant.
  • Chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer.
  • Not having a spleen.

Seek Care Today

Based on your answers, you may need care soon. The problem probably will not get better without medical care.

  • Call your doctor today to discuss the symptoms and arrange for care.
  • If you cannot reach your doctor or you don't have one, seek care today.
  • If it is evening, watch the symptoms and seek care in the morning.
  • If the symptoms get worse, seek care sooner.

Make an Appointment

Based on your answers, the problem may not improve without medical care.

  • Make an appointment to see your doctor in the next 1 to 2 weeks.
  • If appropriate, try home treatment while you are waiting for the appointment.
  • If symptoms get worse or you have any concerns, call your doctor. You may need care sooner.

Seek Care Now

Based on your answers, you may need care right away. The problem is likely to get worse without medical care.

  • Call your doctor now to discuss the symptoms and arrange for care.
  • If you cannot reach your doctor or you don't have one, seek care in the next hour.
  • You do not need to call an ambulance unless:
    • You cannot travel safely either by driving yourself or by having someone else drive you.
    • You are in an area where heavy traffic or other problems may slow you down.

Call 911 Now

Based on your answers, you need emergency care.

Call 911 or other emergency services now.

Sometimes people don't want to call 911. They may think that their symptoms aren't serious or that they can just get someone else to drive them. Or they might be concerned about the cost. But based on your answers, the safest and quickest way for you to get the care you need is to call 911 for medical transport to the hospital.

Seek Care Today

Based on your answers, you may need care soon. The problem probably will not get better without medical care.

  • Call your dentist today to discuss the symptoms and arrange for care.
  • If you cannot reach your dentist or you don't have one, seek care today.
  • If it is evening, watch the symptoms and seek care in the morning.
  • If the symptoms get worse, seek care sooner.

Make an Appointment

Based on your answers, the problem may not improve without medical care.

  • Make an appointment to see your dentist in the next 1 to 2 weeks.
  • If appropriate, try home treatment while you are waiting for the appointment.
  • If symptoms get worse or you have any concerns, call your dentist. You may need care sooner.

Call 911 Now

Based on your answers, you need emergency care.

Call 911 or other emergency services now.

After you call 911, the operator may tell you to chew 1 adult-strength (325 mg) or 2 to 4 low-dose (81 mg) aspirin. Wait for an ambulance. Do not try to drive yourself.

Sometimes people don't want to call 911. They may think that their symptoms aren't serious or that they can just get someone else to drive them. Or they might be concerned about the cost. But based on your answers, the safest and quickest way for you to get the care you need is to call 911 for medical transport to the hospital.

Sore Throat and Other Throat Problems

Mouth and Dental Injuries

Toothache and Gum Problems

Источник: https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/mouth

What causes a sore tongue?

Common causes of sore tongue

Many things can cause a sore tongue. The most common causes include:

  • tongue injury, such as a bite or burn
  • a geographic tongue
  • a mouth ulcer
  • oral thrush
  • lichen planus

Tongue injury

If you bite your tongue or burn it with hot food or drink, you can develop a painful sore or swelling that usually lasts for a few days.

A tongue injury tends to heal on its own and usually needs no specific treatment.

While shallow tongue injuries tend to heal quickly, deeper tongue injuries can take up to three weeks to heal. If you have a deep tongue injury, see your doctor or go to hospital as you may need stitches to help the tongue heal properly.

Geographic tongue

What is geographic tongue?

Geographic tongue is a harmless condition in which irregular, smooth red patches and wavy white lines develop on the top and sides of the tongue. The condition is called geographic tongue because the patches often look like the outline of a map.

The patches may feel sore or burn, especially when you eat hot or spicy foods.

The exact cause of geographic tongue is unknown, but there is no specific treatment for it. However, you can minimise any discomfort by:

  • avoiding foods that make your tongue feel more sore
  • using protective, numbing or anti-inflammatory gels from a pharmacy

Mouth ulcer

What is a mouth ulcer?

Mouth ulcers are small, often painful sores that usually appear on the inner surface of the cheeks, lips or underside of the tongue. They are common and tend to go away on their own within a week or two.

You can have more than one ulcer at a time and they can change in size.

Some people develop a type of recurrent mouth ulcer known as aphthous ulcers or canker sores. These ulcers are not infectious and are not caused by an underlying illness.

Mouth ulcers usually heal on their own in time. Self-care measures can be used to help them heal and reduce their risk of returning. These self-care measures can involve avoiding things that irritate your mouth and using non-prescription treatments.

If you have an ulcer that has lasted longer than three weeks, see your doctor.

Read more about mouth ulcers.

Oral thrush

What is oral thrush?

Oral thrush is a common infection that is caused by a fungus called Candida. Oral thrush causes white patches (plaques) to develop in the mouth. It can make your tongue and gums feel sore.

Other symptoms of oral thrush include:

  • not tasting things properly
  • an unpleasant taste in the mouth
  • cracks at the corners of the mouth
  • difficulty eating and drinking

Oral thrush is not contagious in adults, but babies with thrush can pass the infection to their mothers through breastfeeding.

Some people are more likely to get thrush than others. Read about the risk factors and causes of oral thrush.

Oral thrush will not go away without treatment and it can spread to other parts of the body.

Oral thrush can be treated with antifungal mouth treatments, such as a mouth gel that you can buy from a pharmacy without a prescription.

Read more about how to treat oral thrush.

Lichen planus

Lichen planus is a long-term rash that can affect different parts of your body, including the inside of your mouth.

When it affects the mouth, lichen planus can cause a white lacy pattern and painful patches on the tongue, gums, and insides of the cheeks.

The cause of lichen planus is unknown, but the condition is not contagious.

Lichen planus in the mouth can last for several years. But once it goes away, it usually does not come back.

You can use several self-care methods to reduce tongue pain from lichen planus, including:

  • avoiding salty, spicy or acidic foods if they make your mouth sore
  • avoiding alcohol in food, drinks, and mouthwashes

Read more about lichen planus.

How to heal a sore tongue at home

If you have a sore tongue, try the following self-help tips at home:

  • avoid eating hot, spicy, salty, hard or acidic foods - these may irritate your tongue
  • rinse your mouth with warm salt water
  • avoid smoking and drinking alcohol
  • take painkillers
  • use a soft toothbrush to brush your teeth
  • use a toothpaste that doesn't contain the ingredient sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), which can irritate the tongue
  • drink cool drinks through a straw

If you have a sore tongue, a pharmacist may be able to give you advice on:

  • the cause
  • if you need to see a doctor or dentist
  • non-prescription treatments to help with pain and irritation

When to see a doctor or dentist about a sore tongue:

  • if you have persistent pain and you haven't accidentally bitten or burned your tongue
  • you have a growth or lump in your mouth or on your tongue or lips
  • you have an ulcer on your tongue, lips, or in the mouth lasting more than three weeks
  • you have a persistent and unexplained lump in the neck
  • you have a patch of dry, scaly skin on your lips that doesn't heal
  • you have white or red patches on your tongue or in your mouth
  • you have a dark spot in your mouth and have light-colored skin
  • your symptoms last longer than two weeks or improve and then return
  • you have mouth pain or trouble eating, swallowing or talking
  • your dentures don't fit well

Other causes of sore tongue

Other causes of a sore tongue include:

What is a sore tongue?

A sore or painful tongue is any kind of tongue discomfort, such as pain or a burning sensation. This symptom often has an obvious cause, such as a bite or burn. However, it can be a sign of a less obvious and more serious problem.

In many cases, a sore tongue is short-lived and easily treated.

Источник: https://www.livehealthily.com/tongue-pain/what-causes-a-sore-tongue

How to treat a sore tongue

The tongue is sensitive to pain. Canker sores, injuries, or infections may cause discomfort across part or all of the tongue. Treatments will largely depend on the cause.

A person can treat a sore tongue with some simple home remedies. However, certain health conditions may trigger tongue pain, and these will need medical attention.

This article explores home remedies and different medications for a sore tongue, as well as potential causes of pain.

