second national bank loan payment

Online Loan Payment will accept payments from a checking or savings account via ACH or debit card for active consumer, mortgage, home equity lines of credit. Proudly serving the community banking needs of Hillsdale, Jackson, Lenawee, and Calhoun counties since 1934 with personal and business banking solutions. It's simple to set up. To enroll, log in to Online Banking with your America First Account Number and Password, then select Bill Pay to get started *. You can.

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Second national bank loan payment
Second national bank loan payment
Second national bank loan payment

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Payroll Protection Program (PPP)

Contact your local business lender to start the application process, or if you have questions about the program.

First Draw PPP Loan

Loan details

The Paycheck Protection Program is a loan designed to provide a direct incentive for small businesses to keep their workers on payroll. First Draw PPP Loans can be used to help fund payroll costs, including benefits, and may also be used to pay for mortgage interest, rent, utilities, worker protection costs related to COVID-19, uninsured property damage costs caused by looting or vandalism during 2020, and certain supplier costs and expenses for operations.

SBA will forgive loans if all employee retention criteria are met, and the funds are used for eligible expenses.

  • PPP loans have an interest rate of 1%.
  • Loans issued prior to June 5, 2020 have a maturity of two years. Loans issued after June 5, 2020 have a maturity of five years.
  • Loan payments will be deferred for borrowers who apply for loan forgiveness until SBA remits the borrower's loan forgiveness amount to the lender. If a borrower does not apply for loan forgiveness, payments are deferred 10 months after the end of the covered period for the borrower’s loan forgiveness (either 8 weeks or 24 weeks).
  • No collateral or personal guarantees are required.
  • Neither the government nor lenders will charge small businesses any fees.

Who may qualify

The following entities affected by Coronavirus (COVID-19) may be eligible:

  • Sole proprietors, independent contractors, and self-employed persons
  • Any small business concern that meets SBA’s size standards (either the industry size standard or the alternative size standard)
  • Any business, 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, 501(c)(19) veterans organization, or tribal business concern (sec. 31(b)(2)(C) of the Small Business Act) with the greater of:
  • 500 employees, or
  • That meets second national bank loan payment SBA industry size standard if more than 500
  • Any business with a NAICS code that begins with 72 (Accommodations and Food Services) that has more than one physical location and employs less than 500 per location

Read full details on theSBA PPP Website


SECOND DRAW PPP LOAN

Loan details
The Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) now allows certain eligible borrowers that previously received a PPP loan to apply for a Second Draw PPP Loan with the same general loan terms as their First Draw PPP Loan. 

Second Draw PPP Loans can be used to help fund payroll costs, including benefits. Funds can also be used to pay for pbau uib interest, rent, utilities, worker protection costs related to COVID-19, uninsured property damage costs caused by looting or vandalism during bb&t and wells fargo, and certain supplier costs second national bank loan payment expenses for operations.

Maximum loan amount and increased assistance for accommodation and food services businesses

For most borrowers, the maximum loan amount of a Second Draw PPP Loan is 2.5x average monthly 2019 or 2020 payroll costs up to $2 million. For borrowers in the Accommodation and Food Services sector (use NAICS 72 to confirm), the maximum loan amount for a Second Draw PPP Loan is 3.5x average monthly 2019 or 2020 payroll costs up to $2 million.

Who may qualify
A borrower is generally eligible for a Second Draw PPP Loan if the borrower: 

  • Previously received a First Draw PPP Loan and will or has used the full amount only for authorized uses
  • Has no more than 300 fcbc church online and
  • Can demonstrate at least a 25% reduction in gross receipts second national bank loan payment comparable quarters in 2019 and 2020

Read full details on the SBA PPP Website


Contact your local business lender

London

Phone: second national bank loan payment Stokes

Michael Hacker

Elizabeth Sparks


Lexington

Phone: 859.268.1189

Rockie Mason

David Snyder


Richmond

Phone: 859.623.2243

Eric Vorseth

Jeremy Rigney


Berea

Phone: 859.985.1221

Dominique Martin

Bonnie Berry


Somerset

Phone: 606.676.0784

Mike Blount

Davin Roberts


Corbin

Phone: 606.528.3120

Jeannie Hensley

Diane McKeehan

Источник: https://www.cvnb.com/business/payroll-protection-program

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Closed THANKSGIVING

All locations will be closed on November 25th in observance of Thanksgiving Day. All locations will reopen on Friday, November 26th. Online and mobile banking will be available for your convenience. We wish everyone a wonderful holiday spent with those who mean the most.

New Alerts Available Now!

We have upgraded to provide you more control, more options and more security. For personal account alerts, visit our Alerts page and for business account alerts visit Business Alerts to learn more.

Webinars Available

Check out our upcoming webinars and register today! www.SNBconnect.com/Webinars. 

We've Got Your Back!

If there is suspected debit card fraud linked to your account, you may now receive a text message notifying you of the suspicious activity. There is no charge for fraud alerts, however your phone carrier message and data rates may apply.  Watch a video tutorial to learn more.

Stop Check Fraud with Positive Pay

Help protect your business with Positive Pay, our fraud detection program that ensures only checks written and authorized by your business are paid. Watch a tutorial on Positive Pay to learn more or contact our Cash Management Team at 402-344-7300 to learn more

SNB tips

Источник: https://www.snbconnect.com/

Online Services and Online Banking FAQs

Online Banking Security

What will I experience when I log in to my online banking account the first time?
You will automatically be guided through an easy three-step process:
Step 1:  Sign in with your secure username and password. 
Step 2: You will be prompted to enter up to two phone numbers. These numbers will be used to send you a one-time passcode via voice or text message (you choose the method). Note: You can also choose to receive your one-time passcode through email.
Step 3:  You will be prompted to enter the one-time passcode you received. A confirmation message will appear, along with the option of allowing the system to remember your computer (so that you can skip this step in the future).


How do I update my username and password?
To update your username and password, go to the “My Settings” page and click on the link for “Update username” and “Update Password,” respectively. Then, create a new username and password that meet the following requirements:
Username criteria:

  • Must be between six and 20 characters long
  • Must contain one letter
  • Can contain numbers and/or the following special characters: @$*_-=!~
  • Must NOT contain any spaces (including before, in the middle of, or after the username)
  • [Username are not case-sensitive]

Password criteria:

  • Must be between six and 32 characters
  • Must contain a combination of:
  •  Letters and numbers
  • or Letters and any special characters
  • or Numbers and any special characters
  • Must NOT contain any spaces (including before, in the middle of, or after the password)
  • Cannot be a substring of the username

Other items to note about passwords:

  • Passwords are case-sensitive
  • Passwords do not expire

What information is contained in the automated voice call or SMS text message?
Information within an automated voice call:
“Hello, this is City National Bank. Please press pound to receive your 6-digit access code.”
**Press pound (#):**
[1.5 second pause and your unique one-time access code will be provided].
** Press pound (#) to repeat. **
Information within a SMS text message:
City National Bank Access Code. Your access code is xxxxxx. Reply HELP for help.

If I am travelling internationally, can I receive a one-time access code via SMS text or automated voice call if First central state bank online banking access my online banking account from an unrecognized computer (or mobile device)?
You may receive the one-time access code via SMS text or automated voice call either through your international phone or a U.S.-based mobile phone as long as your U.S.-based wireless carrier and current wireless plan are supported within the country you are visiting.

How will using my phone make my account safer?
We have implemented “multifactor authentication,” which makes it more difficult for phishers and attackers to access your accounts without you knowing it. While this might seem unfamiliar, you actually use it every time you visit an ATM. When you access your account from any ATM, you need both your ATM card (sometimes that you have) and PIN (something that you know). We are implementing this same type of protection by using login credentials (username and password) and your phone to access your account. By doing this, even if a phisher or an attacker manages to steal your password and tries to use it to log in, they would be unsuccessful because they would need your phone as well.

