tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo

Here is the translation of what Doc and Johnny Ringo are saying to one another in Latin: Doc Holliday: In vino veritas. Doc Holliday: Credat. Doc Holliday spells it out for us during the famous first encounter he has with Johnny Ringo in Tombstone; here is a man who reminds him of. What's the term I'll be your huckleberry mean? What is the meaning of “I'm your huckleberry,” said by Doc Holliday in the 1993 movie Tombstone? tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo

: Tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo

Tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo
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Tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo
Tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo
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May 3, in history:

In 1469, Niccolo Machiavelli, Italian politician, writer, historian and philosopher, was born. The renaissance diplomat is best known for his 1513 treatise, "The Prince," in which an “ends justify the means” idea of politics employs being sneaky, cunning, and having no moral code. Today he is often called the father of modern political philosophy.

In 1802, Washington, D.C., was incorporated as a city.

In 1921, West Virginia imposed the first State Sales Tax.

In 1937, Margaret Mitchell's novel "Gone with the Wind" won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

In 1952, the first landing of an airplane at the North Pole occurred.

In 1960, the Anne Frank House museum opened in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

In 1999, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above 11,000 for the first time in its history at 11,014.70.

In 2013, Aorun zhaoi, a Theropod dinosaur, dating from 161 million years ago, was discovered in China.

Meanwhile in Wayne County, on May 3, 1850, a dark soul entered the world.

The notorious man-killer named Johnny Ringo was born on that date in Washington (now Greens Fork).

He would later be portrayed in numerous books and poems, in 18 television shows and half a dozen movies. He would be the most-mythologized person ever born in East Central Indiana and certainly one of the most dangerous outlaws of the Old West.

MORE OUT OF OUR PAST: Heroine halted an 'ornery horse' in mid-rampage in 1883

Johnny Ringo’s early years in Greens Fork are virtually unknown. When he was 7 years of age, his family relocated to Missouri where they lived an additional seven years.

In May of tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo, when Ringo was 14, they joined a wagon train heading for California.

While crossing the country, Johnny’s father died tragically.

According to the Missouri Liberty Tribune: “Just after daylight one morning in July, Martin Ringo stepped outside of the wagons for the purpose to see if any Indians were in sight, and his shotgun went off accidentally in his own hands, the load entering the right eye and coming out of the top of the head. His hat blew up 20 feet in the air and his brains were scattered in all directions.” 

The loss of his father traumatized young Johnny. The family pushed on to San Jose despite the tragedy.

Ringo’s early years in San Jose are shrouded. The timeline for his lawlessness began when he left there in 1871 at the age of 21 and entered the Old West.

He resurfaced in Burnet, Texas, on Dec. 25, 1874, and was arrested for shooting a gun in a public square. Taken into custody, he was soon released on bond.

Immediately afterwards, he got involved in a blood feud over cattle ownership rights. Following that, in May of 1875, a cattleman was brutally murdered by a mob. A Texas Ranger named James Cheyney sought retribution. Two members of the mob rode into an ambush and were killed by him. The two men were friends of Johnny Ringo.

Ringo sought retribution. He and another man coldheartedly executed Cheyney in front of his family. After the murder, Ringo rode into town and had breakfast bragging he had “made beef of Cheyney and if someone did not bury him he would soon stink.”

Ringo threatened other law officers and his name began regularly appearing in newspapers. He was arrested for the threats, and broke jail in May of 1876.

The July 14, 1876, edition of the Burnet Bulletin stated a startling truth: “The notorious Johnny Ringo… is certainly a very desperate and daring man.”

The frequency of his name in newspapers established his bloody reputation and a future map of his biography.

Ringo was later captured and taken to the Travis County Jail in Austin. He was released on bond because no one would appear as witness against him out of fear. The case was dropped.

In 1879 Ringo drifted to the Arizona Territory and blended into violent crowds on the Mexican border.

On Dec. 9, 1879, he shot a man in a saloon for refusing to drink with him.

The Dec. 14, 1879, edition of the Arizona Daily Star stated: “Last Tuesday a shooting took place at Safford in which Louis Hancock was shot by Johnny Ringo. It appears Ringo wanted Hancock to take a drink of whiskey, and refused, tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo he would prefer beer. Ringo then struck him over the head with his pistol and fired, the ball taking effect in the lower end of the ear and passing through the fleshy part of his neck. Half an inch more in the neck would have killed Hancock. Ringo is under arrest.”

Ringo, released on bond, did not show up for court.

He resurfaced in July of 1880, as he and the Ike and Billy Clanton gang drove cattle to the San Carlos Indian Reservation. After selling the beef, the men descended on the town of Maxey and created a drunken disturbance. They then went to Safford and created more havoc.

The Clanton family and their ranch hands were a loosely organized band of desperadoes operating along the Mexican border. They stole cattle, robbed stagecoaches, ambushed teamsters and killed people. They were commonly referred to as the Clanton Gang or simply the “Cowboys.”

Ringo stayed with his friends, the Clantons, until April of 1881, and then returned to Texas.

Ringo frequented an Austin whorehouse on May 2, 1881.

In the wee morning hours, he misplaced his money. There were three suspicious men seated in the hallway so he pulled his gun. After a search he determined they did not have his money, so he smiled and returned to his tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo. The men reported the incident to renowned Texas marshal gunman Ben Thompson, who rushed to Ringo’s room.

Ringo refused to open the door.

Thompson kicked the door in and arrested Ringo for disturbing the peace.

Ringo paid the $25 fine and costs, according to newspaper accounts.

In early August, he was again in Galeyville. He entered a poker game and lost all his money. He asked other players to loan him money so he could play. They refused so he held them up at gunpoint and stole $500 and a horse. This also made the papers.

Months later Ringo learned there was a fast-growing feud between Wyatt Earp’s brothers and his buddies, the Clantons. He was ready to take an active part in the fight, but got jailed because of the Galeyville robbery and horse theft.

Being incarcerated kept Greens Fork native Johnny Ringo out of the most famous gunfight in western history.

Wyatt Earp, Virgil Earp, Morgan Earp and Doc Holliday confronted their mortal enemies, the Clanton gang, in a gunfight at the O.K. corral. Despite its name, the battle did not take place within or next to the O.K. Corral, but six doors west of the corral's rear entrance.

Those participating were Billy Claiborne, Ike and Billy Clanton, and Tom and Frank McLaury on one side, the three Earp brothers and Doc Holliday on the other side.

The Earp party came to disarm the Clanton gang in violation of firearms law. They faced off, barely six feet apart.

Virgil Earp shouted, “Throw up your hands, I want your guns!”

Frank McLaury and Billy Clanton slapped leather and cocked their single-action six-shot revolvers.

Virgil yelled, “Hold! I didn’t mean that!” (He didn’t want a fight.)

Who started shooting is not clearly known.

Witnesses agreed the first two shots were almost indistinguishable from each other.

Wyatt Earp later testified, "Billy Clanton leveled his pistol at me, but I did not aim at him. I knew that Frank McLaury had the reputation of being a good shot and a dangerous man, so I aimed at Frank McLaury. The first two shots were fired by Billy Clanton and myself, he shooting at me, and I shooting at Frank McLaury."

Clanton missed, Earp did not. Frank McLaury was gut-shot.

About 30 shots were fired in about 30 seconds amidst waves of gun smoke in the narrow space. When the haze cleared, Tom and Frank McLaury and Billy Clanton lay dead. Virgil was shot in the leg, Morgan in the shoulder. Doc Holliday was grazed on the hip. Wyatt was unhurt.

The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral did not end the blood feud, as the real death toll rose after the fight when both sides began to assassinate members of the opposing faction.

Ringo heard what the Earps had done to the Clantons at the O.K. Corral and was furious. He was released on bond at his Nov. 26, 1881, trial because no witnesses were willing to testify against him. Ringo immediately sought revenge for the Clantons and angrily confronted Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday in Tombstone, believing they had unfairly implicated him in a stagecoach robbery. He argued with the now-mythical gunfighters. A constable grabbed Ringo from behind and they all were arrested before any gunplay.

The Jan. 18,1882, Tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo Epitaph read: “J.H. Holliday, Wyatt Earp and Johnny Ringo were arrested for carrying deadly weapons. Earp was discharged. Holliday and Ringo were each fined $30.”

Wyatt Earp’s case was dismissed because he was a U.S. deputy marshal.

The following March, Morgan Earp was killed by unknown assassins.

It was rumored Johnny Ringo was involved.

Two days after Morgan’s death, Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday and others escorted Morgan’s corpse to Tucson. They ran into Frank Stilwell, one of the alleged killers.

Stilwell was found dead the next day.

The Earp party returned to Tombstone and refused to submit to arrest. They were after Morgan’s killers and had no use for the law now.

A posse was formed to bring in the Earps.

Incredibly, Johnny Ringo was one of the members of the posse.

One of current 15 year mortgage rates wells fargo deputies recorded: “Excitement again this morning. Sheriff went out with a posse to arrest the Earp party, but they will never do it. The cowboy element is backing them strongly. Johnny Ringo being one of the posse, there is a prospect of bad times.” 

News reached Tombstone that Wyatt Earp had killed Curly Bill Brocius, considered the most famous outlaw of the day.

This killing of Brocius made Earp a hero.

The posse was dismissed.

On July 2, 1882, Johnny Ringo was in Tombstone, depressed and drinking heavily.

On July 8 he left.

He was last seen in Galeyville late on July 9, where he continued his debauch.

He left town on July 11th … and on July 14th was found dead by a wagon driver.

The Greens Fork native was found seated with his back leaning against a tree. In his right hand, he clenched a .45-caliber Colt. He had a gunshot wound in his right temple. The bullet exited out the top of his head. He was found with his boots off and strips of undershirt were wrapped about his feet. He had traveled a short distance in his footwear, according to the tracks. One of his cartridge belts was on upside down. There was also a cut on his scalp with a small part of the hair gone. His horse was not at the scene, but was found a couple of weeks later, still saddled.

Johnny Ringo died drunk and depressed at the age of 32 with his boots off and his body wedged against a tree. Although suicide is the generally accepted theory, there is strong speculation that Wyatt Earp, on a blood trail for his brother’s murderers, killed him.

Earp always denied this.

The Greens Fork Hoosier has been characterized in books and poems, in 18 television shows and at least half a dozen movies. He is the most-mythologized person ever born in Wayne County and certainly one of the most dangerous outlaws of the old west.

He was buried at the spot where he was found dead.

Greens Fork celebrates Johnny Ringo Days in May.

(Johnny Ringo — coincidently — was distantly related to outlaw Cole Younger by the marriage of an aunt to an uncle of the outlaw. Ironically, he was also related to Jesse and Frank James in a similar manner.)

Contact columnist Steve Martin at [email protected]

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Источник: https://www.pal-item.com/story/news/local/2021/04/29/out-our-past-notorious-old-west-outlaw-johnny-ringo-born-wayne-county-indiana/4862425001/

Tombstone (film)

1993 film

Tombstone is a 1993 American Western film directed by George P. Cosmatos, written by Kevin Jarre (who was also the original director, but was replaced early in production[5][6]), and starring Kurt Russell and Val Kilmer, with Sam Elliott, Bill Paxton, Powers Boothe, Michael Biehn, and Dana Delany in supporting roles, as well as narration by Robert Mitchum.

The film is loosely based on events in Tombstone, Arizona, including the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral and the Earp Vendetta Ride, during the 1880s. It depicts a number of Western outlaws and lawmen, such as Wyatt Earp, William Brocius, Johnny Ringo, and Doc Holliday.

Tombstone was released by Hollywood Pictures in theatrical wide release in the United States on December 25, 1993, grossing $56.5 million in domestic ticket sales. The film was a financial success, and for the Western genre, it ranks number 16 in the list of highest-grossing films since 1979. Six months later, the similarly themed film Wyatt Earp was released with far less commercial success.[7] Critical reception was generally positive, with Kilmer's performance receiving critical acclaim. The film has become a cult classic since its release.[8]The Making of Tombstone, a book about the film, was published in 2018.[9]

Plot[edit]

In 1879, members of an outlaw gang known to wear red sashes called the Cowboys, led by "Curly Bill" Brocius, ride into a Mexican town and interrupt a local police officer's wedding. They then proceed to massacre the assembled policemen in retribution for killing two of their fellow gang members. Shortly before being shot, a local priest warns them that their acts of murder and savagery will be avenged, referencing the biblical fourth horseman.

Wyatt Earp, a retired peace officer with a notable reputation, reunites with his brothers Virgil and Morgan in Tucson, Arizona, where they venture on toward Tombstone to settle down. There they encounter Wyatt's long-time friend Doc Holliday, who is seeking relief in the dry climate from his worsening tuberculosis. Josephine Marcus and Mr. Fabian are also newly arrived with a traveling theater troupe. Meanwhile, Wyatt's common-law wife, Mattie Blaylock, is becoming dependent on laudanum. Wyatt and his brothers begin to profit from a stake in a gambling emporium and saloon when they have their first encounter with the Cowboys.