Sore tongue home remedies

There are many ways to treat a sore tongue. Home remedies and other methods include:

Maintaining good oral hygiene

Keeping the mouth clean could help heal a sore tongue. Brushing teeth and mouth rinsing reduces harmful bacteria, which lowers the risk of infection.

A person should use a soft toothbrush to avoid irritating and scratching the mouth. They should also avoid using strong mouthwash, as this could aggravate sore tongues.

Sucking on ice

Sucking ice chips the discomfort of a sore tongue. People should take care not to chew or bite into the ice, which could damage the tooth enamel or break a tooth.

A person should leave ice chips out of the freezer for a few seconds before putting them in the mouth. This melts the surface, reducing the risk of an ice chip sticking to the tongue.

Rinsing the mouth with saltwater

If a person has a tongue injury, keeping the wound clean could promote healing. The American Dental Association (ADA) suggest a gentle saltwater rinse may reduce the risk of infection.

To create a rinse, add half a teaspoon of salt to a small glass of warm water. Gently swill the saltwater around the mouth a few times, then spit.

Rinsing the mouth with cool chamomile tea

According to the , chamomile is a herbal remedy that can soothe mouth sores. Although it is generally safe, there is limited evidence for its benefits.

People commonly consume chamomile as an infusion or in tea. To treat a mouth sore, a person can gently rinse the mouth with cooled tea. They can also soak a chamomile tea bag and press lightly on to the affected area.

Using sage as a herbal remedy

Sage is a herbal remedy and could reduce inflammation of the mouth. A person should steep sage leaves in boiling water and allow it to cool before rinsing. This may help alleviate canker sores on the tongue.

More research is needed to understand the full effects of sage on a sore throat or tongue. Currently, there is no solid evidence that the herb effectively treats any medical condition.

Applying honey to the sore

A notes that honey has antibacterial properties and may promote wound healing after a burn. Winchester Hospital suggests this natural substance could help ease the symptoms of canker sores.

In an , participants smeared honey on their canker sores 4 times every day for 5 days. Afterward, they reported reductions in pain and ulcer size.

Being mindful of foods and drinks

Spicy, salty, or acidic foods may irritate the tongue and mouth. People should try to cut out spicy curries and meals that contain a lot of citric acid until a sore tongue heals. They should also avoid crunchy foods with sharp edges, such as chips, which could injure the tongue.

Soda can also irritate sore tongues or canker sores, so if a person wants to drink these beverages, they should use a straw.

Avoiding smoking

Tobacco can wound healing and irritate the tongue. People with a sore tongue who smoke regularly may wish to try nicotine patches to help break their habit.

Learn more about tips to quit smoking here.

Sore tongue medicines

If home remedies are not effective, a person may consider using over-the-counter (OTC) products, such as pain relievers. For infected sores, a doctor may prescribe antibiotics.

Pain medication

OTC pain medication may reduce the discomfort of a sore tongue. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, could help reduce swelling. For severe canker sores, a doctor may prescribe stronger corticosteroids to treat swelling and pain.

Topical gel

Topical gels may ease canker sore pain by numbing the area. According to the ADA, they also provide a barrier against further irritation. This medication is available over the counter, but stronger topical gels may need a prescription.

Prescription mouthwash

A doctor may prescribe a medicated mouthwash to ease painful tongue sores. Therapeutic or medicated mouthwashes contain active ingredients that cosmetic mouthwashes do not.

Vitamin supplements

A lack of certain vitamins may of developing canker sores. People can take supplements to reduce this risk and support their immune system.

However, people who undergo chemotherapy should speak to their doctor before they start taking vitamin supplements.

Medication to stimulate saliva

According to the ADA, dry mouth may cause oral thrush. People may experience a dry mouth after taking some medications. To treat this, a doctor can prescribe medication to encourage the mouth to produce saliva. Drinking enough fluids and chewing sugar-free gum may also help.

Antibiotics

If a sore tongue is due to a bacterial infection, a doctor may prescribe antibiotics. Symptoms include pain, inflammation, and the wound not showing any signs of healing.

Causes

There are many triggers for a sore tongue, with some more serious than others. These can include:

Canker sores

Canker sores are small ulcers that are usually white or grey, and can sometimes appear with a red border. They usually heal within .

Trauma

It is easy to burn or bite the tongue when eating food. Loose wires from a brace or broken dentures may also injure the tongue.

If a person breaks their braces or dentures, they should get them fixed as soon as possible to prevent further damage to the tongue and mouth.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy and some medications sores on the tongue. These sores should heal after the treatment ends. A prescription mouthwash may help. People should seek medical advice when they choose a mouthwash, as there are several options.

Oral thrush

According to the ADA, some fungal infections affect the tongue. Oral thrush causes red and white patches on the tongue and in the mouth. Other symptoms may include pain, bad breath, and difficulty swallowing.

When to see a doctor

A person may wish to seek medical advice if a canker sore lasts for longer than 2 weeks, if there are multiple sores, or if an ulcer is large. A doctor may suggest medication or an oral bandage.

People should see a dentist if a denture, brace, or tooth injures the tongue. This will help prevent further damage to the mouth.

Outlook

Minor cuts, burns, and canker sores should heal within 2 weeks. A sore tongue as a side effect of cancer treatment may appear after treatment starts and may persist until it ends. People can seek medical advice to ease painful symptoms.

Summary

Pain and discomfort can affect all or part of the tongue. A canker sore causes pain and irritation in a small area, while oral thrush may affect the entire tongue surface.

The treatment for a sore tongue depends on what causes it. In many cases, simple home remedies may ease pain and aid healing.

People can reduce the risk of tongue injuries from orthodontics and dentures with regular dental checkups. Good oral hygiene can help decrease the risk of oral infections and keep the mouth healthy.

Источник: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/sore-tongue-treatment

Home remedy for sore tongue and throat -

Canker sores

My baby has a sore inside his mouth that seems to bother him when he's eating. Could it be a canker sore?

Canker sores, also called mouth ulcers, are rare in babies. In fact, they're rare in children under 10, but it's possible that this is what's causing your baby's discomfort.

A canker sore is a roundish white or yellow open sore surrounded by a red halo. Canker sores usually appear inside the cheeks or lips, as well as on the tongue, gums, and soft palate (the soft tissue around and behind the hard roof of the mouth). They usually appear individually but can also show up in small clusters.

inside of lip with a few white ovals

© Dr. P. Marazzi / Science Source

Canker sores aren't serious, but they can be painful, especially when your baby is eating or drinking or when they're touched.

What causes canker sores?

It's not really clear what causes canker sores. They tend to run in families, so they appear to have a genetic link. Some people are prone to getting sores when they're under stress.

Canker sores can also appear after a trauma to the mouth, such as a break in the skin caused by a dental procedure or by biting the tongue or cheek. There's some evidence that food allergies, viral infections, and dietary deficiencies (in particular, not getting enough iron, folic acid, zinc, or B12) can trigger canker sores.

Is a canker sore the same as a cold sore?

No, canker sores and cold sores (or fever blisters) are two different things. Canker sores are not contagious, and they appear in the soft tissues of the mouth. Cold sores (caused by the herpes simplex virus) are contagious and generally appear on the outside of the lips.

How should I treat a canker sore?

Canker sores almost always go away on their own, usually in a week to ten days (although large ones can take longer). The pain often subsides in three or four days.

In the meantime, you might want to apply ice to the sore to help numb the area. If your baby's eating solid food, cold or frozen foods – such as ice pops – may also do the trick. But don't give him hot, spicy food or citrus, which could make his mouth hurt more.

You might try a teething gel or cream, but apply it carefully – touching the sore can hurt. For a home remedy, combine 1 part hydrogen peroxide and 1 part water. Dab (gently!) on the canker sore with a cotton swab. Follow by dabbing on a little milk of magnesia. Do this three or four times a day to soothe the area and help it heal.