Will I always need to use my login credentials (username and password) and my phone from now on?
The first time you attempt to log in from a new computer (or mobile device) you will need to use your log in credentials (username and password) and the access code that will be sent to your registered phone in order to log in. If you are accessing from a private computer (or mobile device) that you personally use, you can opt for the system to remember your computer (or mobile device) for future logins by clicking on “Register.” By doing this, you will no longer need to retrieve an passcode via phone; you will only need your username and password for at home olathe coupon access to your online banking account. For the best security protection, we suggest that you always use your login credentials (username and password) and your phone. If you do opt to have your computer (or mobile device) remembered, we recommend that you do so only on devices that you personally own and that have the latest updates and virus protection software installed on them.

How about if I log in from another computer (or mobile device)?
The same process will apply each time you log into a computer (or mobile device). The first time you attempt to log in from a new computer (or mobile device) you will need to use your login credentials (username and password) and the passcode that will be sent to your registered phone in academy login to log in. If you are accessing from a private computer (or mobile device) that you personally use, you can opt for the system to remember your computer (or mobile device) for future logins by clicking on “Register.” By doing this, you will no longer need to retrieve an access code via phone; you will only need your username and password for future access to your online banking account. For the best security protection, we suggest that you always use your login credentials (username and password) and your phone. If you do opt to have your computer (or mobile device) remembered we recommend that you do so only on devices that you personally own and that have the latest updates and virus protection software installed on them.

I don’t have a text-capable phone. Can the verification code be emailed?
Yes, you can also choose to receive your one-time access code through email.


I am on the screen with “Text Me” and “Call Me” buttons. Why am I being asked to verify my contact information? And which one should I choose?
Our system needs to make sure at least one phone number (or email address) you entered is correct. You can select “Call Me,” “Text Me,” or “Email Me” – whichever you have access to and is most convenient at the moment is the one you should select.

Will I have to perform these login steps (username and password, and my phone) with all my accounts?
If you have one Online Banking login for all your accounts, then no, you will only be required to perform your login credentials once. But if you have separate Online Banking logins for each account then yes, you will need to go through the login credentials process for each account.

Yes, you can also choose to receive your one-time passcode through email.

I’m trying to get into Online Banking using Internet Explorer, but I’m seeing a message that my browser needs updating. Why?
For security reasons, Online Banking does not support Internet Explorer browsers below 11. You will need to follow the instructions on screen to update your browser.


What about Chrome or Firefox – do they work?
Yes, you can choose to use one of those browsers instead of upgrading Internet Explorer.

I’m being prompted to enable JavaScript and/or I’m being prompted to enable cookies. Are those safe?
Yes, those are perfectly safe, and necessary for Online Banking to function properly.

What if I still have questions about security and logging into my online banking account?
Please contact Online Banking and Bill Payment support at 305-349-5490 or 1-866-CNB-EPAY (262-3729), available 24/7.

SECURITY

How does City National Bank of Florida Online Banking security work?

Imagine sending a friend a letter. For us it's as simple as dropping it in a mailbox for the carrier to pick up and deliver. Now imagine that instead of just dropping it into the mailbox, you put the letter through a shredder that only you have the key to and then into the mailbox. And instead of one carrier coming to pick it up, the post office sends 100 carriers to each take a piece of your letter. They each go on their own route through all sorts of neighborhoods to second national bank loan payment friend's house. Once there, your friend takes this pile of incomprehensible paper, puts it through a reverse shredder that only they have a key to, and out comes your letter, safe and sound.

If we sent information through the traditional manner of one letter, one carrier and one route, it would be easy for a criminal to find the truck carrying your letter and pick it out. So we use the 100-carrier method, otherwise known as RSA public-key cryptography. It's become a standard on the Internet wherever private or sensitive information is concerned. The government uses it; the financial industry uses it, and now, so can you.

Security has always been a top priority with City National Bank of Florida. It will continue to be so by adopting new technologies only after they've passed our unchanging business principles of confidentiality, flexibility, commitment and stability. To have it any other way would not only endanger your finances, but in turn, our reputation, and that is never good for business.

Are there any other securities issues I should be aware of?
There are two additional areas you should be aware of. The e-mail generated through the 'Contact Us' or Certified E-Mail feature of the website, as well as within online banking will be encrypted (scrambled so no one else can read it) automatically as long as you are using one of the certified browsers listed below. Requests and questions requiring specific information about your account should be initiated through 'Contact Us' or via 'Certified E-Mail'. You may also call City National Bank and Bill Payment support at 305-349-5490 or 1-866-CNB-EPAY (262-3729) available 24/7 or e-mail us using our Contact Us form. Initiating an e-mail to the support center using your normal e-mail program will not be encrypted or secure and should be used only for general questions and requests.

The second issue involves your browser. For added security, it is important to log off and close your browser when you have completed your transactions in City National Bank Online Banking. In addition, some browsers contain the ability to retain information in memory. Check the preferences of your browser to heighten the security or turn its memory capabilities off. Check with your browser's customer support for more information.

What is Certified E-Mail and why should I use it?
Certified E-Mail is a way for the bank to help you ensure that your communications with us is safe and secure. With this system, you create a special e-mail account with City National Bank. It is the policy of City National Bank of Florida not to request information that is confidential in nature regarding its customers or their accounts via normal email. If you receive an unsolicited email that appears to be from City National Bank of Florida that requests confidential information, we recommend that you do not respond. In such instance(s) please contact your City National Bank of Florida representative to report any such requests. With Certified E-Mail you will receive and email that tells you there is an email waiting for you in your special account email box. Only you have the username and password to that account and then you can retrieve it when you want to. Additionally, once you have read the email, you can respond to your bank representative via the same secure system.

How do I get Internet Access?
Check your local Yellow Pages under Internet Online Service providers.

What is a cookie?
A cookie is a piece of data passed to your browser. City National Bank of Florida Online Banking uses "per session" cookies inside the secure banking environment to keep track of your session data. This means that as you go through the program from page to page, the information is stored on your computer while you are on that page, and as soon as you leave that page it is deleted. Clicking the sign-off button ensures that all this information is successfully deleted from your computer.

Newer browser versions have a feature that allows you to be notified when a cookie is being added to your system. You can disable this option in the Network Preference/Protocols area.

To keep my banking information private, what recommendations do you have?

  • Keep your password confidential. Change it frequently to ensure that no one else can guess it, and do not let anyone else use it.
  • Never walk away from your computer without exiting the system first. When you are finished with your banking, click the sign-off button located at the top and bottom navigational toolbars and then close your browser. Once you have ended your session, no further transactions can be processed until you sign on to the system again.
  • Use the latest version of Netscape Navigator, Microsoft Internet Explorer, or AOL. All of these browsers are certified for use at our site.

BROWSER QUESTIONS

What browser do I need to be able to use Online Banking?
Supported browsers are:

  • Microsoft Internet Explorer for Windows version 11 and Edge
  • Firefox
  • Safari version 8.0
  • Google Chrome

While trying to go back to a previous page I received a message to enter my User ID and password. Why did this happen?
Sometimes using your browser's back button will cause you to be logged out of City National's Online Banking. For security reasons some pages are automatically expired so that you cannot return to them. By using the navigation toolbar found at the top of your City National Bank of Florida Online Banking page, you should not encounter this problem.  

Why do I get a "Certificate Expired" error message when trying to access the site?
This will occur when you are using a browser older than the supported versions. To resolve the problem, upgrade your web browser to the newest version.  

How can I tell if I have a secured connection to City National Bank Online Banking?
The visual indicators of a secured connection vary from browser to browser. The following is a listing of all the major browsers and their methods of indicating a secured connection. With all browsers, if https is in the address bar, the "s" means you have a secure connection.

  • Microsoft Internet Explorer - A small lock will appear in the bottom right corner of the browser to indicate a secured connection.

What do I do if I receive the following message: "Server is busy or is not responding"?
Check the location box and make sure that the address was typed properly. A complete web address is in the format http://www.citynational.com, or with secure web sites, don't forget the "s": https:www.site.com. Sometimes you will receive this message when the server is busy. Try a second time to connect and the connection will go through. Maybe the server you are looking for doesn't exist, because you've typed the name incorrectly or the server is down right now. If after three attempts you still do not connect, please call the Online Banking and Bill Payment support at 305-349-5490 or 1-866-CNB-EPAY (262-3729) available 24/7 or e-mail us using our Contact Us form. 


