contra costa property tax rate 2017

tax from a fee (as described on the following **Requires only a vote of the property owners. Contra Costa, 1.155%. Riverside, 1.155%. based on acquisition value, with a maximum tax rate of 1 percent, and annual increases in a property's assessed value capped at the lesser. use tax” add-ons to the combined state and local sales tax rate. in the counties of Los Angeles, Alameda and Contra Costa where the.

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Rates & Fees

Annual Sewer Service Charge

Central San collects an annual Sewer Service Charge from each property connected to the sewer system. The current residential rate is $660 per year for a single-family residence and $625 per year for a multi-family residential unit. For most property owners, the charge is billed on the Contra Costa County property tax bill and is labeled “CCCSD SEWER CHG.”

The annual Sewer Service Charge covers the collection and treatment of wastewater and other activities described in the Proposition 218 notice mailed to property owners. The Sewer Service Charge is billed for the upcoming fiscal year.  For most non-residential customers, the charge is based on their water consumption for the prior calendar year.

The schedule of annual Sewer Service Charges can be found in the ordinance below:
 

Environmental and Development-Related Fees and Charges

Central San charges fees for sewer permits, plan review, inspections, and other activities associated with certain new construction, sewer repair, remodel, and renovation projects. These fees are generally intended to recover Central San’s cost to provide a service.

To determine which fees might apply to a particular project, please call our Permit Counter at (925) 229-7371.

The Schedule of Environmental and Development-Related Fees and Charges can be found in the ordinance below:

  • Ordinance No. 317 – An Ordinance of the Central Contra Costa Sanitary District Adopting an Uncodified Schedule of Environmental and Development-related Fees and Charges in Accordance with District Code Chapter 6.30 (effective July 1, 2021)

Capacity Fees

A Capacity Fee is charged for new construction projects or for the expansion of a non-residential facility which may result in an increased wastewater burden. The Capacity Fee is calculated using the equity buy-in method. Under this method, new customers are charged for their share of Central San’s assets at the same equity position as existing customers.

Capacity Fees for residential projects are calculated on a per-residential unit basis. Capacity Fees for most non-residential projects are calculated based on the business type and building square footage.

To obtain a fee quote for a particular project, please contact our Permit Counter at (925) 229-7371.

The capacity fee schedule can be found in the ordinance below: 

  • Ordinance No. 309 (as amended) – An Ordinance of the Central Contra Costa Sanitary District Adopting an Uncodified Schedule of Capacity Fees, Rates and Charges in Accordance with District Code Chapter 6.12 (effective April 2, 2021)

Recycled Water

Central San’s recycled water pipelines deliver recycled water to portions of Martinez, Pacheco, Concord, and Pleasant Hill. Customers who receive are pistachios good or bad for you recycled water are billed monthly for the amount of recycled water delivered.

The rate schedule for recycled water can be found in the ordinance below:
 

  • Ordinance No. 305 – An Uncodified Ordinance of the Central Contra Costa Sanitary district Adopting a Schedule of Recycled Water Charges in Accordance with District Code Chapter 6.38 (effective July 1, 2019)
Источник: https://www.centralsan.org/rates-fees
Two houses in <b>Contra costa property tax rate 2017</b> side by side, one for rent

Walk the leafy streets near UC Berkeley’s Clark Kerr campus and you’ll come across a three-bedroom, three-bathroom home whose value Redfin puts at $2.34 million. Its owners are paying $28,000 a year in property taxes.

Go contra costa property tax rate 2017 on the same block and you’ll see another three-bathroom, three-bedroom contra costa property tax rate 2017 with a nearly identical Redfin value of $2.27 million. Its owners are paying about $6,000 in property taxes.

What the heck?

Welcome to the weird world of California homeownership, where the time when you bought a home influences how much property tax you pay (2017 in the first case, 1973 in the latter). Now, thanks to the brow sweat of data visualizer Ian Webster, you can explore the vast tax gulfs among homes in Berkeley and beyond — and if you’re a relatively new buyer, get mightily P.O.’d at how little many of your neighbors are paying.

Webster, a 30-year-old software engineer in San Mateo, scraped more than 5 million online records to create maps of property taxes in 12 California counties, including Alameda, Sonoma, Marin and Contra Costa. Parcels that pay the highest 10% of property tax in your browser viewport are marked in red, those paying the lowest 10% are green, and the middle 80%  are black. Click on individual properties to pull up government tax records, photos from Google Street View, and listings on Redfin and Zillow.

See Berkeley property taxes contra costa property tax rate 2017 a map

A flyby of Berkeley on Webster’s map reveals a dizzying quilt of property tax bills, from $15,000 tabs on modest-sized but pricey new purchases around San Pablo Park to grand old homes in the Berkeley Hills that are worth millions but dinged just a few thousand in property taxes a year. It’s not too difficult to find places with bills as much as 30 times greater than neighboring properties — a juxtaposition not quite as jarring as the 100-times disparities you’ll see in Palo Alto, but eye-opening nevertheless.

“I think the main surprising thing is you can zoom in to pretty much any block in the Bay Area and find examples that kind of make you scratch your head,” said Webster. “I don’t know what is right or wrong here, but just the fact there are these massive disparities suggests the policy is broken in some way.”

Locals contra costa property tax rate 2017 no doubt recognize this “policy” as Proposition 13, an initiative voters approved in 1978 that rejiggered the property-tax system across the state. (Voters at the upcoming election are being asked to modify Prop 13 with Proposition 15, which would allow commercial properties to be reassessed regularly and not just when they are sold.)

“There was a real concern [back then] which was that there were seniors living on fixed incomes who, in a period of really high inflation, were finding their houses were going up double, triple, quadruple-many-more times than what they paid for it. And the property taxes were going up with it,” said Jesse Rothstein, a professor of public policy and economics at UC Berkeley.

To help vulnerable populations deal with skyrocketing property taxes, Prop 13 froze everybody’s assessment basically at the amount they paid for the house, with only 2% annual increases in assessed values from thereon. That means your California property tax bill is basically what it would’ve been when you bought the house – people who live in their houses for 40 years are paying property taxes based on what their houses were worth 40 years ago.

Prop 13 pretty much guaranteed that nobody receives surprise property tax bills. But it also spawned complications in the housing market.

“It means people who are coming in later can pay multiples – their contributions are 10 or 30 times greater toward public services that we all rely on and use in our daily lives,” said Citizens one student loan refinance just a lot of inequity,” said Rothstein. “It makes it harder for people buying houses. And it encourages people to stay in their houses well beyond when that’s the right house for them, just because they don’t want to give up the low property-tax bill they’re paying.”