If your baby seems really uncomfortable, ask his doctor about giving him the proper dose of an over-the-counter pain reliever, like acetaminophen or ibuprofen. (Never give your baby aspirin, which can trigger a rare but deadly disease called Reye's syndrome in children with a viral illness.)

Should I take my baby to the doctor if he has a canker sore?

If you're not sure whether your baby's sore is a canker sore or it lasts longer than a couple of weeks, take him to the doctor for a diagnosis.

Also talk with his doctor if your baby has any other symptoms – like a rash, swollen lymph nodes, or a fever – or if the sore makes it difficult for your baby to drink adequate amounts of liquid. Talk with the doctor if your baby seems to be getting canker sores frequently, too.

Источник: https://www.babycenter.com/health/illness-and-infection/canker-sores_1464984

How to treat a sore tongue

The tongue is sensitive to pain. Canker sores, injuries, or infections may cause discomfort across part or all of the tongue. Treatments will largely depend on the cause.

A person can treat a sore tongue with some simple home remedies. However, certain health conditions may trigger tongue pain, and these will need medical attention.

This article explores home remedies and different medications for a sore tongue, as well as potential causes of pain.

Sore tongue home remedies

There are many ways to treat a sore tongue. Home remedies and other methods include:

Maintaining good oral hygiene

Keeping the mouth clean could help heal a sore tongue. Brushing teeth and mouth rinsing reduces harmful bacteria, which lowers the risk of infection.

A person should use a soft toothbrush to avoid irritating and scratching the mouth. They should also avoid using strong mouthwash, as this could aggravate sore tongues.

Sucking on ice

Sucking ice chips the discomfort of a sore tongue. People should take care not to chew or bite into the ice, which could damage the tooth enamel or break a tooth.

A person should leave ice chips out of the freezer for a few seconds before putting them in the mouth. This melts the surface, reducing the risk of an ice chip sticking to the tongue.

Rinsing the mouth with saltwater

If a person has a tongue injury, keeping the wound clean could promote healing. The American Dental Association (ADA) suggest a gentle saltwater rinse may reduce the risk of infection.

To create a rinse, add half a teaspoon of salt to a small glass of warm water. Gently swill the saltwater around the mouth a few times, then spit.

Rinsing the mouth with cool chamomile tea

According to the , chamomile is a herbal remedy that can soothe mouth sores. Although it is generally safe, there is limited evidence for its benefits.

People commonly consume chamomile as an infusion or in tea. To treat a mouth sore, a person can gently rinse the mouth with cooled tea. They can also soak a chamomile tea bag and press lightly on to the affected area.

Using sage as a herbal remedy

Sage is a herbal remedy and could reduce inflammation of the mouth. A person should steep sage leaves in boiling water and allow it to cool before rinsing. This may help alleviate canker sores on the tongue.

More research is needed to understand the full effects of sage on a sore throat or tongue. Currently, there is no solid evidence that the herb effectively treats any medical condition.

Applying honey to the sore

A notes that honey has antibacterial properties and may promote wound healing after a burn. Winchester Hospital suggests this natural substance could help ease the symptoms of canker sores.

In an , participants smeared honey on their canker sores 4 times every day for 5 days. Afterward, they reported reductions in pain and ulcer size.

Being mindful of foods and drinks

Spicy, salty, or acidic foods may irritate the tongue and mouth. People should try to cut out spicy curries and meals that contain a lot of citric acid until a sore tongue heals. They should also avoid crunchy foods with sharp edges, such as chips, which could injure the tongue.

Soda can also irritate sore tongues or canker sores, so if a person wants to drink these beverages, they should use a straw.

Avoiding smoking

Tobacco can wound healing and irritate the tongue. People with a sore tongue who smoke regularly may wish to try nicotine patches to help break their habit.

Learn more about tips to quit smoking here.

Sore tongue medicines

If home remedies are not effective, a person may consider using over-the-counter (OTC) products, such as pain relievers. For infected sores, a doctor may prescribe antibiotics.

Pain medication

OTC pain medication may reduce the discomfort of a sore tongue. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, could help reduce swelling. For severe canker sores, a doctor may prescribe stronger corticosteroids to treat swelling and pain.

Topical gel

Topical gels may ease canker sore pain by numbing the area. According to the ADA, they also provide a barrier against further irritation. This medication is available over the counter, but stronger topical gels may need a prescription.

Prescription mouthwash

A doctor may prescribe a medicated mouthwash to ease painful tongue sores. Therapeutic or medicated mouthwashes contain active ingredients that cosmetic mouthwashes do not.

Vitamin supplements

A lack of certain vitamins may of developing canker sores. People can take supplements to reduce this risk and support their immune system.

However, people who undergo chemotherapy should speak to their doctor before they start taking vitamin supplements.

Medication to stimulate saliva

According to the ADA, dry mouth may cause oral thrush. People may experience a dry mouth after taking some medications. To treat this, a doctor can prescribe medication to encourage the mouth to produce saliva. Drinking enough fluids and chewing sugar-free gum may also help.

Antibiotics

If a sore tongue is due to a bacterial infection, a doctor may prescribe antibiotics. Symptoms include pain, inflammation, and the wound not showing any signs of healing.

Causes

There are many triggers for a sore tongue, with some more serious than others. These can include:

Canker sores

Canker sores are small ulcers that are usually white or grey, and can sometimes appear with a red border. They usually heal within .

Trauma

It is easy to burn or bite the tongue when eating food. Loose wires from a brace or broken dentures may also injure the tongue.

If a person breaks their braces or dentures, they should get them fixed as soon as possible to prevent further damage to the tongue and mouth.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy and some medications sores on the tongue. These sores should heal after the treatment ends. A prescription mouthwash may help. People should seek medical advice when they choose a mouthwash, as there are several options.

Oral thrush

According to the ADA, some fungal infections affect the tongue. Oral thrush causes red and white patches on the tongue and in the mouth. Other symptoms may include pain, bad breath, and difficulty swallowing.

When to see a doctor

A person may wish to seek medical advice if a canker sore lasts for longer than 2 weeks, if there are multiple sores, or if an ulcer is large. A doctor may suggest medication or an oral bandage.

People should see a dentist if a denture, brace, or tooth injures the tongue. This will help prevent further damage to the mouth.

Outlook

Minor cuts, burns, and canker sores should heal within 2 weeks. A sore tongue as a side effect of cancer treatment may appear after treatment starts and may persist until it ends. People can seek medical advice to ease painful symptoms.

Summary

Pain and discomfort can affect all or part of the tongue. A canker sore causes pain and irritation in a small area, while oral thrush may affect the entire tongue surface.

The treatment for a sore tongue depends on what causes it. In many cases, simple home remedies may ease pain and aid healing.

People can reduce the risk of tongue injuries from orthodontics and dentures with regular dental checkups. Good oral hygiene can help decrease the risk of oral infections and keep the mouth healthy.

Источник: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/sore-tongue-treatment

Mouth sores

There are different types of mouth sores. They can occur anywhere in the mouth including bottom of the mouth, inner cheeks, gums, lips, and tongue.

Mouth sores may be caused by irritation from:

  • A sharp or broken tooth or poorly fitting dentures
  • Biting your cheek, tongue, or lip
  • Burning your mouth from hot food or drinks
  • Braces
  • Chewing tobacco

Cold sores are caused by the herpes simplex virus. They are very contagious. Often, you will have tenderness, tingling, or burning before the actual sore appears. Cold sores most often begin as blisters and then crust over. The herpes virus can live in your body for years. It only appears as a mouth sore when something triggers it, such as:

  • Another illness, especially if there is a fever
  • Hormone changes (such as menstruation)
  • Stress
  • Sun exposure

Canker sores are not contagious. They may look like a pale or yellow ulcer with a red outer ring. You may have one, or a group of them. Women seem to get them more than men. The cause of canker sores is not clear. It may be due to:

  • A weakness in your immune system (for example, from the cold or flu)
  • Hormone changes
  • Stress
  • Lack of certain vitamins and minerals in the diet, including vitamin B12 or folate

Less commonly, mouth sores can be a sign of an illness, tumor, or reaction to a medicine. This can include:

Drugs that may cause mouth sores include aspirin, beta-blockers, chemotherapy medicines, penicillamine, sulfa drugs, and phenytoin.

