best food to get in nyc

If NYC's best food halls and food courts bring out your decision paralysis, stress no more—we chose for you. FiDi-focused restaurant mogul Peter. Where to find the absolute best street food in NYC · 1. The Halal Guys, Midtown · 2. Delicioso Coco Helado, Bronx · 3. Nuts 4 Nuts, Manhattan · 4. All photos courtesy of respective restaurants and restaurant Facebook pages. Nothing pairs with a good meal like an epic view. Bring your.

Best food to get in nyc -

This is the first in a series of late-night city guides supported by The Sexton Irish Whiskey and inspired by the The Sexton Midnight Club, an intimate event series for chefs who want to eat and drink well after a late-night shift.

If New York City never sleeps, what do city-dwellers do at night? Beyond drinking, dancing, and karaoke-ing, many of us are indulging in the pleasures of a nighttime meal. Whether it’s an after-hours dinner, post-drink snack, or a just-because midnight feast, the joys of dining late are many: everyone with kids has long gone home, the distractions of daytime can wait until tomorrow, and the only focus is good food and good company. And in New York, specifically, those options are plentiful. Whether you’re tapping out of the club or just strolling around with the munchies on your mind, the city’s got pizza counters, sushi joints, and even white-tableclothed brasseries open late and waiting for you. Here, we’ve put together the definitive guide to after-hours feasting in New York City.

Wo Hop
17 Mott St, New York, NY 10013
(212) 962-8617

Hidden below street level at 17 Mott Street in the heart of Chinatown, Wo Hop has been owned by the Huang family since 1938. It’s one of the last of its kind, a dinosaur of an old-school American Cantonese restaurant that specializes in “chop suey-style food.” Between its loyal clientele, retro menu (go for the egg roll chow mein), and the huge portions, the prices remain a relic of the past: disturbingly low. Plus, it stays open until 7 a.m. to sop up your bad choices at last call at whatever bar you just came from.

The Donut Pub
203 W 14th St, New York, NY 10011
(646) 398-7007

Enjoy a very late (or very early?) breakfast at this all-day donut counter hawking classic glazed rounds alongside a selection of croissant donuts like salted caramel and maple bacon, as well as quite possibly the city's best black-and-white cookie. On offer beyond sweets is a variety of bagels, egg sandwiches, and regular sandwiches (grilled cheese, chicken salad).

Hide-Chan
248 E 52nd St, New York, NY 10022
(212) 813-1800

There is no shortage of good ramen in New York City, and Hide-Chan is at the top of the list for its tonkotsu ramen, which is served whichever way you want it: spicy, plain, with extra pork, or miso, but you’d be bummed to miss out on the Hakata kuro ramen, which is served with burned garlic in oil—you’ve got to try it to believe it—that clears your throat and makes you hungrier.

Insomnia Cookies
Various locations

This aptly-named chain with eight locations in New York caters to the late-nighters with reliably decent cookies in tried-and-true flavors like chocolate chip, white chocolate-macadamia, and M&M. Bonus: they offer warm cookie delivery until 3 AM.

Hana Food
534 Metropolitan Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211
(718) 218-7747

This Williamsburg grocery is secretly the home of the best bodega deli sandwiches in Williamsburg. If you’ve made the mistake of going to Union Pool, Hana Foods might just save your life.

Blue Ribbon Brasserie
97 Sullivan St, New York, NY 10012
(212) 274-0404

Sitting at the crossroads of Soho and the West Village, this swanky old-school dining room stays open until 4 a.m. every night of the week. The first restaurant of the now expansive Blue Ribbon empire, the iconic brasserie remains a standby for oyster and seafood platters, dippable bone marrow, and buttoned-up service.

Veselka
144 2nd Ave, New York, NY 10003
(212) 228-9682

Yes, the legendary 24-hour diner turns out hearty, delicious Ukrainian delicacies—5 a.m. pierogis anyone?—but they’ve got everything you could ever want: exceptional homemade chicken soup, meatball heroes, daily specials, and even pancakes, all served with strong coffee. And don’t sleep on the burgers, which is lowkey one of the best in the city.

Corner Bistro
331 West 4th Street, New York, NY 10014
(212) 242-9502

Corner Bistro is the West Village’s worst kept secret, so prepare to stand in line for the biggest, best bacon cheeseburgers in the neighborhood, and don’t forget to order the onion rings unless you want to piss yourself off.

Guantanamera
939 8th Ave, New York, NY 10019
(212) 262-5354

It’s Havana by way of Hell’s Kitchen at this nearly 15-year-old, mural-covered Eighth Avenue mainstay that hands out cigars—free, hand-rolled cigars, to be exact—on Saturdays and Sundays. That truly excellent customer service is matched by a menu of comfort staples (Cubano sandwiches, arroz con pollo), pitch-perfect mojitos, and a regular live music show that goes ‘til 1 a.m. on weekends. There’s also a location in Queens too, but it closes at 11 most nights, midnight on the weekends.

Great NY Noodletown
28 Bowery, New York, NY 10013
(212) 349-0923

Tourists, drunks, and New York cops are all in on the secret: Great NY Noodletown is the best choice on Bowery to get all of your Cantonese favorites, from succulent duck to Singapore chow fun and salt-baked squid. Open every day from 9 a.m. to 4 a.m.

Crif Dogs
113 St Marks Pl, New York, NY 10009
(212) 614-2728

Maybe you’ve been enjoying a cocktail at that no-longer-secret speakeasy hidden inside this hot dog joint, or maybe you’re just hungry in the East Village after hours. Either way, stop by Crif Dogs to upgrade from your usual street dog to one of these gourmet links that come in combinations like the Chihuahua Signature (bacon-wrapped dog, avocado, sour cream) and the Morning Jersey (Taylor ham-wrapped dog with cheese and a fried egg).

Odessa Restaurant
119 Avenue A, New York, NY 10009
(212) 253-1482

This late night—open 24 hours, seven days a week—Eastern European diner is the place to go if you want a late-night pierogis, cheeseburgers, pancakes, or a pitcher of sangria. Also great for eggs and home fries. And French toast. And hot or cold borscht. Blintzes. Disco fries. Oh, and kielbasa. You get the picture.

Butter & Scotch
818 Franklin Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11225
(347) 350-8899

Sweet tooths, take note. This Crown Heights feminist bakery-bar hybrid whips up an array of pies, boozy milkshakes, and more sweet nighttime snacks that you can enjoy alongside your craft cocktails. They’re open till midnight on weekdays and 2 a.m. on weekends.

Kang Ho Dong Baekjeong
1 E 32nd St, New York, NY 10016
(212) 966-9839

This Korean barbecue restaurant mini-chain already had a fanatic following at its LA and (now closed) Queens locations, but thanks to the light touch of chef and cookbook author Deuki Hong, who’s cooked under legends like David Chang and Jean-Georges Vongerichten, the Manhattan restaurant became the best of the bunch. Now, even though Hong has left to pursue his own venture, Baekjeong in Manhattan still reigns supreme for late-night eats—it only uses high-quality meats for its barbecue, and it shows. Side dishes like the stir-fried squid, noodles, and the fried dumplings also slay.

Brooklyn Ice House
318 Van Brunt St, Brooklyn, NY 11231
(718) 222-1865

In the South, old-school ice houses were lowkey places to kick back outdoors with some beers. This Brooklyn take on the genre stays true to that ethos with a back patio, great beer selection, and amped-up pub grub. Open till 4 a.m. every night, naturally.

Chilo's
323 Franklin Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11238
(718) 676-5245

This always-down-to-party Mexican theme bar stays crowded with great frozen drinks and an awesome outdoor space complete with a taco truck that turns out tortas and tacos late into the night. Michael Cera is one of Chilos’ co-owners if that’s what you’re looking for in a bar. Open till 1 a.m. weekdays, and 4 on weekends.

Holy Ground
112 Reade St, New York, NY 10013
(646) 882-0666

This decked-out BBQ slinger fuses an old-school chophouse motif with some smoky southern realness. On offer till midnight on weekdays and 2 a.m. on Saturdays: slow-smoked Wagyu brisket, chopped beef sliders, and a burger with white cheddar and a garlic aioli.

Bagelsmith
189 Bedford Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211
(718) 218-7414

Bagels aren’t just for breakfast, and technically, if it’s after midnight it’s the morning anyway. Known for fast, cheap bagels, sandwiches, and pastries, it’s really no surprise Bagelsmith’s egg sandwiches are the secret antidote to Williamsburg’s worst hangovers. It’s open 24 hours, so if you want to test out a social experiment, go stand in here for an entire day and watch what happens.

Oasis
161 N 7th St, Brooklyn, NY 11211
(718) 218-7607

On your way to the Bedford Avenue station, make a pit stop (around all the construction) at this nondescript Middle Eastern deli. The focus here is falafel, served in a platter or sandwich with hummus and offered until 3 a.m., seven days a week.

The Long Island Bar
110 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 625-8908

We are so grateful The Long Island Bar exists in all its beautiful, historic, Art Deco diner glory. One of the very most pleasant places to drink in Brooklyn also happens to serve incredible food—the Buffalo-fried cauliflower and Long Island burger are a thing of beauty. We don’t see why we should ever leave. Kitchen’s open until 1 a.m. on weekends.

Sushi Seki
1143 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10065
(212) 371-0238

With all due respect to our uptown friends, a fancy sushi dinner is pretty much the only cool thing you can do at 2 a.m. on the Upper East Side. Founded in 2002, this location of the city-wide Sushi Seki brand turns out all manner of raw seafood from fatty tuna and amberjack to Kumamoto oyster and flying fish roe. Craving something heartier? They’ve also got a hot food selection with dishes like karaage fried chicken and noodle soup.

Katz Delicatessen
205 E Houston St, New York, NY 10002
(212) 254-2246

Katz’s is legendary and one of the few overexposed, tourist-swamped, and Meg Ryan-approved restaurants that live up to the hype. And yes, it’s still worth waiting in line for. Order the pastrami on rye and a side of latkes while you’re at it.

The Commodore
366 Metropolitan Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211
(718) 218-7632

If you've ever craved a frozen piña colada, a heaping plate of nachos, and crunchy fried chicken all at once, The Commodore was made for you. The DJ-soundtracked boozy temple of fried delights was wonderfully unpretentious when it first opened back in 2010 and still is today. No matter what hour of night, sidle up to the bar for poboys and cheap beer or post up for a game of pinball.

Mamoun's Falafel
119 MacDougal St, New York, NY 10012

MacDougal Street has become one of the rowdiest in Manhattan. Escape the street chaos at Mamoun’s, open until 3 a.m. on weekdays or 5 a.m. on weekends, for their beloved falafel, shawarma, and kebabs. Order your filling of choice in a sandwich with tahineh sauce or on a platter with salad and a side of pita bread.

Prince Street Pizza
27 Prince St A, New York, NY 10012
(212) 966-4100

Of the infinite late-night pizza joints in town, Prince Street reigns supreme among celebrities and common folk alike. The cult-loved pies—which draws lines throughout the day—stays open ‘til 2:30 a.m. on weekends, giving you plenty of time to make it there after throwing back a couple beers at Spring Lounge (yikes).

Empellon Al Pastor
132 St Marks Pl, New York, NY 10009
(646) 833-7039

This East Village outpost of Chef Alex Stupak's Empellón empire serves seriously good tacos and margaritas till midnight on weekdays and 2 a.m. on weekends. But that's not all, folks: your munchies brain will explode choosing between the likes of Chinese takeout-style spare ribs, bacon cream cheese-filled jalapeño poppers, and a chalupa of red chile short rib.

Rosario's Pizza
173 Orchard St, New York, NY 10002
(212) 777-9813

This late-night, bare bones slice spot has engendered a cultish following among a certain type of drunk pizza enthusiast. That said, while the clientele might be obnoxious, the pizza's excellence is undeniable. So is the rigatoni, which takes 20 minutes to make, if you can last that long.

L’Express
249 Park Ave S, New York, NY 10003
(212) 254-5858

Croque madame at 3 a.m.? Steak frites at 5 a.m.? You must be at L’Express. This round-the-clock Park Avenue bistro is a reliable favorite for fancy-pants clubgoers and night owls for whom a hot dog just won’t do. For the full effect, snag a sidewalk seat and light up a cigarette like it’s midnight in Paris. Open 24 hours, seven days a week.

