liberty bank and trust company new orleans

This depository institution is held by LIBERTY FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC. 283438 LIBERTY BANK AND TRUST COMPANY 6600 PLAZA DRIVE, SUITE 600 NEW ORLEANS LA. Ronald works at Liberty Bank & Trust Co as Vice President Of Development. Ronald is based out of New Orleans, Louisiana, United States and. Address, 6600 Plaza Dr, Ste 600, New Orleans, Louisiana 70127, US Keywords, liberty bank and trust company, liberty bank, liberty bank and trust.

Liberty bank and trust company new orleans -

Liberty Bank And Trust Company

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General Info
Founded in 1972, Liberty Bank & Trust is one of the five largest African-American-owned financial institutions. With nearly $350 million in assets, Liberty Bank is a financial force in New Orleans. Primarily focused on bringing financial services to the traditionally underserved, Liberty is also a major supplier of financial services to government agencies and institutions throughout Louisiana and Mississippi. Liberty Bank has more than a dozen branch offices in three cities, including New Orleans, Baton Rouge, La., and Jackson, Miss. It offers personal banking products, such as checking and savings accounts, credit and debit cards and home mortgages. It also offers insurance and investment services. Liberty Bank & Trust offers business customers checking, savings, lending and merchant services. It was awarded the Community Reinvestment Act outstanding rating in 1994 and has maintained it.
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visa
Location
Textron Marine Bldg
Neighborhoods
West Lake Forest, New Orleans East Area
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http://www.libertybank.net

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Источник: https://www.yellowpages.com/new-orleans-la/mip/liberty-bank-and-trust-company-473452824

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (WMC) - The Tri-State Bank of Memphis has been around since the 1940s, serving as a financial lifeline for many African Americans.

One of their biggest supporters then and even now is the black church.

Mt. Olive CME Church in South Memphis has been banking with Tri-State for decades.

“As a matter of fact, since the inception of Tri-State, Mt. Olive was one of the first churches,” said Pastor Peris J. Lester

It’s a tradition within the Christian Methodist church and countless other black houses of worship and organizations across the city.

“Many times during the segregated period, we couldn’t get the loans for our churches and for our parishioners who needed homes,” said CME Bishop Henry Williamson.

Tri-State Bank of Memphis was founded in 1946 by Dr. Joseph E. Walker and his son A. Maceo Walker.

For many blacks in the Mid-South, Tri-State was their only hope for owning a home or a business. However in recent years, Tri-State Bank of Memphis has faced challenging times. As a small community bank, it has been difficult to keep up with the ever changing and very expensive banking technology.

“So, it really just became a matter of scale and we realized we either had to grow and grow substantially or partner with other institutions,” said chairman of the board for Tri-State, Archie Willis, III.

He says while the bank has taken on non-minority owned banking partners, such as First Tennessee, Tri-State Bank has always remained a majority black-owned bank and they wanted to stay that way.

“So, you still have a lot of mistrust in the African American community about banking in general, and you also have the situation where the regulatory environment, the credit environment, all of the things banks look at is not necessarily at the level of sensitivity when you deal with African Americans,” said Willis.

Last week, it was announced that Tri-State Bank of Memphis would be acquired by Liberty Bank and Trust Company in an all-cash transaction.

Liberty is also a minority-owned bank based out of New Orleans.

“It’s bittersweet to lose the name Tri-State, but it’s the function of the black bank that with Liberty. We have researched it strengthens us with two black banks coming together. Actually more loans, more services can be provided,” said Williamson.

We’re also being told that all employees with Tri-State Bank will be offered their jobs back even after the merger goes through, which should take place by the end of the year.

Copyright 2021 WMC. All rights reserved.

Источник: https://www.actionnews5.com/2021/06/09/tri-state-bank-memphis-be-acquired-by-liberty-bank-trust-new-orleans/

Counterfeit cashier's checks bearing the name Liberty Bank, New Orleans, Louisiana, are reportedly in circulation

Liberty Bank and Trust Company, New Orleans, Louisiana, has contacted the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) to report that counterfeit cashier's checks bearing the institution's name are in circulation.

The counterfeit items display the routing number 065002108, which is assigned to Liberty Bank and Trust Company. The items are dissimilar to authentic cashier's checks. A security feature statement is embedded within a darkened top border and along the bottom border between two padlock icons. The signature is shown inside of a darkened rectangle in the lower-right corner and a "VOID" background is shown when copied.

Authentic cashier's checks are light blue with a basket-weave background. Checks have an ornate border on all sides and are perforated along the left side. The numerical amount is shown inside of a darkened rectangle. Two signatures lines are in the lower-right corner.

Copies of a counterfeit item and an authentic check (VOID) are attached for your review. Be aware that the appearance of counterfeit items can be modified and that additional variations may be presented.

Any information you have concerning this matter should be brought to the attention of:

Calvin Kaufmann
Vice President of Operations
Liberty Bank and Trust Company
P.O. Box 60131
New Orleans, Louisiana 70160
Telephone: (504) 240-5109
Fax: (504) 240-2720
E-mail: [email protected]

Information about counterfeit items, cyber-fraud incidents and other fraudulent activity may be forwarded to the FDIC's Cyber-Fraud and Financial Crimes Section, 550 17 th Street, N.W., Room F-3054, Washington, D.C. 20429, or transmitted electronically to [email protected] Questions related to federal deposit insurance or consumer issues should be submitted to the FDIC using an online form that can be accessed at http://www2.fdic.gov/starsmail/index.asp.

For your reference, FDIC Special Alerts may be accessed from the FDIC's website at www.fdic.gov/news/news/SpecialAlert/2010/index.html. To learn how to automatically receive FDIC Special Alerts through e-mail, please visit www.fdic.gov/about/subscriptions/index.html.

Sandra L. ThompsonDirector
Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection

Источник: https://www.bankersonline.com/alerts/46295

Alden J. McDonald, Jr.