Help Sources
If you still have questions regarding your browser, we encourage you contact the company that created it. However, if you have any questions regarding City National Bank of Florida Online Banking or your accounts, contact Online Banking and Bill Payment support at 305-349-5490 or 1-866-CNB-EPAY (262-3729) available 24/7 or e-mail us using our Contact Us form.

ONLINE BANKING

Am I able to change my Username?
Yes, our online banking system allows you to change both your Username and/or password. Once in Online banking select My Settings to make these changes. 


How long will my activity be available on City National Online Banking?
City National Bank of Florida Online Banking supports a 24 month history that begins upon registration.


What types of accounts can I see on City National Online Banking?
You are able to see all deposit accounts (checking, savings, money market and CDs) loan accounts and lines of credit. 


When I try to sign on to Online Banking I receive an error message saying that I had an invalid login attempt. What happened?
It is possible that you have entered your username and/or password incorrectly. The password is case sensitive, so we recommend that you verify that your Caps Lock button is either on or off, depending on how you initially entered it, and that you have typed the password correctly. Also, when entering your username, make sure you do not include the dashes. If you still are unable to access your account information, call Online Banking and Bill Payment support at 305-349-5490 or 1-866-CNB-EPAY (262-3729) available 24/7 or e-mail us using our Contact Us form. 


Why do I see a "0" in the balance column of my Account History Screen when I make a transfer or when today's transactions appear?
Balances are pending until all transactions are processed at the end of each business day. You will see updated balances the following business day. The real-time balance is reflected at the top of the screen under account balance. 


How do Bank of america student account register for Bill Payment through City National Online Banking?
You may register for Bill Payment online by selecting the Bill Payment icon. First, you will be requested to read and accept City National Bank of Florida's authorization disclosure. Failure to accept the disclosure terms prevents the registration process from proceeding. After the disclosure is agreed to, you complete an online registration form. After submission, the registration form is electronically forwarded to City National Bank of Florida for review.

You will be notified via email upon completion within 1-2 business days.


When can I start using Bill Payment?
After enrolling for Bill Payment you will first receive an approval E-mail. Once your account has been enabled, you will receive an Activation E-mail indicating that you may log on to your City National Bank of Www prudential com structured settlements Online Banking session, and begin using Bill Payment.  

Will Bill Pay reports be available?
Yes, you have the ability to Filter and download the report.

How are my bills actually paid?
City National Bank of Florida Online Banking transmits all your bill pay requests to our bill payment service around 9:00 p.m. CST each day, Sunday through Friday. The business day after we transmit the payment request, the san jose ca zip code and area code payment service determines if your payee will accept your payment electronically or if a check needs to be sent. Once this is determined, your payment is sent and the funds are deducted from your checking account. Typically the funds are deducted from your account two business days following transmission of payment.

Be certain to review your bills carefully for the correct address. Many companies direct you to an address other than what is listed on the envelope when using alternative delivery means.

Please remember that the transmit date is not the day your payee will receive your payment. It is the day the bill payment process begins. The payment must still be processed and sent electronically or by check through the mail. City National Bank of Florida Online Banking transmits bill payments Sunday through Friday so PLAN AHEAD and remember weekends and holidays. Allow 2-3 business days for companies to receive payments sent electronically, and 5-7 business days for payments sent by check. You will see the method of payment displayed on the Payee screen the next time you log on to the program after you enter your Payee information.  

What is the daily cutoff for paying bills through City National Online Banking?
Requests for payments entered prior to 7:00 p.m. CST Sunday through Friday, will be processed on the same day. Second national bank loan payment for all payments entered after 7:00 p.m. CST or on a non-business day, will be processed on the next business day.  

Is there a dollar limit per payment sent through Online Banking?
Yes, the maximum dollar amount per payment is $9,999.99.  

Can I make a payment to a government agency through Online Banking?
No, you cannot make a payment to government agencies. The following are examples of government agencies included:

  • Municipalities
  • Student Loans
  • Court-ordered Payments
  • City, State, and Federal Taxes

City National Bank of Florida has limited ability to research any problems with a payment to a government agency due to the government's strict adherence to the Consumer Privacy Act. These payments might not be processed by the government on a timely basis without the attachment of government forms.

Can I make a payment to my Line of Credit Account through City National Online Banking?
Yes, you can make a payment to your Line of Credit through Online Banking in two ways. Keep in mind, if you make a payment within 10 days prior to your due date the funds will be applied to your scheduled payment amount. If you make a payment after your due date, the funds will be applied directly to your principal balance as long as your scheduled payment has been satisfied.

  • If you have signed the agreement to allow transfers from your Checking or Savings to your Line of Credit Account, you may transfer directly to your line using the transfer feature.
  • You may set up a payment to City National Bank of Florida using the address on your statement and Line of Credit Account number. Your payment will be made electronically to City National Bank of Florida. Keep in mind that these payments will be in addition to the automatic payment that comes from your checking account each month.


What if I need a copy of a check submitted by City National Online Banking?
Online Banking shows you both sides of a paid check! Click the check number on the Account History page.

Can I place a stop payment on a check through City National Online Banking?
Yes. You must first verify that the check was not paid. Select the stop payment button inside online banking fill in the blanks. 

Can I re-order checks online?
Yes. Simply click "Online Services" on the top navigation bar on any page. 

I cannot successfully send an email using the Contact Us link. Why is this?
It is likely that your browser is not configured to use this feature. Please use your normal e-mail software or service to send your message to our Contact Us form. 

Please refer to the Help icon within the Bill Payment feature for additional detailed frequently asked Questions and Answers.

Online Statements

Is the Online Statement service free?
Yes, this product is free for all Online Banking users (Commercial and Consumer). 

Will I solano county population receive my paper statements when I register?
No. When you register for Online Statements you will no longer receive paper statements in the mail. 

What if I want to receive my paper statements?
If you register for Online Statements, a copy of your paper statements will be available upon request by contacting City National Bank of Florida. However, if you want to stop receiving Online Statements and begin receiving your paper statements again, you can submit this request by clicking the "Contact Us" link. 

Will my statement cycle date change?
If you are not currently on a statement cycle that santander consumer bank your statements on the last business day of the month, a statement cycle change will apply to you. All Online statement users are required to be on a statement cycle that produces statements on the last business day of the month. 

I registered for Online Statements but when I try to retrieve a statement, it tells me that none are available. Why?

  • Scenario A. After registering for Online Statements, it can take up to two weeks for the past 24 months of statements to become available. Your current month's statement will not be available until your next cycle date.
  • Scenario B. If you received a combined statement in the past, your first 24 months of statements prior to registering can be found under the primary account number.
  • Scenario C. If you are unable to retrieve your previous savings account statements, please remember that for the first 24 months prior to registration they are only available at each quarter-end.


When I click the PDF Icon to view my statements, they do not show properly and I cannot print them. What can I do to correct this?
To view and print your statements, we highly recommend that you download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader, as there are printing limitations with certain versions. This software can be downloaded free of charge from our website.  

For any questions or concerns regarding Online Banking and Bill Pay call us at 305-349-5490 or 1-866-CNB-EPAY (262-3729) available 24/7.

Источник: https://www.citynationalcm.com/online-services-and-online-banking-faqs

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Personal and Business

The Second Bank of the United States

In the years leading up to the War of 1812, the U.S. economy had been on the upswing. The war with Britain, however, disrupted foreign trade. As one of the United States’ largest trading partners, Britain used its navy to blockade U.S. trade with other nations. The war prevented U.S. farmers and manufacturers from exporting merchandise, blocked U.S. merchants and fisherman from sailing the high seas, and curtailed federal government revenues, which were derived mainly from tariffs on trade. By 1815, the United States found itself heavily in debt, much like it had been at the end of the Revolutionary War thirty years earlier.