Mouth sores often go away in 10 to 14 days, even if you do not do anything. They sometimes last up to 6 weeks. The following steps can make you feel better:

  • Avoid hot beverages and foods, spicy and salty foods, and citrus.
  • Gargle with salt water or cool water.
  • Eat fruit-flavored ice pops. This is helpful if you have a mouth burn.
  • Take pain relievers like acetaminophen.

For canker sores:

  • Apply a thin paste of baking soda and water to the sore.
  • Mix 1 part hydrogen peroxide with 1 part water and apply this mixture to the sores using a cotton swab.
  • For more severe cases, treatments include fluocinonide gel (Lidex), anti-inflammatory amlexanox paste (Aphthasol), or chlorhexidine gluconate (Peridex) mouthwash.

Over-the-counter medicines, such as Orabase, can protect a sore inside the lip and on the gums. Blistex or Campho-Phenique may provide some relief of canker sores and fever blisters, especially if applied when the sore first appears.

Acyclovir cream 5% can also be used to help reduce the duration of the cold sore.

To help cold sores or fever blisters, you can also apply ice to the sore.

You may reduce your chance of getting common mouth sores by:

  • Avoiding very hot foods or beverages
  • Reducing stress and practicing relaxation techniques like yoga or meditation
  • Chewing slowly
  • Using a soft-bristle toothbrush
  • Visiting your dentist right away if you have a sharp or broken tooth or poorly fitting dentures

If you seem to get canker sores often, talk to your provider about taking folate and vitamin B12 to prevent outbreaks.

To prevent cancer of the mouth:

  • DO NOT smoke or use tobacco.
  • Limit alcohol to 2 drinks per day.

Wear a wide-brimmed hat to shade your lips. Wear a lip balm with SPF 15 at all times.

Call your health care provider if:

  • The sore begins soon after you start a new medicine.
  • You have large white patches on the roof of your mouth or your tongue (this may be thrush or another type of infection).
  • Your mouth sore lasts longer than 2 weeks.
  • You have a weakened immune system (for example, from HIV or cancer).
  • You have other symptoms like fever, skin rash, drooling, or difficulty swallowing.

The provider will examine you, and closely check your mouth and tongue. You will be asked questions about your medical history and symptoms.

Treatment may include:

  • A medicine that numbs the area such as lidocaine to ease pain. (DO NOT use in children.)
  • An antiviral medicine to treat herpes sores. (However, some experts do not think medicine makes the sores go away sooner.)
  • Steroid gel that you put on the sore.
  • A paste that reduces swelling or inflammation (such as Aphthasol).
  • A special type of mouthwash such as chlorhexidine gluconate (such as Peridex).

Aphthous stomatitis; Herpes simplex; Cold sores

Daniels TE, Jordan RC. Diseases of the mouth and salivary glands. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 397.

Hupp WS. Diseases of the mouth. In: Kellerman RD, Rakel DP, eds. Conn's Current Therapy 2020. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier 2020:1000-1005.

Sciubba JJ. Oral mucosal lesions. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 89.

Updated by: Josef Shargorodsky, MD, MPH, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

Источник: https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003059.htm

Mouth Problems, Noninjury

Do you have a mouth problem?

A mouth problem can involve the lips, tongue, gums, teeth, or any of the tissue inside the mouth.

How old are you?

Less than 3 months

Less than 3 months

3 to 11 months

3 to 11 months

1 to 11 years

1 to 11 years

12 years or older

12 years or older

Are you male or female?

  • If you are transgender or nonbinary, choose the sex that matches the body parts (such as ovaries, testes, prostate, breasts, penis, or vagina) you now have in the area where you are having symptoms.
  • If your symptoms aren’t related to those organs, you can choose the gender you identify with.
  • If you have some organs of both sexes, you may need to go through this triage tool twice (once as "male" and once as "female"). This will make sure that the tool asks the right questions for you.

Do you have an injury to your mouth or teeth?

Yes

Injury to mouth or teeth

No

Injury to mouth or teeth

Do you have a toothache or a problem with your gums?

Yes

Toothache or gum problem

No

Toothache or gum problem

Is pain or soreness in the back of your mouth and throat your main concern?

Yes

Pain or soreness in back of mouth and throat is main concern

No

Pain or soreness in back of mouth and throat is main concern

Do you think your baby may be dehydrated?

Do you think you may be dehydrated?

Are you having trouble drinking enough to replace the fluids you've lost?

Little sips of fluid usually are not enough. You need to be able to take in and keep down plenty of fluids.

Yes

Unable to maintain fluid intake

No

Able to maintain fluid intake

Are you having trouble breathing (more than a stuffy nose)?

Yes

Difficulty breathing more than a stuffy nose

No

Difficulty breathing more than a stuffy nose

Is your tongue swollen?

Could you be having a severe allergic reaction?

This is more likely if you have had a bad reaction to something in the past.

Yes

Possible severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis)

No

Possible severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis)

Could you be having symptoms of a heart attack?

In some cases, a heart attack may cause a strange feeling in part of the face, such as the jaw.

Yes

Symptoms of heart attack

No

Symptoms of heart attack

Are you having trouble eating or swallowing?

Yes

Difficulty eating or swallowing

No

Difficulty eating or swallowing

Are you having trouble moving your tongue, chewing, or swallowing?

Yes

Difficulty moving tongue, chewing, or swallowing

No

Difficulty moving tongue, chewing, or swallowing

Did the problems with chewing and swallowing start suddenly?

Yes

Difficulty moving tongue, chewing, or swallowing started suddenly

No

Difficulty moving tongue, chewing, or swallowing started suddenly

Can you swallow food or fluids at all?

Yes

Able to swallow food or fluids

No

Unable to swallow food or fluids

Is there any pain?

Has the pain lasted for more than 2 days?

Yes

Pain for more than 2 days

No

Pain for more than 2 days

Do you think you may have a fever?

Are there red streaks leading away from the area or pus draining from it?

Do you have diabetes or a weakened immune system?

What weakens the immune system in an adult or older child may be different than in a young child or baby.

Yes

Diabetes or immune problem

No

Diabetes or immune problem

Do you have any sores in or around your mouth?

Yes

Sores in or around mouth

No

Sores in or around mouth

Does your child have any mouth sores that look like blisters?

Yes

Child has mouth sores that look like blisters

No

Child has mouth sores that look like blisters

Are you concerned that a new sore may have been caused by sexual contact?

Yes

New sore may be related to sexual contact

No

New sore may be related to sexual contact

Do you think you may have a fever?

Do you feel sick?

Do you often get mouth sores?

Yes

Often gets mouth sores

Is there a crusty, honey-colored drainage coming from the sore?

Yes

Crusty, honey-colored drainage from sores around mouth

No

Crusty, honey-colored drainage from sores around mouth

Is there a black or brown coating on your tongue?

Yes

Black or brown coating on tongue

No

Black or brown coating on tongue

Have you tried home treatment for the black coating on your tongue?

Yes

Tried home treatment for black coating on tongue

No

Tried home treatment for black coating on tongue

Are there white patches in the mouth?

Yes

White patches in mouth

Are you being treated for thrush?

Thrush is a yeast infection of the mouth and tongue.

Yes

Being treated for thrush

No

Being treated for thrush

Have the thrush symptoms:

Gotten worse?

Thrush symptoms have gotten worse

Stayed the same (not better or worse)?

Thrush symptoms have not changed

Started to get better?

Thrush symptoms are improving

Did you start treatment for thrush more than 4 days ago?

Yes

Thrush treatment for more than 4 days

No

Thrush treatment for more than 4 days

Do you think that a medicine could be causing the mouth problem?

Think about whether the problem started soon after you began using a new medicine or a higher dose of a medicine.