As tensions rise, Wyatt is pressured to help rid the town of the Cowboys, though he is no longer a lawman. Curly Bill begins shooting at the sky after a visit to an opium den and is told by Marshal Fred White to relinquish his firearms. Curly Bill instead shoots the marshal dead, and is forcibly taken into custody by Wyatt. The arrest infuriates Ike Clanton and the other Cowboys. Curly Bill stands trial, but is found not guilty due to a lack of witnesses. Virgil, unable to tolerate lawlessness, becomes the new marshal and imposes a weapons ban within the city limits. This leads to a gunfight at the O.K. Corral, in which Billy Clanton and the McLaury brothers are killed. Virgil and Morgan are wounded, and the allegiance of county sheriff Johnny Behan with the Cowboys is made clear. As retribution for the Cowboy deaths, Wyatt's brothers are ambushed; Morgan is killed, while Virgil is left handicapped. A despondent Wyatt and his family leave Tombstone and board a train, with Ike Clanton and Frank Stilwell close behind, preparing to ambush them. Wyatt sees that his family leaves safely, and then surprises the assassins. He kills Stilwell, but lets Clanton live to send a message: Wyatt announces that he is a U.S. marshal, and that he intends to kill any man he sees wearing a red sash. Wyatt, Doc, a reformed Cowboy named Sherman McMasters, Texas Jack Vermillion, and Turkey Creek Jack Johnson, form a posse to seek revenge.

Wyatt and his posse are ambushed in a riverside forest by the Cowboys. Wyatt walks into the creek, miraculously surviving the enemy fire, and kills Curly Bill along with many of his men. Curly Bill's second-in-command, Johnny Ringo, becomes the new head of the Cowboys. When Doc's health worsens, the group is accommodated by Henry Hooker at his ranch. Ringo lures McMasters into the Cowboys' clutches under the pretense of parley and then sends a messenger (dragging McMasters' corpse) to tell Wyatt that he wants a showdown to end the hostilities; Wyatt agrees. Wyatt sets off for the showdown, not knowing that Doc has already arrived at the scene. Doc confronts a surprised Ringo, who was expecting Wyatt, and challenges him to a duel to finish their "game," which Ringo accepts (Doc and Ringo have already had a couple of stand offs in Tombstone that were ultimately broken up). Wyatt runs when he hears a gunshot, only to encounter Doc, who has killed Ringo. They then press on to complete their task of eliminating the Cowboys, although Clanton escapes their vengeance by renouncing his red sash. Doc is sent to a sanatorium in Colorado, where he dies of his illness. At Doc's urging, Wyatt pursues Josephine to begin a new life.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

The film was shot primarily on location in Arizona. Shooting began in May 1993. The film was supposed to be screenwriter Kevin Jarre's first job as director, but he was quickly overwhelmed by the job–failing to get needed shots and falling behind the shooting schedule. A month into filming, he was fired by producer Andrew Vajna and replaced with George P. Cosmatos. Michael Biehn, a close friend of Jarre, considered quitting. Biehn recalled feeling (director) Cosmatos ".had no understanding or appreciation of the screenplay."[10] By the time of Cosmatos' arrival, though, all actors stayed on board.[11] The new director brought a demanding, hard-nosed sensibility to the set, which led to conflicts with some of the crew members (most famously with cinematographer William Fraker). Meanwhile, Kurt Russell worked quickly with producer James Jacks to pare down Jarre's sprawling script, deleting subplots and emphasizing the relationship between Wyatt and Doc.[12]

Russell has stated that it was he, and not Cosmatos, who actually directed the film, as Jarre's departure led to the studio's request.[13] Russell stated that Cosmatos was brought in as a "ghost director" as a front man because Russell did not want it to be known that he was directing.[13] Co-star Val Kilmer has supported Russell's statements about working heavily behind the scenes and stating that Russell "essentially" directed the film, but stopped short of saying that Russell did the actual directing.[14] Biehn stated that Russell never directed him personally.[15]

Cosmatos was highly focused on accurate historical detail, including the tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo, props, customs, and scenery, to give them authenticity. All the mustaches in the movie were real. Val Kilmer practiced for a long time on his quick-draw speed, and gave his character a Southern Aristocrat accent. Two locations were used to make the town of Tombstone look bigger. The scene in which Wyatt throws an abusive card dealer (Billy Bob Thornton) out of a saloon was to show that Wyatt was a man who used psychology to intimidate. Thornton's lines in the scene were ad-libbed, as he was only told to "be a bully".[16]

Music[edit]

Soundtrack[edit]

Tombstone: Complete Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
ReleasedMarch 16, 2006
Length1:25:29
LabelIntrada

The original motion picture soundtrack for Tombstone was originally released by Intrada Records on December 25, 1993.[17] On March 16, 2006, an expanded two-disc version of the film score was also released by Intrada Records.[18] The score was composed and produced by Bruce Broughton, and performed by the Sinfonia of London. David Snell conducted most of the score (although Broughton normally conducts his own scores, union problems mandated another conductor here), while Patricia Carlin edited the film's music.[19]

The score contains strong echoes of Max Steiner's music for John Ford's The Searchers (1956) with variations on the 'Indian Traders' theme used midway through the Ford movie. The album begins with the Cinergi logo, composed by Jerry Goldsmith and conducted by Broughton.

Release[edit]

Home media[edit]

Following its cinematic release in theaters, the film was released on VHS video format on November 11, 1994.[20] The Region 1 Codewidescreen edition of the film was released on DVD in the United States on December 2, 1997. Special features for the DVD only include original theatrical trailers.[21] A director's cut of Tombstone was also officially released on DVD on January 15, 2002. The DVD version includes a two-disc set and features "The Making of Tombstone" featurette in three parts; "An Ensemble Cast"; "Making an Authentic Western"; and "The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral". Other features include an audio commentary by director George P. Cosmatos, an interactive Tombstone timeline, the director's original storyboards for the O.K. Corral sequence, the Tombstone "Epitaph" – an actual newspaper account, the DVD-ROM feature "Faro at the Oriental: Game of Chance", and a collectible Tombstone map.[22]

The widescreen high-definition Blu-ray Disc edition of the theatrical cut was released on April 27, 2010, featuring the making of Tombstone, director's original storyboards, trailers, and TV spots.[23] A supplemental viewing option for the film in the media format of video-on-demand is available, as well.[24]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

Tombstone premiered in movie theaters six months before Costner and Kasdan's version, Wyatt Earp, on December 24, 1993, in wide release throughout the United States. During its opening weekend, the film opened in third place, grossing $6,454,752 in business showing at 1,504 locations.[4][25] The film's revenue increased by 35% in its second week of release, earning $8,720,255. For that particular weekend, the film stayed in third place, screening in 1,955 theaters. The film went on to earn $56,505,065 in total ticket sales in the North American market.[4] It ranks 20th out of all films released in 1993.[26]

Critical response[edit]

Rotten Tomatoes reported that 74% of 46 sampled critics gave the film a positive review, with an average score of 6.30/10. The site's critical consensus reads, "If you're seeking a stylish modern western with a solid story and a well-chosen ensemble cast, Tombstone is your huckleberry.".[27] Following its cinematic release in 1993, Tombstone was named "one of the 5 greatest Westerns ever made" by True West Magazine. The film was also called "One of the year's 10 best!" by KCOP-TV in Los Angeles, California.[28]

Gene How can i get my student loan account number and Roger Ebert of Siskel & Ebert originally thought they would have to miss reviewing the film, as they could not get a screening, but as Ebert explained, ". a strange thing started to happen. People started telling me they really liked Val Kilmer's performance in Tombstone, and I heard this everywhere I went. When you hear this once or twice, it's interesting, when you hear it a couple of dozen times, it's a trend. And when you read that Bill Clinton loved the performance, you figured you better catch up with the movie." Ultimately, Ebert recommended the movie while Siskel did not.

Ebert was later to refer tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo Tombstone in future reviews, comparing it favorably to Kevin Costner's Wyatt Earp ("It forced the comparison upon me.") and, in his review of Wild Bill, singling out Val Kilmer's portrayal as "the definitive saloon cowboy of our time."[29][30] In his review of Kurt Russell's Dark Blue, he stated, "Every time I see Russell or Val Kilmer in a role, I'm reminded of their Tombstone, which got lost in the year-end holiday shuffle and never got the recognition it deserved."[31]

Grafted onto this traditional framework, the film's meditative aspects are generally too self-conscious to fit comfortably. Especially when the movie tries to imagine a more enlightened role for women in the Old West, the screenplay begins to strain.
—Stephen Holden, The New York Times[32]

In a mixed review, Chris Hicks writing in the Deseret News said, "aside from Russell and Val Kilmer's scene-stealing, sickly, alcoholic Doc Holliday, there are so many characters coming and going, with none of them receiving adequate screen time, that it becomes difficult to keep track of them all." But he did comment, "some very entertaining moments here, with Russell spouting memorable tough-guy lines". Overall, he felt, "Taken on its own terms, with some lowered expectations, Western fans will have fun."[33]Emanuel Levy of the Variety staff believed the film was a "tough-talking but soft-hearted tale" which was "entertaining in a sprawling, old-fashioned manner." Regarding screenwriter Jarre's dialogue, he noted, "Despite the lack of emotional center and narrative focus, his script contains enough subplots and colorful characters to enliven the film and ultimately make it a fun, if not totally engaging, experience." He also singled out Val Kilmer as the standout performance.[34] The film, however, was not without its detractors. James Berardinelli writing for ReelViews offered a mixed-to-negative review, recalling how he thought, "The first half of Tombstone isn't an example of great filmmaking, but it is engaging. There's a sense of growing inevitability as events build to the shoot-out at the OK Corral. The melodramatic "serious" moments are kept to a minimum, and the various gunfights are choreographed with style and tension. Then, death at a funeral watch for free the one-hour ten-minute mark, the Clanton gang and the Earps square off. From there, things get progressively worse. Not only is the last hour anticlimactic, but it's dull. Too many scenes feature lengthy segments of poorly-scripted dialogue, and, in some cases, character motivation becomes unclear. The gunplay is more repetitious than exciting. The result—a cobbled-together morass of silly lines and shoot- outs—doesn't work well."[35]

Stephen Holden writing in The New York Times saw the film as being a "capacious Western with many modern touches, the Arizona boom town and site of the legendary O.K. Corral has a seedy, vaudevillian grandeur that makes it a direct forerunner of Las Vegas." He expressed his satisfaction with the supporting acting, saying, "[the] most modern psychological touch is its depiction of Josephine (Dana Delany), the itinerant actress with whom Wyatt falls in love at first sight, as the most casually and comfortably liberated woman ever to set foot in 1880s Arizona."[32] Critic Louis Black, writing for The Austin Chronicle, viewed Tombstone as a "mess" and tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo there were "two or three pre-climaxes but no climax. Its values are capitalist rather than renegade, which is okay if it's metaphoric rather than literal. Worse, as much as these actors heroically bancnet atm machine near me to focus the film, the director more successfully hacks it apart."[36]Owen Gleiberman of Entertainment Weekly gave the film a C– rating, calling it "preposterously inflated" at "135 minutes long". He observed the film as being a "three-hour rough cut that's been trimmed down to a slightly shorter rough cut" with "all that holds the film together is Kurt Russell's droll machismo."[37] Author Geoff Andrew of Time Out commented, "Kilmer makes a surprisingly effective and effete Holliday". He negatively acknowledged that there was "a misguided romantic subplot and the ending rather sprawls" but ultimately exclaimed the film was "'rootin', tootin' entertainment with lots of authentic facial hair."[38]

Richard Harrington of The Washington Post highlighted the film's shortcomings by declaring, "too much of Tombstone rings hollow. In retrospect, not much happens and little that does seems warranted. There are so many unrealized relationships you almost hope for redemption in a longer video version. This one is unsatisfying and unfulfilling."[39] Alternately though, columnist Bob Bloom of the Journal & Courier openly remarked that the film "May not be historically accurate, but offers a lot of punch for the buck." He concluded by saying it was "A tough, guilty-pleasure Western."[40]

Although Val Kilmer’s performance as Doc Holliday was praised, he did not get an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor. But he did however get nominated for Best Male Performance and Most Desirable Male at the MTV Movie Awards.