In January 1815, the United States had been without a national bank for almost four years. Many people thought that a successor would again provide relief for the country’s ailing economy and help in paying its war debt. Six men figured prominently in establishing this new entity, commonly referred to as the second Bank of the United States: the financiers John Jacob Astor, David Parish, Stephen Girard, and Jacob Barker; Alexander Dallas, who would become secretary of the Treasury in 1814; and Rep. John C. Calhoun of South Carolina. These men thought that reestablishing a national bank would solve some of the country’s economic woes. In particular, Astor, Parish, Girard, and Barker – as lenders and financiers -- felt that a national bank would restore a stable currency, thereby avoiding bouts of inflation and insuring their business interests.

Establishing a Second National Bank

Despite broad support for reestablishing a national bank, the road to re-creation was not smooth. In January 1814, Congress received a petition signed by 150 businessmen from New York City, urging the legislative body to create a second national bank. In February, and again in November, Calhoun put forth plans to create a bank that would be headquartered in the District of Columbia, but his bills did not pass.

In April 1814, President James Madison, who had opposed the creation of the first Bank of the United States in 1791, reluctantly admitted to the need for another national bank. He believed a bank was necessary to finance the war with Britain. But later that year, progress in peace negotiations led Madison to withdraw his support for the proposed national bank.

After peace with Britain came in 1815, Congress rejected new efforts to create the bank. In the months that followed, however, the federal government’s financial position deteriorated amid a broader economic downturn. Many state-chartered banks had stopped redeeming their notes, which convinced Madison and his advisers that the time had come to move the country toward a more uniform, stable paper currency. In his annual report, Dallas again called for the establishment of a national bank. After much debate and a couple of additional attempts, Madison finally signed in April 1816 an act establishing the second Bank of the United States.

Bank Structure and Operations

The Bank opened for business in Philadelphia second national bank loan payment January 1817. It had much in common with its forerunner, including its functions and structure. It would act as fiscal agent for the federal government — holding its deposits, making its payments, and helping it issue debt to the public — and it would issue and redeem banknotes and keep state banks’ issuance of notes in check. Also like its predecessor, the Bank had a twenty-year charter and operated as a commercial bank that accepted deposits and made loans to the public, both businesses and individuals. Its board consisted of twenty-five directors, with five appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate.

The capitalization for the second Bank was $35 million, considerably higher than the $10 million underwriting of the first Bank. Subscriptions went on sale in July 1816, and the sale period was set at three weeks. To make it easier for investors to buy subscriptions, sales were held in twenty cities. After three weeks, $3 million of scrips remained unsold, so Philadelphia banker Bank of america fraud department phone number debit card Girard bought them.

The Bank’s reach was far greater than that of its predecessor. Its branches eventually totaled twenty-five in number, compared to only eight for the first Bank. The extensive branch network aided the country’s westward expansion and its economic growth in several ways. The branches provided credit to businesses and farmers, and these loans helped finance the production of goods and agricultural output as well as the shipment of these goods to domestic and foreign destinations. Moreover, the network helped move the money deposited in the branches to other parts of the nation, facilitating both the government’s ability to make payments and the branches’ ability to supply credit.

Unlike modern central banks, the Bank did not set monetary policy as we know it today. It also did not regulate, hold the reserves of, or act as a lender of last resort for other financial institutions. Nonetheless, its prominence as one of the largest U.S. corporations and its branches’ broad geographic position in the expanding economy allowed it to conduct a rudimentary monetary policy. The Bank’s notes, backed by substantial gold reserves, gave the country a more stable national currency. By managing its lending policies and the flow of funds through its accounts, the Bank could — and did — alter the supply of money and credit in the economy and hence the level of interest rates charged to borrowers.

A $1,000 note issued by the Second Bank of the United States.

These actions, which had effects similar to today’s monetary policy actions, can be seen most clearly in the national bank’s interactions with state banks. In the course of business, it would accumulate the notes of the state banks and hold them in its vault. When it wanted to slow the growth of money and credit, it would present the notes for collection in gold or silver, thereby reducing state banks’ reserves and putting the brakes on state banks’ ability to circulate new banknotes (paper currency). To speed up the growth of money and credit, the Bank would hold on to the state banks’ notes, thereby increasing state banks’ reserves and allowing those banks to issue more banknotes through their loan-making process.

Bank Leadership

The first president of the Bank was William Mysynchrony payment login care credit, a political appointee and a former secretary of the Navy who had gone bankrupt. Under Jones’s leadership, the Bank first extended too much credit and then reversed that trend too quickly. The result was a financial panic that drove the economy into a steep recession.

When Jones resigned in 1819, shareholders elected Langdon Cheves, an attorney from South Carolina who had served as speaker of the House of Representatives, as president of the Bank. Cheves cut in half the number of second Bank banknotes in circulation, made fewer loans, foreclosed on mortgages, and exerted more control over the Bank’s branches. He presented state banknotes for specie, a request that sent many state-chartered financial institutions into bankruptcy because they did not have enough gold and silver on hand to cover the redemptions. Another depression, characterized by deflation and high unemployment, ensued. Although the economic slump was part of a worldwide downturn, the Bank’s policies magnified the contraction in the United States. Public opinion started turning against the Bank as many believed it contributed to the recession.

In 1823, Cheves withdrew his name from consideration for reelection to the top Bank post, and Nicholas Biddle, a member of a wealthy and prominent Philadelphia family, became head of the Bank. Biddle had previously served on the Bank’s board of directors and in the Pennsylvania legislature. With Biddle’s guidance, animosity toward the Bank diminished. The Bank contributed significantly to economic stability and growth. Biddle increased second national bank loan payment number of notes issued by the Bank and restrained the expansion of the quantity of state banks’ notes by pressing them to redeem their own notes in specie.

The Battle Over the Second Bank

In 1828, Andrew Jackson, hero of the Battle of New Orleans and a determined foe of banks in general and the second Bank of the United States in particular, was elected president of the United States. Jackson’s dislike of the Bank may have been fueled by rumors that Henry Clay, a congressman from Kentucky, was manipulating the Bank to help Jackson’s opponent, John Quincy Adams, but it did not rise to a major campaign issue.

In contrast, the election of 1832, which sent Jackson back to the White House, put the Bank in the spotlight. A request to renew the Bank’s charter was sent to Congress in January 1832, four years before the charter was set to expire. The second national bank loan payment passed both the House and Senate, but it failed to garner enough votes to overcome Jackson’s veto.

Why was Jackson so opposed to the Bank? On a personal level, Jackson brought with him to Washington a strong distrust of banks in general, stemming, at least in part, from a land deal that had gone sour more than two decades before. In that deal, Jackson had accepted paper notes — essentially paper money — as payment for some land he had sold. When the buyers who had issued the notes went bankrupt, the paper he held became worthless. Although Jackson managed to save himself from financial ruin, he never trusted paper notes again. In Jackson’s opinion, only specie — silver or gold coins — qualified as an acceptable medium for transactions. Since banks issued paper notes, Jackson found banking practices suspicious. Jackson also distrusted credit — another function of banks — believing people should not borrow money to pay for what second national bank loan payment wanted.

Jackson’s distrust of the Bank was also political, based on a belief that a federal institution such as the Bank trampled on states’ rights. In addition, he felt that the Bank put too much power in the hands of too few private citizens -- power that could be used to the detriment of the government. The Bank also lacked an effective system of regulation. In other words, it was too far outside the jurisdiction of Congress, the president, and voters.

Biddle, who served as president from 1823 until the Bank’s demise in 1836, refused to accept any criticism of the Bank’s operations, especially claims about the mismanagement of some of the Bank’s branches. He also was not above allowing the Bank to make loans to his friends while denying loans to those less friendly. These actions subjected the Bank to public criticism. Despite all this, Biddle was an excellent administrator who understood banking.

Jackson saw his 1832 win as validation of antibank sentiment. Shortly after the election, Jackson ordered that federal deposits be removed from the second National Bank and put into state banks. Although Jackson’s order met with heavy criticism from members of his administration, most of the government’s money had been moved out of the Bank by late 1833. The loss of the federal government’s deposits caused the Bank to shrink in both size and influence.