Yes

Medicine may be causing mouth problem

No

Medicine may be causing mouth problem

Are your lips or the inside of your mouth burning, tingling, or numb?

Yes

Burning, tingling, or numbness of mouth or lips

No

Burning, tingling, or numbness of mouth or lips

Do you have burning, tingling, or numbness all the time?

Yes

Burning, tingling, or numbness of mouth or lips is constant

No

Burning, tingling, or numbness of mouth or lips is constant

Has the burning, tingling, or numbness lasted for more than 3 days?

Yes

Burning, tingling, or numbness for more than 3 days

No

Burning, tingling, or numbness for more than 3 days

Does your breath have a fruity odor?

Have you had a metallic taste in your mouth for more than 3 days?

Yes

Metallic taste for more than 3 days

No

Metallic taste for more than 3 days

Are dentures or any other type of dental device (like a crown or filling, for instance) causing pain or discomfort?

Yes

Discomfort from dentures or other dental appliance

No

Discomfort from dentures or other dental appliance

Are the dentures or other dental appliance broken?

Yes

Broken dentures or dental appliance

No

Broken dentures or dental appliance

Do you think your mouth problem may be caused by grinding your teeth?

Yes

Problem caused by grinding teeth

No

Problem caused by grinding teeth

Have you had mouth problems for more than 2 weeks?

Yes

Mouth problems for more than 2 weeks

No

Mouth problems for more than 2 weeks

Many things can affect how your body responds to a symptom and what kind of care you may need. These include:

  • Your age. Babies and older adults tend to get sicker quicker.
  • Your overall health. If you have a condition such as diabetes, HIV, cancer, or heart disease, you may need to pay closer attention to certain symptoms and seek care sooner.
  • Medicines you take. Certain medicines, such as blood thinners (anticoagulants), medicines that suppress the immune system like steroids or chemotherapy, herbal remedies, or supplements can cause symptoms or make them worse.
  • Recent health events, such as surgery or injury. These kinds of events can cause symptoms afterwards or make them more serious.
  • Your health habits and lifestyle, such as eating and exercise habits, smoking, alcohol or drug use, sexual history, and travel.

Try Home Treatment

You have answered all the questions. Based on your answers, you may be able to take care of this problem at home.

  • Try home treatment to relieve the symptoms.
  • Call your doctor if symptoms get worse or you have any concerns (for example, if symptoms are not getting better as you would expect). You may need care sooner.

You can get dehydrated when you lose a lot of fluids because of problems like vomiting or fever.

Symptoms of dehydration can range from mild to severe. For example:

  • You may feel tired and edgy (mild dehydration), or you may feel weak, not alert, and not able to think clearly (severe dehydration).
  • You may pass less urine than usual (mild dehydration), or you may not be passing urine at all (severe dehydration).

Severe dehydration means:

  • Your mouth and eyes may be extremely dry.
  • You may pass little or no urine for 12 or more hours.
  • You may not feel alert or be able to think clearly.
  • You may be too weak or dizzy to stand.
  • You may pass out.

Moderate dehydration means:

  • You may be a lot more thirsty than usual.
  • Your mouth and eyes may be drier than usual.
  • You may pass little or no urine for 8 or more hours.
  • You may feel dizzy when you stand or sit up.

Mild dehydration means:

  • You may be more thirsty than usual.
  • You may pass less urine than usual.

Severe dehydration means:

  • The baby may be very sleepy and hard to wake up.
  • The baby may have a very dry mouth and very dry eyes (no tears).
  • The baby may have no wet diapers in 12 or more hours.

Moderate dehydration means:

  • The baby may have no wet diapers in 6 hours.
  • The baby may have a dry mouth and dry eyes (fewer tears than usual).

Mild dehydration means:

  • The baby may pass a little less urine than usual.

Many prescription and nonprescription medicines can cause mouth problems. A few examples are:

  • Antibiotics.
  • Some seizure medicines.
  • Medicines used to treat cancer (chemotherapy).
  • Steroid medicines.
  • Medicines used after organ transplant.

Symptoms of difficulty breathing can range from mild to severe. For example:

  • You may feel a little out of breath but still be able to talk (mild difficulty breathing), or you may be so out of breath that you cannot talk at all (severe difficulty breathing).
  • It may be getting hard to breathe with activity (mild difficulty breathing), or you may have to work very hard to breathe even when you’re at rest (severe difficulty breathing).

Severe trouble breathing means:

  • You cannot talk at all.
  • You have to work very hard to breathe.
  • You feel like you can't get enough air.
  • You do not feel alert or cannot think clearly.

Moderate trouble breathing means:

  • It's hard to talk in full sentences.
  • It's hard to breathe with activity.

Mild trouble breathing means:

  • You feel a little out of breath but can still talk.
  • It's becoming hard to breathe with activity.

Severe trouble breathing means:

  • The child cannot eat or talk because he or she is breathing so hard.
  • The child's nostrils are flaring and the belly is moving in and out with every breath.
  • The child seems to be tiring out.
  • The child seems very sleepy or confused.

Moderate trouble breathing means:

  • The child is breathing a lot faster than usual.
  • The child has to take breaks from eating or talking to breathe.
  • The nostrils flare or the belly moves in and out at times when the child breathes.

Mild trouble breathing means:

  • The child is breathing a little faster than usual.
  • The child seems a little out of breath but can still eat or talk.

Symptoms of a stroke may include:

  • Sudden numbness, tingling, weakness, or paralysis in your face, arm, or leg, especially on only one side of your body.
  • Sudden vision changes.
  • Sudden trouble speaking.
  • Sudden confusion or trouble understanding simple statements.
  • Sudden problems with walking or balance.
  • A sudden, severe headache that is different from past headaches.

Babies can quickly get dehydrated when they lose fluids because of problems like vomiting or fever.

Symptoms of dehydration can range from mild to severe. For example:

  • The baby may be fussy or cranky (mild dehydration), or the baby may be very sleepy and hard to wake up (severe dehydration).
  • The baby may have a little less urine than usual (mild dehydration), or the baby may not be urinating at all (severe dehydration).

Pain in adults and older children

  • Severe pain (8 to 10): The pain is so bad that you can't stand it for more than a few hours, can't sleep, and can't do anything else except focus on the pain.
  • Moderate pain (5 to 7): The pain is bad enough to disrupt your normal activities and your sleep, but you can tolerate it for hours or days. Moderate can also mean pain that comes and goes even if it's severe when it's there.
  • Mild pain (1 to 4): You notice the pain, but it is not bad enough to disrupt your sleep or activities.

Pain in children under 3 years

It can be hard to tell how much pain a baby or toddler is in.

  • Severe pain (8 to 10): The pain is so bad that the baby cannot sleep, cannot get comfortable, and cries constantly no matter what you do. The baby may kick, make fists, or grimace.
  • Moderate pain (5 to 7): The baby is very fussy, clings to you a lot, and may have trouble sleeping but responds when you try to comfort him or her.
  • Mild pain (1 to 4): The baby is a little fussy and clings to you a little but responds when you try to comfort him or her.

Symptoms of infection may include:

  • Increased pain, swelling, warmth, or redness in or around the area.
  • Red streaks leading from the area.
  • Pus draining from the area.
  • A fever.

To do home treatment for a black or coated tongue:

  • Brush your tongue daily with a soft-bristled toothbrush and toothpaste or a solution of 1 part hydrogen peroxide to 2 parts water.
  • Scrape the tongue with the edge of a spoon to remove the furry coating.
  • Do not use tobacco.

Bismuth products, such as Pepto-Bismol, can turn your tongue black. The black color will go away after you stop taking the medicine.

Sudden drooling and trouble swallowing can be signs of a serious problem called epiglottitis. This problem can happen at any age.

The epiglottis is a flap of tissue at the back of the throat that you can't see when you look in the mouth. When you swallow, it closes to keep food and fluids out of the tube (trachea) that leads to the lungs. If the epiglottis becomes inflamed or infected, it can swell and quickly block the airway. This makes it very hard to breathe.