Other media[edit]

Novelization[edit]

A paperback novel of the same name adapted from Kevin Jarre's screenplay, written by Giles Tippette and published by Berkley Publishers, was released on January 1, 1994. The book dramatizes the real-life events of the gunfight at the O.K. Corral and Earp Vendetta Ride, as depicted in the film. It expands on Western genre ideas in Jarre's screenplay.[41]

References[edit]

  1. ^"DVD Reviews – Tombstone – Director's Cut & Original Versions". The Digital Bits. Archived from the original on January 1, 2016. Retrieved June 1, 2014.
  2. ^"Tombstone". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved March 27, 2019.
  3. ^"Tombstone". The Numbers. Archived from the original on November 18, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  4. ^ abc"Tombstone". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  5. ^Myrna Oliver (April 27, 2005). "George P. Cosmatos, 64; Director Was Known for Saving Troubled Projects". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on January 21, 2012. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  6. ^Richard Harrington (December 12, 1993). "'Tombstone' (R)". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 2, 2019. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  7. ^"Genres Western 1979–present". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on March 2, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  8. ^Spangenberger, Phil. "Tombstone 25—A Western Classic's Reunion". True West Magazine. True West Publishing. Archived from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved March 27, 2019.
  9. ^The Making of Tombstone: Behind the Scenes of the Classic Modern Western (2018), by John Farkis, ISBN 9781476675862
  10. ^Biehn, Michael; Anderson, Jim. "Shooting Tombstone". Archived from the original on January 31, 2021. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
  11. ^Jason Priestley (May 6, 2014). Jason Priestley: A Memoir. HarperOne. ISBN 978-0062357892. Retrieved November 7, 2015.
  12. ^"SHOOT FIRST (ASK QUESTIONS LATER)". ew.com. Archived from the original on September 14, 2018. Retrieved September 30, 2018.
  13. ^ ab"The Western Godfather". True West. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  14. ^Parker, Ryan. "Val Kilmer Says Kurt Russell Essentially Directed 'Tombstone'". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on July 9, 2020. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  15. ^“Everything Had to Go Right”: What Happened to ‘Terminator’ Star Michael Biehn
  16. ^George P. Cosmatos. Tombstone DVD Audio Commentary.
  17. ^"Tombstone Original Motion Picture Soundtrack". Archived from the original on March 20, 2021. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  18. ^"Tombstone Soundtrack". Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  19. ^"Tombstone (1993)". Yahoo! Movies. Archived from the original on June 28, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  20. ^Tombstone VHS Format. ASIN 6303109950.
  21. ^"Tombstone DVD". Video.com. Archived from the original on December 4, 2010. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  22. ^"Tombstone Vista Series DVD". Video.com. Archived from the original on December 4, 2010. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  23. ^"Tombstone Widescreen Blu-ray". Barnes & Noble. Archived from the original on July 7, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  24. ^"Tombstone: VOD Format". Archived from the original on September 19, 2015. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  25. ^"December 24–26, 1993 Weekend". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on July 8, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  26. ^"1993 Domestic Grosses". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on March 2, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  27. ^Tombstone (1993)Archived June 5, 2020, at the Wayback Machine. Rotten Tomatoes. IGN Entertainment. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  28. ^Tombstone – DVD AcclaimArchived July 11, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. Video.com. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  29. ^Ebert, Roger (June 24, 1994). Wyatt EarpArchived February 7, 2021, at the Wayback Machine.
  30. ^Ebert, Roger (December 1, 1995). Wild BillArchived February 7, 2021, at the Wayback Machine.
  31. ^Ebert, Roger (February 21, 2003). Dark BlueArchived February 6, 2021, at the Wayback Machine.
  32. ^ abHolden, Stephen (December 24, 1993). A Fractious Old West in a Modern Moral UniverseArchived August 10, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. The New York Times. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  33. ^Hicks, Chris (December 28, 1993). TombstoneArchived August 11, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. Deseret News. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  34. ^Levy, Emanuel (December 22, 1993). TombstoneArchived November 8, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Variety. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  35. ^Berardinelli, James (December 25, 1993). TombstoneArchived February 24, 2021, at the Wayback Machine. ReelViews. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  36. ^Black, Louis (December 31, 1993). TombstoneArchived June 29, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. The Austin Chronicle. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  37. ^Gleiberman, Owen (January 14, 1994). Tombstone (1993)Archived October 21, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  38. ^Andrew, Geoff (1993). TombstoneArchived October 19, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Time Out. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  39. ^Harrington, Richard (December 25, 1993). Tombstone (R)Archived January 2, 2019, at the Wayback Machine. The Washington Post. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  40. ^Bloom, Bob (September 20, 2003). Tombstone. Journal & Courier. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  41. ^Tippette, Giles (January 1, 1994). Tombstone. Berkley. ISBN .

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tombstone_(film)

John Ringo, the famous gun-fighting gentleman, is found dead in Turkey Creek Canyon, Arizona.

Romanticized in both life and death, John Ringo was supposedly a Shakespeare-quoting gentleman whose wit was as quick as his gun. Some believed he was college educated, and his sense of honor and courage was sometimes compared to that of a British lord. In truth, Ringo was not a formally educated man, and he came from a struggling working-class Indiana family that gave him few advantages. Yet, he does appear to have been better read than most of his associates, and he clearly cultivated an image as a refined gentleman.

By the time he was 12, Ringo was already a crack shot with either a pistol or rifle. He left home when he tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo 19, eventually ending up in Texas, where in 1875 he became involved in a local feud known as the “Hoodoo War.” He killed at least two men, but seems to have either escaped prosecution, or when arrested, escaped his jail cell. By 1878, he was described as “one of the most desperate men in the frontier counties” of Texas, and he decided it was time to leave the state.

In 1879, Ringo resurfaced in southeastern Arizona, where he joined the motley ranks of outlaws and gunslingers hanging around the booming mining town of Tombstone. Nicknamed “Dutch,” Ringo had a reputation for being a reserved loner who was dangerous with a gun. He haunted the saloons of Tombstone and was probably an alcoholic. Not long after he arrived, Ringo shot a man dead for refusing to join him in a drink. Somehow, he again managed to avoid imprisonment by temporarily leaving town. He was not involved in the infamous gunfight at the O.K. Corral tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo 1881, but he did later challenge Doc Holliday (one of the survivors of the O.K. Corral fight) to a shootout. Holliday declined and citizens disarmed both men.

The manner of Ringo’s demise remains something of a mystery. He seems to have become despondent in 1882, perhaps because his family had treated him coldly when he had earlier visited them in San Jose. Witnesses reported that he began drinking even more heavily than usual. On this day in 1882, he was found dead in Turkey Creek Canyon outside of Tombstone. It looked as if Ringo had shot himself in the head and the official ruling was that he had committed suicide. Some believed, however, that he had been murdered either by his drinking friend Frank “Buckskin” Leslie or a young gambler named “Johnny-Behind-the-Deuce.” To complicate matters further, Wyatt Earp later claimed that he had killed Ringo. The truth remains obscure to this day.

Источник: https://www.history.com

Why I'd like to be . Val Kilmer in Tombstone

Wyatt Earp is Tombstone's main character, but Doc Holliday is its hero – at least to me. Kurt Russell's Earp is tall, straight-backed and broad-shouldered. He has tanned skin and a personality as imposing as his physique. Val Kilmer's Holliday is smaller and unmistakably sickly. He has a vampiric pallor and constantly coughs, stumbles and sweats. He's dying of tuberculosis, but he's still the fastest gun in the west.

Like Doc Holliday, I am diminished and disabled by long-term illness. Like him, I spend much of my time suffering in bed, recovering from brief exertions. But my brief exertions don't include winning the gunfight at the OK Corral or 12 consecutive pots at poker. When people hear that the movie character I would most like to be is from Tombstone, they assume I mean Wyatt Earp. I can never understand why.

Wyatt Earp is good in a gunfight – he's brave and generally hits what he aims at – but he's not a gunfighter in the classic sense. He's no quick-draw specialist. In contrast, the outlaw Johnny Ringo (Michael Biehn) is a legitimate gunslinger. Ringo engineers fights he knows he will win, like a boxer hand-picking his opponents. This is why he challenges Earp to a one-on-one shoot-out. And it is why, learning of the challenge, Doc Holliday staggers from his sickbed to take Earp's place.

Reading on mobile? Click to view

For me, what follows is one of the most inspiring sights in cinema: the disabled supporting character fighting through his physical limitations to easily defeat an enemy who has the film's great able-bodied hero completely outclassed. When Ringo thinks he sees Earp approaching, he is thrilled and eager to fight. When he recognises instead the pallid, infirm figure of Doc Holliday, he is suddenly terrified and stammers that their previous disagreements don't amount to a real quarrel. "I was just foolin' about," says Ringo.

Reading on mobile? Click to view

"I wasn't," says Holliday, and his eyes announce that the reckoning has arrived. It's the coolest a chronically ill character has ever looked on screen. By this point, Wyatt Earp would already have been dead.

Growing up, I often fantasised about being one of the heroes of the old west played by Clint Eastwood or John Wayne, but I eventually realised that, if I became one, I'd have to give up my favourite pleasures. Rooster Cogburn and The Man With No Name are not noted for their sensitivity to the arts.

But if I became Kilmer's Doc Holliday, I could be a legendary gunslinger and still be a bookworm. Holliday excels at the rough business of gambling and gunfighting, more so than any of the rough men around him, and yet he is educated and elegant. He speaks Latin, quotes Coleridge and plays Chopin on a saloon piano, sending his adoring girlfriend (Joanna Pacula) into erotic reveries.

Reading on mobile? Click to view

And this is another reason I want to be him: women want to be with him. It is hard to feel attractive when you are chronically ill. Kilmer's Doc Holliday makes chronic illness look good. He's a sexy, Keats-esque consumptive. I dream of being a sexy, Keats-esque consumptive. As a long-term invalid, it's the strongest look I can reasonably hope to achieve.

Many seriously ill movie characters are inspirational, but the inspiring message they usually send to seriously ill viewers is that we can learn to make peace with our awful situations or perhaps overcome them enough to get a degree or fight a court case. As wish-fulfilment goes, that's pretty tame. Doc Holliday proves you can be chronically ill and still be an action hero.

Why I'd like to be … Hugo Weaving in The Matrix
Why I'd like to be … Michael J Fox in Back to the Future
More from the Role model series

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2014/jul/17/val-kilmer-doc-holliday-tombstone-role-model

A Gunslinger’s Tale: Johnny Ringo

A historic photo of a man from the 1880s

And now Oh God comes the saddest record of my life for this day my husband accidentally shot himself and was buried by the wayside and oh, my heart is breaking…


The fatal accident of July 30, 1864, near present-day Tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo, Wyoming, left William Ringo’s family fatherless on the California Trail, some thousand miles from their destination. His widow, Mary, who recorded her grief in her trail journal, would have to manage alone for her five children, ages 2 to 14. The oldest, Johnny, was traumatized from witnessing his father’s gruesome death.

Johnny, Johnny Ringo.That Johnny Ringo.

Already, at 14, young Johnny (it is told) was a crack shot with pistol and rifle. He would hone his skills with firearms, perhaps to ensure he would never make his father’s clumsy mistake, and become a lesser-known gunslinger of the Old West.

Not much is known of his life after the Ringo family reached California, until 1875. Then, at age 25, Johnny showed up in Texas and got himself charged for shooting a man in a range feud and threatening a pair of lawmen. By hook or by crook, he squirmed out of that trouble but soon found or caused more in Tombstone, Arizona, in New Mexico, and once again in Texas. People who knew him in those years described Johnny as a moody, hard-drinking loner and a reciter of Shakespeare, which fed the doubtful rumor that Ringo was college educated. More likely, he was just a desperado who liked to read.

1879 found Johnny back in Tombstone, where, his legend says, he shot down a man for refusing to drink with him. There he also tangled with the famous Earp brothers, Wyatt, Virgil and Morgan, and the sociopathic killer Doc Holliday. In an iconic scene from the 1993 movie Tombstone, Johnny Ringo (played by Michael Biehn) spins his flashing six-shooter while staring down an unimpressed Doc Holliday (Val Kilmer). Holliday, in mockery, spins and tosses his tin cup in a like manner. That confrontation was strictly Hollywood, but it’s a fact that the two actual gunfighters were willing and wanting to shoot each other. They might have gotten their chance at the 1881 showdown at O.K. Corral, but Johnny happened to be out of town that day.

In spring of 1882, Johnny Ringo was deep in his cups, drinking more than usual, and talking about a sense of impending death. On July 14, his body was found slumped against the base of an oak in Turkey Creek Canyon, outside of Tombstone, with a gunshot wound to the head. A man living nearby reported hearing a single gunshot from that area the previous day. The official verdict was suicide, although Wyatt Earp later claimed to have done the deed. Some think some other shady character may have put an end to Ringo—he had plenty of enemies—while others, including the scriptwriters for Tombstone, imagine Doc was the killer. “I’m your huckleberry,” Holliday tells a wild-eyed Johnny Ringo in another famous scene, just before the two men begin circling like curs, hands poised above their shooting irons.

Johnny Ringo, 1850-1882. Had a boy not witnessed the violent death of his father on the California Trail, how might his life have unfolded?

Источник: https://www.nps.gov/articles/000/a-gunslinger-s-tale-johnny-ringo.htm

Tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo -

Why I'd like to be ... Val Kilmer in Tombstone

Wyatt Earp is Tombstone's main character, but Doc Holliday is its hero – at least to me. Kurt Russell's Earp is tall, straight-backed and broad-shouldered. He has tanned skin and a personality as imposing as his physique. Val Kilmer's Holliday is smaller and unmistakably sickly. He has a vampiric pallor and constantly coughs, stumbles and sweats. He's dying of tuberculosis, but he's still the fastest gun in the west.

Like Doc Holliday, I am diminished and disabled by long-term illness. Like him, I spend much of my time suffering in bed, recovering from brief exertions. But my brief exertions don't include winning the gunfight at the OK Corral or 12 consecutive pots at poker. When people hear that the movie character I would most like to be is from Tombstone, they assume I mean Wyatt Earp. I can never understand why.

Wyatt Earp is good in a gunfight – he's brave and generally hits what he aims at – but he's not a gunfighter in the classic sense. He's no quick-draw specialist. In contrast, the outlaw Johnny Ringo (Michael Biehn) is a legitimate gunslinger. Ringo engineers fights he knows he will win, like a boxer hand-picking his opponents. This is why he challenges Earp to a one-on-one shoot-out. And it is why, learning of the challenge, Doc Holliday staggers from his sickbed to take Earp's place.