Meanwhile, in Philadelphia, Biddle responded to Jackson’s action by announcing that the Bank would (or could) not respond to the loss of government deposits by attracting new private deposits or raising new capital. Instead, the Bank would limit credit and call in 1801 main street houston tx. This contraction of credit, he believed, might create a backlash against Jackson and force the president to relent and redeposit government funds in the Bank, perhaps even renewing the charter. But Biddle’s move backfired: in the end, it helped to support Jackson’s claim that the Bank had been created to serve the interests of the wealthy, not to meet the nation’s financial needs.

Closing of the Second Bank of the United States

One event that foreshadowed the Bank’s demise was its supporters’ inability to muster a two-thirds majority to override Jackson’s veto in 1832. More damaging was the removal of federal deposits in 1833, resulting not only in a reduction in the Bank’s size but also in its ability to influence the nation’s currency and credit. In April 1834, the House of Representatives voted against rechartering the Bank and confirmed that federal deposits should remain in state banks. These developments, coupled with Jackson’s determination to do away with the Bank and the widespread second national bank loan payment of the pro-Bank Whig Party in the 1834 congressional elections, sealed the Bank’s fate.

It would be more than seventy-five years before the United States made another attempt to establish a central bank. During that period, the U.S. economy experienced several banking crises. But after the Panic of 1907, which triggered a nationwide suspension of payments and a deep recession, Congress established a commission to look into ways to improve how the banking system responsed to the shocks. The commission’s findings led to the creation of the Federal Reserve System in 1913.

This article is adapted from the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia’s publication "The Second Bank of the United States: A Chapter in the History of Central Banking." To order print copies of the publication visit https://www.philadelphiafed.org/education/publication-orders

Image of Custom House by J.C. Wild, printed by John T. Bowen, c.1848, courtesy Library Company of Philadelphia, accession number P.2227


Bibliography

Bordo, Michael D., and Joseph G. Haubrich. “Credit Crises, Money, and Contractions: An Historical View.” Journal of Monetary Economics vol. 57, no. 1 (January 2010): pp. 1-18.

Catterall, Ralph C.H. The Second Bank of the United States. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1903.

Hammond, Bray. Banks and Politics in America from the Revolution to the Civil War. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1957.

Kaplan, Edward S. The Bank of the United States and the American Economy. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1999.

Remini, Robert. Andrew Jackson and the Bank War: A Study in the Growth of Presidential Power. New York: W.W. Norton and Company, 1967.

Walters, Raymond, Jr. “The Origins of the Second Bank of the United States.” Journal of Political Economy vol. 53, no. 2 (June 1945): pp. 115-31.

Источник: https://www.federalreservehistory.org/essays/second-bank-of-the-us
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    Welcome to TD Bank Personal Banking

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    Источник: https://www.td.com/us/en/personal-banking/

    The Second Bank of the United States

    In the years leading up to the War of 1812, the U.S. economy had been on the upswing. The war with Britain, however, disrupted foreign trade. As one of the United States’ largest trading partners, Britain used its navy to blockade U.S. trade with other nations. The war prevented U.S. farmers and manufacturers from exporting merchandise, blocked U.S. merchants and fisherman from sailing the high seas, and curtailed federal government revenues, which were derived mainly from tariffs on trade. By 1815, the United States found itself heavily in debt, much like it had been at the end of the Revolutionary War thirty years earlier.

    In January 1815, the United States had been without a national bank for almost four years. Many people thought that a successor would again provide relief for the country’s ailing economy and help in paying its war debt. Six men figured prominently in establishing this new entity, commonly referred to as the second Bank of the United States: the financiers John Jacob Astor, David Parish, Stephen Girard, and Jacob Barker; Alexander Dallas, who would become secretary of the Treasury in 1814; and Rep. John C. Calhoun of South Carolina. These men thought that reestablishing a national bank would solve some of the country’s economic woes. In particular, Astor, Parish, Girard, and Barker – as lenders and financiers -- felt that a national bank would restore a stable currency, thereby avoiding bouts of inflation and insuring their business interests.

    Establishing a Second National Bank

    Despite broad support for reestablishing a national bank, the road to re-creation was not smooth. In January 1814, Congress received a petition signed by 150 businessmen from New York City, urging the legislative body to create a second national bank. In February, and again in November, Calhoun put forth plans to create a bank that would be headquartered in the District of Columbia, but his bills did not pass.

    In April 1814, President James Madison, who had opposed the creation of the first Bank of the United States in 1791, reluctantly admitted to the need for another national bank. He believed a bank was necessary to finance the war with Britain. But later that year, progress in peace negotiations led Madison to withdraw his support for the proposed national bank.

    After peace with Britain came in 1815, Congress rejected new efforts to create the bank. In the months that followed, however, the federal government’s financial position deteriorated amid a broader economic downturn. Many state-chartered banks had stopped redeeming their notes, which convinced Madison and his advisers that the time had come to move the country toward a more uniform, stable paper currency. In his annual report, Dallas again called for the establishment of a national bank. After much debate and a couple of additional attempts, Madison finally signed in April 1816 an act establishing the second Bank of the United States.

    Bank Structure and Operations

    The Bank opened for business in Philadelphia in January 1817. It had much in common with its forerunner, including its functions and structure. It would act as fiscal agent for the federal government — holding its deposits, making its payments, and helping it issue debt to the public — and it would issue and redeem banknotes and keep state banks’ issuance of notes in check. Also like its predecessor, the Bank had a twenty-year charter and operated as a commercial bank that accepted deposits and made loans to the public, both businesses and individuals. Its board consisted of twenty-five directors, with five appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate.

    The capitalization for the second Bank was $35 million, considerably higher than the $10 million underwriting of the first Bank. Subscriptions went on sale in July 1816, and the sale period was set at three weeks. To make it easier for investors to buy subscriptions, sales were held in twenty cities. After three weeks, $3 million of scrips remained unsold, so Philadelphia banker Stephen Girard bought them.

    The Bank’s reach was far greater than that of its predecessor. Its branches eventually totaled twenty-five in number, compared to only eight for the first Bank. The extensive branch network aided the country’s westward expansion and its economic growth in several ways. The branches provided credit to businesses and farmers, and these loans helped finance the production of goods and agricultural output as well as the shipment of these goods to domestic and foreign destinations. Moreover, the network helped move the money deposited in the branches to other parts of the nation, facilitating both the government’s ability to make payments and the branches’ ability to supply credit.

    Unlike modern central banks, the Bank did not set monetary policy as we know it today. It also did not regulate, hold the reserves of, or act as a lender of last resort for other financial institutions. Nonetheless, its prominence as one of the largest U.S. corporations and its branches’ broad geographic position in the expanding economy allowed it to conduct a rudimentary monetary policy. The Bank’s notes, backed by substantial gold reserves, gave the country a more stable national currency. By managing its lending policies and the flow of funds through its accounts, the Bank could — and did — alter the supply of money and credit in the economy and hence the level of interest rates charged to borrowers.

    A $1,000 note issued by the Second Bank of the United States.

    These actions, which had effects similar to today’s monetary policy actions, can be seen most clearly in the national bank’s interactions with state banks. In the course of business, it would accumulate the notes of the state banks and hold them in its vault. When it wanted to slow the growth of money and credit, it would present the notes for collection in gold or silver, thereby reducing state banks’ reserves and putting the brakes on state banks’ ability to circulate new banknotes (paper currency). To speed up the growth of money and credit, the Bank would hold on to the state banks’ notes, thereby increasing state banks’ reserves and allowing those banks to issue more banknotes through their loan-making process.

    Bank Leadership

    The first president of the Bank was William Jones, a political appointee and a former secretary of the Navy who had gone bankrupt. Under Jones’s leadership, the Bank first extended too much credit and then reversed that trend too quickly. The result was a financial panic that drove the economy into a steep recession.

    When Jones resigned in 1819, shareholders elected Langdon Cheves, an attorney from South Carolina who had served as speaker of the House of Representatives, as president of the Bank. Cheves cut in half the number of second Bank banknotes in circulation, made fewer loans, foreclosed on mortgages, and exerted more control over the Bank’s branches. He presented state banknotes for specie, a request that sent many state-chartered financial institutions into bankruptcy because they did not have enough gold and silver on hand to cover the redemptions. Another depression, characterized by deflation and high unemployment, ensued. Although the economic slump was part of a worldwide downturn, the Bank’s policies magnified the contraction in the United States. Public opinion started turning against the Bank as many believed it contributed to the recession.