Alameda
195 Franklin St, Brooklyn, NY 11222
(347) 227-7296

This little Greenpoint restaurant is exactly the kind of place we love: a place that offers strong rum cocktails, oysters, crispy chicken wings, an awesome burger, and some of the best people-watching in Brooklyn. Don’t leave without ordering the pimento cheese fries.

Bonchon Chicken
325 5th Ave, New York, NY 10016
(212) 686-8282

While we’re talking chicken: If you’ve been karaoke-ing in K-town, ward off an impending soju-induced hangover by soaking up the booze with some seriously good Korean fried chicken. At this casual chain with a second location on 38th Street, take your pick of wings, strips, or drumsticks doused in a sweet-savory soy garlic or a mouth-searing spicy sauce. bonchon.com

Mad for Chicken
157-18 Northern Blvd, Flushing, NY 11354
(718) 321-3818

A restaurant that takes wings seriously for people who take wings seriously. Order yours with the spicy garlic sauce. Eat too much, drink too much, and wipe your fingers on your shirt. Or don’t. Locations in Queens and Brooklyn; the former is open later.

Tagged:city guideswhere to eat in nycguide to new york cityMUNCHIES City GuidesThe Best Places to Eat in NYClate night eatssupported by the sexton

Источник: https://www.vice.com/en/article/43j7zq/all-the-best-late-night-food-in-nyc
New York Where to Eat Now

A Meal for Every Occasion

Twelve short months ago, members of the city’s restaurant cognoscenti were still huddled in poky little rooms, picking at warmed-over barbecued ribs and platters of frites, gamely singing the praises of neighborhood restaurants and comfort food. Not anymore. The great restaurant boom that began in the nineties but fizzled out at the beginning of the new millennium has exploded all over again. Overnight, the meatpacking district has blown up into a chaotic gastronomic version of Bourbon Street. Grand old French restaurants have been replaced by baroque new corporate venues, extravagant wine bars, and Pan-Asian food palaces as big as bus depots. Out in Brooklyn, little mom-and-pop joints are serving foie gras and salting their dishes with black truffles, and in Manhattan, diners can blow $180 on a single entrée of Kobe-beef “Châteaubriand,” and $13,000 for a magnum of 1899 Château Lafite-Rothschild. Organic food is big business in the city these days, fancy Shanghai banquets are all the rage among Chinese connoisseurs, and down on the Bowery, the hot new restaurants are doing what the fancy uptown joints do: They’re serving an elaborate champagne brunch.

The Big Splurge

I’m not normally in favor of spending $350 on a single meal, but if you have a fat year-end bonus to blow, take the elevator up past the Aveda store to the fourth floor of the Time Warner Center, bow politely to the security guard patrolling the area, and take a seat at the glowing blond Hinoki-wood bar at Masa. If you find yourself face-to-face with a wry, middle-aged, vaguely monkish-looking gentleman, don’t lift a finger—Masa Takayama will do the rest. yama will do the rest. Maybe you’d enjoy a bowl of truffled uni risotto, or tuna rolls stuffed with milky pink tuna belly, and it’s perfectly permissible to close your eyes in quiet ecstasy when you take your first bite of Masa’s “Foie Gras Shabu Shabu.” But if by chance you don’t see Masa at the bar, or if they try to seat you at one of the small, dimly lit tables, do what my wife did when she first glimpsed our bill: complain bitterly, and threaten to turn on your heel and go spend all that cash at the Bose store downstairs.

Next door, at Per Se, the décor is pristine in an icy sort of way, the service is immaculate, and even if Thomas Keller isn’t actually in New York that day, he’s always connected to his palatial East Coast kitchen via videophone. The specialty of the house (following a bowl of truffled popcorn at the bar) is a profusion of small, preciously wrought, archly named dishes, many of which might be considered pretentious if they weren’t so damn delicious. Try the “Bacon and Eggs” (bits of braised calf’s head molded in a cake, with a poached quail egg wobbling on top), a sinful fat man’s treat called “Chaud Froid” (soft foie gras confit, apple purée, brioche croutons, and sweet cipollini onions), and anything you can find containing lobster, scallops, or snails.

If you tire of murmuring waiters and pious, fat-cat connoisseurs, then ride the escalator down to the third floor and join the party at Café Gray. Gray Kunz’s long-awaited second act is notable for old Lespinasse-style favorites like the lightly creamy lobster chowder, bowls of classically dense mushroom risotto, and tender, blocky short ribs braised down to their rich, beefy essence. But the real star of the show is the room itself: a sparkling, mirrored fun house, with a swanky bar area and a long, open kitchen that spreads before the rows of white-topped tables like a Broadway stage. Beyond the kitchen is a wall of windows looking out over Columbus Circle and Central Park. Suddenly, you don’t feel like you’re dining in a glorified corporate food mall anymore. You’re back, again, in glittering New York.

Japan Chic

I don’t know about you,” one of my food-professional friends whispered the other evening, “but I grow weary of raw fish.” Or edamame, he might have said, or friendly Caucasian waiters dressed in ill-fitting samurai outfits, or any multisyllabic cocktail name containing the word geisha. It’s all on display at the city’s new wave of Japanese restaurants, plus much, much more. At the mammoth EN Japanese Brasserie, on Hudson Street, the specialty is freshly made tofu, ladled from lacquer boxes with big wooden dippers, along with an ingenious “miso sampler” served with a pile of iced-cabbage crudités. On the opposite end of the spectrum, there’s Megu, in Tribeca, where Kobe-beef addicts can sit in the shadow of a giant dripping Buddha ice sculpture and addle themselves with Kobe-beef meatballs stuffed with foie gras ($5 per piece), Kobe-beef short ribs, and, for a cool $180, decorous cuts of Kobe-beef “Châteaubriand” finished with soy butter and exotic black sesame seeds jetted in from Kyoto.

The glittering Fiji-stone sushi bar is the place to sit at Geisha, on 61st Street, where I spent a hectic evening, not long ago, nibbling on decent though unspectacular sushi, and watching silent anime splatter films projected on the wall, next to a wild-eyed Upper East Side matron clutching a fur-lined purse. With its great vaulted dining hall and long, runway-style sushi bar, Matsuri, in the bottom of the Maritime Hotel in Chelsea, is still the most elegant of the new big-box Japanese establishments. Though Jeffrey Chodorow’s latest culinary-theme-park, Ono, has similarly impressive, mothlike paper lanterns suspended from the ceiling; addictive shot-glass shooters composed of Kumamoto oysters, ponzu sauce, and a single raw quail egg; plus the services of Sakiko, the very knowledgeable “sake sommelier.” Best of all, though, is the fully automated Japanese push-button toilet (on the second floor), complete with pop-up lid; a subtle, expertly aimed blow-dryer; and a whole range of cleansing water-jet options, including Regular, Oscillating, and Pulsating.

You’ll find no such gizmos uptown at Sushi of Gari, where the city’s most discerning sushi monks still stampede the tiny bar to taste Gari’s inventive, much-imitated raw-fish creations. The cramped modernist bar at Riingo is my favorite spot in midtown for Kobe beef sushi. But whenever I’m loitering around downtown and feel the need for a shot of pure protein, I’ll duck into a new restaurant called Hedeh, on Great Jones Street, for a bite of tuna belly or, perhaps, a helping of the lightly caramelized house foie gras, before ambling down Second Avenue to the tiny new Jewel Bako outlet called Makimono. This closet-sized establishment is hidden behind a discreet façade of brushed cement, and if you bring your uptown expense account with you, you can sample three generally superior grades of toro (o-toro for $12, chu for $8, aka for $4); an elegant, Atkins-friendly salad made with quail egg, tuna sashimi, hijiki, and red plum; and an almost perfect “inside-out” maki roll made with bay scallops and creamy avocado, spiked with yuzu, and speckled on its exterior with crunchy, golden caviar.

Blue Hill in New York's Where to Eat

Organic Chic

In these politically correct times, you’re not a self-respecting member of the foodie aristocracy unless you know who Carlo Petrini is (he’s the founding father of the ever-expanding Slow Food sect), what “self-sustaining” means, or the true definition of that hazy term biodynamic. And if you pass the test, chances are you’ve also made the pilgrimage up the Hudson to Blue Hill at Stone Barns, where the industrious Barber brothers (Dan and David) have set up (with the help of the fine chef Michale Anthony and generous amounts of Rockefeller cash) their own fully organic Shangri-la amid the rolling hills and meadows of the old Rockefeller country estate in Pocantico Hills, New York. In season, you’ll find several varieties of asparagus on the menu, and all eggs are produced, in time-honored Slow Food tradition, by the restaurant’s own flock of hyperorganic chickens. Even the nourishing, exceptionally porky-tasting pork comes from a band of Berkshire hogs who feed in a stand of acorn trees near the restaurant, where they are attended, during visiting hours, by crowds of thankful, slightly mournful-looking gastronomes.

Next stop on the rickety Greenmarket bandwagon is Galen Zamarra’s stylish, faithfully organic restaurant Mas, in Greenwich Village, where the glowing little room has been painstakingly constructed to resemble the inside of a (very rich) peasant’s farmhouse in the south of France, and even the rigorously seasonal menus are tied together with bits of twine. After that it’s on to Better Burger, for a bite of the leathery ostrich burger (with a spot of curry-flavored “Karma Ketchup”), before we decamp to Quartino Bottega Organica, in the East Village, to sit on one of the chaste wooden pews along the wall and sip cups of pomegranate juice, while picking at helpings of wholly organic pesto or brittle, supremely healthy slices of whole-wheat pizza or, best of all, the superior house focaccia, shot through with slabs of melted Stracchino cheese.

You won’t find any cheese at all at Pure Food and Wine, in Gramercy Park, where the room smells vaguely of pulped cabbage, and wistful, glossy pictures of happy ducks and smiling sheep adorn the orange walls. Nothing on the all-vegan menu is cooked to over 118 degrees, which doesn’t keep the summery tomato tartare from looking uncannily like tuna tartare, or the impressive raw-food lasagne (made with tomatoes, strips of raw zucchini, crushed basil, and pistachio pesto) from tasting uncannily like a cooler, healthier version of the real thing. The same is true of the non-fish but curiously fishy “Cape Cod Cakes” (they’re tofu-based) available at Counter, in the East Village, which I enjoyed one placid evening while sipping on a glass of biodynamic Pinot Grigio from Slovenia, and smugly observing the parade of unenlightened sad sacks trooping in and out of the very large McDonald’s across the street.

Hot Spots

When we called to secure a table at Spice Market, the kindly voice on the other end of the line suggested the wait would be five weeks. Next, we joined the great roiling meatpacking-district mob and attempted to batter our way into the joint. After intense negotiation, we secured a couple of seats at the long cantilevered bar, where, to our vast surprise, Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s street-food fusion menu lived up to all the outlandish, possibly even insane, hype. Maybe you’ll begin your little gastronomic tour like we did, with chicken wings drizzled in a sticky, sweet chili sauce, followed by white bowls of curried duck or pork vindaloo (laced with long red chilies, cumin, garlic, and cinnamon), before progressing to the short ribs, which are softened in a mass of garlic and green chilies and served, for delicate eaters, with a pair of silver tongs.

My other favorite meatpacking-district destination is the chaotic townhouse dining room at Ninth, where, on select evenings, Zak Pelaccio serves up his ingenious “pork fries” (tender pork strips rolled in bread crumbs, then fried) with a sweet chaser of bourbon. Glittery fusion establishments like Jefferson, and Bao 111 continue to pack in crowds of revelers, but for a slightly more soothing, feng shui–approved brand of trendiness, this year’s choice is Kittichai, where a pod of auspicious goldfish guard the narrow entrance, and lucky coins are taped under many of the tables. The food, by the accomplished Thai chef Ian Chalermkittichai, is generally auspicious, too, particularly the shiny little baby pork ribs lacquered with chocolate, the bowls of cool, peppery beef salad dusted with crunchy rice powder, and the braised loin of lamb tossed with tiny round Thai eggplants and melting, very un-Thai-like cubes of foie gras.