Reading on mobile? Click to view

For me, what follows is one of the most inspiring sights in cinema: the disabled supporting character fighting through his physical limitations to easily defeat an enemy who has the film's great able-bodied hero completely outclassed. When Ringo thinks he sees Earp approaching, he is thrilled and eager to fight. When he recognises instead the pallid, infirm figure of Doc Holliday, he is suddenly terrified and stammers that their previous disagreements don't amount to a real quarrel. "I was just foolin' about," says Ringo.

Reading on mobile? Click to view

"I wasn't," says Holliday, and his eyes announce that the reckoning has arrived. It's the coolest a chronically ill character has ever looked on screen. By this point, Wyatt Earp would already have been dead.

Growing up, I often fantasised about being one of the heroes of the old west played by Clint Eastwood or John Wayne, but I eventually realised that, if I became one, I'd have to give up my favourite pleasures. Rooster Cogburn and The Man With No Name are not noted for their sensitivity to the arts.

But if I became Kilmer's Doc Holliday, I could be a legendary gunslinger and still be a bookworm. Holliday excels at the rough business of gambling and gunfighting, more so than any of the rough men around him, and yet he is educated and elegant. He speaks Latin, quotes Coleridge and plays Chopin on a saloon piano, sending his adoring girlfriend (Joanna Pacula) into erotic reveries.

Reading on mobile? Click to view

And this is another reason I want to be him: women want to be with him. It is hard to feel attractive when you are chronically ill. Kilmer's Doc Holliday makes chronic illness look good. He's a sexy, Keats-esque consumptive. I dream of being a sexy, Keats-esque consumptive. As a long-term invalid, it's the strongest look I can reasonably hope to achieve.

Many seriously ill movie characters are inspirational, but the inspiring message they usually send to seriously ill viewers is that we can learn to make peace with our awful situations or perhaps overcome them enough to get a degree or fight a court case. As wish-fulfilment goes, that's pretty tame. Doc Holliday proves you can be chronically ill and still be an action hero.

Why I'd like to be … Hugo Weaving in The Matrix
Why I'd like to be … Michael J Fox in Back to the Future
More from the Role model series

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2014/jul/17/val-kilmer-doc-holliday-tombstone-role-model

Johnny Ringo

US criminal and gunfighter

For other uses, see Johnny Ringo (disambiguation).

John Peters Ringo (May 3, 1850 – July 13, 1882), known as Johnny Ringo, was an American Old West outlaw loosely associated with the Cochise County Cowboys in frontier boomtown Tombstone, Arizona Territory. He took part in the Mason County War during which he committed his first murder. He was arrested and charged with murder, but escaped from jail shortly before his death.[1] He was affiliated with Cochise County Sheriff Johnny Behan, Ike Clanton, and Frank Stilwell during 1881–1882. He got into a confrontation in Tombstone with Doc Holliday and was suspected by Wyatt Earp of having taken part in the attempted murder of Virgil Earp and the ambush and death of Morgan Earp. Ringo was found dead with a bullet wound to his temple. Modern writers have advanced various theories attributing his death to Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday, Frank Leslie, and Michael O'Rourke.

Early life[edit]

Johnny Ringo, son of Martin and Mary Peters Ringo, had distant Dutch ancestry,[2] and was born in (what would later become) the small town of Greens Fork, Clay Township, Wayne County, Indiana. His family moved to Liberty, Missouri in 1856. He was a tangentially related cousin to the Younger brothers through his aunt Augusta Peters Inskip, who married Coleman P. Younger, uncle of the outlaws.[3]

In 1858, his family moved from Liberty to Gallatin, where they rented property from the father of John W. Sheets, who became the first "official" victim of the James–Younger Gang when they robbed the Daviess County Savings & Loan Association in 1869.[3]

On July 30, 1864, when Johnny was 14, his family was in Wyoming en route to California. His father, Martin Ringo, was killed when he stepped off their wagon holding a shotgun, which accidentally discharged. The buckshot entered the right side of his face and exited the top of his head. The family buried Martin on a hillside alongside the trail.[4]

Mason County War[edit]

Main article: Mason County War

By the mid-1870s, Ringo had migrated from San Jose, California, to Mason County, Texas. Here he befriended an ex-Texas Ranger named Scott Cooley, who was the adopted son of a local rancher named Tim Williamson.

Trouble started when two American rustlers, Elijah and Pete Backus, were dragged from the Mason jail and lynched by a predominantly German mob. Full-blown war began on May 13, 1875, when Tim Williamson was arrested by a hostile posse and murdered by a German farmer named Peter "Bad Man" Bader. Cooley and his friends, including Johnny Ringo, conducted a terror campaign against their rivals. Officials called it the "Mason County War"; locally it was called the "Hoodoo War".[5] Cooley retaliated by killing the local German ex-deputy sheriff, John Worley, shooting him, scalping him, and tossing his body down a well on August 10, 1875.

Cooley already had a reputation as a dangerous man, and was respected as a Texas Ranger. He killed several others during the "war". After Cooley supporter Moses Baird was killed, Ringo committed his first murder on September 25, 1875, when he and a friend named Bill Williams rode up in front of the house of James Cheyney, the man who led Baird into the ambush. Cheyney came out unarmed, invited them in, and began washing his face on the porch, when both Ringo and Williams shot and killed him. The two then rode to the house of Dave Doole and called him outside, but he came out with a gun so they fled back into town.

Some time later, Scott Cooley and Johnny Ringo mistook Charley Bader for his brother Pete and killed him. After that, both men were jailed in Burnet, Texas by Sheriff A. J. Strickland. Shortly thereafter, both Ringo and Cooley broke out of jail with help of their friends, and they parted company to evade the law.

By November 1876, the Mason County War had petered out after about a dozen individuals had been killed. Scott Cooley was thought to be dead, and Johnny Ringo and his pal George Gladden were locked up once again. One of Ringo's alleged cellmates was the notorious killer John Wesley Hardin.[6] While Gladden was sentenced to 99 years, Ringo appears to have been acquitted. Two years later, Ringo was a constable in Loyal Valley, Texas. Soon after this, he traveled to Arizona for the first time.

Life in Tombstone[edit]

Ringo first appeared in Cochise County, Arizona Territory in 1879 with Joseph Graves Olney (alias "Joe Hill"), a friend from the Mason County War. In December 1879, a drunk Ringo shot unarmed Louis Hancock in a Safford, Arizona saloon when Hancock refused a complimentary drink of whiskey, stating that he preferred beer. Hancock survived his wound. In Tombstone, Arizona, Ringo had a reputation as having a bad temper. He may have participated in robberies and killings with the Cochise County Cowboys, a loosely associated group of outlaws. He was occasionally erroneously referred to as "Ringgold" by local newspapers.[7]: 238 

Confrontation with Doc Holliday[edit]

On January 17, 1882, Ringo and Doc Holliday traded threats and seemed headed for a gunfight. Both men were arrested by Tombstone's chief of police, James Flynn, and hauled before a judge for carrying weapons in town. Both were fined. Judge William H. Stilwell followed up on charges outstanding against Ringo for a robbery in Galeyville and Ringo was re-arrested and jailed on January 20 for the weekend.[8] Ringo was suspected by the Earps of taking part in the December 28, 1881, ambush of Virgil Earp, that crippled him for life, and the March 18, 1882, murder of Morgan Earp while he was shooting pool in a Tombstone saloon.[9]

Joins posse pursuing Earps[edit]

Deputy U.S. Marshal Wyatt Earp and his posse killed Frank Stilwell in Tucson on March 20, 1882. After the shooting, the Earps and a federal posse set out on a vendetta to find and kill the others they held responsible for ambushing Virgil and Morgan. Cochise County Sheriff Johnny Behan received warrants from a Tucson judge for arrest of the Earps and Holliday and deputized Ringo and 19 other men, many of them friends of Stilwell and the Cochise County Cowboys. The county posse pursued but never found the Earps' posse.[10][11]

During the Earp Vendetta Ride, Wyatt Earp killed one of Ringo's closest friends, "Curly Bill" Brocius, in a gunfight at Iron Springs (later Mescal Springs) about 20 miles (32 km) from Tombstone. Earp told his biographer, Stuart Lake, that a man named Florentino Cruz confessed to being the lookout at Morgan's murder and identified Ringo, Stilwell, Swilling, and Brocius as Morgan's killers,[12] though modern researchers have cast doubt on Earp's account.[10]

Death[edit]

Memorial Plaque and Grave of Johnny Ringo

On July 14, 1882, Ringo's body was found lying against the trunk of a large tree in West Turkey Creek Valley, near Chiricahua Peak in Arizona Territory.[13] A neighboring property owner heard a single gunshot on the afternoon of July 13 and discovered Ringo's body the following day. His feet were wrapped in strips of cloth torn from his undershirt, probably because his horse had gotten loose from its picket and bolted with his boots tied to the saddle, a method commonly used at that time to keep scorpions out of them. There was a bullet hole in his right temple and an exit wound at the back of his head. According to the coroner's report, which appears in its entirety in John Ringo: The Gunfighter Who Never Was by Jack Burrows, Ringo's Colt Single Action Army revolver held five live rounds. No mention is made in this report of a spent casing being present in the revolver. Additionally, the coroner's report states that a knife cut was found at the base of his scalp, indicating someone had started to scalp the dead Ringo, but stopped for unknown reasons. His horse was found two miles away with his boots still tied to the saddle. A coroner's inquest officially ruled his death a suicide.[14]

Ringo's body is buried near the base of the tree where it was discovered. The grave is located on private land and permission is needed to visit the site.[14] Despite the coroner's ruling, and contemporaneous newspaper reports that Ringo had "frequently threatened to commit suicide, and that the event was expected at any time",[15] alternative theories about Ringo's death, of varying plausibility, have been proposed over the years by researchers and amateur enthusiasts.

Wyatt Earp theory[edit]

According to the book I Married Wyatt Earp, which author and collector Glen Boyer claimed to have assembled from manuscripts written by Earp's third wife, Josephine Marcus Earp, Earp and Doc Holliday returned to Arizona with some friends in early July and found Ringo camped in West Turkey Creek Valley. As Ringo attempted to flee up the canyon, Earp shot him with a rifle.[16] Boyer refused to produce his source manuscripts, and reporters wrote that his explanations were conflicting and not credible. New York Times contributor Allen Barra wrote that I Married Wyatt Earp "... is now recognized by Earp researchers as a hoax."[17]: 154 [16] However, Tombstone historian Ben T. Traywick considers the Earp theory the most credible, as only Earp had sufficient motive, he was probably in the area at the time, and near the end of his life, reportedly told one historian "in circumstantial detail how he killed John Ringo".[18]

In 1888, Earp was interviewed by an agent of California historian Hubert H. Bancroft, and then by Frank Lockwood, who wrote Pioneer Days in Arizona in 1932. Earp told them that he killed Ringo as he left Arizona in 1882, but included details that do not match what is known about Ringo's death. He repeated that claim to at least three other people.[19][20] In an interview with a reporter in Denver in 1896, Earp denied that he had killed Ringo; but later, privately, claimed once again that he had.[19]

Doc Holliday theory[edit]

The Holliday theory is similar to the Earp theory, except that Holliday is alleged to have killed Ringo.[21] A variant, popularized in the movie Tombstone, holds that Holliday stepped in for Earp in response to a gunfight challenge from Ringo and shot him.[16] Records of the Pueblo County, Colorado District Court (located in Pueblo, Colorado) indicate that Holliday and his attorney appeared in court on July 11, 14, and 18, 1882 to answer charges of "larceny". However, a writ of capias was issued for him on the 11th, suggesting that he did not in fact appear in court on that date. Ringo's body was found on the 14th. Six days before Ringo's death, the Pueblo Daily Chieftain reported that Holliday was in Salida, Colorado, about 670 miles (1,080 km) from Turkey Creek, Arizona; and then in Leadville, about 700 miles (1,100 km) distant, on July 18.[22] There was still an arrest warrant outstanding on Holliday in Arizona for his part in Frank Stilwell's murder, making it unlikely that he would have entered Arizona at that time.[21]: 295–5 

Michael O'Rourke theory[edit]

Some accounts attribute Ringo's death to Michael O'Rourke, an itinerant gambler who was arrested in Tucson in January 1881 on suspicion of murdering a mining engineer named Henry Schneider. Wyatt Earp is said to have protected him from being lynched by a mob organized and led by Ringo. O'Rourke escaped from jail in April 1881 and never stood trial on the murder charges.[23]

The last documented sighting of O'Rourke was in the Dragoon Mountains near Tombstone during May 1881, "well-mounted and equipped", and presumably on his way out of the territory.[24] From then on he is referenced only in unsubstantiated rumors and legends; according to one, a combination of the debt he owed Earp and the grudge he held against Ringo prompted him to return to Arizona in 1882, track Ringo down, and kill him. While some sources consider the story plausible,[25] others point out that O'Rourke, like Holliday, would have been reluctant to re-enter Arizona with a murder warrant hanging over his head, particularly to commit another murder.[26][27]

Frank Leslie theory[edit]

A theory popular in the years immediately following Ringo's death named Buckskin Frank Leslie as his killer.[28] Leslie apparently did tell a guard at the Yuma prison, where he was serving time for killing his wife, that he had shot Ringo. While many believed his story, others thought he was simply claiming credit for it to curry favor with Earp's inner circle, or for whatever notoriety it might bring him. In a popular but unsubstantiated story, Billy Claiborne's last words, after losing a gunfight to Leslie in November 1882, were, "Frank Leslie killed John Ringo. I saw him do it."[28][29]