The symptoms start suddenly. A person with epiglottitis is likely to seem very sick, have a fever, drool, and have trouble breathing, swallowing, and making sounds. In the case of a child, you may notice the child trying to sit up and lean forward with his or her jaw forward, because it's easier to breathe in this position.

Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) may include:

  • The sudden appearance of raised, red areas (hives) all over the body.
  • Rapid swelling of the throat, mouth, or tongue.
  • Trouble breathing.
  • Passing out (losing consciousness). Or you may feel very lightheaded or suddenly feel weak, confused, or restless.

A severe reaction can be life-threatening. If you have had a bad allergic reaction to a substance before and are exposed to it again, treat any symptoms as an emergency. Even if the symptoms are mild at first, they may quickly become very severe.

Symptoms of a heart attack may include:

  • Chest pain or pressure, or a strange feeling in the chest.
  • Sweating.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Nausea or vomiting.
  • Pain, pressure, or a strange feeling in the back, neck, jaw, or upper belly, or in one or both shoulders or arms.
  • Lightheadedness or sudden weakness.
  • A fast or irregular heartbeat.

For men and women, the most common symptom is chest pain or pressure. But women are somewhat more likely than men to have other symptoms, like shortness of breath, nausea, and back or jaw pain.

Certain health conditions and medicines weaken the immune system's ability to fight off infection and illness. Some examples in adults are:

  • Diseases such as diabetes, cancer, heart disease, and HIV/AIDS.
  • Long-term alcohol and drug problems.
  • Steroid medicines, which may be used to treat a variety of conditions.
  • Chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer.
  • Other medicines used to treat autoimmune disease.
  • Medicines taken after organ transplant.
  • Not having a spleen.

Certain health conditions and medicines weaken the immune system's ability to fight off infection and illness. Some examples in children are:

  • Diseases such as diabetes, cystic fibrosis, sickle cell disease, and congenital heart disease.
  • Steroid medicines, which are used to treat a variety of conditions.
  • Medicines taken after organ transplant.
  • Chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer.
  • Not having a spleen.

Seek Care Today

Based on your answers, you may need care soon. The problem probably will not get better without medical care.

  • Call your doctor today to discuss the symptoms and arrange for care.
  • If you cannot reach your doctor or you don't have one, seek care today.
  • If it is evening, watch the symptoms and seek care in the morning.
  • If the symptoms get worse, seek care sooner.

Make an Appointment

Based on your answers, the problem may not improve without medical care.

  • Make an appointment to see your doctor in the next 1 to 2 weeks.
  • If appropriate, try home treatment while you are waiting for the appointment.
  • If symptoms get worse or you have any concerns, call your doctor. You may need care sooner.

Seek Care Now

Based on your answers, you may need care right away. The problem is likely to get worse without medical care.

  • Call your doctor now to discuss the symptoms and arrange for care.
  • If you cannot reach your doctor or you don't have one, seek care in the next hour.
  • You do not need to call an ambulance unless:
    • You cannot travel safely either by driving yourself or by having someone else drive you.
    • You are in an area where heavy traffic or other problems may slow you down.

Call 911 Now

Based on your answers, you need emergency care.

Call 911 or other emergency services now.

Sometimes people don't want to call 911. They may think that their symptoms aren't serious or that they can just get someone else to drive them. Or they might be concerned about the cost. But based on your answers, the safest and quickest way for you to get the care you need is to call 911 for medical transport to the hospital.

Seek Care Today

Based on your answers, you may need care soon. The problem probably will not get better without medical care.

  • Call your dentist today to discuss the symptoms and arrange for care.
  • If you cannot reach your dentist or you don't have one, seek care today.
  • If it is evening, watch the symptoms and seek care in the morning.
  • If the symptoms get worse, seek care sooner.

Make an Appointment

Based on your answers, the problem may not improve without medical care.

  • Make an appointment to see your dentist in the next 1 to 2 weeks.
  • If appropriate, try home treatment while you are waiting for the appointment.
  • If symptoms get worse or you have any concerns, call your dentist. You may need care sooner.

Call 911 Now

Based on your answers, you need emergency care.

Call 911 or other emergency services now.

After you call 911, the operator may tell you to chew 1 adult-strength (325 mg) or 2 to 4 low-dose (81 mg) aspirin. Wait for an ambulance. Do not try to drive yourself.

Sometimes people don't want to call 911. They may think that their symptoms aren't serious or that they can just get someone else to drive them. Or they might be concerned about the cost. But based on your answers, the safest and quickest way for you to get the care you need is to call 911 for medical transport to the hospital.

Sore Throat and Other Throat Problems

Mouth and Dental Injuries

Toothache and Gum Problems

Источник: https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/mouth
Time: 3:26 home remedy for sore tongue and throat

Canker sores

My baby has a sore inside his mouth that seems to bother him when he's eating. Could it be a canker sore?

Canker sores, also called mouth ulcers, are rare in babies. In fact, they're rare in children under 10, but it's possible that this is what's causing your baby's discomfort.

A canker sore is a roundish white or yellow open sore surrounded by a red halo. Canker sores usually appear inside the cheeks or lips, as well as on the tongue, gums, and soft palate (the soft tissue around and behind the hard roof of the mouth). They usually appear individually but can also show up in small clusters.

inside of lip with a few white ovals

© Dr. P. Marazzi / Science Source

Canker sores aren't serious, but they can be painful, especially when your baby is eating or drinking or when they're touched.

What causes canker sores?

It's not really clear what causes canker sores. They tend to run in families, so they appear to have a genetic link. Some people are prone to getting sores when they're under stress.

Canker sores can also appear after a trauma to the mouth, such as a break in the skin caused by a dental procedure or by biting the tongue or cheek. There's some evidence that food allergies, viral infections, and dietary deficiencies (in particular, not getting enough iron, folic acid, zinc, or B12) can trigger canker sores.

Is a canker sore the same as a cold sore?

No, canker sores and cold sores (or fever blisters) are two different things. Canker sores are not contagious, and they appear in the soft tissues of the mouth. Cold sores (caused by the herpes simplex virus) are contagious and generally appear on the outside of the lips.

How should I treat a canker sore?

Canker sores almost always go away on their own, usually in a week to ten days (although large ones can take longer). The pain often subsides in three or four days.

In the meantime, you might want to apply ice to the sore to help numb the area. If your baby's eating solid food, cold or frozen foods – such as ice pops – may also do the trick. But don't give him hot, spicy food or citrus, which could make his mouth hurt more.

You might try a teething gel or cream, but apply it carefully – touching the sore can hurt. For a home remedy, combine 1 part hydrogen peroxide and 1 part water. Dab (gently!) on the canker sore with a cotton swab. Follow by dabbing on a little milk of magnesia. Do this three or four times a day to soothe the area and help it heal.

If your baby seems really uncomfortable, ask his doctor about giving him the proper dose of an over-the-counter pain reliever, like acetaminophen or ibuprofen. (Never give your baby aspirin, which can trigger a rare but deadly disease called Reye's syndrome in children with a viral illness.)

Should I take my baby to the doctor if he has a canker sore?

If you're not sure whether your baby's sore is a canker sore or it lasts longer than a couple of weeks, take him to the doctor for a diagnosis.

Also talk with his doctor if your baby has any other symptoms – like a rash, swollen lymph nodes, or a fever – or if the sore makes it difficult for your baby to drink adequate amounts of liquid. Talk with the doctor if your baby seems to be getting canker home remedy for sore tongue and throat frequently, too.

Источник: https://www.babycenter.com/health/illness-and-infection/canker-sores_1464984

Tongue blisters are common oral problems which are categorized as swelling, spots or sores on the tongue. Though it is harmless, it can be irritating and may also lessen the sense of taste. Almost one-third of people are affected by it at some point in their life. The soreness associated with tongue blisters settles on its own within 7-10 days, but the blisters are extremely painful. Also Read: Mouth Ulcers: 5 Amazing Kitchen Remedies To Heal Canker Sores

Tongue blisters are caused due to an injury or an underlying infection, some of the common causes include yeast infection, biting tongue accidentally, mouth ulcers, allergies and warts and medical conditions like stomatitis and cancer.