To judge from the online reaction, Webster’s map is achieving its intended goal of educating people about the effects of Prop 13. (The project is open-source; you can help expand it to all of California on Github or donate to bandwidth costs here.)

“WOW! This is an incredible tool! My neighbors are paying almost nothing!!!” one person wrote on Twitter. “I’m paying 58 x what one of my neighbors pays,” said another on the Bay Area Reddit. “My entire lot is 3,300 sq. ft. Theirs is over an acre. Similar size houses on each. Seems fair.”

Another Redditor has this simple advice: “If you bought any time in the last five years: Don’t click, it’s not worth it.”

John Metcalfe is an Oakland reporter who's written for Berkeleyside since 2020, covering the pandemic, equity and all things East Bay. Twitter: citycalfe.

Источник: https://www.berkeleyside.org/2020/10/27/property-taxes-interactive-map-berkeley

Historical Tax Rates in California Cities & Counties

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California Department of Tax and Fee Administration

Certification date

July 1, 2021

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The undersigned certify that, as of June 18, 2021, the internet website of the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration is designed, developed and maintained to be in compliance with California Government Code Sections 7405 and 11135, and the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.1, Level AA success criteria, published by the Web Accessibility Initiative of the World Wide Web Consortium.

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Источник: https://www.cdtfa.ca.gov/taxes-and-fees/archive-rates.htm

Q&A: How will the Northern California wildfires affect the property taxes of those who lost their home?

Napa County assessor John Tuteur has listened to people in disaster relief centers share stories of how they lost their homes and all their possessions when recent wildfires ripped across Northern California.

Then Tuteur tells them the state offers substantial property tax relief and protections as they consider what’s next.

“People say, ‘That’s the first good news I’ve had since my house burnt down,’” he said.

Proposition 13, the landmark 1978 ballot measure, has kept homeowners’ property tax bills lower than they would be otherwise by basing tax rates on when people bought contra costa property tax rate 2017 houses, rather than their current market value.

Under Proposition 13, tearing down your old house and building a new one would normally result in a full reassessment of your property and therefore a higher tax bill.

But after disasters that’s not the case: California law offers homeowners numerous ways to lower their taxes in the short term and maintain their previous rates if they decide to rebuild or move to a new home.

Here’s how it works:


How does Proposition 13 affect my property taxes in general?

Proposition 13 passed nearly four decades ago amid concerns that rising property taxes could force people out of their homes. The ballot measure limited property taxes to 1% of a home’s value at time of purchase and said the assessed value on which the taxes are based could only increase by a maximum of 2% a year — no matter how much cruz azul vs america 2020 home’s market value goes up

So, if in 2000 you bought a home in San Francisco for $500,000, your property taxes would be based on that value, factoring in the corresponding maximum 2% annual increases, even if that home is worth $1 million today.

My home just burned down. What options do I have?

Many.

The state allows homeowners to defer paying their property taxes in the wake of disasters and also temporarily lowers their taxes if a house has received more than $10,000 in damage or is gone entirely.

If homeowners defer their taxes and receive disaster relief, they will owe less money when the bill ultimately comes due.

In this case, homeowners affected by the fires are supposed to contact their county assessor’s office by Dec. 10 to receive a property tax deferral. But in Sonoma County, where more than 5,300 structures were destroyed, including 5% of the homes in the city of Santa Rosa, the assessor’s office is providing deferrals and disaster relief to homeowners automatically.

“We wanted to make it as seamless and easy as possible for people to be able to get relief,” Sonoma County Assessor Bill Rousseau said.

I want to rebuild my house or buy somewhere else in California. What will happen to my taxes?

State law offers numerous property tax protections when it comes time to rebuild, too. In short, if your house burns down after a disaster, you get to keep your Proposition 13 benefits.

A rebuilt house that’s substantially the same as the one previously on the property will maintain all Proposition 13 protections. So if you bought your house in Sonoma County in 2005, it was destroyed in the fires and you decide to rebuild, you’ll pay the same property tax rate as you did before.

Homeowners who lost their properties also can buy a new home in the same county and take their Proposition 13 benefit with them. For the tax rate to transfer completely, the new home’s purchase price has to be up contra costa property tax rate 2017 120% of the market value of your previous home at the time it was destroyed.

This benefit extends to other parts of California. Ten counties — Contra Costa, Los Angeles, Modoc, Orange, San Francisco, Santa Clara, Solano, Sonoma, Sutter and Ventura — allow homeowners displaced by natural disasters to keep their prior property tax rate. A homeowner who lost a house will be able to buy a new one in any of those counties and keep their tax rate.

What if I want to add another unit on my property or build or buy a bigger house?

The North Bay faced soaring housing prices before the wildfires wiped out thousands of homes. Some leaders in Santa Rosa, the largest city in the region, want to encourage residents to add smaller second units, known as granny flats, on their properties when they rebuild as one way to address the housing shortage.

Doing so wouldn’t require you to give up your Proposition 13 protections, either. You would keep your tax rate for your new home, and add the value of the second unit onto the property.

The same process holds if you wanted to build a larger house on your property or purchase a more expensive one instead. You’d keep your tax rate and the assessor would simply add the additional new value to determine the amount you’d pay.

FOR THE RECORD:

11:55 a.m.: An earlier version of this article described Proposition 13 as limiting the increase in a property’s tax bill to 2% a year. The proposition limits the increase in a property’s assessed value to 2% a year.

ALSO

Mapping the destruction from California’s wine country fires

Thousands displaced by Northern California's wildfires now face the region's housing shortage

With 5% of its housing destroyed by fire, Santa Rosa faces wrenching questions about its future

Updates on California politics

Источник: https://www.latimes.com/politics/la-pol-ca-property-taxes-wildfires-northern-california-20171103-htmlstory.html

The Most Notorious Property-Tax Underpayers in California

the webster new york ny 10013 Disneyland in 1978: The company is still paying property taxes at that year’s rate. Photo: Ted Streshinsky/Corbis via Getty Images

In 1978, Californians voted overwhelmingly in support of a consequential ballot best stock trading programs online that would forever change the state. Heralded as a “tax revolt” against Big Government, Proposition 13 essentially froze property taxes at 1975 rates, ensuring that any property is reassessed only when it’s contra costa property tax rate 2017. It effectively creates random subsidies based not on need but instead rewarding property owners who were lucky enough to get in early or can dodge the rules. Forty-two years on, some of California’s landowners — including many of the state’s wealthiest and most powerful corporations — continue to pay disco-era taxes on land that carries 2020 values.