Prominent African American businessman Alden Joseph McDonald, Jr. was born on September 16, 1943, in New Orleans, Louisiana. McDonald attended Louisiana State University’s School of Banking and received his undergraduate degree. McDonald also joined Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. and later attended Columbia University’s Commercial Banking Management Program.

McDonald began his banking career at International City Bank in New Orleans. In 1972, he became the President and CEO of Liberty Bank and Trust company, a position that he still holds today. Since 1972, McDonald has been an active force in the New Orleans business community. In 1987, he played a central role in the establishment of the Black Economic Development Council helping many minority businesses to secure public and private contracts for goods and services. Furthermore, he has served on almost all well known professional and social boards in the New Orleans region. As both a business leader and a community leader, he has devoted his life to community development through promoting entrepreneurship, supporting civic organizations and empowering businesses and individuals. Moreover, under his leadership, Liberty Bank and Trust’s successes helped black professionals and others settle east New Orleans and established a large African American homeownership class for the first time in the city’s history.

In 2001, McDonald received the prestigious Loving Cup from New Orleans’ major newspaper, The Times-Picayune. This award is considered the highest honor in the New Orleans Metropolitan Area. He then became the chairman of the New Orleans Chamber of Commerce. McDonald became the co-chair of the Greater New Orleans Education Foundation. In 2004, he became the first chairman for Greater New Orleans, Inc., established for the economic development of the New Orleans region.

In 2005, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, McDonald led efforts toward the economic rehabilitation of New Orleans as well as his own, Liberty Bank and Trust. Katrina devastated Liberty’s headquarters, branches and spread the bank’s customers throughout the nation. Despite these obstacles, he moved back into his community to concentrate his efforts toward the economic rehabilitation of New Orleans. McDonald enacted creative policy decisions for his bank and opened new branches that helped overturn the economic downturn of the New Orleans economy, thus cutting his bank’s estimated losses dramatically.

McDonald’s Liberty Bank and Trust is one of the five largest African American owned financial institutions in the United States. The bank serves as the fiscal agent for the City of New Orleans, substantially improving the City’s cash flow and cash management practices. Furthermore, McDonald opened the Liberty Freedom Fund, the first and only mutual fund to be owned, managed and distributed by African Americans. Since its incorporation in 1972, McDonald has grown Liberty’s assets from $2 million to over $370 million.

In 2006, McDonald was named to Fortune Magazine’s highly regarded “Portraits of Power” list for 2006, extolling him for his powerful presence in the business community and his impact on the global market. He was also named to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s (FDIC) Advisory Committee on Economic Inclusion, concentrating on the expansion of access to banking services for underserved populations. In 2008, he became a Fleur-de-lis Ambassador for New Orleans, a group of New Orleans professionals that travel across America to seek additional Katrina recovery support from businesses and philanthropic organizations.

See how Alden J. McDonald, Jr. is related to other HistoryMakersDonate NowClick Here To Explore The Archive Today!

Tape: 1

  • Slating of Alden J. McDonald, Jr.'s interview
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. lists his favorites
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his mother's family background, pt. 1
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his mother's family background, pt. 2
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his maternal family's traditions
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes the Martinez Kindergarten School in New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers his mother's transportation service
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers his early entrepreneurism
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his father's family background
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers his paternal grandfather

Tape: 2

  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his father's occupation, pt. 1
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his father's occupation, pt. 2
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his parents' personalities
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers his community in New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers defending himself in school
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers his family's finances
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his schooling in New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his educational experiences

Tape: 4

  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers the opening of Liberty Bank and Trust Company
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes the Liberty Bank and Trust Company, pt. 1
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers purchasing his first home
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes the Liberty Bank and Trust Company, pt. 2
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his higher education in banking
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers the impact of Hurricane Katrina
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes Liberty Bank and Trust Company's response to Hurricane Katrina, pt. 1
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes Liberty Bank and Trust Company's response to Hurricane Katrina, pt. 2
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes Liberty Bank and Trust Company's community development efforts

Tape: 5

  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his medical board service
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. talks about the Black Economic Development Council
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes the National Bankers Association
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. reflects upon his banking career
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. reflects upon his life
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. reflects upon his legacy
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his hopes for the African American community
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his children
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes how he met his wife
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. talks about his relationship with his wife
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes how he would like to be remembered
Источник: https://www.thehistorymakers.org/biography/alden-j-mcdonald-jr

Liberty Bank and Trust Company in New Orleans, Louisiana (LA), KS, MI, MS, MO
Overview, Financial Summary, Detailed Financial Reports, Branches

014407Liberty Bank And Trust Company6600 Plaza Drive, Suite 600, New Orleans, LA 70127November 16, 1972Full Service Brick and Mortar1251827Gentilly Branch3002 Gentilly Boulevard, New Orleans, LA 70122September 19, 1974Full Service Brick and Mortar2251828New Orleans East Branch7200 Crowder Boulevard, New Orleans, LA 70127September 17, 1981Full Service Brick and Mortar32518291950 St. Bernard Avenue1950 St. Bernard Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70116September 25, 1992Full Service Brick and Mortar42518301907 St. Bernard Branch1907 St. Bernard Avenue, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA 70116September 25, 1992Limited Service Facility5480227990 Scenic Highway Branch7990 Scenic Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70807January 29, 1993Full Service Brick and Mortar7227548Magazine Street Branch3200 Magazine Street, New Orleans, LA 70115November 07, 1988Full Service Brick and Mortar8251831De Gaulle Branch3535 General De Gaulle Drive, New Orleans, LA 70114July 29, 1996Full Service Brick and Mortar9251832Perkins Road Branch4707 Perkins Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70808July 29, 1996Full Service Brick and Mortar11257883Lake Oaks Branch6600 Franklin Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70122June 10, 1996Full Service Brick and Mortar13432380Greenwell Springs Branch8796 Greenwell Springs Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70814July 19, 2004Full Service Brick and Mortar17469270Baton Rouge Loan Production Office3233 South Sherwood Forest Boulevard, Suite 108, Baton Rouge, LA 70816June 06, 2006Limited Service Loan Production21463792714 Canal Street Branch2714 Canal Street, New Orleans, LA 70119September 28, 1990Full Service Brick and Mortar23466267Opelousas Branch323 South Academy Street Suite A, Opelousas, LA 70570Febuary 26, 2007Full Service Retail
Источник: http://www.bankencyclopedia.com/Liberty-Bank-and-Trust-Company-20856-New-Orleans-Louisiana.html

This story is the first in a four-part BCN exclusive series entitled “The Future of Black Banks in America” that BlackConsumerNews.com will publish this summer.