    In 1823, Cheves withdrew his name from consideration for reelection to the top Bank post, and Nicholas Biddle, a member of a wealthy and prominent Philadelphia family, became head of the Bank. Biddle had previously served on the Bank’s board of directors and in the Pennsylvania legislature. With Biddle’s guidance, animosity toward the Bank diminished. The Bank contributed significantly to economic stability and growth. Biddle increased the number of notes issued by the Bank and restrained the expansion of the quantity of state banks’ notes by pressing them to redeem their own notes in specie.

    The Battle Over the Second Bank

    In 1828, Andrew Jackson, hero of the Battle of New Orleans and a determined foe of banks in general and the second Bank of the United States in particular, was elected president of the United States. Jackson’s dislike of the Bank may have been fueled by rumors that Henry Clay, a congressman from Kentucky, was manipulating the Bank to help Jackson’s opponent, John Quincy Adams, but it did not rise to a major campaign issue.

    In contrast, the election of 1832, which sent Jackson back to the White House, put the Bank in the spotlight. A request to renew the Bank’s charter was sent to Congress in January 1832, four years before the charter was set to expire. The legislation passed both the House and Senate, but it failed to garner enough votes to overcome Jackson’s veto.

    Why was Jackson so opposed to the Bank? On a personal level, Jackson brought with him to Washington a strong distrust of banks in general, stemming, at least in part, from a land deal that had gone sour more than two decades before. In that deal, Jackson had accepted paper notes — essentially paper money — as payment for some land he had sold. When the buyers who had issued the notes went bankrupt, the paper he held became worthless. Although Jackson managed to save himself from financial ruin, he never trusted paper notes again. In Jackson’s opinion, only specie — silver or gold coins — qualified as an acceptable medium for transactions. Since banks issued paper notes, Jackson found banking practices suspicious. Jackson also distrusted credit — another function of banks — believing people should not borrow money to pay for what they wanted.

    Jackson’s distrust of the Bank was also political, based on a belief that a federal institution such as the Bank trampled on states’ rights. In addition, he felt that the Bank put too much power in the hands of too few private citizens -- power that could be used to the detriment of the government. The Bank also lacked an effective system of regulation. In other words, it was too far outside the jurisdiction of Congress, the president, and voters.

    Biddle, who served as president from 1823 until the Bank’s demise in 1836, refused to accept any criticism of the Bank’s operations, especially claims about the mismanagement of some of the Bank’s branches. He also was not above allowing the Bank to make loans to his friends while denying loans to those less friendly. These actions subjected the Bank to public criticism. Despite all this, Biddle was an excellent administrator who understood banking.

    Jackson saw his 1832 win as validation of antibank sentiment. Shortly after the election, Jackson ordered that federal deposits be removed from the second National Bank and put into state banks. Although Jackson’s order met with heavy criticism from members of his administration, most of the government’s money had been moved out of the Bank by late 1833. The loss of the federal government’s deposits caused the Bank to shrink in both size and influence.

    Meanwhile, in Philadelphia, Biddle responded to Jackson’s action by announcing that the Bank would (or could) not respond to the loss of government deposits by attracting new private deposits or raising new capital. Instead, the Bank would limit credit and call in loans. This contraction of credit, he believed, might create a backlash against Jackson and force the president to relent and redeposit government funds in the Bank, perhaps even renewing the charter. But Biddle’s move backfired: in the end, it helped to support Jackson’s claim that the Bank had been created to serve the interests of the wealthy, not to meet the nation’s financial needs.

    Closing of the Second Bank of the United States

    One event that foreshadowed the Bank’s demise was its supporters’ inability to muster a two-thirds majority to override Jackson’s veto in 1832. More damaging was the removal of federal deposits in 1833, resulting not only in a reduction in the Bank’s size but also in its ability to influence the nation’s currency and credit. In April 1834, the House of Representatives voted against rechartering the Bank and confirmed that federal deposits should remain in state banks. These developments, coupled with Jackson’s determination to do away with the Bank and the widespread defeat of the pro-Bank Whig Party in the 1834 congressional elections, sealed the Bank’s fate.

    It would be more than seventy-five years before the United States made another attempt to establish a central bank. During that period, the U.S. economy experienced several banking crises. But after the Panic of 1907, which triggered a nationwide suspension of payments and a deep recession, Congress established a commission to look into ways to improve how the banking system responsed to the shocks. The commission’s findings led to the creation of the Federal Reserve System in 1913.

    This article is adapted from the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia’s publication "The Second Bank of the United States: A Chapter in the History of Central Banking." To order print copies of the publication visit https://www.philadelphiafed.org/education/publication-orders

    Image of Custom House by J.C. Wild, printed by John T. Bowen, c.1848, courtesy Library Company of Philadelphia, accession number P.2227


    Bibliography

    Bordo, Michael D., and Joseph G. Haubrich. “Credit Crises, Money, and Contractions: An Historical View.” Journal of Monetary Economics vol. 57, no. 1 (January 2010): pp. 1-18.

    Catterall, Ralph C.H. The Second Bank of the United States. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1903.

    Hammond, Bray. Banks and Politics in America from the Revolution to the Civil War. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1957.

    Kaplan, Edward S. The Bank of the United States and the American Economy. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1999.

    Remini, Robert. Andrew Jackson and the Bank War: A Study in the Growth of Presidential Power. New York: W.W. Norton and Company, 1967.

    Walters, Raymond, Jr. “The Origins of the Second Bank of the United States.” Journal of Political Economy vol. 53, no. 2 (June 1945): pp. 115-31.

    Источник: https://www.federalreservehistory.org/essays/second-bank-of-the-us

    Online Services and Online Banking FAQs

    Online Banking Security

    What will I experience when I log in to my online banking account the first time?
    You will automatically be guided through an easy three-step process:
    Step 1:  Sign in with your secure username and password. 
    Step 2: You will be prompted to enter up to two phone numbers. These numbers will be used to send you a one-time passcode via voice or text message (you choose the method). Note: You can also choose to receive your one-time passcode through email.
    Step 3:  You will be prompted to enter the one-time passcode you received. A confirmation message will appear, along with the option of allowing the system to remember your computer (so that you can skip this step in the future).


    How do I update my username and password?
    To update your username and password, go to the “My Settings” page and click on the link for “Update username” and “Update Password,” respectively. Then, create a new username and password that meet the following requirements:
    Username criteria:

    • Must be between six and 20 characters long
    • Must contain one letter
    • Can contain numbers and/or the following special characters: @$*_-=!~
    • Must NOT contain any spaces (including before, in the middle of, or after the username)
    • [Username are not case-sensitive]

    Password criteria:

    • Must be between six and 32 characters
    • Must contain a combination of:
    •  Letters and numbers
    • or Letters and any special characters
    • or Numbers and any special characters
    • Must NOT contain any spaces (including before, in the middle of, or after the password)
    • Cannot be a substring of the username

    Other items to note about passwords:

    • Passwords are case-sensitive
    • Passwords do not expire

    What information is contained in the automated voice call or SMS text message?
    Information within an automated voice call:
    “Hello, this is City National Bank. Please press pound to receive your 6-digit access code.”
    **Press pound (#):**
    [1.5 second pause and your unique one-time access code will be provided].
    ** Press pound (#) to repeat. **
    Information within a SMS text message:
    City National Bank Access Code. Your access code is xxxxxx. Reply HELP for help.

    If I am travelling internationally, can I receive a one-time access code via SMS text or automated voice call if I access my online banking account from an unrecognized computer (or mobile device)?
    You may receive the one-time access code via SMS text or automated voice call either through your international phone or a U.S.-based mobile phone as long as your U.S.-based wireless carrier and current wireless plan are supported within the country you are visiting.