Along the way, Prop 13 has decimated the state’s public-funding mechanisms, siphoning money away from parks contra costa property tax rate 2017 city services. In particular, one of the world’s great public university systems was starved, and per-pupil spending for K–12 public education plummeted to 41st out of 50 states. A new measure on next week’s ballot — Proposition 15, or Schools and Communities First — aims to reinstate contra costa property tax rate 2017 taxes on commercial property. A statewide “yes” on Prop 15 would capture up to $11.5 billion in annual tax revenue, according to the state’s legislative analysis, including $5 billion a year for schools and the rest directly to local communities’ general use. Most pundits think Prop 15 will pass, but it’s polling right at 50 percent.

If Prop 15 does pass, most commercial properties won’t be affected, as they’ve already been reassessed and are taxed close to market value. (Businesses that own properties valued under $3 million in total will remain exempt; residential property owners will still be exempt, too.) But for a handful of corporate commercial property owners — those who have held onto multiple properties for more than 40 years or those have taken advantage of plenty of loopholes to protect themselves — the reassessed values would result in significantly higher taxes. These are just a few of the companies that have been benefiting the most from Prop 13 — and how much the state stands to gain.

The most famous: Disney
Underpaying by: At least $25.8 million per year (and probably way more)

Disneyland’s 85 acres of Anaheim land are among of the state’s most legendary beneficiaries under Prop 13; if taxed properly, Orange County would see $19.6 million or more from the world’s biggest media company each year. (And that’s just if Disneyland was assessed similarly to nearby commercial properties; it’s likely to be worth far more.) But Disney owns way more property than theme parks, and its two Los Angeles–area studios located in Burbank and Glendale are assessed at 1975 and 1999 values, respectively, denying those cities a combined $6.2 million in property taxes every year as well. During the pandemic, Disney — which was sued last year for failing to pay its employees a living wage — has furloughed and laid off tens of thousands of workers at its studios and parks citing property-related expenses, yet still paid shareholders $1.5 billion.

The most egregious: The Blackstone Group/Boston Properties
Underpaying by: At least $6 million

Yes, that Blackstone — the Wall Cruz azul vs america 2020 investment firm known as the “nation’s largest landlord” that has purchased thousands of California rental properties — underpays by millions for its 1.1-million-square-foot corporate campus in Santa Monica. Taking advantage of a loophole that allowed them to skirt wheres the nearest regions bank reassessment twice as part of a merger, Blackstone bought a 49.8 percent stake in the Colorado Center for $229 million in 2007 and sold this stake in 2012 for $511 million, essentially making $281 million off a property that had last been assessed in 2005. The new owner, Boston Properties, also avoided a reassessment, meaning Colorado Center also retains rates from a 2005 assessment even though the property is estimated to be worth twice as much today. Santa Monica misses out on $6 million every year. As of the last filing, Blackstone — which is collectively one of the country’s largest Trump donors and has also spent millions to defeat rent-control measures comerica bank routing number arkansas California — has contributed $7 million to the “No on Prop 15” campaign.

The worst discrimination record: Los Angeles Country Club
Underpaying by: $1.6 million

Golf courses, requiring many acres of land often acquired many decades ago, will be facing a particularly harsh reckoning if Prop 15 wins. One of the biggest wake-up calls will be to the Los Angeles Country Club, considered to be one of the most exclusive in the U.S. Just the land itself, a 295-acre property next to Beverly Hills and surrounded by some of the priciest homes in the country, is valued at over $3 billion, meaning the club should be paying at least $2 million in annual taxes. Instead it pays $360,000, a figure handily covered by three of its annual six-figure memberships. Prop 13 is not just subsidizing the costs of a private club only accessible to the wealthiest Angelenos — it’s giving out a tax break that was granted to the club at a time when it explicitly banned women from joining and had no Jewish or Black members.

The most amenable: Facebook
Underpaying by: Not nearly as much as its competitors

Nowhere are Prop 13 disparities more apparent than in Silicon Valley, is kohls store open today the tax rates of tech giants across the street from each other are subject to wildly different rates. Intel has owned its Santa Clara property since 1970 and is still paying taxes from 1975. Apple’s $5 billion spaceship, built in 2017, is assessed at fair market value, more or less, in Cupertino. (Most of the land is or was owned by Silicon Valley’s billionaire commercial landlords, John Arrillaga and Richard Peery, who capitalized on Prop 13 by snatching up farmland and converting it chase credit card customer care office parks starting in the 1960s.) If all the tech companies in town were on contemporary footing, Santa Clara County would set up bill pay wells fargo in $1 billion annually in tax revenues, about double what it currently receives. Say what you will about Mark Zuckerberg, but he’s come out in favor of leveling the field, citing the need fhn model public services and schools (although a strongly worded letter from California’s NAACP chapter, which opposes Prop 15, says if Zuckerberg really wanted to support local communities, he should do so directly). But perhaps, because his relatively new campus expansions are already paying meredith village savings bank jobs rent compared to the Intels of the Valley, 1st wok calhoun village feeling generous: His charity has kicked in just under $11 million to the “Yes on 15” campaign.

The most environmentally destructive: Chevron
Underpaying by: $100 million 

Part of what Prop 15 funds would help pay for are upgrades to transportation that provide alternatives to cars, projects that are often underfunded — sidewalks, bike lanes, public transit. Yet many of the state’s most auto-dependent land uses contra costa property tax rate 2017 on Prop 13 to keep operating dirt cheap: parking lots, car dealerships, and yes, oil companies. That’s what a group of protesters were arguing earlier this month when they marched on the Chevron refinery in Richmond, California, which is underpaying its taxes to Contra Costa County by an estimated $4.2 million per year while becoming the region’s biggest polluter. In fact, Prop 13 helps Chevron avoid about $100 million statewide on its many properties, including refineries, oil extraction sites, and gas stations.

The loopiest: South Coast Plaza
Underpaying by: At least $26 million

The Segerstrom family built South Coast Plaza on the site of a lima bean farm in Orange County in 1967. They still own it. Last year, decades after agriculture gave way to Anthropologie, the family paid $4.8 million in taxes on a property assessed at $456 million but valued around $3 billion (although with something like a mall, there’s really no way of knowing for sure unless the property sells). An investigation by LAist looked at the way the land has been carved up into parcels that have avoided a reassessment of the entire property, meaning that the Saks, assessed in the 2000s, is paying five times more taxes than the Macy’s, even though they’re both similarly sized anchor stores right next to each other. The Segerstroms have paid $500,000 to fight Prop 15.

The best-known: Donald Trump
Underpaying by: $3.3 million

The Trump Organization holds a 30 percent stake of San Francisco’s Bank of America building, a 52-story skyscraper it bought jointly with New York’s Vornado Realty Trust in 2007. Over the past 13 years, the owners have managed to evade $164 million in taxes, or about $11 million per year. In many California cities, according to a report by 48 Hills, large out-of-town investors hold onto real estate that allows them to reap lower tax benefits over time. And even if either party needed to get out of the deal — if, hypothetically, the people who run the Trump Organization had their assets seized contra costa property tax rate 2017 Vornado’s majority stake means that a reassessment would not be triggered unless Prop 15 passed.