Further uptown, my demure, usually unflappable mother has stopped agitating for her annual luncheons at Swifty’s or The Four Seasons’ Grill Room and demands to be taken instead to the glass-walled dining room at Asiate, high in the sky over Columbus Circle at the new Mandarin Oriental Hotel in the Time Warner Center. If that’s all booked up, we’ll pay our $20 to get into the refurbished MoMA to get a peek at Danny Meyer’s fancy new museum canteen, The Modern, which opens later this month for dinner. After that, we’ll make a beeline for davidburke & donatella, where it’s always amusing to watch the local neighborhood swells chattering in their colorful gowns and dark charcoal suits while fighting for tastes of Mr. Burke’s foie gras terrine (sweetened with kumquats), his bristling “Crisp and Angry Lobster Cocktail” (a whole lobster rolled in Cajun spices and spiked on a flower holder), and the simple baked salmon, which is piled with ginger and sweet Chinese sausages and served with a tall shot glass brimming with the kind of spicy, fishy, freshly made XO sauce you rarely ever see in the vicinity of Bloomingdale’s.

The Return of the Tasting Menu

Jaded, semi-corpulent restaurant critics like myself usually consider tasting menus to be an overly mannered, overpriced waste of time. But the new mania for small plates has made every dinner a tasting event, and the city is brimming with so many inventive chefs that the only way to track their endless experiments is to submit, now and then, to a gut-busting, marathon meal. Take Sumile, in the West Village, where Josh DeChellis offers a multicourse omakase feast containing, among other things, little rounds of Dungeness crab capped with caviar and yuzu gelée, a pod of crunchy, Chiclit-size duck tongues (served with smoked trout), and an impossibly smooth thimbleful of panna cotta flavored with chamomile tea. Then there’s Dévi, in the Flatiron district, where the well-traveled Indian chefs Suvir Saran and Hemant Mathur manage to turn a pile of ordinary vegetables into a multicultural tasting extravaganza (seven courses for $95, with wine pairings) replete with tall spicy thatches of crisp frizzled okra, fat rice puffs called poha and soaked in mint curry, and a delicious Indo-Chinese cauliflower dish smothered, like some ethereal version of sweet-and-sour pork, in a tangy tomato sauce.

Compared to the numerous big-ticket items in the impressive 65,000-bottle wine “portfolio” at Cru, chef Shea Gallante’s $75 tasting menu is a relative bargain. My recent dinner there began with a whole rainbow of à la carte crudi (arctic char tipped with vanilla, tuna spiked with espresso, etc.); progressed through a variety of choice gnocchi (with oxtail), risottos (with uni), and pastas; and then, before the wine obliterated all memory, reached a grand finale with a perfectly cooked piece of sturgeon laced with a crème fraîche and caviar sauce. At Wylie Dufresne’s restaurant wd-50, the mad genius of Clinton Street shuffles foie gras with slivers of caramel-covered nori, decks his venison tartare with scoops of deliciously smooth edamame ice cream, and serves up thin ribbons of beef tongue with dice-size cubes of fried mayonnaise, which melt in the mouth in a most pleasing way. Then there are Sam Mason’s pyrotechnic desserts, like tequila-flavored ice cream served with wedges of pineapple. My menu indicated the pineapple had been smoked in tea, but when I sampled this curiously addictive dish (it was on the summer menu), the pineapple wedges tasted somehow stronger, more bracing, and more interesting than that, as if they had been soaked for a week, and possibly longer, in a particularly potent form of bong water.

The Brooklyn Boom

I confess i used to be one of those Manhattanites who quietly turn up their noses whenever their Brooklyn friends begin babbling about the beautifully articulated pork chop they’ve just enjoyed on Smith Street, or the quaint little wine bar that’s just opened on their block. But the steak tartare at 360, on Van Brunt Street in Red Hook, is still the best I’ve tasted in the city. The clean, well-lit Haitian establishment Kombit, on Flatbush Avenue, wins this year’s prize for the best fried goat in town (they also serve an exemplary dish of fried pork called grillot, with big smashed plantains). And if you’re craving an old-fashioned infusion of jerk chicken or medallions of hot, jellied oxtail poured over rice and a pile of butter beans, I suggest you hail a taxi and direct your driver to a diminutive West Indian joint on the northernmost fringes of Polish Greenpoint called Bleu Drawes Café.

In a borough known for its pizza meccas, Franny’s, on Flatbush Avenue, is the latest big thing. The pies are charred in a wood oven, of course, and you can peruse the Greenmarket pedigrees of the various toppings (oregano from Stokes Farms in Old Tappan, basil from the Farm at Miller’s Crossing in Claverack, etc.) on the menu while you wait for your order to arrive. The pizzas are superior, particularly the one covered with four cheeses (mozzarella, ricotta, Gorgonzola, fontina) and the one covered with nothing much at all (olive oil, rosemary, and garlic only), but if you’re wise, you’ll save room for appetizers like rigorously organic piles of mashed chicken liver heaped on rounds of crostini, or long strips of soft, vaguely charred eggplant drizzled with pine nuts and flakes of ricotta cheese.

An unlikely bistro called Ici serves the best chicken-liver schnitzel in all of Fort Greene—or anywhere else, for that matter—and if you happen to drop by when the braised pork shoulder is on the menu (it’s served with Brussels sprouts folded with bits of bacon, and a pile of the most refined organic grits from South Carolina), you should order that too. Pork is also one of the specialties at Applewood, newly opened on a quiet, leafy street in Park Slope. The room was filled with smiling children on the night I visited, which didn’t detract from the quality of the spoon-soft pork belly or my short ribs, which were wrapped in a rich layer of caul fat, or my wife’s special sturgeon, which was crisped on top and flavored, in the new Brooklyn style, with a hint of truffles.

Roll-n-Roaster in New York's Where to Eat

Fatso Dreams

Like racing jockeys and opera stars, food critics are doomed to a succession of diets. I endured a lengthy stretch of abstinence recently, and while I sat in grand restaurants gnawing on carrot sticks and gently pushing dessert plates aside, I passed the time hallucinating about meals that might have been. I dreamt of bellying up to the bar at Casa Mono, near Gramercy Park, and hoovering down towers of salty, charred lamb chops, and Andy Nusser’s special sweetbreads, which are fried and rolled in crushed almonds. I fantasized about the puffy, fresh-made bread at Taboon, and bowls of the steamy, sweet shrimp-and-corn risotto served with all sorts of other southern delicacies at the East Village bayou joint Natchez. I dreamt of barbecue in all its forms, particularly the greasy cuts of brisket at Blue Smoke, and the Texas beef chili sold in cups at my local Daisy Mae’s BBQ USA cart (it’s on the corner of 39th and Broadway), which I used to supplement, during the course of long-ago binges, with sandwiches of Carolina pulled pork tasting faintly of citrus.

During my bleak days of no snacking, I also pondered fat Niman Ranch hot dogs from the new East Village branch of Westville; the wet, gravy-infused, uncannily tender roast-beef sandwiches at the new Manhattan outpost of Roll ’N’ Roaster; and the impressive “Fourth of July Picnic” (cole slaw, fried-chicken strips, and bourbon-flavored mayonnaise squeezed between a messy baguette), which is just one of the inventive creations available at a clean little shop called Carve Unique Sandwiches, on a raffish corner of Eighth Avenue and 47th Street. I imagined devouring a brace or two of toasty, compact pork-chop banh mi (sweet pork, pickled carrots, mayonnaise, and cilantro stuffed in a hot, crunchy bun) at Nicky’s Vietnamese Sandwiches, on the Lower East Side, before creeping uptown to demolish the great, toppling “Skyscraper Burger,” the most formidable of several pleasing burger options at the bustling lower Park Avenue outlet of New York Burger Co.

Speaking of hamburgers, I’ve whiled away long abstemious afternoons pining for Tom Valenti’s structurally impressive new Ouest Burger, served at lunchtime only, at Ouest, or the zeppelin-sized roquefort cheeseburger at The Spotted Pig, which is best enjoyed, for maximum caloric damage, with a bowl of pillowy gnudi (little ricotta dumplings rolled in semolina and drowned in brown butter) and several dizzying tankards of very fattening Old Speckled Hen Ale. The burger at Danny Meyer’s seasonal fast-food boutique, Shake Shack (try the Triple Shack Burger when the restaurant opens again in the spring), is pretty good, too, although what I craved most of all as I tossed and turned in bed, listening to the unhappy sounds of my gurgling belly, was the four-dip, four-topping, frozen-custard extravaganza called the “Shackapalooza” (Valrhona-chocolate chunks, hot caramel sauce, and coconut macaroons, please), presented with proper ceremony in a decorous pail, with a plastic shovel.

Bar Crazy

As the revelers celebrating the 150th anniversary of the great McSorley’s Old Ale House can attest, dining at the bar is an ancient New York custom. But what began as the preference of a few solitary gin hounds seems to have blossomed into a full-blown culinary fad. The highbrow simplicity of Craft gave birth to Craftbar, which, late last year, produced Hearth. Former Craft chef’s Marco Canora’s East Village restaurant has plenty of tables, but the best seats in the house are at the narrow three-seat bar overlooking the kitchen. All sorts of fine food (consistently good house gnocchi, braised pork, olive-oil cake) is available from the regular menu, but that’s where eager downtown gourmets gather each evening like seagulls on a wharf, jockeying for delicious scraps (pork ends, little morsels of monkfish wrapped in pancetta) thrown up from the stove by the busy cooks.

If you don’t feel like dropping a month’s wages at Masa Takayama’s flagship restaurant, you can take a seat next door at Bar Masa and order a bowl of truffle-and-uni-laced risotto for a mere $68. At the long bar at Alta, in Greenwich Village, you and your friends can order the entire menu for $300 (called “The Whole Shebang”) and receive a tsunami of tapas-style dishes like sweet dates wrapped in bacon, lamb meatballs with yogurt sauce, and tender little pieces of hanger steak rolled in a spicy mix of crushed chilies from Aleppo. The whole menu at the superior noodle bar Momofuko, in the East Village, costs around $130, and whenever I repair there I like to blow another $20 on a nice bottle of sake, followed by plate after plate of the deliciously steamy Chinese buns stuffed with crisp chicken (with shredded cucumbers and greens), or deposits of sugary Cantonese braised pork.

Ham, in all its thinly sliced, multitudinous Eurocentric forms, is the main theme at Bar Jamón, where the Lilliputian-sized, fourteen-stool room gets so crowded on weekend nights that plates of Serrano ham or wedges of the excellent Tortilla Catalan get passed around over the heads of the diners, like at some raucous frat-house event. And if you want to expand on this Iberian-bar-food experience, the place is Tia Pol, in Chelsea, where on any given evening you’ll find legions of artsy-looking eaters balanced on little bar stools, taking prim bites of pork-loin sandwiches, perfectly tender calamari simmered in their own salty black ink, golden croquettes laced with slices of ham, and thin coins of red-hot chorizo served on slices of bread spread with chocolate.

The Indestructible Brasserie

As the town’s old, grande dame French restaurants continue to expire, the city’s great classically trained chefs are frantically hedging their bets. Along with Daniel, a neighborhood café (Café Boulud), and a distinguished midtown burger joint (DB Bistro Moderne), the Boulud empire will soon include a new restaurant in that superchef’s Valhalla, Las Vegas. Jean-Georges’s original flagship has more international outlets these days than the Hong Kong Shanghai Bank, and Mix in New York, the poor cousin to Alain Ducasse’s woefully overpriced Alain Ducasse at the Essex House, recently began serving a new bistro-oriented menu containing a newfangled version of banquette du veau. But the most conspicuous downmarket transformation has taken place on 55th Street, where La Côte Basque has morphed into Brasserie LCB, an agggresively casual establishment with rustling potted palm fronds and yards of brass railings all polished to a glittering sheen in the fashionably faux, Balthazar style. Luckily, there’s nothing fake about Jean-Jacques Rachou’s menu, which contains old La Côte Basque favorites like cassoulet plus an impressive roster of hearty old-fashioned dishes like calf’s-liver Lyonnaise, tournedos Rossini, and an exceptional rendition of tripes à l’Armagnac, cooked in veal stock and brandy and served with all the grandness it deserves, under a great silver warmer.