In popular culture[edit]

Film and television[edit]

The character of Johnny Ringo has been depicted in the following film and television shows:

  • The Gunfighter (1950) depicts Jimmy Ringo, a fictional depiction of Johnny Ringo's life[30][31]
  • City of Bad Men (1953) played by Richard Boone
  • The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp includes two episodes depicting Ringo. John Pickard played the role in 1957; Peter M. Thompson in 1959.[32]: 88–90 
  • '"The Johnny Ringo Story" (March 17, 1958), an episode of Tales of Wells Fargo portrayed by Paul Richards
  • Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957), portrayed by John Ireland[33]
  • "Johnny Ringo's Last Ride" (1958), an episode of the ABC series Tombstone Territory, starring Myron Healey[34]
  • Johnny Ringo, starring Don Durant, aired for one season (1959-1960) on CBS. It depicted virtually nothing about Ringo's actual life.[35]: 135 
  • "The Melancholy Gun" (1963), an episode of the syndicated televisionanthology seriesDeath Valley Days. Portrayed by Ken Scott.[36]
  • Ringo and His Golden Pistol, a Sergio CorbucciSpaghetti Western featuring a character called Johnny Ringo in the English dubbed version, though there is no reference to any real-life deeds or companions of the historical Ringo, and he is depicted as being of Mexican ancestry
  • The High Chaparral (1969) included two appearances of Ringo, portrayed first by Robert Viharo and then by Luke Askew.[37]
  • The Gunfighters (1966), the seventh serial of the third season of Doctor Who, portrayed by Laurence Payne. Inaccurately depicted Ringo as one of the Cowboys killed in the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral.[16]
  • Doc (1971), played by Fred Dennis[38]
  • The Lost World (1999), played by David Orth[16]
  • Tombstone (1993), played by Michael Biehn[39]
  • Wyatt Earp (1994), played by Norman Howell

In music[edit]

In literature[edit]

Confessions of Johnny Ringo, a fictionalized memoir. Ringo is depicted as a bookish and introspective observer of his era whose sweetheart is killed by Union troops during the Civil War. He is driven to become an outlaw until he is killed by Wyatt Earp.[41]

References[edit]

  1. ^Burrows, Jack (1996-03-01). John Ringo: The Gunfighter Who Never Was. University of Arizona Press. ISBN .
  2. ^"The High Chaparral Johnny Ringo". Thehighchaparral.com. Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  3. ^ abWilkinson, Darryl (1992-07-22). "Johnny Ringo Called Gallatin Home as a Boy". Gallatin North Missourian. Archived from the original on 2007-09-29. Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  4. ^Clanton, Terry (1997). "John Ringo Family History". Tombstone History. Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  5. ^Hadeler, Glenn. "The Mason County Texas Hoo Doo Wars". Texas History. Archived from the original on 2010-05-12. Retrieved 2008-05-10.
  6. ^"Handbook of Texas bio". Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  7. ^Roberts, Gary L. (2007). Doc Holliday: The Life and Legend. New York, NY: Wiley, J. p. 544. ISBN .
  8. ^Roberts (2007), p. 548
  9. ^Roberts (2007), pp. 551-2
  10. ^ ab"Wyatt Earp's Vendetta Posse". HistoryNet.com. January 29, 2007. Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  11. ^"Earp Vendetta Ride". Legends of America. Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  12. ^Lake, S. Wyatt Earp: Frontier Marshal. Houghton Mifflin (1931), p. 277. ASIN B00085IQ0I
  13. ^"Johnny Ringo: The Wild West Outlaw Too Fearsome To Ever End Up In Prison". All That's Interesting. 2019-01-25. Retrieved 2019-10-08.
  14. ^ abJohn Ringo at thewildwest.org, retrieved October 4, 2016.
  15. ^The Tombstone Epitaph, July 18, 1882
  16. ^ abcdeOrtega, Tony (March 4, 1999). "I Married Wyatt Earp". Phoenix New Times. Retrieved 29 May 2011.
  17. ^Lubet, Steven (2006). Murder in Tombstone: The Forgotten Trial of Wyatt Earp. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press. ISBN .
  18. ^Lockwood, F. Pioneer Days in Arizona. MacMillan (1932), p. 224. ASIN: B00085XW16
  19. ^ abGatto, Steve. "Johnny Ringo – The Death of Johnny Ringo". Archived from the original on April 6, 2011. Retrieved April 16, 2011.
  20. ^"An Arizona Vendetta"(manuscript). c. 1918. Archived from the original on August 31, 2011. Retrieved April 16, 2011.
  21. ^ abHolliday Tanner, Karen; Dearment, Robert K. (2001). Doc Holliday: a Family Portrait. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN .
  22. ^Pueblo Daily Chieftain, July 19, 1882.
  23. ^Bell, Bob Boze (March 1, 2005). "Gunfight at the Stilwell Corral". Retrieved 24 March 2015.
  24. ^The Johnny Behind the Deuce Affair tombstone history.com, retrieved October 7, 2016.
  25. ^"The Johnny Behind The Deuce Affair at wyattearp.net, retrieved October 6, 2016.
  26. ^Davis, GM. Keeping the Peace: Tales from the Old West. Booklocker (2012), p. 123. ISBN 1614349029
  27. ^The Arizona Daily Star, January 26, 1964.
  28. ^ abThe Death of Johnny Ringo at johnnyringo.com, retrieved October 6, 2016.
  29. ^Bell, Bob Boze (March 1, 2005). "Wyatt Earp vs. the Tombstone Mob". Retrieved October 6, 2016.
  30. ^Tefertiller, C. Wyatt Earp: The Life Behind the Legend. Wiley (1997), pp. 86-90. ISBN 0471189677
  31. ^Gatto, S. John Ringo: The Reputation of a Deadly Gunman. San Simon (1997), pp. 201-16. ASIN: B0006QCC9U
  32. ^Tefertiller, Casey (22 September 1997). Wyatt Earp – Life Behind The Legend. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. ISBN .
  33. ^Lovell, G. Escape Artist: The Life and Films of John Sturges. University of Wisconsin Press (2008), pp.151-153 ISBN 0299228347
  34. ^"Tombstone Territory" at western clippings.com, retrieved October 4, 2016.
  35. ^McNeil, Alex (September 1996). Total Television (revised ed.). Penguin Books. ISBN .
  36. ^"The Melancholy Gun on Death Valley Days". Internet Movie Data Base. Retrieved September 8, 2018.
  37. ^"The High Chaparral full credits". IMDb.com. Retrieved October 4, 2016.
  38. ^"Doc". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  39. ^Beck, Henry Cabot. "The "Western" Godfather" True West Magazine. October 2006.
  40. ^Whitburn, Joel (2002). Top Adult Contemporary: 1961-2001. Record Research. p. 108.
  41. ^Aggeler, G. Confessions of Johnny Ringo. E.P. Dutton (1987). ISBN 0451159888

Further reading[edit]

  • Burrows, Jack (1987). John Ringo: The Gunfighter Who Never Was. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press. ISBN .
  • Gatto, Steve (2002). Johnny Ringo. Lansing: Protar House. ISBN .

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_Ringo

What language does Doc Holliday and Johnny Ringo speak?

Latin

Did Doc Holliday speak Latin?

Doc certainly did, he learned to speak Latin. Greek and also French at The Valdosta Institute, a private school in Valdosta, Georgia. By all accounts he was a good student. Johnny Ringo on the other hand may or may not have had the opportunity.

What was Doc Holliday’s famous saying?

I’m your huckleberry

What does you’re no daisy mean?

‘ and ‘you’re not daisy, you’re no daisy at all’ is saying that Ringo didn’t just fall to the ground when he shot him. He tried to fight. That means he’s not weak. Huckleberry is slang for hucklebearer which is a Southern paulbearer thing.

What is a huckleberry kiss?

What is a huckleberry kiss? Huckleberry is kissing the camera lens.

What’s the term I’ll be your huckleberry mean?

What is the meaning of “I’m your huckleberry,” said by Doc Holliday in the 1993 movie Tombstone? Basically “I’m your huckleberry” means “Name the place, and I’ll go with you,” “Name the job and I can do it,” “I’ll oblige you” or “I’m your man.”

Where did I’ll be your huckleberry originate?

The phrase has ties to Arthurian lore. A Knight, coming to the service of a damsel would lower his lance and receive a huckleberry garland from the lady ( or kingdom) he would be defending. Therefore, “I am your huckleberry” may well have been spoken to the Earps and the statement’s meaning may be “I am your champion”.

Why did they call her Big Nose Kate?

In 1875 she was going by the name of Kate Elder and was listed as being in Dodge City, Kansas working as a dance hall girl. By this time, Kate had earned the nickname “Big Nose” Kate. While the dance hall girl and prostitute was attractive, she did have a prominent nose.

Did Doc Holliday really kill Ringo?

He got into a confrontation in Tombstone with Doc Holliday and was suspected by Wyatt Earp of having taken part in the attempted murder of Virgil Earp and the ambush and death of Morgan Earp. Ringo was found dead with a bullet wound to his temple….

Johnny Ringo
Years active1875–1882

Did Doc Holliday die alone?

Holliday spent the few remaining years of his life in Colorado, and died of tuberculosis in his bed at the Hotel Glenwood at age 36….

Doc Holliday
DiedNovember 8, 1887 (aged 36) Glenwood Springs, Colorado, U.S.

Who dies at the OK Corral?

Billy Clanton and Tom and Frank McLaury were dead. Ike Clanton and two other cowboys had escaped the same fate. On the Earps’ side, all survived, but only Wyatt remained unharmed. Under Tombstone law, policemen were in the right if they shot armed opponents threatening to kill.

What did Doc Holliday drink?

Old Overholt Rye Whiskey Essential Facts The whiskey was supposedly the drink of choice for Doc Holliday, infamous gunfighter and gambler.

Источник: https://www.mvorganizing.org/what-language-does-doc-holliday-and-johnny-ringo-speak/

John Ringo, the famous gun-fighting gentleman, is found dead in Turkey Creek Canyon, Arizona.

Romanticized in both life and death, John Ringo was supposedly a Shakespeare-quoting gentleman whose wit was as quick as his gun. Some believed he was college educated, and his sense of honor and courage was sometimes compared to that of a British lord. In truth, Ringo was not a formally educated man, and he came from a struggling working-class Indiana family that gave him few advantages. Yet, he does appear to have been better read than most of his associates, and he clearly cultivated an image as a refined gentleman.

By the time he was 12, Ringo was already a crack shot with either a pistol or rifle. He left home when he was 19, eventually ending up in Texas, where in 1875 he became involved in a local feud known as the “Hoodoo War.” He killed at least two men, but seems to have either escaped prosecution, or when arrested, escaped his jail cell. By 1878, he was described as “one of the most desperate men in the frontier counties” of Texas, and he decided it was time to leave the state.

In 1879, Ringo resurfaced in southeastern Arizona, where he joined the motley ranks of outlaws and gunslingers hanging around the booming mining town of Tombstone. Nicknamed “Dutch,” Ringo had a reputation for being a reserved loner who was dangerous with a gun. He haunted the saloons of Tombstone and was probably an alcoholic. Not long after he arrived, Ringo shot a man dead for refusing to join him in a drink. Somehow, he again managed to avoid imprisonment by temporarily leaving town. He was not involved in the infamous gunfight at the O.K. Corral in 1881, but he did later challenge Doc Holliday (one of the survivors of the O.K. Corral fight) to a shootout. Holliday declined and citizens disarmed both men.

The manner of Ringo’s demise remains something of a mystery. He seems to have become despondent in 1882, perhaps because his family had treated him coldly when he had earlier visited them in San Jose. Witnesses reported that he began drinking even more heavily than usual. On this day in 1882, he was found dead in Turkey Creek Canyon outside of Tombstone. It looked as if Ringo had shot himself in the head and the official ruling was that he had committed suicide. Some believed, however, that he had been murdered either by his drinking friend Frank “Buckskin” Leslie or a young gambler named “Johnny-Behind-the-Deuce.” To complicate matters further, Wyatt Earp later claimed that he had killed Ringo. The truth remains obscure to this day.

Источник: https://www.history.com
  • RabidAU avatar

    Posted on Jul 28th, 2018, 4:56 PM, , User Since 239 months ago, User Post Count: 23469

    • Jul 28th, 2018, 4:56 PM
    • 239 months
    • 23469
  • Discussion
  • auburntopcat avatar

    Posted on Jul 28th, 2018, 5:05 PM, , User Since 227 months ago, User Post Count: 25391

    • Jul 28th, 2018, 5:05 PM
    • 227 months
    • 25391

    Hard to really argue with any of them . Just goes to show how great the movie is.

    I have a few more to add

    "Oh I wasn't quite as sick as I made out"

    "Thanks for always being there Doc"

    "That is a hellva thing for you to say to me"

  • RabidAU avatar

    Posted on Jul 28th, 2018, 6:44 PM, , User Since 239 months ago, User Post Count: 23469

    • Jul 28th, 2018, 6:44 PM
    • 239 months
    • 23469

    I had forgotten...
    “Johnny, I apologize. I forgot you were there. You may go now.”