The Most Notorious Property-Tax Underpayers in CaliforniaИсточник: https://www.curbed.com/2020/10/prop-15-california-property-tax-prop-13.html

Contra costa property tax rate 2017 -

With West Contra Costa residents already paying some of the highest tax rates in the state for school bonds, and with aggressive projections about rising property values failing to materialize, school trustees should slow their massive construction program.

Current debt will likely force the district by 2014 to exceed the tax rate limit promised voters in 2002 and 2005 when they approved more construction bonds.

Rather than pausing, the school board last week voted to issue more bonds that property owners must repay. While legal, it’s fiscally unsound.

Unfortunately, the district’s school construction program has been plagued with deception. Five times in the past 13 years, officials obtained voter approval to issue bonds. Each time, the ballot analysis mentioned only the immediate proposal, hiding the ongoing costs of the previously approved measures.

All told, the district obtained voter approval to borrow $1.27 billion, of which it has issued $812 billion in bonds so far. Property owners must pay them back with interest. Under current forecasts, repayment of the full amount by 2050 will cost property owners close to $3 billion.

That might have been fine when times were good. But the school board’s decision last week to soon issue another $100 million of bonds is the key reason property owners will pay 24 percent more this fiscal year for school construction.

The average homeowner’s payment for school bonds will jump from $402 to $500. That’s on top of the baseline property tax. And the bond costs will increase in coming years.

It’s not just the absolute amount that’s at issue, it’s also the tax rate. When school districts seek voter approval for bonds, they estimate how much the borrowing will increase property owners’ tax rates.

Usually, that estimate can be no more than $60 per $100,000 of assessed valuation. Thus an owner of a home assessed at $300,000 would pay no more than $180 annually for that bond issue. But school districts typically project that property values will rise and that resales will spark reassessments at higher levels.

If the actual increase in assessments falls below expectations, each property owner must be charged a higher rate to make up the shortfall. That’s why property tax rates in West Contra Costa will soon exceed what voters had been promised in 2002 and 2005.

Even if the assessed value of real estate in the district increases by 4 percent annually in the future, the tax rates will exceed the $60 limits starting in 2014. District estimates show the rate for one of the bond measures will be in the $70 range from 2017-34, and in the $80-90 range for the other from 2020-2034. And that’s all for repayment of bonds that have already been issued.

So how can the district charge more than it promised and issue additional bonds this fall?

First, the tax-rate limits are not binding. The law only requires that districts provide estimates at the time they issue bonds showing they will meet the limits. They are free to make rosy assumptions about rising real estate markets. Not surprisingly, many districts, including West Contra Costa, do just that. If assumptions don’t pan out, bonds still must be repaid. So districts are free to raise the tax rates beyond what they originally estimated.

Second, the tax-rate limits apply individually to each bond measure. Thus, while the West Contra Costa district is on a trajectory to exceed the limits for the bonds approved in 2002 and 2005, it has not issued any of the bonds voters approved in 2010. That’s the pot from which it will draw for the fall bond issue. Of course, it’s highly doubtful voters would have approved the 2010 bonds if they had known the district would likely renege on its previous tax rate promises.

The district almost exceeded the limits this year. Because of favorable bond rates, officials were able to recently refinance the 2002 bonds and use the savings to hold rates down for two years. But the district can’t count on being able to repeat that. To avoid exceeding the limits, the district could also refinance into longer-term bonds, but that would mean higher costs in later years for taxpayers.

The reality is the district has maxed out — and will soon exceed the limit on — two of its charge cards. Meanwhile, it plans to just pull out the next one.

Daniel Borenstein is a staff columnist and editorial writer. Reach him at 925-943-8248 or [email protected] Follow him at twitter.com/borensteindan.

Источник: https://www.eastbaytimes.com/2011/09/23/daniel-borenstein-west-contra-costa-school-tax-rate-likely-to-exceed-limit/

East Bay board agrees to ask taxpayers to vote in March to approve $575 million bond measure

Theresa Harrington / EdSource

The West Contra Costa Unified school board listens to a budget presentation by Superintendent Matthew Duffy, right, and Tony Wold, associate superintendent of business services, on Nov. 20, 2019.

Theresa Harrington / EdSource

The West Contra Costa Unified school board listens to a budget presentation by Superintendent Matthew Duffy, right, and Tony Wold, associate superintendent of business services, on Nov. 20, 2019.

This story was updated at 3:05 p.m. Nov. 22 to add a link to the ballot measure, which includes potential projects to be funded through the bond measure.

A San Francisco Bay Area district has decided to go to the voters in March asking them to approve a $575 million construction bond measure so it can build and upgrade school facilities.

Related

Supporters urge board to keep East Bay superintendent despite budget crisis

If voters approve the measure, West Contra Costa Unified — which includes Richmond and surrounding communities — could only use the money for construction, renovation, technology or other facilities upgrades.

The new funds would not help offset the district’s $48 million operating deficit, which caused the school board last week to consider firing its superintendent. In the end the board agreed to work with Superintendent Matthew Duffy to find ways to close its budget gap.

Related

Higher pay, smaller classes, housing perks in San Francisco Bay Area district’s plan to attract teachers

West Contra Costa is considering spending cuts and the use of budget reserves to close its budget gap, which surfaced since last spring, in part to fund a 17 percent cumulative raise for the district’s teachers from July 2017 to July 2020 in order to attract and retain high quality educators. Officials said the district may return to the voters next November to ask for a new parcel tax to restore any programs, services and staffing that it cuts to balance its 2020-21 budget.

The district bond measure is different from the statewide $15 billion construction bond measure that will also appear on the March ballot, because the West Contra Costa measure only applies to residents in the district and would require them to pay additional property taxes to fund it. The statewide measure, on the other hand, would be funded as part of the state budget and could provide matching funds to districts such as West Contra Costa, if they have their own local funding. The state measure requires a district match in most cases, but the percentage varies based on the type of project and the demographic makeup of students. The state bond may cover up to the entire project cost for some districts that qualify for financial hardship. The state measure requires a majority vote to pass, while district measures require 55 percent voter approval.

The school board on Wednesday voted 4-1 to place the measure on the March 3, 2020 ballot to be used to rebuild and renovate 21 schools considered priorities based on the district’s facilities master plan, while also providing air conditioning and technology districtwide.