Frogs’ legs are my favorite dish at Gavroche, newly opened on a clamorous stretch of 14th Street, and if you don’t like the sound of rumbling buses, and if weather permits, you can eat them alfresco, in a shaded little garden covered in flagstones. Dave Pasternack, the resident seafood expert at Esca, also turns out to be a closet Francophile, and his new Batali-backed restaurant, Bistro Du Vent, attempts to replicate the simple culinary glories of old Provence, like socca (a kind of chickpea pancake); a thick, bone-sticking version of pistou; and even salade Niçoise. For full-on French immersion, however, I like to travel down to Le Quinze, on Houston Street, where it’s a curious pleasure to slouch at the little round café tables with the rest of the louche downtown café lizards and puzzle over back issues of the sports paper L’Equipe (the owners are former French rugby players) while sampling the chunky foie gras terrine, cannelloni stuffed with monkfish, and, if it’s lunchtime, the most illustrious croque monsieur in the city, stuffed with big flaps of ham and covered in melted Gruyère cheese.

Casual Italian

The great rustic-Italian-food binge, which began with the superb Batali-Bastianich restaurants Babbo and Lupa and reached a thundering crescendo last year with the opening of Tom Valenti’s ’Cesca, on the Upper West Side, seems to have abated. But if you’re still salivating for multiple varieties of risotto or six kinds of pasta, Pace, in Tribeca, is the new place to go. For more dainty eaters, there’s also Abboccato, recently opened on the old 55th Street restaurant row, where numerous fat-man Italian staples (tripe, suckling pig, veal cheeks) are reproduced in a most civilized uptown way. My order of trippa grigliata turned out to be little ribbons of grilled calf’s stomach served with croutons of polenta and a mild mint salsa, and the veal cheeks I sampled were scented with perhaps too much vanilla. But the suckling pig had a soft, candied quality (it’s simmered in milk and hazelnuts), and the actual desserts (pomegranate panna cotta, buffalo milk-ricotta torta with honeycomb, Friulian dumplings filled with crushed nuts) seemed to have descended from some great Italian pastry chef in the sky.

They don’t serves frites yet at Barbuto, or profiteroles smothered in chocolate sauce, but with its clean, streamlined café chairs and scruffy fashionista clientele, Jonathan Waxman’s latest restaurant threatens to become something new to the world of dining: an Italian brasserie. It hasn’t taken much time for the talented, itinerant chef to master the art of the brick oven, so try his crackly-skinned chicken (covered with spoonfuls of lemony salsa verde), or, if you crave pasta, order the spaghetti carbonara flecked with bits of guinciale. Hot pressed panini in all its forms is still what my wife and I order whenever we find ourselves wandering by ’Inoteca, on the Lower East Side. And whenever we feel the desperate need for an infusion of hipness, we rush to Bivio, on Hudson Street, to squint through the nightclub gloom at the wall-size chalkboard scrawled with elegant house specials like duck-confit salad and the formidable beef-ragù lasagne, which is served piping-hot and spread, like a chocolate-cream cake, with layers of oozing béchamel sauce.

I haven’t detected béchamel sauce yet on any of Mario Batali’s ingenious pizza creations at Otto Enoteca Pizzeria, but the last time I checked, the mercurial Vincent Scotto was putting pumpkin on his grilled pizza a couple of blocks away at Gonzo. A mind-boggling 40 toppings are available at the new thin-crust-pizza outpost on lower Second Avenue called Posto, so it was a relief when my gregarious waiter insisted I put down my menu and order the “Shroomtown,” an excellent concoction of shiitake, portobello, and button mushrooms all spritzed with white-truffle oil. You’ll find no spritzing of pies at Una Pizza Napoletana, or slicing of pies, or even, God forbid, pies baked to go. The owner, Anthony Mangieri, is a pizza scholar of the most severe Neapolitan school, and to give his pizza dough the proper attention, his East Village parlor is open only four days a week. He bakes only four kinds of pies in his perfectly calibrated wood-fired brick oven, the best of which is the superbly chaste pizza bianca, blooming with pools of melted buffalo mozzarella flown in specially from old Napoli.

Steaks

During the course of the long, tired Atkins boom, chefs of the highest distinction have busied themselves tinkering with the profitable steakhouse formula. So it’s no surprise that Jean-Georges himself has been spotted in the kitchen of his baroque new establishment V Steakhouse grimly broiling gourmet lamb chops and great hunks of prime (though overpriced and indifferent-tasting) porterhouse steak. Former seafood wizard Laurent Tourondel does a better job massaging all this beef into something new and interesting at his own midtown restaurant BLT Steak. His steak tartare has a smooth, dessert-like texture, as do soups like cream of mushroom and clam chowder. But the real key, it seems, is to serve all sorts of things besides plenty of good steak, like Dover sole poured with brown butter, rose-colored lobsters the size of puppy dogs, and crispy roasted chicken, served in a cast-iron pot, with savory deposits of bread crumbs and rosemary stuffed under the skin.

Among neighborhood joints, Ian, on the eastern fringes of 86th Street, is home to the estimable “Dirty Drunken Ribeye” (a tender, deboned piece of meat soaked in sherry, soy sauce, and garlic, rubbed with spices, and glazed with honey), and Landmarc, in Tribeca, produces a very fine version of boudin noir, along with a whole potpourri of other trencherman’s products. For the grandiose Manhattan-steakhouse experience, I’ll still take the New York strip at Sparks, or a few slabs of the porterhouse served by Wolfgang Zwiener and his band of Peter Luger’s apostates at Wolfgang’s, on lower Park Avenue. The room is about four sizes too small, especially on Friday nights, when members of the city’s red-faced steak-house fraternity gather four-deep at the bar. But the steak sauce is an almost exact Luger facsimile, and the serving platters are suitably scuffed around the edges from incessant cooking and tipped forward at the table, in the classic Luger way, to showcase all the sizzling juices. Then there’s the fat, corn-fed, decidedly un-organic steak, which is baked to a proper salty crunch and comes with rafts of creamed spinach, thatches of onion rings, and boats of venerable fried German potatoes tossed with sweet onions.

Chinese Food

Until Anita Lo (Annisa) opens her long-awaited Rickshaw Dumpling Bar on 23rd Street later this month, Dumpling Man, in the East Village, is the place for a whole variety of inventive pot stickers made by tag teams of reassuringly surly dumpling ladies (good dumpling ladies, in my experience, are always surly) from locations as distant as Shanghai. Jean-Georges’s 66 is still my favorite place in town for a bite of antiseptic, highly inauthentic, perfectly tasty Sunday-morning dim sum, and for a fancy Shanghai feast, this year’s choice is Shanghai Pavilion, on the Upper East Side. My discerning banker friends always call the day before to order the Beggar’s Chicken, although when I wandered in off the street not long ago with a friend from Shanghai, a feast materialized before our eyes. It was composed of an opening salvo of soup dumplings, followed by tender pieces of carp belly served up in a slightly peppery red sauce. There were nuggets of sugary, crispy-fried baby chicken, that great Shanghai specialty, sautéed snow-pea leaves, and, for dessert, a bite or two of fried soup, made with cubes of jellied water chestnuts, which look like candy but turn to liquid as they dissolve in the mouth.

“I enjoy the pig’s-blood cakes and chives, but I don’t think you will,” piped the sweet lady who took my order at the old Queens standby Spicy & Tasty, which recently reopened in fancy new digs on a quiet back street in Flushing. She was right, although my dish of cold chili-soaked rabbit was good enough, as were the wontons, poured with a strangely sweet chili sauce infused with mouth-numbing amounts of the famous Sichuan pepper called ma. The fractious Grand Sichuan International empire has a new East Village branch, although my favorite outlet is still the one on Ninth Avenue between 50th and 51st Streets. If you work close to midtown, however, and desire a quick fix of sinus-clearing tripe loaded with fresh cilantro, I commend Szechuan Gourmet, the new Manhattan outpost of another well-known restaurant in Queens. There’s a separate menu for devotees of obscure local specialties like duck tongues in chili pepper or sliced fish with pork blood pudding, so squeamish diners should stick to old standards like spicy lamb and delicious ribbons of twice-cooked pork tossed with fresh scallions in the classic Chen Du style.

Seafood

If you’re one of those people who’ve had their fill of precious, exorbitantly priced servings of crudo, then I’m afraid you’re out of luck. The movement’s new high priest is Scott Conant, who’s taken time out from his labors at the fine Italian restaurant L’Impero to open Bar Tonno, a diminutive, stylish bar and restaurant off Lafayette Street. The menu is devoted entirely to the cult of what the chef reverently calls “Italian sashimi.” On the evenings I visited, the crudo hounds sat at the long, elegant bar in contemplative silence, taking finicky bites of bay scallops touched with olive oil, pink slices of red orata (sea bream), and mounds of admittedly fine Maine lobster painted with a thick Sicilian tomato sauce. If this doesn’t sound like much food, do what I did and just keep ordering. The entire menu costs roughly as much as a single (very good) ticket to the opera.

The crudo craze has spread all the way up to 79th Street, on the gastronomically challenged Upper West Side, where raw meze items (uni and beets, scallops with yogurt and anise) have insinuated themselves into the big, jumbled menu at the ambitious new Greek restaurant called Onera. Raw fish is also featured at Lure Fish Bar, the swank new nautically appointed fish palace in Soho. With its polished-teak walls and beamy white leather banquettes, the place looks like some billionaires’ boat club in Cap Ferrat. The crudi I sampled were perfectly okay, particularly the arctic char and the lobster, served on buttery squares of garlic bread. There are also oddly successful skewers of Hamachi, foie gras, and grilled pineapple and a whole range of simple, surprisingly fine fish dishes, particularly the Dourade (marinated in country herbs) and a fresh, perfectly grilled piece of red snapper balanced on a pile of spinach with a wedge of lemon on the side.

Curried-eggplant-and-lobster soup and something called a “Crispy Cod Dog” (deep-fried cod, served with a lemon-caper rémoulade) are just a few of the tasty new dishes at The Mermaid Inn. From a pure price-to-pleasure ratio, the best piece of fish I had anywhere last year was a whole orata, doused with a mixture of citrus, olive oil, and herbs, and baked in a brick oven, at August, in the West Village. Among the regal midtown fish parlors, the fancy Mexican seafood at Pampano is still almost as good as the fat shrimp burritos and spicy fish tacos sold at the restaurant’s tiny taqueria out back. rm seems to be going strong despite the momentary absence of Rick Moonen (who’s opening a new restaurant in Las Vegas), and at Le Bernardin, Eric Ripert continues his ethereal seafood experiments with dishes like “Hamachi Tandoori” (lightly seared yellowtail rolled in tandoori spices) and something called “Lobster Choucroute,” poached lobster and bits of bacon folded in a delicate net of champagne-braised sauerkraut.

Downtown Brunch Fever . . .

Once upon a time, weekend brunch was the official province of dazed yuppie couples and the vast roaming baby-stroller hordes of the Upper West Side. These days, however, my raffish downtown friends all agree that the best time to visit Schiller’s Liquor Bar is on weekend mornings, when Keith McNally serves fruity Pimm’s Cups to his bleary clientele, plus fresh-made dollar doughnuts and a thick hazelnut waffle doused in bourbon-flavored maple syrup. At Public, in Nolita, the excellent weekend brunch includes bowls of freshly baked muffins along with novel delicacies like corn, saffron and blueberry pancakes and tea-smoked salmon covered in spoonfuls of hollandaise spiked with yuzu. And then there’s Freemans, the suddenly chic cubbyhole of a restaurant at the end of a narrow street called Freeman Alley, on the Lower East Side. The Rum Swizzle (Haitian rum, lime juice, syrup, bitters) is one of the finer cocktails in town, but if you don’t feel like battling for one during the raucous evening hours, do what I do and order one (or two) on a peaceful Sunday afternoon, along with a bowl of the stewed plums (with Greek yogurt and vanilla syrup), a slab or two of excellent wild-boar terrine, and a fat lamb-sausage patty served with watercress salad, two poached eggs, and thick slices of sourdough.

There are myriad trendy brunch options up in the West Village, but my choice is Snack Taverna, on Bedford Street, where the lovely waitresses dress all in black, like sorrowful Greek widows. This doesn’t detract from the quality of the puffy bourekis (minced lamb in phyllo pastry), the grilled loukaniko (country sausage), or the fine avga me hirino, which, in case you didn’t know, consists of two poached eggs served with braised pork and a mess of cranberry beans. Similar Mediterranean brunch delicacies are on display in midtown at the newly renovated San Domenico NY, where every table is stocked with a pitcher of orange juice mixed with Prosecco, and the aggressively priced menu includes clouds of whipped baccalà served over polenta, and giant cotecchino pork sausages swimming in lentils. And if you feel like braving the Upper West Side brunch scrum, take a number and go to the end of the line outside Nice Matin, where I like to supplement my Sunday-morning pissaladière (the Provencal tart made with sweet onions, anchovies and black olives) with a bite of healthful Swiss-chard frittata, followed by a platter of scrambled eggs tossed with a generous crumbling of spicy merguez sausage.