By BCN Executive Editor Wesley Brown – May 5, 2021Two of the nation’s oldest Black-owned banks jointly announced after the close of market Thursday that they intend to join operations in an all-cash deal to create a regional bank chain with nearly $1 billion in total assets and operations in nine states.

According to the details of the deal, New Orleans-based Liberty Bank and Trust Company and its parent holding company, Liberty Financial Services Inc., would acquire the smaller Tri-State Bank of Memphis. After the deal closes in late 2021, the new Liberty Bank would be the largest Black-owned Minority Depository Institutions (MDIs) in the U.S. as defined by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC), which provides deposit insurance for more than 5,100 U.S. banks.

According to both Liberty Trust and Tri-State officials, the acquisition represents a partnership between two minority-owned banks whose mission is to provide affordable financial products and offer banking services to underserved communities. Today, Liberty Bank has $860 million in assets and branch offices in Detroit, Forest Park, Ill., Jackson, Miss., Kansas City, Kan., Kansas City, Mo., Louisville, Ky., Montgomery, Ala., Baton Rouge, La., and Tuskegee, Ala.

Tri-State provides banking services in the Memphis area. Once the deal is completed, Liberty will enter the Memphis market and assume the operations of Tri-State, founded by the late Black insurance and banking magnate Dr. J. E. Walker, and his son, the late A. Maceo Walker. In the 1920s, Dr. Walker also founded Universal Life Insurance Company, known for selling life insurance door-to-door to Black families.

Started in 1946, Tri-State is one of the longest-serving Black banks in the U.S., pioneered signature loans, real estate loans, and church loans to African Americans without a special endorsement. Prior to Tri-State, it was difficult for African Americans to make loans on their homes or toward the purchase of homes. In its first ten years, more than $10 million of first mortgage loans on homes were made, representing homeownership for over 2,000 black families, company officials said.

The historic Memphis community financier also played an important role in the Civil Rights struggles of the 1950s and 1960s, organizing local sit-ins were planned in the bank’s boardroom and keeping the vault open to provide bail money for protesters. It has also provided loans to other community organizations and historically black colleges from Tennessee to Texas.

And when the Lorraine Motel faced foreclosure in 1982, Tri-State Bank provided $60,000 in loans to help save the historic site where Dr. Martin Luther King was assassinated. The motel is now home to the National Civil Rights Museum, one of the top African American tourist attractions in the Mid-South.

“Memphis is extremely rich in history, and we are proud to continue servicing the Community. Both Tri-State and our Board have a history of serving the underbanked, and this merger offers more financial access, products, banking technology, and enhanced capacity for lending,” said Liberty President and CEO Alden McDonald. “We are excited and focused on continuing to service the people of Memphis with an expanded suite of financial services – including a more robust mortgage product and a variety of personal and commercial banking options. This is a great time for Minority Deposit Institutions, and we are honored to join the Memphis community.”

“Combining with Liberty, an extremely well-run institution that shares our culture, will enhance our ability to serve our customers and uphold our mission,” added Tri-State Chairman Archie Willis. “This transaction is compelling for all of Tri-State’s stakeholders including customers, employees, shareholders and our community.”

The deal still has been approved by the boards of directors of both Black-owned but remains subject to Tri-State Bank of Memphis’ shareholder approval and customary state and federal regulatory approvals. The transaction is expected to close before the end of 2021, company officials said.

After closing and regulatory approvals, Liberty would be the largest of the 20 remaining Black-owned MDI banks in the U.S. Under FDIC rules, 51% or more of an Black-led MDI’s voting stock must be owned by minority shareholders, or most of the board of directors must be Black and serve in a community that is predominantly of the same race. Ownership also must be by U.S. citizens or permanent legal U.S. residents to be counted in determining minority ownership.

Founded in 1972, Liberty has grown from an initial asset base of $2 million to approximately $860 million at the end of the third quarter, making it the largest of the nation’s remaining Black-owned MDIs. Tri-State Bank operates through a single office in Memphis and reported approximately $105 million in assets and $95 million in deposits through the three-month period ended March 31.

Dying Black banks

The merger of Liberty and Tri-State comes at a time when Black-owned banks are struggling to survive. According to a widely cited 2019 report commissioned by FDIC Chair Jelena McWilliams, the number of MDIs in the U.S. declined by 9.1% between 2001 and 2018. What sticks out about this report was that the number of Asian American and Hispanic American MDIs increased but African American MDIs were decimated by the Great Recession in 2008 and the financial and housing crisis fallout in the decade after.

As the MDI sector has changed, so has its composition in terms of minority status. According to the FDIC report, African American MDIs represented 15% of all MDIs at year-end 2018, compared with nearly 30% of all MDIs in 2001. During that same period, the asset value of Black-owned MDIs has also taken a big hit. In 2018, African American banks had less than 2% of total assets for all MDIs, compared with 6% in 2001. The combined asset value of all Black-owned banks in the U.S. is only a tidy $4.5 billion.

By comparison, the $10 billion asset mark is the key financial touchstone established by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act as the regulatory baseline between mid-sized-community banks and smaller regional banking groups such as Bank OZK, Simmons First, Home BancShares, and Arvest Bank in Arkansas..

During the FDIC study period, MDIs initially grew from 164 charters in 2001 to 215 in 2008, an increase of 31%. As of year-end 2018, failures, mergers, and closures had reduced the number of MDI charters by 31%from its peak of 215 in 2008 to 149. At the end of the first quarter of 2021, there were only 20 Black-owned MDIs that remained in operation, down from 23 when the FDIC commissioned the 2019 report.