Board president Tom Panas voted against the bond. He said he opposed asking voters to approve another district tax, adding that he preferred to wait until November because there isn’t much time to drum up support for the March measure with holidays coming up. He said he was also concerned that the project list was too broad and vague.

The bond measure would require property owners to pay $60 per $100,000 in assessed value through 2052-53. That would increase the property tax rate from nearly $238 to almost $300 per $100,000 of assessed valuation. The rate would drop every year as other measures are paid off.

Board member Consuelo Lara said she was “excited” about the planned projects, including air conditioning, career technical education, arts facilities and health centers.

“Everybody’s going to benefit,” she said. “These are things I’m passionate about.”

Board member Mister Phillips said some of his neighbors have told him they are experiencing financial hardships and have to choose between feeding their families and heating their homes.

“I want us to realize when we talk about putting a bond or a parcel tax on the ballot, this money we’re trying to get is not free money,” he said. “It’s coming from our neighbors and some of those folks are struggling.”

Tony Wold, associate superintendent of business services, said the district recognizes that even without the new tax“our community is feeling the burden of taxes.” But he said the district has identified more than $1 billion in facilities needs “and that is only going to go up” if the district waits.

The school board has not yet identified which specific projects among all of those listed in the ballot measure would be funded with the money. The bond measure states that the final costs have not yet been determined and that based on these costs, some projects “may be delayed or may not be completed.”

The district plans to pay for placing the bond measure on the ballot, estimated at $256,700 to $385,000, from revenue in its operating budget set aside for legal fees, which won’t be needed this year, Wold said.

Editor’s Note: As a special project, EdSource is tracking developments this year in the Oakland Unified and West Contra Costa Unified School Districts as a way to illustrate some of the most urgent challenges facing many urban districts in California. West Contra Costa Unified includes Richmond, El Cerrito and several other East Bay communities.

One more thing… Help shape EdSource’s future, and tell us how to better serve you. Please take a few minutes to fill out our audience survey here.

EXPLORE:

Elections and EducationEast Bay SchoolsEast BayFeaturedMatthew DuffySchool Construction BondsTony WoldWest Contra Costa Unified School District

Источник: https://edsource.org/2019/amid-budget-worries-east-bay-board-approves-575-million-bond-measure/620373

Q&A: How will the Northern California wildfires affect the property taxes of those who lost their home?

Napa County assessor John Tuteur has listened to people in disaster relief centers share stories of how they lost their homes and all their possessions when recent wildfires ripped across Northern California.

Then Tuteur tells them the state offers substantial property tax relief and protections as they consider what’s next.

“People say, ‘That’s the first good news I’ve had since my house burnt down,’” he said.

Proposition 13, the landmark 1978 ballot measure, has kept homeowners’ property tax bills lower than they would be otherwise by basing tax rates on when people bought their houses, rather than their current market value.

Under Proposition 13, tearing down your old house and building a new one would normally result in a full reassessment of your property and therefore a higher tax bill.

But after disasters that’s not the case: California law offers homeowners numerous ways to lower their taxes in the short term and maintain their previous rates if they decide to rebuild or move to a new home.

Here’s how it works:


How does Proposition 13 affect my property taxes in general?

Proposition 13 passed nearly four decades ago amid concerns that rising property taxes could force people out of their homes. The ballot measure limited property taxes to 1% of a home’s value at time of purchase and said the assessed value on which the taxes are based could only increase by a maximum of 2% a year — no matter how much a home’s market value goes up

So, if in 2000 you bought a home in San Francisco for $500,000, your property taxes would be based on that value, factoring in the corresponding maximum 2% annual increases, even if that home is worth $1 million today.

My home just burned down. What options do I have?

Many.

The state allows homeowners to defer paying their property taxes in the wake of disasters and also temporarily lowers their taxes if a house has received more than $10,000 in damage or is gone entirely.

If homeowners defer their taxes and receive disaster relief, they will owe less money when the bill ultimately comes due.

In this case, homeowners affected by the fires are supposed to contact their county assessor’s office by Dec. 10 to receive a property tax deferral. But in Sonoma County, where more than 5,300 structures were destroyed, including 5% of the homes in the city of Santa Rosa, the assessor’s office is providing deferrals and disaster relief to homeowners automatically.

“We wanted to make it as seamless and easy as possible for people to be able to get relief,” Sonoma County Assessor Bill Rousseau said.

I want to rebuild my house or buy somewhere else in California. What will happen to my taxes?

State law offers numerous property tax protections when it comes time to rebuild, too. In short, if your house burns down after a disaster, you get to keep your Proposition 13 benefits.

A rebuilt house that’s substantially the same as the one previously on the property will maintain all Proposition 13 protections. So if you bought your house in Sonoma County in 2005, it was destroyed in the fires and you decide to rebuild, you’ll pay the same property tax rate as you did before.

Homeowners who lost their properties also can buy a new home in the same county and take their Proposition 13 benefit with them. For the tax rate to transfer completely, the new home’s purchase price has to be up to 120% of the market value of your previous home at the time it was destroyed.

This benefit extends to other parts of California. Ten counties — Contra Costa, Los Angeles, Modoc, Orange, San Francisco, Santa Clara, Solano, Sonoma, Sutter and Ventura — allow homeowners displaced by natural disasters to keep their prior property tax rate. A homeowner who lost a house will be able to buy a new one in any of those counties and keep their tax rate.

What if I want to add another unit on my property or build or buy a bigger house?

The North Bay faced soaring housing prices before the wildfires wiped out thousands of homes. Some leaders in Santa Rosa, the largest city in the region, want to encourage residents to add smaller second units, known as granny flats, on their properties when they rebuild as one way to address the housing shortage.

Doing so wouldn’t require you to give up your Proposition 13 protections, either. You would keep your tax rate for your new home, and add the value of the second unit onto the property.

The same process holds if you wanted to build a larger house on your property or purchase a more expensive one instead. You’d keep your tax rate and the assessor would simply add the additional new value to determine the amount you’d pay.

FOR THE RECORD:

11:55 a.m.: An earlier version of this article described Proposition 13 as limiting the increase in a property’s tax bill to 2% a year. The proposition limits the increase in a property’s assessed value to 2% a year.

ALSO

Mapping the destruction from California’s wine country fires

Thousands displaced by Northern California's wildfires now face the region's housing shortage

With 5% of its housing destroyed by fire, Santa Rosa faces wrenching questions about its future

Updates on California politics

Источник: https://www.latimes.com/politics/la-pol-ca-property-taxes-wildfires-northern-california-20171103-htmlstory.html

SECURED PROPERTY TAXES TERMS

Annual Secured Property Tax Bill
The annual bill, which includes the General Tax Levy, Voted Indebtedness, and Direct Assessments, that the Department of Treasurer and Tax Collector mails each fiscal tax year to all Los Angeles County property owners by November 1, due in two installments.