… And a Few Favorite Desserts

Dad, it’s yummy” is the ultimate compliment my 5-year-old daughter bestows on any dessert. I haven’t exposed her yet to the supreme chocolate fondant at Asiate (served with a raspberry granita and fromage blanc in a ceramic Japanese teacup), or the excellently dense apple-walnut strudel produced (with maple ice cream and a spoonful of schlag) by the Austrian pastry wizards at Wallsé. When I took her and a few of her nursery-school classmates for a farewell dinner at Le Cirque 2000, they were struck mute when a tray of towering Napoleons arrived, and refused to lift their spoons until the waiters produced a communal bowl of vanilla ice cream. The same thing happened at the pocket-sized, perpetually crowded, dessert-only establishment ChicKaLicious, in the East Village, where we presented our coats with the coat-check man, took our seats at the glossy white bar, and watched in silent wonder as the two industrious lady proprietors whipped up an elegant apple pudding cake (with Granny Smith–apple sorbet) and a batch of sweet figs steamed in parchment paper, with a sidecar of port-wine ice cream.

Next stop on the great father-daughter dessert ramble is our local downtown branch of the Cold Stone Creamery, where on busy evenings, the line of rotund, eagerly salivating ice-cream fanatics spills out the door onto the sidewalk. The specialties of the house are elaborate “mix-ins” like Oreo Overload (cream-flavored ice cream, chocolate fudge, double-size Oreos, chocolate chips) or the profound Cookie Don’t You Want Some (vanilla ice cream, chocolate chips, cookie dough, fudge, caramel), all prepared to order on a frozen granite stone. From there, we’ll nip around the corner to our neighborhood Beard Papa Sweets Café, the eccentric Japanese establishment where the preparation of excellent cream puffs (a warm choux-pastry shell injected with custard folded with vanilla beans hand-picked in Madagascar and dusted with powdered sugar) has been raised to the level of wacky performance art. And, at long last, we’ll conclude our annual sugar binge at Jacques Torres Chocolate Haven, the cavernous new chocolate factory recently opened at the bottom of Hudson Street by the city’s own Willie Wonka, Jacques Torres. Through the tall glass windows, my daughter observed the making of chocolate fruit drops and batches of Love Potion No. 9, before proclaiming her favorite treat of all: a simple graham cracker, covered in chocolate. “It’s really yummy,” she announced between earnest chipmunk-size bites. “Now, where can we go next, Dad?”

The Best of 2005

Best Famous MealWorth the Price
Prix Fixe at Per Se
The atmosphere’s a little stilted,but Thomas Keller’s cooking sure is good. If possible, begin with “Oysters and Pearls,” and be sure to save room for the“Coffee and Doughnuts” dessert.







Best Way to Impress Your Boss
The Wine List at Cru
Peruse the restaurant’s vast 65,000-bottle “wine portfolio,” and pretend you’re familiar with the ’85 Chambertain Grand Crus from Chateau Leroy ($1,950) and the rare magnum of 1899 Lafite Rothschild ($13,000). Be sure to mention the food’s pretty good, too.





Best MealUnder $10
The BBQ Pork Buns at Momofuko
The trendy new East Village version of the Wimpy burger. They’re pocket-size, portable, and good for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Eat five in one sitting, or maybe ten.







Best Tasting Menu
wd-50
Who knew that lambsweetbreads went with chocolate powder, or that fried mayonnaise tasted good? Wylie Dufresne is the city’s most inventive homegrown chef, and his eponymous restaurant is as good as it’s ever been.







Best Pizza
Franny’s Tomato and Mozzarella
The unadorned pie (extra-virgin olive oil, rosemary, and garlic) is a classic of its kind. If it’s cheese you desire, order the “Quattro Formaggio.”







Best Lobster
Crisp and Angry Lobster Cocktailat Davidburke & Donatella
at long last, a New York lobsterdish that requires our full attention and respect. Tackle this spicy monster with your hands and a bib tucked under your collar.







Best NouveauxSteak Dinner
Porterhouse at BLT Steak
Laurent Tourendot cuts this 40-ounce piece of beef lengthwise and serves it in a cast-iron pot. There are myriad newfangled sauces to choose from, but you still can’t go wrong with béarnaise.







Best New Bistro Dish
Chicken Liver Schnitzel at Ici
The kitchen produces plenty of fine food at this sleek little French bistro in Fort Greene. If you’re a liver connoisseur, this dish alone is worth the trip.







Best Highbrow Dessert
Chocolate Fondant with Raspberry Grantie at Asiate
This decadent, soothing, andbeautifully presented dish is a perfect compliment to the restaurant’s dazzling views of Central Park.







Best Meal, Period
Omakase at Masa
Chef Masa Takayama’s fusion masterpieces like “UniRisotto” and “Foie Gras Shabu Shabu” give new meaning to the oft-used foodie adjective melting. Unfortunately, you’ll have to pay $350 for a taste.







PHOTOGRAPHED BY KENNETH CHEN.

The Overrated List
Adam Platt’s least-favorite food trends.

Speck The prosciutto of the new millennium, only milder, more leathery, and less appetizing.

Edamame Paying $8 for a plate of gourmet lima beans gets tired after a while.

The Boisterously Jolly Japanese Salute In Japan, it’s quaint custom. In jumpy Manhattan, having eighteen Japanese guys yell at you when you walk in the door can be a little unsettling.

Fancy Tea Menus Who knew you could get Sencha Reserve organic tea at Le Bernardin? Who cares?

Wagyu Beef The poor cousin of Kobe beef, which, as everyone knows, ascended to the overrated Hall of Fame several decades ago.

Really Tiny Kitchens If you can see an electric range and the whites of the chef’s eyes, the drinks had better be really good, because the food probably isn’t.

Small Plates The current haute-restaurant term for price-gouging.

Wine Pairings The current sommelier term for price-gouging.

Romanesco This year’s version of ramps.

Cocoa Nibs If you don’t know what this exotic dessert item is, you’re not alone. What ever happened to chocolate chips?

Unisex Bathrooms Like chicken coops and airplane toilets, they promote messiness, overcrowding, and confusion.

The Communal Hand-Washing Moat This fashionable new feature makes washing your hands at a glamorous restaurant feel perilously close to scrubbing up after a day at the dairy barn.

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Источник: https://nymag.com/nymetro/food/guides/wheretoeat2005/10724/
Pinterest image: two images of London with caption reading '10 New York Food Favorites'

Are you wondering what to eat in New York City during your first trip to the Big Apple? Read on to discover ten must-eat New York food favorites that you simply should not miss during your Gotham adventure.

Bagel and Lox in New York

Start spreading the word. The highlight of any trip to New York City is the food in one of the country’s best food cities.

Let’s face it, eating in New York is the best thing to do in the city that doesn’t sleep. This is a city where you can eat great food from the crack of dawn until … the crack of dawn.

Laminated Pastry at Win Son in Brooklyn

Sure, the US megacity has fabulous museums and sights that all travelers should visit during their first visit. Travelers who buy a New York Pass never regret checking out the Statue of Liberty, Empire State Building and 9/11 Tribute Center too. As for art, we recommend the Met, MOMA and Neue Galerie.

What can we say? After living and working in Manhattan for a combined 17 years followed by too many visits to count on our fingers and toes, we now focus on finding the best food every time we return to New York.

New York Food Favorites

Eggs with Morels and Spring Peas at Le Coucou in New York

Food travelers can find New York food favorites throughout the city from the tip of the Bronx to the bottom of Staten Island. And the best part? Savvy diners don’t have to spend a lot of money to eat well in New York.

In many ways, New York is a city of immigrants and millionaires. The immigrants, many who arrived over a century ago, brought all kinds of food traditions that continue to this day. As for the millionaires, let’s just say that they like to eat well. Accordingly, food in New York ranges from global cheap eats to the echelon of fine dining.

Feeling overwhelmed? We recommend that you take a deep breath and start your culinary exploration with the following iconic New York food favorites:

1. Bagels

New York Bagels

Bagels weren’t invented in New York but they’re better in the big apple than anywhere else in the world. Sorry, Montreal – we like New York’s jumbo, crunchy, dense bagels better than your smaller, sweeter version.

Eastern European Jews brought their bagel recipes to New York at the turn of the 20th century. Since then, bagels have become a worldwide phenomenon enjoyed by food lovers from Edinburgh to Shanghai.

In New York, bakers hand roll bagels using a special twisting and shaping method before boiling them in a mixture of water and malt syrup and then baking them to a dark, crusty brown. Many people incorrectly attribute the New York bagel’s magnificent qualities to local water, but we attribute the New York bagel’s excellence to bagel-making methods refined over a century or more.

Discover 29 more iconic American food favorites you need to eat at least once in your life.

A New York bagel is a wonderful vessel for cream cheese, lox and other fixings. Popular bagel flavors include sesame, salt, poppy, onion and garlic as well as everything bagels that have all of the above.

Most New Yorkers are loyal to their favorite neighborhood bagel shops. Visit a few so that you can find your personal favorite too.

Insider Tip: Order a Black & White Cookie as part of your bagel experience. The two-colored glazed cookie is available at most bagel shops.

Where to Eat Bagels in New York City
Absolute Bagels, Bagel Corner (Riverdale), Ess-A-Bagel and Murray’s Bagels

2. Pizza

New York Pizza Slice with Pepperoni

With thousands of pizzerias in New York, pizza is the food that fuels America’s biggest city. From dollar slices to loaded pies, pizza is a common denominator among the classes that rarely disappoints.

New Yorkers now claim the ubiquitous food favorite as their own and for good reason – those thousands of pizza parlors make it difficult to find bad pizza in NYC. Although New York’s version is distinctly different from the kind served in Italy, the American city can take some credit for pizza’s global popularity.

Italian immigrants like Gennaro Lombardi imported the pizza tradition when they moved to NYC at the end of the 19th century. Lombardi opened the still operating Lombardi’s, a coal-oven pizzeria, in 1897. New York visitors can eat pizza at joints like Lombardi’s or sample several during a pizza tour.

Read our New York pizza guide with pizzerias in all five boroughs.

Plan to eat New York pizza with your hands, carefully folding each slice before gleefully stuffing it into your mouth. First, though, sprinkle enough oregano, grated cheese and red chili flakes to achieve your own version of pizza perfection.

3. Hot Dogs

New York Hot Dog

Though they’re as American as baseball and apple pie, hot dogs are another classic New York food brought over by immigrants – in this case, Germans and Austrians. One of those German immigrants, Charles Feltman, opened Nathan’s Famous in Coney Island back in 1915. Although his original pushcart business now has locations around the world, the best location remains in Brooklyn.

You won’t have to look hard for a New York hot dog. They’re all over the city in street carts, at Gray’s Payaya stands and at the aforementioned Nathan’s. There’s really no more classic hot dog experience than enjoying it while watching baseball, America’s pastime, at a Yankees or Mets game.

Add plenty of mustard to your dog as well as relish and (untraditionally) ketchup if you must. You can even add sauerkraut if that’s how you roll.

Where to Eat Hot Dogs in New York City
Nathan’s Famous, Papaya King and carts around the city

4. Pastrami Sandwiches

New York Pastrami Sandwich

Popular for over a century, pastrami sandwiches hit the worldwide zeitgeist in 1989 thanks to a memorable scene in the movie When Harry Met Sally. Today, passionate food travelers make a pilgrimage to the Lower East Side to “have what she’s having” a/k/a a hand-carved pastrami sandwich.

Eastern Europeans brought the Jewish deli concept from countries like Poland and Romania when they fled their homes in search of the American dream. Made with cured and smoked beef brisket, a pastrami sandwich is the classic deli item with its thin layers of pastrami piled high between two slices of seeded rye bread.

Discover the 20 best sandwiches in America.

Plan to share your Pastrami Sandwich unless you’re starving. Good ones are both expensive and huge. Add brown mustard and dill pickles for optimal satisfaction.

While in New York, you can also enjoy Pastrami’s cousin – the Corned Beef Sandwich on rye. You can simply add Russian dressing or opt for a Reuben, the semi-Jewish, non-kosher classic sandwich loaded with Swiss cheese (the unkosher part), sauerkraut, and Russian dressing.