In the post-slavery era, fluctuations in the growth of Black banks in the U.S. runs parallel to the downturns in the financial markets. Between 1888 and 1934, there were more than 134 Black-owned banks and financial institutions founded and located mainly in southern states. However, the Great Depression in the 1930s wiped out nearly all Black banks in the 1930s, dropping the number down to single digits.

During the Civil Rights era in the 1960s and 1970s, that number rose again to as many as 50. However, the savings and loans crisis in the 1980s forced two-thirds of those financial institutions into default. According to research by Washington, D.C.-based Creative Investment Research, the number of Black-owned banks peaked again in 1994 when there were 55 in operation during the era of strong gross domestic product (GDP) growth under former President Bill Clinton.

Amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in late August 2020, publicly traded Broadway Financial Corp. of Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.-based CFBanc Corp. announced what they called a “transformational merger of equals” to create the largest Black-led MDI. At the time, the East and West coasts banks operating as Broadway Federal and City First boasted that they would be the lone Black-owned bank in the U.S. with more than $1 billion in combined assets under management and nearly $850 million in assets.

The newly joined Black-owned banks also agreed to maintain their federal Community Development Financial Institution, or CDFI status, pledging 60% of their lending to low- to moderate-income communities. Executives from both banks also said that combining the two institutions will increase their collective commercial lending capacity for investments in multifamily affordable housing, small businesses, and nonprofit development in financially underserved urban areas, while creating a national platform for impact investors.

“Given the compounding factors of a global pandemic, unprecedented unemployment and social unrest resulting from centuries of inequities, the work of CDFIs has never been more urgent and necessary,” said City First President and CEO Brian Argrett, now the vice chair and CEO of the newly created Black-owned bank that trades on the Nasdaq stock exchange under the “BYFC” stock symbol. “As part of this historic merger, we are demonstrating that thriving urban neighborhoods are viable markets that require a dedicated focus, long-term commitment and critical access to capital.”

“The new combined institution will strengthen our position and will help drive both sustainable economic growth and societal returns,” said Broadway CEO Wayne-Kent Bradshaw, who now serves as the chair of the publicly traded Black bank. “We envision building stronger profitability and creating a multiplier effect of capital availability for our customers and for the communities we serve.

But the merger has not been as accretive as expected. At the end of the first quarter, Broadway reported a first quarter loss of $3.5 million. Following the close of the merger, the company also sold off 18,474,000 shares of common stock in private placements to Wall Street investors, raising $32.9 million in gross proceeds to fund the bank’s ongoing operations.

In explaining the poor financial results, Broadway executives blamed the “impact of the lingering COVID-19 pandemic” on its operations, ominously noting that it had not implemented layoffs or furloughs of any employees because of the ongoing health crisis.

Also, the claim to being the nation’s largest Black-owned MDI and first to exceed the $1 billion asset mark is now also in question. According to the first quarter financial results and FDIC’s quarterly banking data, Broadway’s total asset value of nearly $480 billion is more than half of the pre-merger goal. That total would put it well behind Liberty and three other Black-owned banks, including Harlem-based Carter Federal Savings at $687 million, Citizens Trust in Atlanta at $572 million, Industrial Bank in the D.C. area at $559 million.

Nationally, the so-called “Big Five” banking and financial conglomerates that includes JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Citigroup, Wells Fargo and Goldman Sachs all have total assets exceeding a trillion dollars. At the end of the first quarter, JPMorgan reported first quarter profits of $14.3 billion on revenue of $33.1 billion. The Wall Street financial titan, which is the nation’s largest banking chain, ended fiscal 2020 with total assets of $3.48 trillion.

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Источник: https://blackconsumernews.com/new-orleans-based-liberty-bank-to-acquire-tri-state-bank-of-memphis-creating-nations-largest-black-led-financier/

New Orleans-based Liberty Bank and Trust Co. agreed to acquire Louisville, Ky.-based Louisville Development Bancorp Inc., the holding company for Metro Bank.

The deal is expected to close during the first quarter of 2020.

On an aggregate basis, S&P Global Market Intelligence calculates that the deal value is 56.43% of common equity and of tangible common equity. It is also 11.64% of assets and 14.61% of deposits.

S&P Global Market Intelligence valuations for bank and thrift targets in the Midwest region between Dec. 5, 2018, and Dec. 5, 2019, averaged 140.74% of book and 146.03% of tangible book and had a median of 16.21x last-12-months earnings, on an aggregate basis.

Liberty Financial Services Inc., the holding company for Liberty Bank and Trust, will enter Jefferson County, Ky., with one branch to be ranked No. 21 with a 0.1% share of approximately $21.16 billion in total market deposits due to the deal.

Metro Bank had about $26 million in assets and $21 million in deposits at Sept. 30. Liberty Bank and Trust had roughly $628 million in assets and $541 million in deposits as of the same date, according to a news release.

To use S&P Global Market Intelligence's branch analytics tools to compare market overlap, click here. To create custom maps, click here.

SNL Image

Источник: https://www.spglobal.com/marketintelligence/en/news-insights/trending/3aKo1bWowGH7pwCnaVH3FQ2
liberty bank and trust company new orleans

Liberty bank and trust company new orleans -

Liberty Bank and Trust Company in New Orleans, Louisiana (LA), KS, MI, MS, MO
Overview, Financial Summary, Detailed Financial Reports, Branches