Adjusted Annual Secured Property Tax Bill
A bill that replaces the Annual Secured Property Tax Bill due to the following reasons: a change or correction to the assessed value of the property; the allowance of an exemption that was previously omitted; the correction of a Direct Assessment placed on the property from a municipality or special district; or the inclusion of a penalty for failure to comply with certain requirements of the Office of the Assessor prescribed by law (this excludes a penalty resulting from a delinquent payment).

Ad Valorem
“According to the value” – Based on value. For example, the Office of the Assessor calculates property taxes based on the assessed value of a property.

Non-Ad Valorem
“Not according to the value.”

Assessment
The rate or value of a property for taxation purposes.

Assessor’s Identification Number (AIN)
A 10-digit number (a.k.a., map book, page, and parcel) that identifies each piece of real property for property tax purposes, e.g., 1234-567-890.

California Relay Service
A telecommunications relay service that provides full telephone accessibility to people who are deaf, hard of hearing, or speech impaired.

Closing/Settlement Statement
A document that provides the closing details on a real estate transaction including the escrow deposits for property taxes, commissions, loan fees, points, hazard insurance, and mortgage insurance. Also called HUD-1 Settlement Statement or Settlement Sheet.

Current Year
The current fiscal tax year in which the Department of Treasurer and Tax Collector issues an Annual Secured Property Tax Bill.

Current Assessed Value
The assessed value the Office of the Assessor assigns to a property.

Current Market Value
The estimated resale value of a property.

Delinquent/Delinquency
Each current year installment payment that is past due.

Defaulted
The unpaid property taxes at the end of the fiscal tax year.

Direct Assessment
The costs of services or benefits (e.g., weed removal, landscape, flood control, refuse, sewer, sidewalk repair, and lighting) that the Department of Auditor-Controller adds to the Secured Tax Roll at the request of local taxing agencies.

Electronic Check
An electronic form of payment made via the Internet that is designed to perform the same function as a conventional paper check.

Escaped Assessment
A taxable or an assessable prior year event that escaped the Office of the Assessor, which as a result, was not added to the corrected property’s assessed value to the prior year Annual Secured Property Tax Bill.

Escrow
A contractual arrangement in which a third party (title company or escrow company) receives and disburses money or documents related to the sale of a property.

Escrow Statement
A statement with the breakdown of credits, debits, and payments for the buyer and the seller at the closing of a real estate transaction.

Exemption
A protection or exclusion on a portion of property taxes.

Fiscal Tax Year/Tax Roll Year
A fiscal tax year runs from July 1 through June 30; a tax roll year refers to the fiscal tax year. For example, Fiscal Tax Year 2018-19 runs from July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019, and the Tax Roll Year is 2018-19.

Five-Pay Plan
A five-year payment plan that allows defaulted property taxes to be paid in 20 percent increments of the redemption amount, with interest, along with the current year property taxes annually.

Four-Pay Plan
A four-year payment plan that allows prior year escaped assessments to be paid in 20 percent increments of the escaped property taxes, without penalties or interest, along with the current year property taxes annually.

Impound/Escrow Account
An account a taxpayer establishes with his/her lender to pay property taxes.

Military Orders
The documentation required for military personnel to apply for relief of property tax penalties.

Pay Online
To make an electronic payment for property taxes via the Department of Treasurer and Tax Collector’s website. This is not a payment through your bank’s online bill payment or home banking functions.

Personal Identification Number (PIN)
A numerical code necessary for completing electronic financial transactions. The PIN can be found on any original Secured Property Tax Bill.

Postmark
A United States Postal Service (USPS) marking on an envelope or package that indicates the date and time a mail piece was taken into custody by the USPS. Please visit https://ttc.lacounty.gov/avoid-penalties-by-understanding-postmarks/  for samples.

Prior Year
The property taxes that have defaulted or escaped during the prior fiscal tax year.

Property Tax Postponement
A State program offered to senior, blind, or disabled citizens to defer their current year property taxes on their principal residence if they meet certain criteria.

Public Auction
An auction, held pursuant to the California Revenue and Taxation Code Section 3691, in which the Department of Treasurer and Tax Collector auctions and sells tax-defaulted properties in its possession.

Reassessment
The rate or value of a property when a change in ownership or completion of new construction occurs.

Reassessment Exclusion
A taxpayer’s request to be excluded from reassessment of the value of a property after meeting certain conditions (e.g., transfer of property from parent/grandparent to child/grandchild or transfer of base year value).

Secured Property Tax Information Request form
A form to request information on multiple properties all at once.

Service Fees
A charge for processing all credit/debit card transactions for property tax payments.

Substitute Secured Property Tax Bill
A replacement bill used for making property tax payments on lost or missing original bills. This bill does not contain the Personal Identification Number or a breakdown of the General Levy, Voted Indebtedness, or Direct Assessments.

Supplemental Secured Property Tax Bill
An additional property tax bill issued as a result of the reassessment of the value of a property upon a change in ownership or completion of new construction.

Supplemental Tax Estimator
A tool to estimate the expected amount of Supplemental Secured Property Taxes on a recent purchase of property. Please visit https://assessor.lacounty.gov/supplemental-tax-estimator/.

Taxable Event
An event that requires the Office of the Assessor to assess or reassess the value of a property (e.g., change in ownership or completion of new construction).

Taxing agency
A local agency within a specific tax rate area (e.g., schools, fire, water, parks, districts, departments, community services, etc.).

TDD Equipment
A telecommunication device such as a teleprinter that is designed for people who have hearing or speech difficulties.

Third-Party Payment Processor
A Los Angeles County contracted vendor that processes all credit/debit card property tax payments.

Источник: https://ttc.lacounty.gov/unsecured-property-taxes/

Historical Tax Rates in California Cities & Counties

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California Department of Tax and Fee Administration

Certification date

July 1, 2021

Accessibility Technology Inquiry

The undersigned certify that, as of June 18, 2021, the internet website of the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration is designed, developed and maintained to be in compliance with California Government Code Sections 7405 and 11135, and the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.1, Level AA success criteria, published by the Web Accessibility Initiative of the World Wide Web Consortium.

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Источник: https://www.cdtfa.ca.gov/taxes-and-fees/archive-rates.htm

What is the property tax rate in Contra Costa County?

At what age do you stop paying property taxes in California? California Property Tax Exemption at Age 55 in a Nutshell. If you own property in California, you must pay property taxes. Many Californians struggle with covering their property tax bills and are actively looking for ways to reduce property taxes on their own.