    Doc to Johnny Tyler (Billy Bob Thornton) in a hilarious moment when an almost unrecognizable Thornton comes hauling ass with a shotgun in the middle of Tombstone, presumably to shoot Wyatt after Wyatt kicked him out of a saloon. Thornton timidly sets down the shotgun, says “Thank you,” and walks away.

  • auburntopcat avatar

    Posted on Jul 28th, 2018, 7:22 PM, , User Since 227 months ago, User Post Count: 25391

    • Jul 28th, 2018, 7:22 PM
    • 227 months
    • 25391

    And "Sheriff may I present am pair of fellow sophisticates" that whole scene was fantastic.

  • RedArrow22 avatar

    Posted on Jul 28th, 2018, 8:56 PM, , User Since 42 months ago, User Post Count: 7792

    • Jul 28th, 2018, 8:56 PM
    • 42 months
    • 7792

    Smell that Bill? Smells like someone died - Ringo

  • mamadoo avatar

    Posted on Jul 28th, 2018, 9:09 PM, , User Since 199 months ago, User Post Count: 5515

    • Jul 28th, 2018, 9:09 PM
    • 199 months
    • 5515
  • coreyc avatar

    Posted on Jul 28th, 2018, 10:30 PM, , User Since 229 months ago, User Post Count: 3104

    • Jul 28th, 2018, 10:30 PM
    • 229 months
    • 3104

    My favorite line in the whole movie (because I can relate) is when Doc says “Wyatt Earp is my friend” and then when the guys say “hell, i got lots of friends” and Dic replies “I don’t.”

    A well-deserved #1.

    This post was edited by coreyc 3 years ago

  • bcox4life avatar

    Posted on Jul 29th, 2018, 7:48 AM, , User Since 155 months ago, User Post Count: 34799

    • Jul 29th, 2018, 7:48 AM
    • 155 months
    • 34799

    One my all time favorites.

    Johnny Ringo: [Ringo steps up to Doc] And you must be Doc Holliday.

    Doc Holliday: That's the rumor.

    Johnny Ringo: You retired too?

    Doc Holliday: Not me. I'm in my prime.

    Johnny Ringo: Yeah, you look it.

    Doc Holliday: And you must be Ringo. Look, darling, Johnny Ringo. The deadliest pistoleer since Wild Bill, they say. What do you think, darling? Should I hate him?

    Kate: You don't even know him.

    Doc Holliday: Yes, but there's just something about him. Something around the eyes, I don't know, reminds me of... me. No. I'm sure of it, I hate him.

    Wyatt Earp: [to Ringo] He's drunk.

    Doc Holliday: In vino veritas.

    ["In wine is truth" meaning: "When I'm drinking, I speak my mind"]

    Johnny Ringo: Age quod agis.

    ["Do what you do" meaning: "Do what you do best"]

    Doc Holliday: Credat Judaeus apella, non ego.

    ["The Jew Apella may believe it, not I" meaning: "I don't believe drinking is what I do best."]

    Johnny Ringo: [pats his gun] Eventus stultorum magister.

    ["Events are the teachers of fools" meaning: "Fools have to learn by experience"]

    Doc Holliday: [gives a Cheshire cat smile] In pace requiescat.

    ["Rest in peace" meaning: "It's your funeral!"]

    Tombstone Marshal Fred White: Come on boys. We don't want any trouble in here. Not in any language.

    Doc Holliday: Evidently Mr. Ringo's an educated man. Now I really hate him.

  • bcox4life avatar

    Posted on Jul 29th, 2018, 7:49 AM, , User Since 155 months ago, User Post Count: 34799

    • Jul 29th, 2018, 7:49 AM
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    Johnny Ringo: My fight's not with you, Holliday.

    Doc Holliday: I beg to differ, sir. We started a game we never got to finish. "Play for Blood," remember?

    Johnny Ringo: Oh that. I was just foolin' about.

    Doc Holliday: I wasn't.

  • bcox4life avatar

    Posted on Jul 29th, 2018, 7:50 AM, , User Since 155 months ago, User Post Count: 34799

    • Jul 29th, 2018, 7:50 AM
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    Doc Holliday: Down by the creek, walking on water

  • bcox4life avatar

    Posted on Jul 29th, 2018, 7:53 AM, , User Since 155 months ago, User Post Count: 34799

    • Jul 29th, 2018, 7:53 AM
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    Johnny Tyler: [stammers, scared] Listen, mister, I - I'm - I'm - I'm gettin' awful tired of your...

    Wyatt Earp: [slaps Tyler across the face, unafraid] I'm gettin' tired of your gas. Now jerk that pistol and go to work!

    Wyatt Earp: [slaps him harder, now completely steely-eyed] I said throw down, boy!

  • bcox4life avatar

    Posted on Jul 29th, 2018, 7:58 AM, , User Since 155 months ago, User Post Count: 34799

    • Jul 29th, 2018, 7:58 AM
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    Kate: I've been good to you, I've taken care of you. If you die, where does that leave me?

    Doc Holliday: Without a meal ticket I suppose.

    [Doc rides horse out of barn into stable area, Kate runs out after him punching him in anger]

    Kate: You bastard!

    Doc Holliday: Why Kate, have you no kind words for me as I ride away?

    [pause]

    Doc Holliday: I calculate not.

    [rides off]

  • bcox4life avatar

    Posted on Jul 29th, 2018, 8:00 AM, , User Since 155 months ago, User Post Count: 34799

    • Jul 29th, 2018, 8:00 AM
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    Johnny Tyler: Christ Almighty, it's like I'm sittin' here playin' cards with my brother's kids or somethin'. You nerve-wrackin' sons-a-bitches

  • mamadoo avatar

    Posted on Jul 29th, 2018, 12:05 PM, , User Since 199 months ago, User Post Count: 5515

    • Jul 29th, 2018, 12:05 PM
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    Doc Holliday to Big Nose Kate: It's true, you are a good woman. Then again, you may be the antichrist.

  • Posted on Jul 29th, 2018, 4:38 PM, , User Since 119 months ago, User Post Count: 2502

    • Jul 29th, 2018, 4:38 PM
    • 119 months
    • 2502

    I'd take a deal then crawfish on it then drill that devil right in the....

Источник: https://247sports.com/college/auburn/board/104827/Contents/Top-10-Tombstone-Movie-Lines-120168004/

Tombstone doc holliday johnny ringo -

Johnny Ringo

US criminal and gunfighter

For other uses, see Johnny Ringo (disambiguation).

John Peters Ringo (May 3, 1850 – July 13, 1882), known as Johnny Ringo, was an American Old West outlaw loosely associated with the Cochise County Cowboys in frontier boomtown Tombstone, Arizona Territory. He took part in the Mason County War during which he committed his first murder. He was arrested and charged with murder, but escaped from jail shortly before his death.[1] He was affiliated with Cochise County Sheriff Johnny Behan, Ike Clanton, and Frank Stilwell during 1881–1882. He got into a confrontation in Tombstone with Doc Holliday and was suspected by Wyatt Earp of having taken part in the attempted murder of Virgil Earp and the ambush and death of Morgan Earp. Ringo was found dead with a bullet wound to his temple. Modern writers have advanced various theories attributing his death to Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday, Frank Leslie, and Michael O'Rourke.

Early life[edit]

Johnny Ringo, son of Martin and Mary Peters Ringo, had distant Dutch ancestry,[2] and was born in (what would later become) the small town of Greens Fork, Clay Township, Wayne County, Indiana. His family moved to Liberty, Missouri in 1856. He was a tangentially related cousin to the Younger brothers through his aunt Augusta Peters Inskip, who married Coleman P. Younger, uncle of the outlaws.[3]

In 1858, his family moved from Liberty to Gallatin, where they rented property from the father of John W. Sheets, who became the first "official" victim of the James–Younger Gang when they robbed the Daviess County Savings & Loan Association in 1869.[3]

On July 30, 1864, when Johnny was 14, his family was in Wyoming en route to California. His father, Martin Ringo, was killed when he stepped off their wagon holding a shotgun, which accidentally discharged. The buckshot entered the right side of his face and exited the top of his head. The family buried Martin on a hillside alongside the trail.[4]

Mason County War[edit]

Main article: Mason County War

By the mid-1870s, Ringo had migrated from San Jose, California, to Mason County, Texas. Here he befriended an ex-Texas Ranger named Scott Cooley, who was the adopted son of a local rancher named Tim Williamson.

Trouble started when two American rustlers, Elijah and Pete Backus, were dragged from the Mason jail and lynched by a predominantly German mob. Full-blown war began on May 13, 1875, when Tim Williamson was arrested by a hostile posse and murdered by a German farmer named Peter "Bad Man" Bader. Cooley and his friends, including Johnny Ringo, conducted a terror campaign against their rivals. Officials called it the "Mason County War"; locally it was called the "Hoodoo War".[5] Cooley retaliated by killing the local German ex-deputy sheriff, John Worley, shooting him, scalping him, and tossing his body down a well on August 10, 1875.

Cooley already had a reputation as a dangerous man, and was respected as a Texas Ranger. He killed several others during the "war". After Cooley supporter Moses Baird was killed, Ringo committed his first murder on September 25, 1875, when he and a friend named Bill Williams rode up in front of the house of James Cheyney, the man who led Baird into the ambush. Cheyney came out unarmed, invited them in, and began washing his face on the porch, when both Ringo and Williams shot and killed him. The two then rode to the house of Dave Doole and called him outside, but he came out with a gun so they fled back into town.

Some time later, Scott Cooley and Johnny Ringo mistook Charley Bader for his brother Pete and killed him. After that, both men were jailed in Burnet, Texas by Sheriff A. J. Strickland. Shortly thereafter, both Ringo and Cooley broke out of jail with help of their friends, and they parted company to evade the law.

By November 1876, the Mason County War had petered out after about a dozen individuals had been killed. Scott Cooley was thought to be dead, and Johnny Ringo and his pal George Gladden were locked up once again. One of Ringo's alleged cellmates was the notorious killer John Wesley Hardin.[6] While Gladden was sentenced to 99 years, Ringo appears to have been acquitted. Two years later, Ringo was a constable in Loyal Valley, Texas. Soon after this, he traveled to Arizona for the first time.

Life in Tombstone[edit]

Ringo first appeared in Cochise County, Arizona Territory in 1879 with Joseph Graves Olney (alias "Joe Hill"), a friend from the Mason County War. In December 1879, a drunk Ringo shot unarmed Louis Hancock in a Safford, Arizona saloon when Hancock refused a complimentary drink of whiskey, stating that he preferred beer. Hancock survived his wound. In Tombstone, Arizona, Ringo had a reputation as having a bad temper. He may have participated in robberies and killings with the Cochise County Cowboys, a loosely associated group of outlaws. He was occasionally erroneously referred to as "Ringgold" by local newspapers.[7]: 238 

Confrontation with Doc Holliday[edit]

On January 17, 1882, Ringo and Doc Holliday traded threats and seemed headed for a gunfight. Both men were arrested by Tombstone's chief of police, James Flynn, and hauled before a judge for carrying weapons in town. Both were fined. Judge William H. Stilwell followed up on charges outstanding against Ringo for a robbery in Galeyville and Ringo was re-arrested and jailed on January 20 for the weekend.[8] Ringo was suspected by the Earps of taking part in the December 28, 1881, ambush of Virgil Earp, that crippled him for life, and the March 18, 1882, murder of Morgan Earp while he was shooting pool in a Tombstone saloon.[9]

Joins posse pursuing Earps[edit]

Deputy U.S. Marshal Wyatt Earp and his posse killed Frank Stilwell in Tucson on March 20, 1882. After the shooting, the Earps and a federal posse set out on a vendetta to find and kill the others they held responsible for ambushing Virgil and Morgan. Cochise County Sheriff Johnny Behan received warrants from a Tucson judge for arrest of the Earps and Holliday and deputized Ringo and 19 other men, many of them friends of Stilwell and the Cochise County Cowboys. The county posse pursued but never found the Earps' posse.[10][11]

During the Earp Vendetta Ride, Wyatt Earp killed one of Ringo's closest friends, "Curly Bill" Brocius, in a gunfight at Iron Springs (later Mescal Springs) about 20 miles (32 km) from Tombstone. Earp told his biographer, Stuart Lake, that a man named Florentino Cruz confessed to being the lookout at Morgan's murder and identified Ringo, Stilwell, Swilling, and Brocius as Morgan's killers,[12] though modern researchers have cast doubt on Earp's account.[10]

Death[edit]

Memorial Plaque and Grave of Johnny Ringo

On July 14, 1882, Ringo's body was found lying against the trunk of a large tree in West Turkey Creek Valley, near Chiricahua Peak in Arizona Territory.[13] A neighboring property owner heard a single gunshot on the afternoon of July 13 and discovered Ringo's body the following day. His feet were wrapped in strips of cloth torn from his undershirt, probably because his horse had gotten loose from its picket and bolted with his boots tied to the saddle, a method commonly used at that time to keep scorpions out of them. There was a bullet hole in his right temple and an exit wound at the back of his head. According to the coroner's report, which appears in its entirety in John Ringo: The Gunfighter Who Never Was by Jack Burrows, Ringo's Colt Single Action Army revolver held five live rounds. No mention is made in this report of a spent casing being present in the revolver. Additionally, the coroner's report states that a knife cut was found at the base of his scalp, indicating someone had started to scalp the dead Ringo, but stopped for unknown reasons. His horse was found two miles away with his boots still tied to the saddle. A coroner's inquest officially ruled his death a suicide.[14]

Ringo's body is buried near the base of the tree where it was discovered. The grave is located on private land and permission is needed to visit the site.[14] Despite the coroner's ruling, and contemporaneous newspaper reports that Ringo had "frequently threatened to commit suicide, and that the event was expected at any time",[15] alternative theories about Ringo's death, of varying plausibility, have been proposed over the years by researchers and amateur enthusiasts.