Prevent Oral Health Problems With Our Wide Range Of Oral Care Products!

Some of the symptoms that are associated with tongue blisters are:

Tongue blisters are uncomfortable to deal with, though harmless it is best to get rid of the pain at the earliest. Try some of the effective home remedies that can ease in healing these blisters. However, if pain persists seek medical care.
home remedies for tongue blisters

Home Remedies To Ease Tongue Blisters

Salt

Common salt is an amazing home remedy that helps to lessen the inflammation and pain caused by the blisters. Besides this, antibacterial properties of salt help to naturally fight underlying infection.

How To Do

Mix 1 teaspoon of salt in a cup of warm get relieved from tongue blisters, water and rinse your mouth well. Repeat this several times in a day to

Yogurt

The potent anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and antioxidant properties of yogurt works amazingly well to cure tongue blisters. Yogurt bestowed with essential nutrients and a natural probiotic helps to lessen the pain, inflammation and infection associated with blisters.

How To Do

Regularly have a cup of plain yogurt to get respite from blisters.

Clove Essential Oils

Clove oil is loaded with active compound eugenol which works as a natural anaesthetic. This active compound exhibits amazing anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties that help to heal tongue blisters.

How To Do

In a cup of warm water add 3-4 drops of clove oil and rinse your mouth well. Repeat this 3-4 times daily for the best result.

Baking Soda       

Baking soda possesses strong antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties which help to reduce the inflammation and heal blisters. Moreover, its alkaline nature facilitates maintaining the pH balance in the mouth which eases to get rid of tongue blisters. Also Read: 5 Incredible Health Benefits Of Baking Soda

How To Do

In a cup of warm water, add 1 teaspoon of baking soda and rinse your mouth well with this solution. You can also make a paste of baking soda and apply it on the blisters. Repeat this 3 times a day.

Ice

Ice cubes possess potential anaesthetic and anti-inflammatory properties that work well to soothe the inflammation and heal tongue blisters.

How To Do                  

Take an ice cube, keep it on the blisters until it becomes numb, you can also sip on cold water often. Repeat this several times in a day to alleviate tongue blisters.

Tulsi Leaves

Tulsi leaves are highly valued since times immemorial for its indispensable medicinal properties. The strong anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and antiseptic properties of tulsi leaves works wonders to naturally heal tongue blisters.

How To Do

Chew on a few Tulsi leaves at least 2-3 times in a day, to get rid of tongue blisters.

Turmeric

Turmeric, the golden spice is a quintessential ingredient in Indian cooking. The active compound curcumin in turmeric possesses powerful analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties which are valuable in getting rid of inflammation and blisters on the tongue.

How To Do

In a cup of warm milk, mix 1 teaspoon of turmeric and drink this milk regularly to get relief from blisters. Alternatively makes a paste of turmeric, honey and milk and apply this mixture on the affected regions, let it stay for 10 minutes and rinse well. Do this once daily for the best result.

Coconut oil

The potent antifungal, antibacterial, and antiviral traits of coconut oil are valuable for healing the tongue blisters.

How To Do

Apply coconut oil directly to the affected area with a cotton ball, gently. Furthermore, oil pulling is an effective natural remedy that works well to treat tongue blisters. Swish coconut oil in and around the mouth for a few seconds and spit it out.

Chamomile

Chamomile tea bestowed with anti-inflammatory is helpful in treating tongue sores. Rinse your mouth with cool chamomile tea twice daily for better results.

Vitamin Supplements

Tongue blisters are caused due to deficiency of vitamins, hence taking a multivitamin or B complex supplements help to treat sore tongue. However, seek advice from your healthcare provider before taking any supplements.

Preventive Measures

Some of the precautionary measures that may help prevent mouth sores include:

Avoid having very hot foods and drinks.

Eat slowly and chew food thoroughly.

It is best to use a soft toothbrush and practice regular dental hygiene.

Seek advice from a dentist if you have any trouble with dental hardware or teeth that may be irritating your mouth.

Beat stress and stay relaxed.

Eat a balanced and wholesome diet.

Eliminate food irritants such as hot and spicy foods that are known to aggravate tongue soreness.

Stay well hydrated.

Quit smoking and tobacco use.

Limit consumption of alcohol.

Use SPF lip balm while going out in the sun.

Источник: https://www.netmeds.com/health-library/post/tongue-blisters-7-simple-and-effective-home-remedies-to-soothe-inflamed-sores

Mouth ulcer

Mouth ulcers can be painful, which can make it uncomfortable to eat, drink or brush your teeth.

It's usually safe to treat mouth ulcers at home, although your pharmacist may advise that yousee your GP or dentist if:

  • your mouth ulcer has lasted three weeks
  • you keep getting mouth ulcers
  • your mouth ulcer becomes more painful or red – this could be a sign of a bacterial infection, which may need treatment with antibiotics

Mouth ulcers are also a possible symptom of a viral infection that mainly affects young children, called hand, foot and mouth disease. Speak to your GP or home remedy for sore tongue and throat the NHS 24 111service if you're unsure.

Read about the symptoms of hand, foot and mouth disease.

How to treat mouth ulcers

Mouth ulcers don’t usually need to be treated, because they tend to clear up by themselves within a week or two.

However, treatment can help to reduce swelling and ease any discomfort. This may help if you keep getting mouth ulcers or your mouth ulcer affects eating and drinking.

Self care

Things you can do to speed up healing include:

  • applying a protective paste recommended by your pharmacist
  • using a soft toothbrush to brush your teeth
  • using a toothpaste that doesn’t contain sodium lauryl sulphate, as this may be irritating 
  • avoiding hard, spicy, salty, acidic or hot food and drink until the ulcer heals
  • using a straw to drink cool drinks
  • avoiding things that may be triggering your mouth ulcers – see causes, below

Pharmacy medicines

You can get several types of mouth ulcer treatment from a pharmacy. Speak to your pharmacist about the best treatment for you. Options include the following:

  • Antimicrobial mouthwash may speed up healing and prevent infection of the ulcer. Children under two are apples good for you during pregnancy use this treatment. It also contains chlorexidine gluconate, which may stain teeth – but this may fade once treatment is finished. 
  • Painkillers are available as a mouthwash, lozenge, gel or spray. They can sting on first use and your mouth may feel numb – but this is temporary. Mouthwash can be diluted with water if stinging continues. Children under 12 shouldn’t use mouthwash or gel. Mouthwash shouldn’t be used for more than seven days in a row.
  • Corticosteroid lozenges may reduce pain and speed up healing. These are best used as soon as the ulcer appears, but shouldn't be used by children under 12.

Medicines from your dentist or GP

If necessary, you may be prescribed a course of stronger corticosteroids to help reduce pain and swelling, and speed up healing.

Corticosteroids are available on prescription as tablets, mouthwash, paste or spray, but are not suitable for children under 12.

Is it mouth cancer?

In a few cases, a long-lasting mouth ulcer can be a sign of mouth cancer. Ulcers caused by mouth cancer usually appear on or under the tongue, although you can get them in other areas of the mouth.

Risk factors for mouth cancer include:

  • smoking or using products that contain tobacco
  • drinking alcohol – smokers who are also heavy drinkers have a home remedy for sore tongue and throat higher risk compared to the population at large
  • infection with the human papilloma virus (HPV) – the virus that causes genital warts

It's important to detect mouth cancer as early as possible. If mouth cancer is detected early, the chances of a complete recovery are good. Regular dental check-ups are the best way to detect the early signs.

What causes mouth ulcers?