How can I lower my property taxes in California? If a homeowner feels that there was an incorrect valuation of their home, they may be able to reduce their California property taxes by filing an appeal. Before moving forward with a formal appeal, however, homeowners should speak with their local county assessor’s office.

How do I calculate property tax? To calculate the tax on your property, multiply the Assessed Value by the Tax Rate. Assume you have a house with an APPRAISED VALUE of $100,000. The ASSESSED VALUE is $25,000 (25% of $100,000), and the TAX RATE has been set by your county commission at $3.20 per hundred of assessed value.

What is the property tax rate in Contra Costa County? – Related Questions

Is California property tax based on purchase price?

California real property taxes are based on a real property’s purchase price. For instance, if you buy a real property in California, the assessed value is equal to the purchase price. The assessed value of the real property can rise with inflation every year, which is the change in the California Consumer Price Index.

What is Texas property tax rate?

How Much Are Taxes In Texas? Property taxes in Texas are calculated based on the county you live in. The average property tax rate in Texas is 1.80%. This is currently the seventh-highest rate in the United States.

How often is property tax paid?

Property taxes are usually paid twice a year—generally March 1 and September 1—and are paid in advance. So the payment you make March 1 pays for March through August, while the payment you make September 1 pays for September through February.

Is property tax deductible in California?

Property taxes are generally still tax-deductible, but this year the deduction is subject to a total cap of $10,000, which includes property taxes plus state and local income taxes or sales taxes paid during the year ($5,000 if married filing separately).

How much is San Francisco property tax?

The Property Tax Rate for the City and County of San Francisco is currently set at 1.1801% of the assessed value for 2019-20. The assessed value is initially set at the purchase price. The tax rate changes every year.

How do property taxes work when you buy a house?

When you buy a home, who should pay the real estate taxes the first year? The buyer should pay the real estate taxes due after closing. This way, the buyer and seller only pay the real estate taxes that accrued during the time they actually owned the property.

Is there a senior discount for property taxes in California?

California doesn’t offer many special property tax breaks for seniors, although they can claim the standard California write-offs other homeowners are entitled to. For example, there’s a $7,000 deduction on the assessed value of a personal home, which lowers taxes about $70.

At what age is Social Security no longer taxed?

At 65 to 67, depending on the year of your birth, you are at full retirement age and can get full Social Security retirement benefits tax-free. However, if you’re still working, part of your benefits might be subject to taxation.

At what age do seniors stop paying taxes?

Updated for Tax Year 2019

You can stop filing income taxes at age 65 if: You are a senior that is not married and make less than $13,850.

Why are California property taxes so high?

California property taxes are based on the purchase price of the property. So when you buy a home, the assessed value is equal to the purchase price. From there, the assessed value increases every year according to the rate of inflation, which is the change in the California Consumer Price Index.

Who is exempt from paying property taxes?

Who Is Exempt From Paying Property Taxes? Some types of properties are exempt from real estate taxes. These include qualifying nonprofit and religious and government properties. Senior citizens, veterans, and those eligible for STAR (the School Tax Relief program) may qualify for exemptions, as well.

Why are property taxes so high?

State and local budgeting

Your property tax may increase when state governments fund a service like repairing roads — or even if the state cuts funding. Increasing property taxes for homeowners is often a major source of funding when governments put money into school programs or renovations.

How is monthly property tax calculated?

To calculate yours, simply multiply the assessed value of your home by the mill levy. That will give you an estimated amount of taxes you can expect to pay every year. So for example, if you determined the assessed value of your home to be $20,000 and your mill levy was .

Does property tax increase every year in California?

The California State Constitution currently caps ad valorem property tax rates for both commercial and residential properties at 1% of the “full cash value” at the time of acquisition, with increases to assessed values capped at no more than 2% per year regardless of the property’s actual fair market value.

How much is property tax in California per year?

Let’s talk in numbers: the average effective property tax rate in California is 0.77%. The national average sits at 1.08%. Of course, the average tax rate in California varies by county. If a property has an assessed home value of $300,000, the annual property tax for it would be $3,440 based on the national average.

Where do California property taxes go?

All property taxes are allocated to local governments within the county in which the tax is collected. Specifically, property tax revenues are distributed to K12 schools and community colleges, counties, cities, special districts, and redevelopment agencies as shown in Figure 1.

How can I lower my property taxes in Texas?

Homeowners have two ways they can reduce the amount of taxes they have to pay. One is, they can contest the property’s appraised value put forth by the appraisal district’s appraiser. And the other, and most common, is to take advantage of the property tax exemptions available to Texas residents.

How can I avoid paying property taxes in Texas?

You may apply for homestead exemptions on your principal residence. Homestead exemptions remove part of your home’s value from taxation so they lower taxes. For example, your home is appraised at $50,000, and you qualify for a $15,000 exemption, you will pay taxes on the home as if it was worth only $35,000.

Do I pay property tax monthly?

Property taxes are an ad valorem tax, so the tax is based on the value of the property. If you have a mortgage, your property tax may be rolled into your monthly mortgage payment. Otherwise, you pay the tax office directly.

Who qualifies for property tax exemption California?

You may be eligible for property tax assistance if you are 62 years of age or older, blind or disabled, own and live in your own home, and meet certain household income limitations. For additional information regarding homeowner property tax assistance, contact the California Franchise Tax Board at 1-800-868-4171.

Can you deduct property taxes in 2020 California?

State and local taxes

California does not allow a deduction of state and local income taxes on your state return. California does allow deductions for your real estate tax and vehicle license fees.

Источник: https://cementanswers.com/what-is-the-property-tax-rate-in-contra-costa-county/

The Most Notorious Property-Tax Underpayers in California

Disneyland in 1978: The company is still paying property taxes at that year’s rate. Photo: Ted Streshinsky/Corbis via Getty Images

In 1978, Californians voted overwhelmingly in support of a consequential ballot measure that would forever change the state. Heralded as a “tax revolt” against Big Government, Proposition 13 essentially froze property taxes at 1975 rates, ensuring that any property is reassessed only when it’s sold. It effectively creates random subsidies based not on need but instead rewarding property owners who were lucky enough to get in early or can dodge the rules. Forty-two years on, some of California’s landowners — including many of the state’s wealthiest and most powerful corporations — continue to pay disco-era taxes on land that carries 2020 values.

Along the way, Prop 13 has decimated the state’s public-funding mechanisms, siphoning money away from parks and city services. In particular, one of the world’s great public university systems was starved, and per-pupil spending for K–12 public education plummeted to 41st out of 50 states. A new measure on next week’s ballot — Proposition 15, or Schools and Communities First — aims to reinstate fair-market-value taxes on commercial property. A statewide “yes” on Prop 15 would capture up to $11.5 billion in annual tax revenue, according to the state’s legislative analysis, including $5 billion a year for schools and the rest directly to local communities’ general use. Most pundits think Prop 15 will pass, but it’s polling right at 50 percent.