014407Liberty Bank And Trust Company6600 Plaza Drive, Suite 600, New Orleans, LA 70127November 16, 1972Full Service Brick and Mortar1251827Gentilly Branch3002 Gentilly Boulevard, New Orleans, LA 70122September 19, 1974Full Service Brick and Mortar2251828New Orleans East Branch7200 Crowder Boulevard, New Orleans, LA 70127September 17, 1981Full Service Brick and Mortar32518291950 St. Bernard Avenue1950 St. Bernard Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70116September 25, 1992Full Service Brick and Mortar42518301907 St. Bernard Branch1907 St. Bernard Avenue, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA 70116September 25, 1992Limited Service Facility5480227990 Scenic Highway Branch7990 Scenic Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70807January 29, 1993Full Service Brick and Mortar7227548Magazine Street Branch3200 Magazine Street, New Orleans, LA 70115November 07, 1988Full Service Brick and Mortar8251831De Gaulle Branch3535 General De Gaulle Drive, New Orleans, LA 70114July 29, 1996Full Service Brick and Mortar9251832Perkins Road Branch4707 Perkins Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70808July 29, 1996Full Service Brick and Mortar11257883Lake Oaks Branch6600 Franklin Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70122June 10, 1996Full Service Brick and Mortar13432380Greenwell Springs Branch8796 Greenwell Springs Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70814July 19, 2004Full Service Brick and Mortar17469270Baton Rouge Loan Production Office3233 South Sherwood Forest Boulevard, Suite 108, Baton Rouge, LA 70816June 06, 2006Limited Service Loan Production21463792714 Canal Street Branch2714 Canal Street, New Orleans, LA 70119September 28, 1990Full Service Brick and Mortar23466267Opelousas Branch323 South Academy Street Suite A, Opelousas, LA 70570Febuary 26, 2007Full Service Retail
Источник: http://www.bankencyclopedia.com/Liberty-Bank-and-Trust-Company-20856-New-Orleans-Louisiana.html

This story is the first in a four-part BCN exclusive series entitled “The Future of Black Banks in America” that BlackConsumerNews.com will publish this summer.

By BCN Executive Editor Wesley Brown – May 5, 2021Two of the nation’s oldest Black-owned banks jointly announced after the close of market Thursday that they intend to join operations in an all-cash deal to create a regional bank chain with nearly $1 billion in total assets and operations in nine states.

According to the details of the deal, New Orleans-based Liberty Bank and Trust Company and its parent holding company, Liberty Financial Services Inc., would acquire the smaller Tri-State Bank of Memphis. After the deal closes in late 2021, the new Liberty Bank would be the largest Black-owned Minority Depository Institutions (MDIs) in the U.S. as defined by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC), which provides deposit insurance for more than 5,100 U.S. banks.

According to both Liberty Trust and Tri-State officials, the acquisition represents a partnership between two minority-owned banks whose mission is to provide affordable financial products and offer banking services to underserved communities. Today, Liberty Bank has $860 million in assets and branch offices in Detroit, Forest Park, Ill., Jackson, Miss., Kansas City, Kan., Kansas City, Mo., Louisville, Ky., Montgomery, Ala., Baton Rouge, La., and Tuskegee, Ala.

Tri-State provides banking services in the Memphis area. Once the deal is completed, Liberty will enter the Memphis market and assume the operations of Tri-State, founded by the late Black insurance and banking magnate Dr. J. E. Walker, and his son, the late A. Maceo Walker. In the 1920s, Dr. Walker also founded Universal Life Insurance Company, known for selling life insurance door-to-door to Black families.

Started in 1946, Tri-State is one of the longest-serving Black banks in the U.S., pioneered signature loans, real estate loans, and church loans to African Americans without a special endorsement. Prior to Tri-State, it was difficult for African Americans to make loans on their homes or toward the purchase of homes. In its first ten years, more than $10 million of first mortgage loans on homes were made, representing homeownership for over 2,000 black families, company officials said.

The historic Memphis community financier also played an important role in the Civil Rights struggles of the 1950s and 1960s, organizing local sit-ins were planned in the bank’s boardroom and keeping the vault open to provide bail money for protesters. It has also provided loans to other community organizations and historically black colleges from Tennessee to Texas.

And when the Lorraine Motel faced foreclosure in 1982, Tri-State Bank provided $60,000 in loans to help save the historic site where Dr. Martin Luther King was assassinated. The motel is now home to the National Civil Rights Museum, one of the top African American tourist attractions in the Mid-South.

“Memphis is extremely rich in history, and we are proud to continue servicing the Community. Both Tri-State and our Board have a history of serving the underbanked, and this merger offers more financial access, products, banking technology, and enhanced capacity for lending,” said Liberty President and CEO Alden McDonald. “We are excited and focused on continuing to service the people of Memphis with an expanded suite of financial services – including a more robust mortgage product and a variety of personal and commercial banking options. This is a great time for Minority Deposit Institutions, and we are honored to join the Memphis community.”

“Combining with Liberty, an extremely well-run institution that shares our culture, will enhance our ability to serve our customers and uphold our mission,” added Tri-State Chairman Archie Willis. “This transaction is compelling for all of Tri-State’s stakeholders including customers, employees, shareholders and our community.”

The deal still has been approved by the boards of directors of both Black-owned but remains subject to Tri-State Bank of Memphis’ shareholder approval and customary state and federal regulatory approvals. The transaction is expected to close before the end of 2021, company officials said.

After closing and regulatory approvals, Liberty would be the largest of the 20 remaining Black-owned MDI banks in the U.S. Under FDIC rules, 51% or more of an Black-led MDI’s voting stock must be owned by minority shareholders, or most of the board of directors must be Black and serve in a community that is predominantly of the same race. Ownership also must be by U.S. citizens or permanent legal U.S. residents to be counted in determining minority ownership.

Founded in 1972, Liberty has grown from an initial asset base of $2 million to approximately $860 million at the end of the third quarter, making it the largest of the nation’s remaining Black-owned MDIs. Tri-State Bank operates through a single office in Memphis and reported approximately $105 million in assets and $95 million in deposits through the three-month period ended March 31.

Dying Black banks

The merger of Liberty and Tri-State comes at a time when Black-owned banks are struggling to survive. According to a widely cited 2019 report commissioned by FDIC Chair Jelena McWilliams, the number of MDIs in the U.S. declined by 9.1% between 2001 and 2018. What sticks out about this report was that the number of Asian American and Hispanic American MDIs increased but African American MDIs were decimated by the Great Recession in 2008 and the financial and housing crisis fallout in the decade after.