    How will using my phone make my account safer?
    We have implemented “multifactor authentication,” which makes it more difficult for phishers and attackers to access your accounts without you knowing it. While this might seem unfamiliar, you actually use it every time you visit an ATM. When you access your account from any ATM, you need both your ATM card (sometimes that you have) and PIN (something that you know). We are implementing this same type of protection by using login credentials (username and password) and your phone to access your account. By doing this, even if a phisher or an attacker manages to steal your password and tries to use it to log in, they would be unsuccessful because they would need your phone as well.

    Will I always need to use my login credentials (username and password) and my phone from now on?
    The first time you attempt to log in from a new computer (or mobile device) you will need to use your log in credentials (username and password) and the access code that will be sent to your registered phone in order to log in. If you are accessing from a private computer (or mobile device) that you personally use, you can opt for the system to remember your computer (or mobile device) for future logins by clicking on “Register.” By doing this, you will no longer need to retrieve an passcode via phone; you will only need your username and password for future access to your online banking account. For the best security protection, we suggest that you always use your login credentials (username and password) and your phone. If you do opt to have your computer (or mobile device) remembered, we recommend that you do so only on devices that you personally own and that have the latest updates and virus protection software installed on them.

    How about if I log in from another computer (or mobile device)?
    The same process will apply each time you log into a computer (or mobile device). The first time you attempt to log in from a new computer (or mobile device) you will need to use your login credentials (username and password) and the passcode that will be sent to your registered phone in order to log in. If you are accessing from a private computer (or mobile device) that you personally use, you can opt for the system to remember your computer (or mobile device) for future logins by clicking on “Register.” By doing this, you will no longer need to retrieve an access code via phone; you will only need your username and password for future access to your online banking account. For the best security protection, we suggest that you always use your login credentials (username and password) and your phone. If you do opt to have your computer (or mobile device) remembered we recommend that you do so only on devices that you personally own and that have the latest updates and virus protection software installed on them.

    I don’t have a text-capable phone. Can the verification code be emailed?
    Yes, you can also choose to receive your one-time access code through email.


    I am on the screen with “Text Me” and “Call Me” buttons. Why am I being asked to verify my contact information? And which one should I choose?
    Our system needs to make sure at least one phone number (or email address) you entered is correct. You can select “Call Me,” “Text Me,” or “Email Me” – whichever you have access to and is most convenient at the moment is the one you should select.

    Will I have to perform these login steps (username and password, and my phone) with all my accounts?
    If you have one Online Banking login for all your accounts, then no, you will only be required to perform your login credentials once. But if you have separate Online Banking logins for each account then yes, you will need to go through the login credentials process for each account.

    Yes, you can also choose to receive your one-time passcode through email.

    I’m trying to get into Online Banking using Internet Explorer, but I’m seeing a message that my browser needs updating. Why?
    For security reasons, Online Banking does not support Internet Explorer browsers below 11. You will need to follow the instructions on screen to update your browser.


    What about Chrome or Firefox – do they work?
    Yes, you can choose to use one of those browsers instead of upgrading Internet Explorer.

    I’m being prompted to enable JavaScript and/or I’m being prompted to enable cookies. Are those safe?
    Yes, those are perfectly safe, and necessary for Online Banking to function properly.

    What if I still have questions about security and logging into my online banking account?
    Please contact Online Banking and Bill Payment support at 305-349-5490 or 1-866-CNB-EPAY (262-3729), available 24/7.

    SECURITY

    How does City National Bank of Florida Online Banking security work?

    Imagine sending a friend a letter. For us it's as simple as dropping it in a mailbox for the carrier to pick up and deliver. Now imagine that instead of just dropping it into the mailbox, you put the letter through a shredder that only you have the key to and then into the mailbox. And instead of one carrier coming to pick it up, the post office sends 100 carriers to each take a piece of your letter. They each go on their own route through all sorts of neighborhoods to your friend's house. Once there, your friend takes this pile of incomprehensible paper, puts it through a reverse shredder that only they have a key to, and out comes your letter, safe and sound.

    If we sent information through the traditional manner of one letter, one carrier and one route, it would be easy for a criminal to find the truck carrying your letter and pick it out. So we use the 100-carrier method, otherwise known as RSA public-key cryptography. It's become a standard on the Internet wherever private or sensitive information is concerned. The government uses it; the financial industry uses it, and now, so can you.

    Security has always been a top priority with City National Bank of Florida. It will continue to be so by adopting new technologies only after they've passed our unchanging business principles of confidentiality, flexibility, commitment and stability. To have it any other way would not only endanger your finances, but in turn, our reputation, and that is never good for business.

    Are there any other securities issues I should be aware of?
    There are two additional areas you should be aware of. The e-mail generated through the 'Contact Us' or Certified E-Mail feature of the website, as well as within online banking will be encrypted (scrambled so no one else can read it) automatically as long as you are using one of the certified browsers listed below. Requests and questions requiring specific information about your account should be initiated through 'Contact Us' or via 'Certified E-Mail'. You may also call City National Bank and Bill Payment support at 305-349-5490 or 1-866-CNB-EPAY (262-3729) available 24/7 or e-mail us using our Contact Us form. Initiating an e-mail to the support center using your normal e-mail program will not be encrypted or secure and should be used only for general questions and requests.

    The second issue involves your browser. For added security, it is important to log off and close your browser when you have completed your transactions in City National Bank Online Banking. In addition, some browsers contain the ability to retain information in memory. Check the preferences of your browser to heighten the security or turn its memory capabilities off. Check with your browser's customer support for more information.

    What is Certified E-Mail and why should I use it?
    Certified E-Mail is a way for the bank to help you ensure that your communications with us is safe and secure. With this system, you create a special e-mail account with City National Bank. It is the policy of City National Bank of Florida not to request information that is confidential in nature regarding its customers or their accounts via normal email. If you receive an unsolicited email that appears to be from City National Bank of Florida that requests confidential information, we recommend that you do not respond. In such instance(s) please contact your City National Bank of Florida representative to report any such requests. With Certified E-Mail you will receive and email that tells you there is an email waiting for you in your special account email box. Only you have the username and password to that account and then you can retrieve it when you want to. Additionally, once you have read the email, you can respond to your bank representative via the same secure system.

    How do I get Internet Access?
    Check your local Yellow Pages under Internet Online Service providers.

    What is a cookie?
    A cookie is a piece of data passed to your browser. City National Bank of Florida Online Banking uses "per session" cookies inside the secure banking environment to keep track of your session data. This means that as you go through the program from page to page, the information is stored on your computer while you are on that page, and as soon as you leave that page it is deleted. Clicking the sign-off button ensures that all this information is successfully deleted from your computer.

    Newer browser versions have a feature that allows you to be notified when a cookie is being added to your system. You can disable this option in the Network Preference/Protocols area.

    To keep my banking information private, what recommendations do you have?

    • Keep your password confidential. Change it frequently to ensure that no one else can guess it, and do not let anyone else use it.
    • Never walk away from your computer without exiting the system first. When you are finished with your banking, click the sign-off button located at the top and bottom navigational toolbars and then close your browser. Once you have ended your session, no further transactions can be processed until you sign on to the system again.
    • Use the latest version of Netscape Navigator, Microsoft Internet Explorer, or AOL. All of these browsers are certified for use at our site.

    BROWSER QUESTIONS

    What browser do I need to be able to use Online Banking?
    Supported browsers are:

    • Microsoft Internet Explorer for Windows version 11 and Edge
    • Firefox
    • Safari version 8.0
    • Google Chrome

    While trying to go back to a previous page I received a message to enter my User ID and password. Why did this happen?
    Sometimes using your browser's back button will cause you to be logged out of City National's Online Banking. For security reasons some pages are automatically expired so that you cannot return to them. By using the navigation toolbar found at the top of your City National Bank of Florida Online Banking page, you should not encounter this problem.  

    Why do I get a "Certificate Expired" error message when trying to access the site?
    This will occur when you are using a browser older than the supported versions. To resolve the problem, upgrade your web browser to the newest version.  

    How can I tell if I have a secured connection to City National Bank Online Banking?
    The visual indicators of a secured connection vary from browser to browser. The following is a listing of all the major browsers and their methods of indicating a secured connection. With all browsers, if https is in the address bar, the "s" means you have a secure connection.