If Prop 15 does pass, most commercial properties won’t be affected, as they’ve already been reassessed and are taxed close to market value. (Businesses that own properties valued under $3 million in total will remain exempt; residential property owners will still be exempt, too.) But for a handful of corporate commercial property owners — those who have held onto multiple properties for more than 40 years or those have taken advantage of plenty of loopholes to protect themselves — the reassessed values would result in significantly higher taxes. These are just a few of the companies that have been benefiting the most from Prop 13 — and how much the state stands to gain.

The most famous: Disney
Underpaying by: At least $25.8 million per year (and probably way more)

Disneyland’s 85 acres of Anaheim land are among of the state’s most legendary beneficiaries under Prop 13; if taxed properly, Orange County would see $19.6 million or more from the world’s biggest media company each year. (And that’s just if Disneyland was assessed similarly to nearby commercial properties; it’s likely to be worth far more.) But Disney owns way more property than theme parks, and its two Los Angeles–area studios located in Burbank and Glendale are assessed at 1975 and 1999 values, respectively, denying those cities a combined $6.2 million in property taxes every year as well. During the pandemic, Disney — which was sued last year for failing to pay its employees a living wage — has furloughed and laid off tens of thousands of workers at its studios and parks citing property-related expenses, yet still paid shareholders $1.5 billion.

The most egregious: The Blackstone Group/Boston Properties
Underpaying by: At least $6 million

Yes, that Blackstone — the Wall Street investment firm known as the “nation’s largest landlord” that has purchased thousands of California rental properties — underpays by millions for its 1.1-million-square-foot corporate campus in Santa Monica. Taking advantage of a loophole that allowed them to skirt property reassessment twice as part of a merger, Blackstone bought a 49.8 percent stake in the Colorado Center for $229 million in 2007 and sold this stake in 2012 for $511 million, essentially making $281 million off a property that had last been assessed in 2005. The new owner, Boston Properties, also avoided a reassessment, meaning Colorado Center also retains rates from a 2005 assessment even though the property is estimated to be worth twice as much today. Santa Monica misses out on $6 million every year. As of the last filing, Blackstone — which is collectively one of the country’s largest Trump donors and has also spent millions to defeat rent-control measures in California — has contributed $7 million to the “No on Prop 15” campaign.

The worst discrimination record: Los Angeles Country Club
Underpaying by: $1.6 million

Golf courses, requiring many acres of land often acquired many decades ago, will be facing a particularly harsh reckoning if Prop 15 wins. One of the biggest wake-up calls will be to the Los Angeles Country Club, considered to be one of the most exclusive in the U.S. Just the land itself, a 295-acre property next to Beverly Hills and surrounded by some of the priciest homes in the country, is valued at over $3 billion, meaning the club should be paying at least $2 million in annual taxes. Instead it pays $360,000, a figure handily covered by three of its annual six-figure memberships. Prop 13 is not just subsidizing the costs of a private club only accessible to the wealthiest Angelenos — it’s giving out a tax break that was granted to the club at a time when it explicitly banned women from joining and had no Jewish or Black members.

The most amenable: Facebook
Underpaying by: Not nearly as much as its competitors

Nowhere are Prop 13 disparities more apparent than in Silicon Valley, where the tax rates of tech giants across the street from each other are subject to wildly different rates. Intel has owned its Santa Clara property since 1970 and is still paying taxes from 1975. Apple’s $5 billion spaceship, built in 2017, is assessed at fair market value, more or less, in Cupertino. (Most of the land is or was owned by Silicon Valley’s billionaire commercial landlords, John Arrillaga and Richard Peery, who capitalized on Prop 13 by snatching up farmland and converting it into office parks starting in the 1960s.) If all the tech companies in town were on contemporary footing, Santa Clara County would rake in $1 billion annually in tax revenues, about double what it currently receives. Say what you will about Mark Zuckerberg, but he’s come out in favor of leveling the field, citing the need for public services and schools (although a strongly worded letter from California’s NAACP chapter, which opposes Prop 15, says if Zuckerberg really wanted to support local communities, he should do so directly). But perhaps, because his relatively new campus expansions are already paying closer-to-market-rate rent compared to the Intels of the Valley, he’s feeling generous: His charity has kicked in just under $11 million to the “Yes on 15” campaign.

The most environmentally destructive: Chevron
Underpaying by: $100 million 

Part of what Prop 15 funds would help pay for are upgrades to transportation that provide alternatives to cars, projects that are often underfunded — sidewalks, bike lanes, public transit. Yet many of the state’s most auto-dependent land uses rely on Prop 13 to keep operating dirt cheap: parking lots, car dealerships, and yes, oil companies. That’s what a group of protesters were arguing earlier this month when they marched on the Chevron refinery in Richmond, California, which is underpaying its taxes to Contra Costa County by an estimated $4.2 million per year while becoming the region’s biggest polluter. In fact, Prop 13 helps Chevron avoid about $100 million statewide on its many properties, including refineries, oil extraction sites, and gas stations.

The loopiest: South Coast Plaza
Underpaying by: At least $26 million

The Segerstrom family built South Coast Plaza on the site of a lima bean farm in Orange County in 1967. They still own it. Last year, decades after agriculture gave way to Anthropologie, the family paid $4.8 million in taxes on a property assessed at $456 million but valued around $3 billion (although with something like a mall, there’s really no way of knowing for sure unless the property sells). An investigation by LAist looked at the way the land has been carved up into parcels that have avoided a reassessment of the entire property, meaning that the Saks, assessed in the 2000s, is paying five times more taxes than the Macy’s, even though they’re both similarly sized anchor stores right next to each other. The Segerstroms have paid $500,000 to fight Prop 15.

The best-known: Donald Trump
Underpaying by: $3.3 million

The Trump Organization holds a 30 percent stake of San Francisco’s Bank of America building, a 52-story skyscraper it bought jointly with New York’s Vornado Realty Trust in 2007. Over the past 13 years, the owners have managed to evade $164 million in taxes, or about $11 million per year. In many California cities, according to a report by 48 Hills, large out-of-town investors hold onto real estate that allows them to reap lower tax benefits over time. And even if either party needed to get out of the deal — if, hypothetically, the people who run the Trump Organization had their assets seized — Vornado’s majority stake means that a reassessment would not be triggered unless Prop 15 passed.

The Most Notorious Property-Tax Underpayers in CaliforniaИсточник: https://www.curbed.com/2020/10/prop-15-california-property-tax-prop-13.html

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