As the MDI sector has changed, so has its composition in terms of minority status. According to the FDIC report, African American MDIs represented 15% of all MDIs at year-end 2018, compared with nearly 30% of all MDIs in 2001. During that same period, the asset value of Black-owned MDIs has also taken a big hit. In 2018, African American banks had less than 2% of total assets for all MDIs, compared with 6% in 2001. The combined asset value of all Black-owned banks in the U.S. is only a tidy $4.5 billion.

By comparison, the $10 billion asset mark is the key financial touchstone established by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act as the regulatory baseline between mid-sized-community banks and smaller regional banking groups such as Bank OZK, Simmons First, Home BancShares, and Arvest Bank in Arkansas..

During the FDIC study period, MDIs initially grew from 164 charters in 2001 to 215 in 2008, an increase of 31%. As of year-end 2018, failures, mergers, and closures had reduced the number of MDI charters by 31%from its peak of 215 in 2008 to 149. At the end of the first quarter of 2021, there were only 20 Black-owned MDIs that remained in operation, down from 23 when the FDIC commissioned the 2019 report.

In the post-slavery era, fluctuations in the growth of Black banks in the U.S. runs parallel to the downturns in the financial markets. Between 1888 and 1934, there were more than 134 Black-owned banks and financial institutions founded and located mainly in southern states. However, the Great Depression in the 1930s wiped out nearly all Black banks in the 1930s, dropping the number down to single digits.

During the Civil Rights era in the 1960s and 1970s, that number rose again to as many as 50. However, the savings and loans crisis in the 1980s forced two-thirds of those financial institutions into default. According to research by Washington, D.C.-based Creative Investment Research, the number of Black-owned banks peaked again in 1994 when there were 55 in operation during the era of strong gross domestic product (GDP) growth under former President Bill Clinton.

Amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in late August 2020, publicly traded Broadway Financial Corp. of Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.-based CFBanc Corp. announced what they called a “transformational merger of equals” to create the largest Black-led MDI. At the time, the East and West coasts banks operating as Broadway Federal and City First boasted that they would be the lone Black-owned bank in the U.S. with more than $1 billion in combined assets under management and nearly $850 million in assets.

The newly joined Black-owned banks also agreed to maintain their federal Community Development Financial Institution, or CDFI status, pledging 60% of their lending to low- to moderate-income communities. Executives from both banks also said that combining the two institutions will increase their collective commercial lending capacity for investments in multifamily affordable housing, small businesses, and nonprofit development in financially underserved urban areas, while creating a national platform for impact investors.

“Given the compounding factors of a global pandemic, unprecedented unemployment and social unrest resulting from centuries of inequities, the work of CDFIs has never been more urgent and necessary,” said City First President and CEO Brian Argrett, now the vice chair and CEO of the newly created Black-owned bank that trades on the Nasdaq stock exchange under the “BYFC” stock symbol. “As part of this historic merger, we are demonstrating that thriving urban neighborhoods are viable markets that require a dedicated focus, long-term commitment and critical access to capital.”

“The new combined institution will strengthen our position and will help drive both sustainable economic growth and societal returns,” said Broadway CEO Wayne-Kent Bradshaw, who now serves as the chair of the publicly traded Black bank. “We envision building stronger profitability and creating a multiplier effect of capital availability for our customers and for the communities we serve.

But the merger has not been as accretive as expected. At the end of the first quarter, Broadway reported a first quarter loss of $3.5 million. Following the close of the merger, the company also sold off 18,474,000 shares of common stock in private placements to Wall Street investors, raising $32.9 million in gross proceeds to fund the bank’s ongoing operations.

In explaining the poor financial results, Broadway executives blamed the “impact of the lingering COVID-19 pandemic” on its operations, ominously noting that it had not implemented layoffs or furloughs of any employees because of the ongoing health crisis.

Also, the claim to being the nation’s largest Black-owned MDI and first to exceed the $1 billion asset mark is now also in question. According to the first quarter financial results and FDIC’s quarterly banking data, Broadway’s total asset value of nearly $480 billion is more than half of the pre-merger goal. That total would put it well behind Liberty and three other Black-owned banks, including Harlem-based Carter Federal Savings at $687 million, Citizens Trust in Atlanta at $572 million, Industrial Bank in the D.C. area at $559 million.

Nationally, the so-called “Big Five” banking and financial conglomerates that includes JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Citigroup, Wells Fargo and Goldman Sachs all have total assets exceeding a trillion dollars. At the end of the first quarter, JPMorgan reported first quarter profits of $14.3 billion on revenue of $33.1 billion. The Wall Street financial titan, which is the nation’s largest banking chain, ended fiscal 2020 with total assets of $3.48 trillion.

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Источник: https://blackconsumernews.com/new-orleans-based-liberty-bank-to-acquire-tri-state-bank-of-memphis-creating-nations-largest-black-led-financier/

Counterfeit cashier's checks bearing the name Liberty Bank, New Orleans, Louisiana, are reportedly in circulation

Liberty Bank and Trust Company, New Orleans, Louisiana, has contacted the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) to report that counterfeit cashier's checks bearing the institution's name are in circulation.

The counterfeit items display the routing number 065002108, which is assigned to Liberty Bank and Trust Company. The items are dissimilar to authentic cashier's checks. A security feature statement is embedded within a darkened top border and along the bottom border between two padlock icons. The signature is shown inside of a darkened rectangle in the lower-right corner and a "VOID" background is shown when copied.

Authentic cashier's checks are light blue with a basket-weave background. Checks have an ornate border on all sides and are perforated along the left side. The numerical amount is shown inside of a darkened rectangle. Two signatures lines are in the lower-right corner.

Copies of a counterfeit item and an authentic check (VOID) are attached for your review. Be aware that the appearance of counterfeit items can be modified and that additional variations may be presented.