Wyatt Earp theory[edit]

According to the book I Married Wyatt Earp, which author and collector Glen Boyer claimed to have assembled from manuscripts written by Earp's third wife, Josephine Marcus Earp, Earp and Doc Holliday returned to Arizona with some friends in early July and found Ringo camped in West Turkey Creek Valley. As Ringo attempted to flee up the canyon, Earp shot him with a rifle.[16] Boyer refused to produce his source manuscripts, and reporters wrote that his explanations were conflicting and not credible. New York Times contributor Allen Barra wrote that I Married Wyatt Earp "... is now recognized by Earp researchers as a hoax."[17]: 154 [16] However, Tombstone historian Ben T. Traywick considers the Earp theory the most credible, as only Earp had sufficient motive, he was probably in the area at the time, and near the end of his life, reportedly told one historian "in circumstantial detail how he killed John Ringo".[18]

In 1888, Earp was interviewed by an agent of California historian Hubert H. Bancroft, and then by Frank Lockwood, who wrote Pioneer Days in Arizona in 1932. Earp told them that he killed Ringo as he left Arizona in 1882, but included details that do not match what is known about Ringo's death. He repeated that claim to at least three other people.[19][20] In an interview with a reporter in Denver in 1896, Earp denied that he had killed Ringo; but later, privately, claimed once again that he had.[19]

Doc Holliday theory[edit]

The Holliday theory is similar to the Earp theory, except that Holliday is alleged to have killed Ringo.[21] A variant, popularized in the movie Tombstone, holds that Holliday stepped in for Earp in response to a gunfight challenge from Ringo and shot him.[16] Records of the Pueblo County, Colorado District Court (located in Pueblo, Colorado) indicate that Holliday and his attorney appeared in court on July 11, 14, and 18, 1882 to answer charges of "larceny". However, a writ of capias was issued for him on the 11th, suggesting that he did not in fact appear in court on that date. Ringo's body was found on the 14th. Six days before Ringo's death, the Pueblo Daily Chieftain reported that Holliday was in Salida, Colorado, about 670 miles (1,080 km) from Turkey Creek, Arizona; and then in Leadville, about 700 miles (1,100 km) distant, on July 18.[22] There was still an arrest warrant outstanding on Holliday in Arizona for his part in Frank Stilwell's murder, making it unlikely that he would have entered Arizona at that time.[21]: 295–5 

Michael O'Rourke theory[edit]

Some accounts attribute Ringo's death to Michael O'Rourke, an itinerant gambler who was arrested in Tucson in January 1881 on suspicion of murdering a mining engineer named Henry Schneider. Wyatt Earp is said to have protected him from being lynched by a mob organized and led by Ringo. O'Rourke escaped from jail in April 1881 and never stood trial on the murder charges.[23]

The last documented sighting of O'Rourke was in the Dragoon Mountains near Tombstone during May 1881, "well-mounted and equipped", and presumably on his way out of the territory.[24] From then on he is referenced only in unsubstantiated rumors and legends; according to one, a combination of the debt he owed Earp and the grudge he held against Ringo prompted him to return to Arizona in 1882, track Ringo down, and kill him. While some sources consider the story plausible,[25] others point out that O'Rourke, like Holliday, would have been reluctant to re-enter Arizona with a murder warrant hanging over his head, particularly to commit another murder.[26][27]

Frank Leslie theory[edit]

A theory popular in the years immediately following Ringo's death named Buckskin Frank Leslie as his killer.[28] Leslie apparently did tell a guard at the Yuma prison, where he was serving time for killing his wife, that he had shot Ringo. While many believed his story, others thought he was simply claiming credit for it to curry favor with Earp's inner circle, or for whatever notoriety it might bring him. In a popular but unsubstantiated story, Billy Claiborne's last words, after losing a gunfight to Leslie in November 1882, were, "Frank Leslie killed John Ringo. I saw him do it."[28][29]

In popular culture[edit]

Film and television[edit]

The character of Johnny Ringo has been depicted in the following film and television shows:

  • The Gunfighter (1950) depicts Jimmy Ringo, a fictional depiction of Johnny Ringo's life[30][31]
  • City of Bad Men (1953) played by Richard Boone
  • The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp includes two episodes depicting Ringo. John Pickard played the role in 1957; Peter M. Thompson in 1959.[32]: 88–90 
  • '"The Johnny Ringo Story" (March 17, 1958), an episode of Tales of Wells Fargo portrayed by Paul Richards
  • Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957), portrayed by John Ireland[33]
  • "Johnny Ringo's Last Ride" (1958), an episode of the ABC series Tombstone Territory, starring Myron Healey[34]
  • Johnny Ringo, starring Don Durant, aired for one season (1959-1960) on CBS. It depicted virtually nothing about Ringo's actual life.[35]: 135 
  • "The Melancholy Gun" (1963), an episode of the syndicated televisionanthology seriesDeath Valley Days. Portrayed by Ken Scott.[36]
  • Ringo and His Golden Pistol, a Sergio CorbucciSpaghetti Western featuring a character called Johnny Ringo in the English dubbed version, though there is no reference to any real-life deeds or companions of the historical Ringo, and he is depicted as being of Mexican ancestry
  • The High Chaparral (1969) included two appearances of Ringo, portrayed first by Robert Viharo and then by Luke Askew.[37]
  • The Gunfighters (1966), the seventh serial of the third season of Doctor Who, portrayed by Laurence Payne. Inaccurately depicted Ringo as one of the Cowboys killed in the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral.[16]
  • Doc (1971), played by Fred Dennis[38]
  • The Lost World (1999), played by David Orth[16]
  • Tombstone (1993), played by Michael Biehn[39]
  • Wyatt Earp (1994), played by Norman Howell

In music[edit]

In literature[edit]

Confessions of Johnny Ringo, a fictionalized memoir. Ringo is depicted as a bookish and introspective observer of his era whose sweetheart is killed by Union troops during the Civil War. He is driven to become an outlaw until he is killed by Wyatt Earp.[41]

References[edit]

  1. ^Burrows, Jack (1996-03-01). John Ringo: The Gunfighter Who Never Was. University of Arizona Press. ISBN .
  2. ^"The High Chaparral Johnny Ringo". Thehighchaparral.com. Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  3. ^ abWilkinson, Darryl (1992-07-22). "Johnny Ringo Called Gallatin Home as a Boy". Gallatin North Missourian. Archived from the original on 2007-09-29. Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  4. ^Clanton, Terry (1997). "John Ringo Family History". Tombstone History. Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  5. ^Hadeler, Glenn. "The Mason County Texas Hoo Doo Wars". Texas History. Archived from the original on 2010-05-12. Retrieved 2008-05-10.
  6. ^"Handbook of Texas bio". Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  7. ^Roberts, Gary L. (2007). Doc Holliday: The Life and Legend. New York, NY: Wiley, J. p. 544. ISBN .
  8. ^Roberts (2007), p. 548
  9. ^Roberts (2007), pp. 551-2
  10. ^ ab"Wyatt Earp's Vendetta Posse". HistoryNet.com. January 29, 2007. Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  11. ^"Earp Vendetta Ride". Legends of America. Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  12. ^Lake, S. Wyatt Earp: Frontier Marshal. Houghton Mifflin (1931), p. 277. ASIN B00085IQ0I
  13. ^"Johnny Ringo: The Wild West Outlaw Too Fearsome To Ever End Up In Prison". All That's Interesting. 2019-01-25. Retrieved 2019-10-08.
  14. ^ abJohn Ringo at thewildwest.org, retrieved October 4, 2016.
  15. ^The Tombstone Epitaph, July 18, 1882
  16. ^ abcdeOrtega, Tony (March 4, 1999). "I Married Wyatt Earp". Phoenix New Times. Retrieved 29 May 2011.
  17. ^Lubet, Steven (2006). Murder in Tombstone: The Forgotten Trial of Wyatt Earp. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press. ISBN .
  18. ^Lockwood, F. Pioneer Days in Arizona. MacMillan (1932), p. 224. ASIN: B00085XW16
  19. ^ abGatto, Steve. "Johnny Ringo – The Death of Johnny Ringo". Archived from the original on April 6, 2011. Retrieved April 16, 2011.
  20. ^"An Arizona Vendetta"(manuscript). c. 1918. Archived from the original on August 31, 2011. Retrieved April 16, 2011.
  21. ^ abHolliday Tanner, Karen; Dearment, Robert K. (2001). Doc Holliday: a Family Portrait. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN .
  22. ^Pueblo Daily Chieftain, July 19, 1882.
  23. ^Bell, Bob Boze (March 1, 2005). "Gunfight at the Stilwell Corral". Retrieved 24 March 2015.
  24. ^The Johnny Behind the Deuce Affair tombstone history.com, retrieved October 7, 2016.
  25. ^"The Johnny Behind The Deuce Affair at wyattearp.net, retrieved October 6, 2016.
  26. ^Davis, GM. Keeping the Peace: Tales from the Old West. Booklocker (2012), p. 123. ISBN 1614349029
  27. ^The Arizona Daily Star, January 26, 1964.
  28. ^ abThe Death of Johnny Ringo at johnnyringo.com, retrieved October 6, 2016.
  29. ^Bell, Bob Boze (March 1, 2005). "Wyatt Earp vs. the Tombstone Mob". Retrieved October 6, 2016.
  30. ^Tefertiller, C. Wyatt Earp: The Life Behind the Legend. Wiley (1997), pp. 86-90. ISBN 0471189677
  31. ^Gatto, S. John Ringo: The Reputation of a Deadly Gunman. San Simon (1997), pp. 201-16. ASIN: B0006QCC9U
  32. ^Tefertiller, Casey (22 September 1997). Wyatt Earp – Life Behind The Legend. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. ISBN .
  33. ^Lovell, G. Escape Artist: The Life and Films of John Sturges. University of Wisconsin Press (2008), pp.151-153 ISBN 0299228347
  34. ^"Tombstone Territory" at western clippings.com, retrieved October 4, 2016.
  35. ^McNeil, Alex (September 1996). Total Television (revised ed.). Penguin Books. ISBN .
  36. ^"The Melancholy Gun on Death Valley Days". Internet Movie Data Base. Retrieved September 8, 2018.
  37. ^"The High Chaparral full credits". IMDb.com. Retrieved October 4, 2016.
  38. ^"Doc". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  39. ^Beck, Henry Cabot. "The "Western" Godfather" True West Magazine. October 2006.
  40. ^Whitburn, Joel (2002). Top Adult Contemporary: 1961-2001. Record Research. p. 108.
  41. ^Aggeler, G. Confessions of Johnny Ringo. E.P. Dutton (1987). ISBN 0451159888

Further reading[edit]

  • Burrows, Jack (1987). John Ringo: The Gunfighter Who Never Was. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press. ISBN .
  • Gatto, Steve (2002). Johnny Ringo. Lansing: Protar House. ISBN .

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_Ringo

John Ringo, the famous gun-fighting gentleman, is found dead in Turkey Creek Canyon, Arizona.

Romanticized in both life and death, John Ringo was supposedly a Shakespeare-quoting gentleman whose wit was as quick as his gun. Some believed he was college educated, and his sense of honor and courage was sometimes compared to that of a British lord. In truth, Ringo was not a formally educated man, and he came from a struggling working-class Indiana family that gave him few advantages. Yet, he does appear to have been better read than most of his associates, and he clearly cultivated an image as a refined gentleman.

By the time he was 12, Ringo was already a crack shot with either a pistol or rifle. He left home when he was 19, eventually ending up in Texas, where in 1875 he became involved in a local feud known as the “Hoodoo War.” He killed at least two men, but seems to have either escaped prosecution, or when arrested, escaped his jail cell. By 1878, he was described as “one of the most desperate men in the frontier counties” of Texas, and he decided it was time to leave the state.

In 1879, Ringo resurfaced in southeastern Arizona, where he joined the motley ranks of outlaws and gunslingers hanging around the booming mining town of Tombstone. Nicknamed “Dutch,” Ringo had a reputation for being a reserved loner who was dangerous with a gun. He haunted the saloons of Tombstone and was probably an alcoholic. Not long after he arrived, Ringo shot a man dead for refusing to join him in a drink. Somehow, he again managed to avoid imprisonment by temporarily leaving town. He was not involved in the infamous gunfight at the O.K. Corral in 1881, but he did later challenge Doc Holliday (one of the survivors of the O.K. Corral fight) to a shootout. Holliday declined and citizens disarmed both men.

The manner of Ringo’s demise remains something of a mystery. He seems to have become despondent in 1882, perhaps because his family had treated him coldly when he had earlier visited them in San Jose. Witnesses reported that he began drinking even more heavily than usual. On this day in 1882, he was found dead in Turkey Creek Canyon outside of Tombstone. It looked as if Ringo had shot himself in the head and the official ruling was that he had committed suicide. Some believed, however, that he had been murdered either by his drinking friend Frank “Buckskin” Leslie or a young gambler named “Johnny-Behind-the-Deuce.” To complicate matters further, Wyatt Earp later claimed that he had killed Ringo. The truth remains obscure to this day.