5. Burgers

New York Hamburger at The Grill

Although the hamburger’s roots may loosely trace back to Hamburg, New Yorkers have fully embraced the meaty sandwich and made it their own. Teenagers, businessmen and ‘ladies who lunch’ eat juicy burgers all over the city from fast-casual eateries to some of the finest New York restaurants.

In New York, no two hamburgers are identical, with each chef adding his own twist. In just a day, hamburger fans can have two totally different experiences by eating a juicy smashed patty burger at Shake Shack or a beefy, thick Black Label Burger at Keith McNally’s Minetta Tavern.

Most of the city’s best gastropubs source their meat from legendary New Jersey butcher Pat LaFrieda who creates a special blend ground beef and fat. Get a burger made to order, preferably medium-rare, and enjoy every juicy bite.

Where to Eat Burgers in New York City
Shake Shake (budget), Ear Inn (good value), JG Melon (expensive), Minetta Tavern (expensive) and The Grill (luxury)

6. Brunch

Brunch at Russ and Daughters Cafe in New York

The origins of brunch are a mystery. The mid-day meal may have originated with English hunters, churchgoing Catholics or Jews just looking for a good ‘nosh.’ It hit our personal radar in the 1990s when Sarabeth’s was all the rage on Manhattan’s Upper West Side.

Today, brunchers don’t have to look hard for a spot to eat the best meal of the day on a leisurely Saturday or Sunday. And the choices run the gamut with the likes of dim sum in Chinatown, soul food in Harlem, hipster grub in Greenpoint and ‘cheffy’ food in Gramercy Park.

Despite all the brunch choices, there’s one particular brunch that’s unique to NYC – bagels and lox. Though you can buy all the ingredients to make a brunch feast in your hotel room, we recommend Russ & Daughters Cafe located in Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Order a fish board to share and savor a quintessential New York food experience.

Insider Tip: Start your Russ & Daughters brunch with a Super Heebster Bagel Toast topped with whitefish & baked salmon salad, wasabi-infused fish roe and horseradish dill cream cheese.

Where to Eat Brunch in New York City
Russ & Daughters Cafe

7. Chinese Food

New York Dumplings

Chinese food is yet another popular cuisine that’s not indigenous to NYC. Chinese restaurants first popped up in the 1870s when Chinese immigrants started moving from the West Coast after the Gold Rush ended.

Some of the city’s best Chinese restaurants are still located in the city’s original Chinatown in lower Manhattan; however, the more exciting Chinese food hub is now in Flushing. Intrepid food travelers will want to hop on the subway for a culinary trip to China via Queens.

A visit to NYC is the time to expand your Chinese food horizons. Start by slurping soup juicy dumplings at Joe’s Shanghai and devouring hand-pulled noodles at Xi’an Famous Foods.

8. Fine Dining

Quenelle de Brochet at Le Coucou in NYC

With more than fifty Michelin-starred restaurants, New York has enough upscale restaurants to satisfy both lords of industry and wandering gourmands. When it comes to eating well in New York, the options are practically endless so long as your credit limit can handle it.

Top establishments like Eleven Madison Park and Le Bernardin have set the culinary bar not just in NYC but in kitchens around the globe. However, don’t discount more innovative establishments like Momofuku Ko and high-end sushi bars like Sushi Nakazawa.

Fine dining isn’t for everybody, but if you’re going to splurge on a meal, it might as well be in New York. Do your research, make an advance reservation and enjoy the experience.

Where to Experience Fine Dining in New York City
Le Bernardin, Le Coucou and Gramercy Tavern

9. Cronuts and Other Fun Pastries

Cronut at Dominique Ansel Bakery

Pairing donuts with coffee has been a thing in New York for decades. In recent years, artisan bakers have pushed the envelope with exciting pastry creations, none more notable than the cronut.

Invented in NYC by French baker Dominique Ansel and sold in his self-named bakery, cronuts stormed the city when they debuted in 2013. Crowds still queue each morning for their chance to buy the croissant-donut hybrid.

Discover the 25+ best donuts in America.

Just to be clear, cronuts are not the only dessert game in town. The city is filled with bakeries selling cupcakes, cookie dough and crack pie. However, if you want a simple donut, you can easily find that too. You can even take a donut tour and try several.

10. Cheesecake

New York Cheesecake

As much fun as it is to eat creative pastries, there’s something about digging into an old-school slice of New York cheesecake. Although the diner staple is available all over the city, nobody does it better than Junior’s at the original Brooklyn location.

Discover 100 more of the best desserts around the world.

A good New York cheesecake is filled with ingredients like eggs, heavy cream, sugar and the most important ingredient – cream cheese.

Although Kraft’s Philadelphia Brand is famous around the world for cream cheese, cheesecake’s key ingredient was actually invented in Chester, NY – just 60 miles from New York City. (Apparently, in the late 1800s, Philadelphia was known for luxury. Something we, as former Philadelphians, find laughable today.)

Don’t despair if you don’t have time to take a quick trip to Brooklyn. You can eat cheesecake at Junior’s in the heart of the action on Times Square.

Where to Eat Cheesecake in New York City
Junior’s and Diners Around the City

Useful New York Facts

Smoked Salmon at Russ and Daughters Cafe in New York City
  • The largest city in New York State, New York City is the largest city in the USA.
  • The USA is in North America.
  • The USA’s currency is the US Dollar.
  • English is the USA’s official language.
  • Tips are expected and comprise a large component of a server’s compensation. The standard is 15-20%.

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About the Authors

About the Authors

Daryl & Mindi Hirsch

Saveur Magazine’s BEST TRAVEL BLOG award winners Daryl and Mindi Hirsch share their culinary travel experiences and recipes on the 2foodtrippers website and YouTube. The married Food and Travel content creators live in Lisbon, Portugal.

Disclosure

We update our articles regularly. Some updates are major while others are minor link changes and spelling corrections. Let us know if you see anything that needs to be updated in this article.

Important Update
Some businesses may revise their hours and menus due to COVID-19. Others may close, either temporarily or permanently, without notice. Be sure to check websites for updated information and make advance reservations where possible.

Источник: https://www.2foodtrippers.com/new-york-food-favorites/

Alphabet City's home
away from home

restaurant clicks: Where to Get Brunch in New York City

Blocks away from Tompkins Square Park in Alphabet City, Poco boasts bottomless brunch every Friday, Saturday, Sunday for a set price per person. This is a party place where you gather with friends for loud laughs and stories. Abe Lopez, a winner of Chopped, designed the menu, so you’re sure to find something creative and delicious whenever you visit.

The infatuation: The Best Bottomless Brunches in NYC

Poco is a loud, crowded, and fun spot for party time brunch. Thirty dollars will get you an entree, plus unlimited mimosas, Bloody Marys, and sangria. You probably aren’t coming here for the food, but the Latin twists on brunch basics will get the job done. Take note: it’s cash only.

Time Out New York review by boozy brunch goer Maria M

After coming to the weekend boozy brunch, I now understand why this place is on every list of best NYC boozy brunch. A group of four of us went on a Friday afternoon (major plus is that this place's weekend brunch includes Friday!) and the place was busy but not too packed. We all got mimosas, which are supposed to only be served for 1.5 hours, but I guess because it wasn't that busy they let us sit there for FOUR hours... and continued to serve us for those four hours. Our waiter (Aron? I can't remember his name after drinking countless mimosas) was super nice and accommodating. Everyone's dishes were great, though mine was only okay. Highly recommend the lobster guac and lobster Mac & cheese. Also the music was on point.


Foursquare review by boozy brunch goer Byron Flores

The lobster Mac and cheese is awesome! $30 for bottomless mimosa, sangria, and a few other options plus an entree. The mimosas weren't strong but still worth the $30. Great atmosphere and music.

Best Products: BOTTOMLESS-BRUNCH RESTAURANTS IN NYC THAT TURN YOUR SATURDAY INTO AN ALL-DAY PARTY

Poco's menu is so good, it's worth the $32 for just one and a half hours of unlimited mimosas, bloody marys, and sangria. It'll be a tough decision to choose between the lobster mac, lobster grilled cheese, and French toast. Just a heads up: It's cash only.


Refinery 29 review: The Right Way To Do Bottomless Brunch In NYC

This East Village brunch institution is perfect for groups looking to get their drink on without compromising taste. With several filling and delicious options from Lobster Mac and Cheese to Guacamole Benedict, there are options for the whole crowd. This place gets pretty packed on weekends, so be sure to plan ahead.
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THE BEST TOTALLYFREE/UNDERGROUND COMEDY SHOWS IN NYC

“LET’S SEE, WHAT ELSE” AT POCO
Wednesdays at 8pm

Local comedians Tom Delgado and Missy Baker host a new batch of both rising and established comedians in this restaurant’s intimate downstairs cellar every week (there’s a bar down there, relax!) -- which means you could quite literally be rubbing elbows with reputable comics like Nick Vatterott (Comedy Central, Late Night With Jimmy Fallon) and SNL cast member Sasheer Zamata.  

Gotham Magazine: 6 Vegan Comfort Food Dishes That Won't Make You Miss the Real Thing

"Smoked Truffle Mac & Cheese

Local gourmands have spoken: Poco owner Sara Grizzle was declared the winner of the Natural Gourmet Institute’s vegan mac and cheese cook-off in October. And now New Yorkers can taste the winning recipe any night of the week at her Alphabet City restaurant. Expect a big bowl of oversized shells mixed with cashew cheese, roasted broccoli, sautéed mushrooms, and garlic spinach covered with a crunchy layer of truffled panic."

 

Источник: http://www.poconyc.com/

NYC's Best New Restaurants & New Dishes In 2020

It's been a strange and terrible year, but during it all a lot of good people worked incredibly hard to open, and keep open, new restaurants, and create new dishes. Here's a look at the best.

Top 10 New NYC Restaurants of 2020

Dame

Fish & Chips, front left, at Dame ($18)

Fish & Chips, front left, at Dame ($18)

The restaurant of the year. It was literally just days before the shutdown in March that I first ate at Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard's Dame, though back then it was located inside a coffee shop on Allen Street, a test run of the tasting-menu restaurant they planned on opening in the fall. It was a fantastic meal, filled with big flavors and ingredients like duck offal, live scallops, and raw meat. Fast forward three nightmarish months later, and Dame has completely switched gears (and locations), reopening as a Fish & Chips joint on MacDougal Street, where it would continue to grow and evolve along with our city's great outdoor dining experiment. In the spirit of the times, Szmmanski and Howard donated all profits to a rotating series of organizations and charities (nearly $20,000 total), and hosted 14 different guest chef events, sharing their space with out-of-work friends and comrades. Now they're doing two Fish & Chips days a week, selling booze and provisions, and experimenting with recipes for what Szymanski calls "regular Dame," which will be opening... sometime. Anyway, there's nowhere I ate more often this year than at all the versions of Dame, and every time was an enormously satisfying experience, with great food and exactly the sort of communal, emotional pick-me-up I needed.

Located for now at 85 MacDougal Street, between Houston and Bleecker (damenewyork.com)

Thai Diner

Things were looking good in February for Ann Redding and Matt Danze — their acclaimed, ridiculously popular Uncle Boons chugging along nicely, and their brand new restaurant, the magnificent Thai Diner, an instant success. And for good reason! The food at Thai Diner was (and still is) exciting and across-the-board delicious, and the indoor-only vibe back in those pre-COVID days was fun and lively without being even a little bit obnoxious. Uncle Boons is gone, of course, an early coronavirus casualty, but the Thai Diner kitchen crew has emerged stronger than ever — the fish collar, the golden curry with chicken and egg noodles, and a roti "snack" were all fantastic on a recent revisit, and the Thai Tea Babka French Toast is the stuff of legend--and today the place boasts one of the best casual outdoor heated setups in town. Thai Diner is definitely getting plenty of love from me this winter.

Located at 186 Mott Street, at the corner of Kenmare Street (646-559-4140;thaidiner.com)

Tacqueria al Pastor

Taco de Carne Asada, Taco al Pastor, at Taqueria al Pastor ($3.50 each

Taco de Carne Asada, Taco al Pastor, at Taqueria al Pastor ($3.50 each

In a year that saw an explosion of exceptional new taco spots around the city, Bushwick's Taqueria al Pastor, which opened in January, remains my favorite. There's nothing fancy going on here. You choose your format (taco, burrito, quesadilla, volcane, gringa), your tortilla (corn or flour, always made to order), and your filling (al pastor, carne asada, pollo, nopal), and wait a couple of minutes while the busy kitchen team carves, griddles, assembles your feast. Everything is juicy, gooey, and (after you pour on one or all of the house made hot sauces) comes with a serious kick. The last time I went, in late October, the outdoor setup was minimal but comfortable, but take-home is also an obvious option if you live anywhere nearby.