Any information you have concerning this matter should be brought to the attention of:

Calvin Kaufmann
Vice President of Operations
Liberty Bank and Trust Company
P.O. Box 60131
New Orleans, Louisiana 70160
Telephone: (504) 240-5109
Fax: (504) 240-2720
E-mail: [email protected]

Information about counterfeit items, cyber-fraud incidents and other fraudulent activity may be forwarded to the FDIC's Cyber-Fraud and Financial Crimes Section, 550 17 th Street, N.W., Room F-3054, Washington, D.C. 20429, or transmitted electronically to [email protected] Questions related to federal deposit insurance or consumer issues should be submitted to the FDIC using an online form that can be accessed at http://www2.fdic.gov/starsmail/index.asp.

For your reference, FDIC Special Alerts may be accessed from the FDIC's website at www.fdic.gov/news/news/SpecialAlert/2010/index.html. To learn how to automatically receive FDIC Special Alerts through e-mail, please visit www.fdic.gov/about/subscriptions/index.html.

Sandra L. ThompsonDirector
Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection

Источник: https://www.bankersonline.com/alerts/46295

A CRA partnership case study

By Cheryl Winokur Munk

In 2017, $20 billion-asset BancorpSouth Bank in Tupelo, Miss., invested $8.5 million of capital in Liberty Bank and Trust Company, a minority depository institution, or MDI, in New Orleans. The transaction infused needed capital into Liberty Bank and had the added benefit of boosting BancorpSouth’s Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) rating.

BancorpSouth’s interest in $625 million-asset Liberty Bank was motivated in part by a little-known provision in the CRA that credits banks that collaborate with minority banks. There were 148 MDIs as of the first quarter of 2019, according to the FDIC, and many bankers may not be aware that their organizations can receive CRA credit for partnering with these minority banks.

Liberty Bank reached out to BancorpSouth and other banks about their interest to invest in its company, which was looking to redeem about $8.5 million of its cumulative perpetual preferred stock that was issued in 2010, says Mike Meyer, BancorpSouth’s chief banking officer and director of community lending. Finding a more attractive, lower-cost source of funding was an important initiative for Liberty Bank, a community development financial institution (CDFI) that also does business in BancorpSouth’s home state of Mississippi, Meyer adds.

For their part, leaders at BancorpSouth saw an opportunity to simultaneously expand its investment portfolio beyond mortgage-backed securities and boost its CRA rating. In January 2017—the date of the community bank’s last exam was released—its rating had improved to “Satisfactory.”

Besides Liberty Bank, BancorpSouth has made CRA investments in financial institutions including Southern Bancorp, a $1.2 billion-asset CDFI in Arkadelphia, Ark., and LiftFund, a nonprofit in San Antonio, Texas, that provides small business loans.

“We were excited to partner with a minority institution and gain their perspective on how they are able to tap into the communities,” says Tricia Bellamy, BancorpSouth’s chief compliance officer. “We were able to leverage their expertise, and they were able to leverage ours.” After Liberty Bank’s initial contact, members of BancorpSouth’s management and CRA teams traveled to New Orleans for an initial meeting with the smaller bank’s management team. It was a chance to make introductions and discuss some initiatives they had in place. “It was important for us to figure out if we had some common ground,” Meyer says.

From there, things progressed smoothly, both banks say. “I don’t think we had any concerns or sticking points, particularly because our footprint crosses over a little and they also provided us with access to some other markets,” Meyer says. “This investment allowed us to continue our focus on supporting the revitalization of underserved communities, as well as opportunities to leverage the loan product set and banking services that both institutions have to offer.”

Todd O. McDonald, senior vice president at Liberty Bank, says the transaction went especially quickly in part because BancorpSouth understood the “tremendous benefit” to be gained through its capital injection.

Players from both banks say they’re pleased with the collaboration, especially since the relationship has led both parties to other business opportunities, including loan participation possibilities, McDonald says. He predicts the partnership between BancorpSouth and Liberty Bank will be a harbinger of things to come in the banking industry.

“More banks than ever before are starting to collaborate with one another. The banking industry is changing and, especially with fintech firms having great services and products that ultimately need a bank behind them, it’s all about coming together,” McDonald says. “Collaboration is going to be key for the future of banking.”

“Collaboration is going to be key for the future of banking.”
—Todd O. McDonald, Liberty Bank and Trust Company

Liberty Bank’s mission to serve the underserved

Liberty Bank and Trust Company, the first multiracial bank in New Orleans, has come a long way since 1972, when it started operations out of a trailer because its founders couldn’t afford a traditional building. It has grown from a small, scrappy bank into a thriving community development financial institution (CDFI) with locations in eight states and $625 million in assets.

From the start, Liberty Bank’s mission was to improve the financial standing of African American consumers, a sorely underserved market at the time. The bank initially sought to provide African Americans with consumer loans, mortgages and other products and services that they might not otherwise have fair and equal access to, says Todd O. McDonald, Liberty Bank’s senior vice president. He’s also the son of the bank’s cofounder and CEO, Alden McDonald, Jr., the longest-tenured African American financial executive in the U.S.

Since its founding, the bank has broadened its focus to underserved markets in general, whether this is rural, urban or any community that does not have access to mainstream financial products, McDonald says.

There are still too many people who don’t have access to fairly priced loans or credit cards, he says, and many are stuck using costly payday loans or nontraditional financial services that aren’t geared toward their financial well-being. “Our goal is to change that,” he says, “and we’re really good at it.”

Partnership advice

For other banks interested in exploring opportunities to invest in an MDI, finding a partner with the right chemistry is a critical component, says Bellamy. She recommends seeking out a bank with a similar business philosophy or goals.

Banks should also understand what the investment is going to be used for. If it’s being used for CRA credit, “you definitely have to make sure it has a CRA benefit,” Bellamy says. “You also want to make sure that you’re going to be investing in a strong company. Look for companies that have longevity in the market and that are serving the needs of the community.”

“Look for companies that have longevity in the market and that are serving the needs of the community.”
—Tricia Bellamy, BancorpSouth Bank

This is particularly important, because any investment you make is a reflection of your community bank.