Источник: https://www.history.com

A Gunslinger’s Tale: Johnny Ringo

A historic photo of a man from the 1880s

And now Oh God comes the saddest record of my life for this day my husband accidentally shot himself and was buried by the wayside and oh, my heart is breaking…


The fatal accident of July 30, 1864, near present-day Glenrock, Wyoming, left William Ringo’s family fatherless on the California Trail, some thousand miles from their destination. His widow, Mary, who recorded her grief in her trail journal, would have to manage alone for her five children, ages 2 to 14. The oldest, Johnny, was traumatized from witnessing his father’s gruesome death.

Johnny, Johnny Ringo.That Johnny Ringo.

Already, at 14, young Johnny (it is told) was a crack shot with pistol and rifle. He would hone his skills with firearms, perhaps to ensure he would never make his father’s clumsy mistake, and become a lesser-known gunslinger of the Old West.

Not much is known of his life after the Ringo family reached California, until 1875. Then, at age 25, Johnny showed up in Texas and got himself charged for shooting a man in a range feud and threatening a pair of lawmen. By hook or by crook, he squirmed out of that trouble but soon found or caused more in Tombstone, Arizona, in New Mexico, and once again in Texas. People who knew him in those years described Johnny as a moody, hard-drinking loner and a reciter of Shakespeare, which fed the doubtful rumor that Ringo was college educated. More likely, he was just a desperado who liked to read.

1879 found Johnny back in Tombstone, where, his legend says, he shot down a man for refusing to drink with him. There he also tangled with the famous Earp brothers, Wyatt, Virgil and Morgan, and the sociopathic killer Doc Holliday. In an iconic scene from the 1993 movie Tombstone, Johnny Ringo (played by Michael Biehn) spins his flashing six-shooter while staring down an unimpressed Doc Holliday (Val Kilmer). Holliday, in mockery, spins and tosses his tin cup in a like manner. That confrontation was strictly Hollywood, but it’s a fact that the two actual gunfighters were willing and wanting to shoot each other. They might have gotten their chance at the 1881 showdown at O.K. Corral, but Johnny happened to be out of town that day.

In spring of 1882, Johnny Ringo was deep in his cups, drinking more than usual, and talking about a sense of impending death. On July 14, his body was found slumped against the base of an oak in Turkey Creek Canyon, outside of Tombstone, with a gunshot wound to the head. A man living nearby reported hearing a single gunshot from that area the previous day. The official verdict was suicide, although Wyatt Earp later claimed to have done the deed. Some think some other shady character may have put an end to Ringo—he had plenty of enemies—while others, including the scriptwriters for Tombstone, imagine Doc was the killer. “I’m your huckleberry,” Holliday tells a wild-eyed Johnny Ringo in another famous scene, just before the two men begin circling like curs, hands poised above their shooting irons.

Johnny Ringo, 1850-1882. Had a boy not witnessed the violent death of his father on the California Trail, how might his life have unfolded?

Источник: https://www.nps.gov/articles/000/a-gunslinger-s-tale-johnny-ringo.htm
  Special to The Palladium-Item

May 3, in history:

In 1469, Niccolo Machiavelli, Italian politician, writer, historian and philosopher, was born. The renaissance diplomat is best known for his 1513 treatise, "The Prince," in which an “ends justify the means” idea of politics employs being sneaky, cunning, and having no moral code. Today he is often called the father of modern political philosophy.

In 1802, Washington, D.C., was incorporated as a city.

In 1921, West Virginia imposed the first State Sales Tax.

In 1937, Margaret Mitchell's novel "Gone with the Wind" won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

In 1952, the first landing of an airplane at the North Pole occurred.

In 1960, the Anne Frank House museum opened in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

In 1999, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above 11,000 for the first time in its history at 11,014.70.

In 2013, Aorun zhaoi, a Theropod dinosaur, dating from 161 million years ago, was discovered in China.

Meanwhile in Wayne County, on May 3, 1850, a dark soul entered the world.

The notorious man-killer named Johnny Ringo was born on that date in Washington (now Greens Fork).

He would later be portrayed in numerous books and poems, in 18 television shows and half a dozen movies. He would be the most-mythologized person ever born in East Central Indiana and certainly one of the most dangerous outlaws of the Old West.

MORE OUT OF OUR PAST: Heroine halted an 'ornery horse' in mid-rampage in 1883

Johnny Ringo’s early years in Greens Fork are virtually unknown. When he was 7 years of age, his family relocated to Missouri where they lived an additional seven years.

In May of 1864, when Ringo was 14, they joined a wagon train heading for California.

While crossing the country, Johnny’s father died tragically.

According to the Missouri Liberty Tribune: “Just after daylight one morning in July, Martin Ringo stepped outside of the wagons for the purpose to see if any Indians were in sight, and his shotgun went off accidentally in his own hands, the load entering the right eye and coming out of the top of the head. His hat blew up 20 feet in the air and his brains were scattered in all directions.” 

The loss of his father traumatized young Johnny. The family pushed on to San Jose despite the tragedy.

Ringo’s early years in San Jose are shrouded. The timeline for his lawlessness began when he left there in 1871 at the age of 21 and entered the Old West.

He resurfaced in Burnet, Texas, on Dec. 25, 1874, and was arrested for shooting a gun in a public square. Taken into custody, he was soon released on bond.

Immediately afterwards, he got involved in a blood feud over cattle ownership rights. Following that, in May of 1875, a cattleman was brutally murdered by a mob. A Texas Ranger named James Cheyney sought retribution. Two members of the mob rode into an ambush and were killed by him. The two men were friends of Johnny Ringo.

Ringo sought retribution. He and another man coldheartedly executed Cheyney in front of his family. After the murder, Ringo rode into town and had breakfast bragging he had “made beef of Cheyney and if someone did not bury him he would soon stink.”

Ringo threatened other law officers and his name began regularly appearing in newspapers. He was arrested for the threats, and broke jail in May of 1876.

The July 14, 1876, edition of the Burnet Bulletin stated a startling truth: “The notorious Johnny Ringo… is certainly a very desperate and daring man.”

The frequency of his name in newspapers established his bloody reputation and a future map of his biography.

Ringo was later captured and taken to the Travis County Jail in Austin. He was released on bond because no one would appear as witness against him out of fear. The case was dropped.

In 1879 Ringo drifted to the Arizona Territory and blended into violent crowds on the Mexican border.

On Dec. 9, 1879, he shot a man in a saloon for refusing to drink with him.

The Dec. 14, 1879, edition of the Arizona Daily Star stated: “Last Tuesday a shooting took place at Safford in which Louis Hancock was shot by Johnny Ringo. It appears Ringo wanted Hancock to take a drink of whiskey, and refused, saying he would prefer beer. Ringo then struck him over the head with his pistol and fired, the ball taking effect in the lower end of the ear and passing through the fleshy part of his neck. Half an inch more in the neck would have killed Hancock. Ringo is under arrest.”

Ringo, released on bond, did not show up for court.

He resurfaced in July of 1880, as he and the Ike and Billy Clanton gang drove cattle to the San Carlos Indian Reservation. After selling the beef, the men descended on the town of Maxey and created a drunken disturbance. They then went to Safford and created more havoc.

The Clanton family and their ranch hands were a loosely organized band of desperadoes operating along the Mexican border. They stole cattle, robbed stagecoaches, ambushed teamsters and killed people. They were commonly referred to as the Clanton Gang or simply the “Cowboys.”

Ringo stayed with his friends, the Clantons, until April of 1881, and then returned to Texas.

Ringo frequented an Austin whorehouse on May 2, 1881.

In the wee morning hours, he misplaced his money. There were three suspicious men seated in the hallway so he pulled his gun. After a search he determined they did not have his money, so he smiled and returned to his room. The men reported the incident to renowned Texas marshal gunman Ben Thompson, who rushed to Ringo’s room.

Ringo refused to open the door.

Thompson kicked the door in and arrested Ringo for disturbing the peace.

Ringo paid the $25 fine and costs, according to newspaper accounts.

In early August, he was again in Galeyville. He entered a poker game and lost all his money. He asked other players to loan him money so he could play. They refused so he held them up at gunpoint and stole $500 and a horse. This also made the papers.

Months later Ringo learned there was a fast-growing feud between Wyatt Earp’s brothers and his buddies, the Clantons. He was ready to take an active part in the fight, but got jailed because of the Galeyville robbery and horse theft.

Being incarcerated kept Greens Fork native Johnny Ringo out of the most famous gunfight in western history.

Wyatt Earp, Virgil Earp, Morgan Earp and Doc Holliday confronted their mortal enemies, the Clanton gang, in a gunfight at the O.K. corral. Despite its name, the battle did not take place within or next to the O.K. Corral, but six doors west of the corral's rear entrance.

Those participating were Billy Claiborne, Ike and Billy Clanton, and Tom and Frank McLaury on one side, the three Earp brothers and Doc Holliday on the other side.

The Earp party came to disarm the Clanton gang in violation of firearms law. They faced off, barely six feet apart.

Virgil Earp shouted, “Throw up your hands, I want your guns!”

Frank McLaury and Billy Clanton slapped leather and cocked their single-action six-shot revolvers.

Virgil yelled, “Hold! I didn’t mean that!” (He didn’t want a fight.)

Who started shooting is not clearly known.

Witnesses agreed the first two shots were almost indistinguishable from each other.

Wyatt Earp later testified, "Billy Clanton leveled his pistol at me, but I did not aim at him. I knew that Frank McLaury had the reputation of being a good shot and a dangerous man, so I aimed at Frank McLaury. The first two shots were fired by Billy Clanton and myself, he shooting at me, and I shooting at Frank McLaury."

Clanton missed, Earp did not. Frank McLaury was gut-shot.

About 30 shots were fired in about 30 seconds amidst waves of gun smoke in the narrow space. When the haze cleared, Tom and Frank McLaury and Billy Clanton lay dead. Virgil was shot in the leg, Morgan in the shoulder. Doc Holliday was grazed on the hip. Wyatt was unhurt.

The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral did not end the blood feud, as the real death toll rose after the fight when both sides began to assassinate members of the opposing faction.

Ringo heard what the Earps had done to the Clantons at the O.K. Corral and was furious. He was released on bond at his Nov. 26, 1881, trial because no witnesses were willing to testify against him. Ringo immediately sought revenge for the Clantons and angrily confronted Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday in Tombstone, believing they had unfairly implicated him in a stagecoach robbery. He argued with the now-mythical gunfighters. A constable grabbed Ringo from behind and they all were arrested before any gunplay.

The Jan. 18,1882, Tombstone Epitaph read: “J.H. Holliday, Wyatt Earp and Johnny Ringo were arrested for carrying deadly weapons. Earp was discharged. Holliday and Ringo were each fined $30.”

Wyatt Earp’s case was dismissed because he was a U.S. deputy marshal.

The following March, Morgan Earp was killed by unknown assassins.

It was rumored Johnny Ringo was involved.

Two days after Morgan’s death, Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday and others escorted Morgan’s corpse to Tucson. They ran into Frank Stilwell, one of the alleged killers.

Stilwell was found dead the next day.

The Earp party returned to Tombstone and refused to submit to arrest. They were after Morgan’s killers and had no use for the law now.

A posse was formed to bring in the Earps.

Incredibly, Johnny Ringo was one of the members of the posse.

One of the deputies recorded: “Excitement again this morning. Sheriff went out with a posse to arrest the Earp party, but they will never do it. The cowboy element is backing them strongly. Johnny Ringo being one of the posse, there is a prospect of bad times.” 

News reached Tombstone that Wyatt Earp had killed Curly Bill Brocius, considered the most famous outlaw of the day.

This killing of Brocius made Earp a hero.

The posse was dismissed.

On July 2, 1882, Johnny Ringo was in Tombstone, depressed and drinking heavily.

On July 8 he left.

He was last seen in Galeyville late on July 9, where he continued his debauch.

He left town on July 11th … and on July 14th was found dead by a wagon driver.

The Greens Fork native was found seated with his back leaning against a tree. In his right hand, he clenched a .45-caliber Colt. He had a gunshot wound in his right temple. The bullet exited out the top of his head. He was found with his boots off and strips of undershirt were wrapped about his feet. He had traveled a short distance in his footwear, according to the tracks. One of his cartridge belts was on upside down. There was also a cut on his scalp with a small part of the hair gone. His horse was not at the scene, but was found a couple of weeks later, still saddled.

Johnny Ringo died drunk and depressed at the age of 32 with his boots off and his body wedged against a tree. Although suicide is the generally accepted theory, there is strong speculation that Wyatt Earp, on a blood trail for his brother’s murderers, killed him.

Earp always denied this.

The Greens Fork Hoosier has been characterized in books and poems, in 18 television shows and at least half a dozen movies. He is the most-mythologized person ever born in Wayne County and certainly one of the most dangerous outlaws of the old west.

He was buried at the spot where he was found dead.

Greens Fork celebrates Johnny Ringo Days in May.

(Johnny Ringo — coincidently — was distantly related to outlaw Cole Younger by the marriage of an aunt to an uncle of the outlaw. Ironically, he was also related to Jesse and Frank James in a similar manner.)

Contact columnist Steve Martin at [email protected]

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