    • Microsoft Internet Explorer - A small lock will appear in the bottom right corner of the browser to indicate a secured connection.

    What do I do if I receive the following message: "Server is busy or is not responding"?
    Check the location box and make sure that the address was typed properly. A complete web address is in the format http://www.citynational.com, or with secure web sites, don't forget the "s": https:www.site.com. Sometimes you will receive this message when the server is busy. Try a second time to connect and the connection will go through. Maybe the server you are looking for doesn't exist, because you've typed the name incorrectly or the server is down right now. If after three attempts you still do not connect, please call the Online Banking and Bill Payment support at 305-349-5490 or 1-866-CNB-EPAY (262-3729) available 24/7 or e-mail us using our Contact Us form. 


    Help Sources
    If you still have questions regarding your browser, we encourage you contact the company that created it. However, if you have any questions regarding City National Bank of Florida Online Banking or your accounts, contact Online Banking and Bill Payment support at 305-349-5490 or 1-866-CNB-EPAY (262-3729) available 24/7 or e-mail us using our Contact Us form.

    ONLINE BANKING

    Am I able to change my Username?
    Yes, our online banking system allows you to change both your Username and/or password. Once in Online banking select My Settings to make these changes. 


    How long will my activity be available on City National Online Banking?
    City National Bank of Florida Online Banking supports a 24 month history that begins upon registration.


    What types of accounts can I see on City National Online Banking?
    You are able to see all deposit accounts (checking, savings, money market and CDs) loan accounts and lines of credit. 


    When I try to sign on to Online Banking I receive an error message saying that I had an invalid login attempt. What happened?
    It is possible that you have entered your username and/or password incorrectly. The password is case sensitive, so we recommend that you verify that your Caps Lock button is either on or off, depending on how you initially entered it, and that you have typed the password correctly. Also, when entering your username, make sure you do not include the dashes. If you still are unable to access your account information, call Online Banking and Bill Payment support at 305-349-5490 or 1-866-CNB-EPAY (262-3729) available 24/7 or e-mail us using our Contact Us form. 


    Why do I see a "0" in the balance column of my Account History Screen when I make a transfer or when today's transactions appear?
    Balances are pending until all transactions are processed at the end of each business day. You will see updated balances the following business day. The real-time balance is reflected at the top of the screen under account balance. 


    How do I register for Bill Payment through City National Online Banking?
    You may register for Bill Payment online by selecting the Bill Payment icon. First, you will be requested to read and accept City National Bank of Florida's authorization disclosure. Failure to accept the disclosure terms prevents the registration process from proceeding. After the disclosure is agreed to, you complete an online registration form. After submission, the registration form is electronically forwarded to City National Bank of Florida for review.

    You will be notified via email upon completion within 1-2 business days.


    When can I start using Bill Payment?
    After enrolling for Bill Payment you will first receive an approval E-mail. Once your account has been enabled, you will receive an Activation E-mail indicating that you may log on to your City National Bank of Florida Online Banking session, and begin using Bill Payment.  

    Will Bill Pay reports be available?
    Yes, you have the ability to Filter and download the report.

    How are my bills actually paid?
    City National Bank of Florida Online Banking transmits all your bill pay requests to our bill payment service around 9:00 p.m. CST each day, Sunday through Friday. The business day after we transmit the payment request, the bill payment service determines if your payee will accept your payment electronically or if a check needs to be sent. Once this is determined, your payment is sent and the funds are deducted from your checking account. Typically the funds are deducted from your account two business days following transmission of payment.

    Be certain to review your bills carefully for the correct address. Many companies direct you to an address other than what is listed on the envelope when using alternative delivery means.

    Please remember that the transmit date is not the day your payee will receive your payment. It is the day the bill payment process begins. The payment must still be processed and sent electronically or by check through the mail. City National Bank of Florida Online Banking transmits bill payments Sunday through Friday so PLAN AHEAD and remember weekends and holidays. Allow 2-3 business days for companies to receive payments sent electronically, and 5-7 business days for payments sent by check. You will see the method of payment displayed on the Payee screen the next time you log on to the program after you enter your Payee information.  

    What is the daily cutoff for paying bills through City National Online Banking?
    Requests for payments entered prior to 7:00 p.m. CST Sunday through Friday, will be processed on the same day. Requests for all payments entered after 7:00 p.m. CST or on a non-business day, will be processed on the next business day.  

    Is there a dollar limit per payment sent through Online Banking?
    Yes, the maximum dollar amount per payment is $9,999.99.  

    Can I make a payment to a government agency through Online Banking?
    No, you cannot make a payment to government agencies. The following are examples of government agencies included:

    • Municipalities
    • Student Loans
    • Court-ordered Payments
    • City, State, and Federal Taxes

    City National Bank of Florida has limited ability to research any problems with a payment to a government agency due to the government's strict adherence to the Consumer Privacy Act. These payments might not be processed by the government on a timely basis without the attachment of government forms.

    Can I make a payment to my Line of Credit Account through City National Online Banking?
    Yes, you can make a payment to your Line of Credit through Online Banking in two ways. Keep in mind, if you make a payment within 10 days prior to your due date the funds will be applied to your scheduled payment amount. If you make a payment after your due date, the funds will be applied directly to your principal balance as long as your scheduled payment has been satisfied.

    • If you have signed the agreement to allow transfers from your Checking or Savings to your Line of Credit Account, you may transfer directly to your line using the transfer feature.
    • You may set up a payment to City National Bank of Florida using the address on your statement and Line of Credit Account number. Your payment will be made electronically to City National Bank of Florida. Keep in mind that these payments will be in addition to the automatic payment that comes from your checking account each month.


    What if I need a copy of a check submitted by City National Online Banking?
    Online Banking shows you both sides of a paid check! Click the check number on the Account History page.

    Can I place a stop payment on a check through City National Online Banking?
    Yes. You must first verify that the check was not paid. Select the stop payment button inside online banking fill in the blanks. 

    Can I re-order checks online?
    Yes. Simply click "Online Services" on the top navigation bar on any page. 

    I cannot successfully send an email using the Contact Us link. Why is this?
    It is likely that your browser is not configured to use this feature. Please use your normal e-mail software or service to send your message to our Contact Us form. 

    Please refer to the Help icon within the Bill Payment feature for additional detailed frequently asked Questions and Answers.

    Online Statements

    Is the Online Statement service free?
    Yes, this product is free for all Online Banking users (Commercial and Consumer). 

    Will I still receive my paper statements when I register?
    No. When you register for Online Statements you will no longer receive paper statements in the mail. 

    What if I want to receive my paper statements?
    If you register for Online Statements, a copy of your paper statements will be available upon request by contacting City National Bank of Florida. However, if you want to stop receiving Online Statements and begin receiving your paper statements again, you can submit this request by clicking the "Contact Us" link. 

    Will my statement cycle date change?
    If you are not currently on a statement cycle that releases your statements on the last business day of the month, a statement cycle change will apply to you. All Online statement users are required to be on a statement cycle that produces statements on the last business day of the month. 

    I registered for Online Statements but when I try to retrieve a statement, it tells me that none are available. Why?

    • Scenario A. After registering for Online Statements, it can take up to two weeks for the past 24 months of statements to become available. Your current month's statement will not be available until your next cycle date.
    • Scenario B. If you received a combined statement in the past, your first 24 months of statements prior to registering can be found under the primary account number.
    • Scenario C. If you are unable to retrieve your previous savings account statements, please remember that for the first 24 months prior to registration they are only available at each quarter-end.


    When I click the PDF Icon to view my statements, they do not show properly and I cannot print them. What can I do to correct this?
    To view and print your statements, we highly recommend that you download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader, as there are printing limitations with certain versions. This software can be downloaded free of charge from our website.  

    For any questions or concerns regarding Online Banking and Bill Pay call us at 305-349-5490 or 1-866-CNB-EPAY (262-3729) available 24/7.

    Источник: https://www.citynationalcm.com/online-services-and-online-banking-faqs

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