Located at 128 Wyckoff Avenue, at the corner of Stanhope Street (718-269-7538;@taqueriaalpastor)

Mokyo

This delightful "Asian tapas" restaurant from chef Kyungmin Kay Hyun faces the unenviable COVID-era challenge of feeding people through the winter with no curbside dining area (there's a fire hydrant right out front on St. Marks) and a narrow sidewalk that doesn't allow for any sort of heaters. But don't let that dissuade you! Bundle up and devour Hyun's meticulously composed plates loaded with, for example, oxtail spring rolls, or gochujang-glazed roasted cauliflower with raisin labneh, or sweet soy congee with octopus and chorizo, or Pop-Rocks-studded mascarpone. Mokyo's food has been consistently superb all year, from a festive dinner inside last February to a chilly but lovely meal out on the sidewalk a few weeks ago, and I plan on supporting Hyun's endeavor as much as possible in the tough months to come.

Located at 109 St. Mark's Place between First Avenue and Avenue A (mokyony.com)

232 Bleecker

Moses Sleeper Lasagna, at 232 Bleecker ($29)

Moses Sleeper Lasagna, at 232 Bleecker ($29)

For their first foray into fine dining, the Dig fast-casual chain Dig (née Dig Inn) gave Suzanne Cupps free reign to bring this West Village charmer to life, and the onetime Untitled and Gramercy Tavern chef knocked it out of the park. 232 Bleecker opened right at the end of 2019, and my favorite place to be before COVID changed everything in March was at the chef's counter right by the wood-burning hearth, wolfing down Cupps' crackling Porchetta or show-stopping Moses Sleeper Lasagna. And though the seating options have changed quite a bit since then--the highlight now is a nice sidewalk setup--Cupps still makes some of the best rustic, farm-to-table type food in town. This was my indulgent Christmastime dinner last year, and I plan on repeating that plan in a few weeks.

Located at 232 Bleecker Street, at the corner of Carmine (646-905-5800;232bleecker.com)

Public Village

Chengdu Dan Dan Noodles, at Public Village ($8)

Chengdu Dan Dan Noodles, at Public Village ($8)

A new Sichuan noodle shop is always welcome in any neighborhood, but when it's as good as the Public Village on Essex Street? Oh man, you are golden! Envisioned as a local hangout when it first opened three days before the shutdown, then re-envisioned and reopened about a month later as a takeout-only spot, Jia Song and chef Kiyomi Wang's restaurant features a bunch of terrific handmade noodle dishes — my favorites include the Wan Za noodles with ground pork and mashed yellow peas, the Crispy Pork Strips noodles loaded with Sichuan peppercorns, and the vegan Chilled Noodles — and fun things like one of the great stoner food creations in town, the Grill Chilled Noodle Wrap, featuring hot dogs and melted cheese. There's some barebones curbside seating, but spacious Seward Park across the street beckons as well.

Located at 23 Essex Street between Canal and Hester Streets (646-476-7501;publicvillagenyc.com)

Fat Choy

Mushroom Sloppy ($10), Rice, Beans, and Greens ($8), Little Bok Choys ($6), Rice Rolls ($10), at Fat Choy

Mushroom Sloppy ($10), Rice, Beans, and Greens ($8), Little Bok Choys ($6), Rice Rolls ($10), at Fat Choy

A rich bounty of new vegan restaurants opened in 2020, but my favorite was definitely this "kind of Chinese" counter-service spot on Broome Street. Run by amiable non-vegans Justin Lee and Jared Moeller (somewhat ironically, the two of them met while working at the extremely meaty Cannibal), Fat Choy features a tight menu of small "plates" (really, cardboard boats), and everything is excellent so bring your pod and order up the whole damn thing. Personal favorites include the crisp Salt and Pepper Cauliflower, the hefty Sloppy Mushroom sandwich, and the fiery Sticky Rice Dumplings. There's some good (so far unheated) curbside seating as well.

Located at 250 Broome Street between Orchard and Ludlow Streets (347-778-5889;fatchoynyc.com)

Rule of Thirds

Mazemen with pork jowl, at Rule of Thirds ($18)

Mazemen with pork jowl, at Rule of Thirds ($18)

Following what is by now a familiar story, the Japanese izakaya-ish Rule of Thirds opened its stunning, warehouse-sized space in Greenpoint in early March, only to close the doors a few weeks later. Fortunately, chef JT Vuong and George Padilla had two courtyards at their disposal, so reopening came with plenty of outdoor dining, and they'll soon unveil a "Winter Village" of private bungalows out back. Anyway, I ate almost the entire menu in pre-COVID times, then a bunch of new dishes at a recent revisit, and the food is fantastic, with winners like a Hamachi Collar dripping with miso butter, all the skewers, and a decadent Mazemen with pork jowl.

Located at 171 Banker Street, just north of Norman Street (thirdsbk.com)

Kimika

The team behind the popular Thai spot Wayla opened this Italian-Japanese restaurant on Kenmare Street in August, and the crowds have followed, filling the distanced tables spread out on the sidewalk through the fall. And rightly so! The food here, from chef Chrisrine Lau

It's all delicious, but first-timers should definitely get the gooey Crispy Rice Cake Lasagna, the Mortadella Pizzette Fritte drizzled with miso, and the Roe Roe Roe Roe Spaghetti, a raging party of big flavored ingredients like tobiko, ikura, bottarga and, of course, mentaiko, all clinging nicely to the thick strands of extra al-dente noodles. Save room for chef Clarice Lam's desserts too.

Located at 40 Kenmare Street at the corner of Elizabeth Street (212-256-9280;kimikanyc.com)

Silver Apricot

Black Sesame Panna Cotta, at Silver Apricot ($11)

Black Sesame Panna Cotta, at Silver Apricot ($11)

Chef Simone Tong and Emmeline Zhao's lovely follow up to their acclaimed Little Tong (RIP) opened in early August after a long COVID-related delay, and at this point in the restaurant's timeline there are heaters both curbside and out back in the garden, Tong had her baby (congratulations!), and the Silver Apricot menu is a luxurious joy to make your way through. The melt-in-your-mouth Honeynut Squash Wontons, the charred Brussels Sprouts flecked with Chinese Sausage, the Skirt Steak dabbed in dali herb-sesame relish, the knee-buckling Black Sesame Panna Cotta... all ridiculously good. Great vibes too.

Located at 20 Cornelia Street between Bleecker and West 4th Streets (929-367-8664;silverapricot.nyc)

14 Of The Best Dishes At NYC Newcomers

Monkey Bread at Winner

Park Slope's favorite new cafe opened days before the shutdown, but fortunately for Daniel Eddy, his vision of just being a local spot enabled an easy pivot to takeout, with a menu of breakfast pastries and loaves of bread, picnic-worthy sandwiches to bring to nearby Prospect Park, and roasted chicken for dinner. My favorite thing here, though, is chef Ali Spahr's decadent slab of croissant Monkey Bread, glistening and sticky with sugar, a crumbly cinnamon topping adding further delight.

Located at 367 Seventh Avenue at the corner of 11th Street (winnernyc.com)

Ill Papa at Troppo Stretto

This cheeky sandwich shop from L.A. has settled in nicely here in NYC, now running three pop-ups within three different bars in Brooklyn and Queens. Get whatever you feel like, they're all fat and messy and made with a lot of love, but my favorite so far is the Ill Papa, a kind of Italian-Spanish beast stuffed with funky mortadella and capocollo, spicy chorizo, strong manchego, "shredduce", vinegary giardiniera (which also adds crunch to the party), and a creamy dijonnaise.

Located at 27-24 Jackson Avenue in LIC, 42 Hoyt Street in Downtown Brooklyn, and 709 Lorimer Street in Williamsburg (strettobros.com)

Steak Burrito at Nene's Deli

The Birria Tacos are going to get all of the attention here at this tiny, semi-hidden Mexican spot in the back of a Bushwick bodega, but my money will always be on owner and chef Andrés Tonatiuh Galindo Maria's Steak Burrito, just a huge, gooey masterpiece of the form, packed with rice, avocado, melted cheese, and lots of tender beef in a cheesy shell. Pour on a bit of the super spicy red sauce or slightly milder green sauce before each bite, and you've got one of the best $10 dinners in town.

Located at 54 Irving Avenue between Starr and Troutman Streets (347-789-5745;@nenestaqueria)

Pha Lau at Banh Shop House

Pha Lau  <h3>watch the thematic video</h3> American Food - The BEST KEY LIME PIE in New York City! Steve’s Authentic NYC<iframe width='560' height='315' src='https://www.youtube.com/embed/hn1KoXnst-Q' frameborder='0' allowfullscreen></iframe> <div><h2>Take A Bite Out of NYC’s Best Food Halls</h2><div><p>New York City’s dining scene has been embracing the concept of the food hall as a recipe for success. These epicurean centers house a mix of eateries as tenants or involve a single culinary theme. Right now, Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens are leading the menu, with food halls to suit many different tastes. Here are some of New York City’s best food halls to <a href=premierfcu org and eat at.

City Kitchen

Escape the crowds and the corresponding waits at one of the restaurants in this Times Square food mall off the corner of Eighth Avenue and 44th Street. With only seven vendors it might sound small, but this 4000 sq ft venue has enough options for a quick pre- or post-Broadway show meal or a bite before catching your ride home.

Dough’s glazed or filled donut creations include best food to get in nyc sugar or lemon poppy flavors, while Ilili Box has pita wraps and other Mediterranean dishes. Gabriela’s Taqueria, Kuro-Obi, Luke’s Lobster, Whitmans New York and Azuki round out the list.

DSC07313.jpg?mtime=20191004114407#asset:107019A bowl of udon at Industry City © Image courtesy of Industry City

Industry City

Comprised of repurposed warehouses and factory buildings, this 6 million sq ft, mixed-use complex in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, holds a ton of businesses specializing in fashion, food, fitness, film and architecture. It’s also the headquarters for the Brooklyn Nets basketball team and a retail section known as the Design District.

As for dining, Industry City's main food hall is a global cornucopia of cuisines from different parts of the city and the world. Choose from Yaso Tangbao’s Shanghainese street food; Ejen’s Korean comfort food; Table 87, a Brooklyn coal-oven slice pizza shop; Kotti Berliner Doner Kebab (Turkish-German street food); Colson Patisserie’s Belgian pastries; and Li-Lac Chocolates, Manhattan’s oldest chocolatier. There’s also Japan Village, a 20,000 sq ft marketplace with a specialty grocer, an izakaya (traditional Japanese pub), a cocktail bar, and food stations serving traditional Japanese dishes.

Turnstyle Underground Market

It might sound gross to go to a food hall inside a subway station, but Turnstyle Underground Market, within Manhattan’s Columbus Circle-59th Street Subway Station, is filled with eateries that will foster your appetite.

Commuters can grab breakfast, lunch and dinner from 19 food vendors. Hey Hey Canteen serves up Asian fusion fare, while Daa! Dumpling prepares the Russian version of this doughy dish, and Arepa Factory prepares this Latin American corn cake. Access the market through seven street-level entrances; there are shops and pop-up stores too.

IU4A8924-copy.JPG?mtime=20191004114411#asset:107020Inside Essex Market © Image courtesy of Lower East Side Partnership

Essex Market

With a history dating back to 1888, this Lower East Side institution started as an outdoor pushcart market where vendors hawked everything from hats to herring. As city streets got more hectic, Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia created an indoor sales space for them in 1940.

Over the decades, as the neighborhood changed and supermarkets rose in popularity, the Essex Market was showing some wear and tear. In May 2019 it re-opened following a 21st-century makeover and a move to a different spot on Essex Street.

Occupants include shops from the previous location (fruits and vegetables, meats and cheese providers) along with newcomers. Try Thai fried chicken at Eat Gai, breakfast from Shopsin’s and Middle Eastern food from Samesa.