“As an investor, you want to work and deal with companies that have a very high, earned reputation and a good track record,” Meyer says. “The investment goes beyond just dollars and cents. It’s an investment in each other, and so it’s important that both parties see it as a win-win.

“In this instance, the investment and the partnership it has created has the added benefit of having a positive impact on the communities both institutions serve.”

What you need to know about the CRA

The Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) isn’t new, but bankers should be aware of all the potential benefits it offers. Here is a brief history.

In 1977, the CRA was created to ensure that all financial institutions met the credit needs of the communities in which they operate. What many bankers don’t realize is that it was amended in 1992 to include a provision that allowed majority banks to receive consideration for CRA credit for helping minority banks. They can do this in a variety of ways, including:

  • direct investment in a minority depository institution (MDI)
  • loan participations, other lending arrangements and sharing of loan servicing
  • sharing of bank staff and resources
  • technical assistance

A bank that is interested in collaborating with one or more minority institutions should reach out to its regulator’s minority bank program, which include the FDIC Minority Depository Institutions Program, the Fed’s Partnership for Programs and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) Minority Bank program. These programs keep in close contact with most minority banks, so they are aware of collaboration opportunities, and they can help vet proposals to determine whether activities are worthy of CRA credit.

The FDIC also has a national director of minority and community development banking, several regional MDI coordinators and regional community affairs specialists that can help. Majority banks can also reach out to minority banks directly. Go to bit.ly/FDICMDI to find an FDIC list of MDIs.

Cheryl Winokur Munk is a writer in New Jersey.

Источник: https://www.icba.org/newsroom/blogs/independent-banker/2021/06/01/a-cra-partnership-case-study

Alden J. McDonald, Jr.

Prominent African American businessman Alden Joseph McDonald, Jr. was born on September 16, 1943, in New Orleans, Louisiana. McDonald attended Louisiana State University’s School of Banking and received his undergraduate degree. McDonald also joined Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. and later attended Columbia University’s Commercial Banking Management Program.

McDonald began his banking career at International City Bank in New Orleans. In 1972, he became the President and CEO of Liberty Bank and Trust company, a position that he still holds today. Since 1972, McDonald has been an active force in the New Orleans business community. In 1987, he played a central role in the establishment of the Black Economic Development Council helping many minority businesses to secure public and private contracts for goods and services. Furthermore, he has served on almost all well known professional and social boards in the New Orleans region. As both a business leader and a community leader, he has devoted his life to community development through promoting entrepreneurship, supporting civic organizations and empowering businesses and individuals. Moreover, under his leadership, Liberty Bank and Trust’s successes helped black professionals and others settle east New Orleans and established a large African American homeownership class for the first time in the city’s history.

In 2001, McDonald received the prestigious Loving Cup from New Orleans’ major newspaper, The Times-Picayune. This award is considered the highest honor in the New Orleans Metropolitan Area. He then became the chairman of the New Orleans Chamber of Commerce. McDonald became the co-chair of the Greater New Orleans Education Foundation. In 2004, he became the first chairman for Greater New Orleans, Inc., established for the economic development of the New Orleans region.

In 2005, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, McDonald led efforts toward the economic rehabilitation of New Orleans as well as his own, Liberty Bank and Trust. Katrina devastated Liberty’s headquarters, branches and spread the bank’s customers throughout the nation. Despite these obstacles, he moved back into his community to concentrate his efforts toward the economic rehabilitation of New Orleans. McDonald enacted creative policy decisions for his bank and opened new branches that helped overturn the economic downturn of the New Orleans economy, thus cutting his bank’s estimated losses dramatically.

McDonald’s Liberty Bank and Trust is one of the five largest African American owned financial institutions in the United States. The bank serves as the fiscal agent for the City of New Orleans, substantially improving the City’s cash flow and cash management practices. Furthermore, McDonald opened the Liberty Freedom Fund, the first and only mutual fund to be owned, managed and distributed by African Americans. Since its incorporation in 1972, McDonald has grown Liberty’s assets from $2 million to over $370 million.

In 2006, McDonald was named to Fortune Magazine’s highly regarded “Portraits of Power” list for 2006, extolling him for his powerful presence in the business community and his impact on the global market. He was also named to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s (FDIC) Advisory Committee on Economic Inclusion, concentrating on the expansion of access to banking services for underserved populations. In 2008, he became a Fleur-de-lis Ambassador for New Orleans, a group of New Orleans professionals that travel across America to seek additional Katrina recovery support from businesses and philanthropic organizations.

See how Alden J. McDonald, Jr. is related to other HistoryMakersDonate NowClick Here To Explore The Archive Today!

Tape: 1

  • Slating of Alden J. McDonald, Jr.'s interview
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. lists his favorites
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his mother's family background, pt. 1
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his mother's family background, pt. 2
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his maternal family's traditions
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes the Martinez Kindergarten School in New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers his mother's transportation service
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers his early entrepreneurism
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his father's family background
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers his paternal grandfather

Tape: 2

  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his father's occupation, pt. 1
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his father's occupation, pt. 2
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his parents' personalities
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers his community in New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers defending himself in school
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers his family's finances
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his schooling in New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his educational experiences

Tape: 4

  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers the opening of Liberty Bank and Trust Company
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes the Liberty Bank and Trust Company, pt. 1
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers purchasing his first home
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes the Liberty Bank and Trust Company, pt. 2
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his higher education in banking
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. remembers the impact of Hurricane Katrina
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes Liberty Bank and Trust Company's response to Hurricane Katrina, pt. 1
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes Liberty Bank and Trust Company's response to Hurricane Katrina, pt. 2
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes Liberty Bank and Trust Company's community development efforts

Tape: 5

  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his medical board service
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. talks about the Black Economic Development Council
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes the National Bankers Association
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. reflects upon his banking career
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. reflects upon his life
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. reflects upon his legacy
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his hopes for the African American community
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes his children
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes how he met his wife
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. talks about his relationship with his wife
  • Alden J. McDonald, Jr. describes how he would like to be remembered
Источник: https://www.thehistorymakers.org/biography/alden-j-mcdonald-jr

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