In many cases, the reason for mouth ulcers is unclear. Most single mouth ulcers are caused by damage to the lining inside of the mouth. For example:

  • accidentally biting the inside of your cheek or a sharp tooth
  • poorly fitting dentures
  • hard food
  • a defective filling

It’s not always clear what causes mouth ulcers that keep returning, but triggers are thought to include:

  • stress and anxiety 
  • hormonal changes – some women develop mouth ulcers during their monthly period
  • eating certain foods – such as chocolate, spicy foods, coffee, peanuts, almonds, strawberries, cheese, tomatoes and wheat flour
  • toothpaste containing sodium lauryl sulphate
  • stopping smoking – when you first stop smoking, you may develop mouth ulcers

Your genes are also thought to have a role – around 40% of people who keep getting mouth ulcers report that it runs in their family.

Medical conditions

Mouth ulcers can sometimes be caused by certain medical conditions, such as:

Medications and treatments

Mouth ulcers can sometimes be caused by certain medications or treatments, such as:

  • non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) – capital one bank credit card offers as ibuprofen
  • nicorandil – a medication sometimes used to treat angina
  • beta-blockers– used to treat conditions such as angina, high blood pressure and abnormal heart rhythms
  • a side effect of chemotherapyor radiotherapy – this is known as mucositis

Can mouth ulcers be prevented?

It may not be possible to prevent mouth ulcers, because they're often caused by things you can't control (such as a family history or a medical condition).

However, the following may help to reduce home remedy for sore tongue and throat risk of developing mouth ulcers:

  • avoiding certain foods – such as chocolate, spicy foods, coffee, peanuts, almonds, strawberries, cheese, tomatoes and wheat flour, if they cause you to have an ulcer
  • not chewing gum
  • brushing your teeth with a soft-bristled brush, which may reduce irritation in your mouth
  • using toothpaste that doesn’t contain sodium lauryl sulphate
  • reducing stressand anxiety – which may be a trigger for some people

Read more advice on dental health.

Источник: https://www.nhsinform.scot/illnesses-and-conditions/mouth/mouth-ulcer

Mouth and Throat Problems: Cancer Treatment Side Effects

What Causes Mouth and Throat Problems?

Cancer treatments may cause mouth, throat, and dental problems. Radiation therapy to the head and neck may harm the salivary glands and tissues in your mouth and/or make it hard to chew and swallow safely. Some types of chemotherapy and immunotherapy can also harm cells in your mouth, throat, and home remedy for sore tongue and throat. Drugs used to treat cancer and certain bone problems may also cause oral problems.

What Mouth and Throat Problems May Occur?

Mouth and throat problems may include:

When Are Oral Problems Serious?

Mouth problems (also called oral problems) are more serious if they interfere with eating and drinking because they can lead to dehydration and/or malnutrition. It’s important to call your doctor or nurse if you have pain in your mouth, lips, or throat that makes it difficult to eat, drink, or sleep or if you have a fever of 100.5 °F (38 °C) or higher.

Ways to Prevent Mouth and Dental Problems

Your doctor or nurse may advise you to take these and other steps:

  • Get a dental check-up before starting treatment. Before you start treatment, visit your dentist for a cleaning and check-up. Tell the dentist about your cancer treatment and try to get any dental work completed before starting tye caldwell realtor and clean your mouth daily. Check your mouth every day for sores or white spots. Tell your doctor or nurse as soon as you notice any changes, such as pain or sensitivity. Rinse your mouth throughout the day with a solution of warm water, baking soda, and salt. Ask your nurse to write down the mouth rinse recipe that is recommended for you. Gently brush your teeth, gums, and tongue after each meal and before going to bed at night. Use a very soft toothbrush or cotton swabs. If you are at risk of bleeding, ask if you should floss.

Ways to Manage Mouth Problems and Changes in Taste

Your health care team may suggest that you take these and other steps to manage these problems:

  • For a sore mouth or throat: Choose foods that are soft, wet, and easy to swallow. Soften dry foods with gravy, sauce, or other liquids. Use a blender to make milkshakes or blend your food to make it easier to swallow. Ask about pain medicine, such as lozenges or sprays that numb your mouth and make eating less painful. Avoid foods and drinks that can irritate your mouth; foods that are crunchy, salty, spicy, or sugary; and alcoholic drinks. Don’t smoke or use tobacco products.
  • For a dry mouth: Drink plenty of liquids because a dry mouth can increase the risk of tooth decay and mouth infections. Keep water handy and sip it often to keep your mouth wet. Suck on ice chips or sugar-free hard candy, have frozen desserts, or chew sugar-free gum. Use a lip balm. Ask about medicines such as saliva substitutes that can coat, protect, and moisten your mouth and throat. Home remedy for sore tongue and throat may also help with dry mouth.
  • For changes to your sense of taste: Foods may seem to have no taste or may not taste the way they used to or food home remedy for sore tongue and throat not have much taste at all. Radiation therapy may cause a change in sweet, sour, bitter, and salty tastes. Chemotherapy drugs may cause an unpleasant chemical or metallic taste in your mouth. If you have taste changes it may help to try different foods to find ones that taste best to you. Trying cold foods may also help. Here are some more tips to consider:
    • If food tastes bland, marinate foods to improve their flavor or add spices to foods. 
    • If red meat tastes strange, switch to other high-protein foods such as chicken, eggs, fish, peanut butter, turkey, beans, or dairy products.
    • If foods taste salty, bitter, or acidic, try sweetening them.
    • If foods taste metallic, switch to plastic utensils and non-metal cooking dishes.
    • If you have a bad taste in your mouth, try sugar-free lemon drops, gum, or mints.

Talking with Your Health Care Team about Mouth and Throat Problems

Prepare for your visit by making a list of questions to ask. Consider adding these questions to your list:

  • When might these problems start to occur? How long might they last?
  • What steps can I take to feel better?
  • What medicines can help?
  • What symptoms or problems should I call the doctor about?
  • What pain medicine and/or mouthwashes could help me?
  • Would you recommend a registered dietitian who I could see to learn about good food choices?
  • For people receiving radiation therapy to the head and neck: Should I take supplements such as zinc, to help my sense of taste come back after treatment?

Listen to tips on how to manage mouth or throat pain caused by cancer treatments such as radiation therapy.
(Type: MP3

Mouth problems

Keeping your mouth as clean as possible during your treatment will help to prevent or reduce side effects in your mouth.

Using a mouthwash

Mouthwashes can be very soothing, but many of the ones available in chemists or shops may be too strong for you.

Salt water mouthwashes can help reduce soreness, if it is not too severe. To make the mouthwash, add 1 teaspoon of salt to cold or warm water. Rinse this around your mouth. Then spit it out and then rinse your mouth with cold or warm water.

Your doctor can prescribe an anaesthetic gel or mouthwash to help if needed.

Looking after your teeth or dentures

Many hospitals have their own mouth care guidelines for people having chemotherapy or radiotherapy, which include the best toothpaste to use. Your doctor or specialist nurse will be able home remedy for sore tongue and throat advise you.

You may be advised to see your dentist before you start treatment. They may recommend using a high-fluoride or non-foaming toothpaste to help reduce any soreness.

Use a soft toothbrush to clean your teeth gently. Avoid using toothpicks when cleaning your teeth. If you want to use dental floss, check with your doctor or specialist nurse first. If you have a low platelet count, flossing can make your gums bleed.

If you wear dentures, soak them in a denture-cleaning solution overnight. Leave them out for as long as you can during the day to prevent them rubbing against your gums.

If you are having radiotherapy to the jaw area, you may be advised to keep your dentures in as much as possible during the day. This helps to maintain the shape of your gums. But if your mouth is very sore, it may be more comfortable to leave your dentures out.

If your tongue is ‘coated’

This may make your food taste unpleasant and put you off eating. You can clean your tongue with a bicarbonate of soda solution. Dissolve 1 teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda (available from your chemist) in a pint (570mls) of warm water. Use a soft toothbrush or gauze dipped in the solution to clean your tongue.

If this does not help, talk to your doctor or specialist nurse, because you may have oral thrush and need medicine. If you are having radiotherapy for a head and neck cancer, brushing your tongue is not recommended. Your clinical nurse specialist can give you more advice.

Источник: https://www.macmillan.org.uk/cancer-information-and-support/impacts-of-cancer/mouth-problems

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