The Pennsy

Penn Station has been the subject of mixed feelings over time, but this addition makes it easier to squeeze in a food stop at this major rail-transit hub before a train or a show at neighboring Madison Square Garden.

Featuring five chef-driven concepts and a bar with indoor and outdoor dining spaces, diners can order veggie dishes from The Cinnamon Snail and The Little Beet, or go for carnivorous options from the butchery Pat LaFrieda. There's also Neapolitan pizza from Ribalta, rolls and rice bowls from Sabi Sushi and the taqueria and juice bar Taco Dumbo.

HK Food Court

This 2019 newcomer to Flushing, Queens, provides a taste of Asia with food stalls reflecting the continent’s diverse culinary heritage that compliments the neighborhood’s Asian population. On a former grocery store site, this food hall has Tibetan, Thai, Japanese, Vietnamese, Taiwanese, and regional Chinese cuisine including Henan, Fuzhou, northwest halal and Sichuan food. Order Thai stewed pork from Khao Ka Moo NYC, spicy Tibetan lamb ribs from Khawachen, tom yum soup from Just Noodles and Taiwanese pork belly buns from Hang.

2015-08-18-Chelsea-Market-0017-9625-v2.jpg?mtime=20191004115203#asset:107021Chelsea Market © Image courtesy of Chelsea Market

Chelsea Market

This food hall in Chelsea has a tasty backstory. The building was once the factory for the National Biscuit Company – better known as Nabisco. It's also where their Oreo Cookie was produced. Becoming an indoor artisan market in 1996, Chelsea Market is spread out, with artisan grocery shops, retail spaces and food stalls along with their Artists & Fleas craft-makers’ area. Good market eats include cheese-stick-makers Big Mozz; the Fat Witch bakery; Jamaican eatery, Tings; and Thai restaurant, Ayada. Nearby, step into Gansevoort Market, another food hall with Bathing suit stores burlington ontario to American fare.

Mercado Little Spain

Similar to the all-Italian Eataly in the Flatiron District and World Trade Center, and the French-themed Le District in lower Manhattan’s Brookfield Place, this Spanish-inspired eatery from chefs Jose Andres and brothers Albert and Ferran Adria is inside Manhattan’s Hudson Yards development and has restaurants, bars and kiosks putting the spotlight on Spain’s regional foods.

Have a tapas crawl, feast on asador-cooked meats, or simply dine on empanadas and bacalao frito followed by helado for dessert.

DeKalb Market Hall

Home to 40 food vendors, this Fort Green, Brooklyn, venue features well-recognized NYC restaurant names – it boasts the only Katz’s Deli outpost – alongside up-and-coming business in their own right.

Ample Hills Creamery and Arepa Lady have locations here, too. Consider Isan-style grilled chicken over jasmine or sticky rice from Chicks Isan, Fletcher’s barbecue ribs or Home Frite’s sea-salt brined fry varieties. DeKalb Market Hall also has a craft cocktail bar and an events space that hosts regular happy hours and dance parties.

The Plaza Food Hall USA

On the concourse level of The Plaza New York Hotel, this opulent marketplace is full of fine food purveyors and counter-style dining options, where you can feel a little fancy while having breakfast, lunch and dinner or when taking your order to go.

Pick up some high-quality Kusmi Tea or purchase fresh-baked breads and delicate pastries from Boulud’s Épicerie or Pain D’Avignon Bakery. Or get tempted by the colorful macarons made by Ladurée or the richly-layered cakes from Lady M. Savory. Options extend to Pizza Rollio, whose approach to pizza-making is worth tasting, Tartinery, noted for its refined French fare, and Takumi Taco, a popular Mexican brand.

Источник: https://www.budgettravel.com/article/best-food-halls-near-me
Braised Intestines, at Banh Shop House ($13)">

Pha Lau

NYC's Best New Restaurants & New Dishes In 2020

It's been a strange and terrible year, but during it all a lot of good people worked incredibly hard to open, and keep open, new restaurants, and create new dishes. Here's a look at the best.

Top 10 New NYC Restaurants of 2020

Dame

Fish & Chips, front left, at Dame ($18)

Fish & Chips, front left, at Dame ($18)

The restaurant of the year. It was literally just days before the shutdown in March that I first ate at Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard's Dame, though back then it was located inside a coffee shop on Allen Street, a test run of the tasting-menu restaurant they planned on opening in the fall. It was a fantastic meal, filled with big flavors and ingredients like duck offal, live scallops, and raw meat. Fast forward three nightmarish months later, and Dame has completely switched gears (and locations), reopening as a Fish & Chips joint on MacDougal Street, where it would continue to grow and evolve along with our city's great outdoor dining experiment. In the spirit of the times, Szmmanski and Howard donated all profits to a rotating series of organizations and charities (nearly $20,000 total), and hosted 14 different guest chef events, sharing their space with out-of-work friends and comrades. Now they're doing two Fish & Chips days a week, selling booze and provisions, and experimenting with recipes for what Szymanski calls "regular Dame," which will be opening. sometime. Anyway, there's nowhere I ate more often this year than at all the versions of Dame, and every time was an enormously satisfying experience, with great food and exactly the sort of communal, emotional pick-me-up I needed.

Located for now at 85 MacDougal Street, between Houston and Bleecker (damenewyork.com)

Thai Diner

Things were looking good in February for Ann Redding and Matt Danze — their acclaimed, ridiculously popular Uncle Boons chugging along worldwide travel insurance including usa, and their brand new restaurant, the magnificent Thai Diner, an instant success. And for good reason! The food at Thai Diner was (and still is) exciting and across-the-board delicious, and the indoor-only vibe back in those pre-COVID days was fun and lively without being even a little bit obnoxious. Uncle Boons is gone, of course, an early coronavirus casualty, but the Thai Diner kitchen crew has emerged stronger than ever — the fish collar, the golden curry with chicken and egg noodles, and a roti "snack" were all fantastic on a recent revisit, and the Thai Tea Babka French Toast is the stuff of legend--and today the place boasts one of the best casual outdoor heated setups in town. Thai Diner is definitely getting plenty of love from me this winter.

Located at 186 Mott Street, at the corner of Kenmare Street (646-559-4140;thaidiner.com)

Tacqueria al Pastor

Taco de Carne Asada, Taco al Pastor, at Taqueria al Pastor ($3.50 each

Taco de Carne Asada, Taco al Pastor, at Taqueria al Pastor ($3.50 each

In a year that saw an explosion of exceptional new taco spots around the city, Bushwick's Taqueria al Pastor, which opened in January, remains my favorite. There's nothing fancy going on here. You choose your format (taco, burrito, quesadilla, volcane, gringa), your tortilla (corn or flour, always made to order), and your filling (al pastor, carne asada, pollo, nopal), and wait a couple of minutes while the busy kitchen team carves, griddles, assembles your feast. Everything is juicy, gooey, and (after you pour on one or all of the house made hot sauces) comes with a serious kick. The last time I went, in late October, the outdoor setup was minimal but comfortable, but take-home is also an obvious option if you live anywhere nearby.

Located at 128 Wyckoff Avenue, at the corner of F 22 demo Street (718-269-7538;@taqueriaalpastor)

Mokyo

This delightful "Asian tapas" restaurant from chef Kyungmin Kay Hyun faces the unenviable COVID-era challenge of feeding people through the winter with no curbside dining area (there's a fire hydrant right out front on St. Marks) and a narrow sidewalk that doesn't allow for any sort of heaters. But don't let that dissuade you! Bundle up and devour Hyun's meticulously composed plates loaded with, for example, oxtail spring rolls, or gochujang-glazed roasted cauliflower with raisin labneh, or sweet soy congee with octopus and chorizo, or Pop-Rocks-studded mascarpone. Mokyo's food has been consistently superb all year, from a festive dinner inside last February to a chilly but lovely meal out on the sidewalk a few weeks ago, and I plan on first chatham bank savannah ga Hyun's endeavor as much as possible in the tough months to come.

Located at 109 St. Mark's Place between First Avenue and Avenue A (mokyony.com)

232 Bleecker

Moses Sleeper Lasagna, at 232 Bleecker ($29)

Moses Sleeper Lasagna, at 232 Bleecker ($29)

For their first foray into fine dining, the Dig fast-casual chain Dig (née Dig Inn) gave Suzanne Cupps free reign to bring this West Village charmer to life, and the onetime Untitled and Gramercy Tavern chef knocked it out of the park. 232 Bleecker opened right at the end of 2019, and my favorite place to be before COVID changed everything in March was at the chef's counter right by the wood-burning hearth, wolfing down Cupps' crackling Porchetta or show-stopping Moses Sleeper Lasagna. And though the seating options have changed quite a bit since then--the highlight now is a nice sidewalk setup--Cupps still makes some of the best rustic, farm-to-table type food in town. This was my indulgent Christmastime dinner last year, and I plan on repeating that plan in a few weeks.

Located at 232 Bleecker Street, at the corner of Carmine (646-905-5800;232bleecker.com)

Public Village

Chengdu Dan Dan Noodles, at Public Village ($8)

Chengdu Dan Dan Noodles, at Public Village ($8)

A new Sichuan noodle shop is always welcome in any neighborhood, but when it's as good as the Public Village on Essex Street? Oh man, you are golden! Envisioned as a local hangout when it first opened three days before the shutdown, then re-envisioned and reopened about a month later as a takeout-only spot, Jia Song and chef Kiyomi Wang's restaurant features a bunch of terrific handmade noodle dishes — my favorites include the Wan Za noodles with ground pork and mashed yellow peas, the Crispy Pork Strips noodles loaded with Sichuan peppercorns, and the vegan Chilled Noodles — and fun things like one of the great stoner food creations in town, the Grill Chilled Noodle Wrap, featuring hot dogs and melted cheese. There's some barebones curbside seating, but spacious Seward Park across the street beckons as well.

Located at 23 Essex Street between Canal and Hester Streets (646-476-7501;publicvillagenyc.com)

Fat Choy

Mushroom Sloppy ($10), Rice, Beans, and Greens ($8), Little Bok Choys ($6), Rice Rolls ($10), at Fat Choy

Mushroom Sloppy ($10), Rice, Beans, and Greens ($8), Little Bok Choys ($6), Rice Rolls ($10), at Fat Choy

A rich bounty of new vegan restaurants opened in 2020, but my favorite was definitely this "kind of Chinese" counter-service spot on Broome Street. Run by amiable non-vegans Best food to get in nyc Lee and Jared Moeller (somewhat ironically, the two of them met while working at the extremely meaty Cannibal), Fat Choy features a tight menu of small "plates" (really, cardboard boats), and everything is excellent so bring your pod and order up the whole damn thing. Personal favorites include the crisp Salt and Pepper Cauliflower, the hefty Sloppy Mushroom sandwich, and the fiery Sticky Rice Dumplings. There's some good (so far unheated) curbside seating as well.

Located at 250 Broome Street between Orchard and Ludlow Streets (347-778-5889;fatchoynyc.com)

Rule of Thirds

Mazemen with pork jowl, at Rule of Thirds ($18)

Mazemen with pork jowl, at Rule of Thirds ($18)

Following what is by now a familiar story, the Japanese izakaya-ish Rule of Thirds opened its stunning, warehouse-sized space in Greenpoint in early March, only to close the doors a few weeks later. Fortunately, chef JT Vuong and George Padilla had two courtyards at their disposal, so reopening came with plenty of outdoor dining, and they'll soon unveil a "Winter Village" of private bungalows out back. Anyway, I ate almost the entire menu in pre-COVID times, then a bunch of new dishes at a recent revisit, and the food is fantastic, with winners like a Hamachi Collar dripping with miso butter, all the skewers, and a decadent Mazemen with pork jowl.

Located at 171 Banker Street, just north of Norman Street (thirdsbk.com)

Kimika

The team behind the popular Thai spot Wayla opened this Italian-Japanese restaurant on Kenmare Street in August, and the crowds have followed, filling the distanced tables spread out on the sidewalk through the fall. And rightly so! The food here, from chef Chrisrine Lau

It's all delicious, but first-timers should definitely get the gooey Crispy Rice Cake Lasagna, the Mortadella Pizzette Fritte drizzled with miso, and the Roe Roe Roe Roe Spaghetti, a raging party of big flavored ingredients like tobiko, ikura, bottarga and, of course, mentaiko, all clinging nicely to the thick strands of extra al-dente noodles. Save room for chef Clarice Lam's desserts too.

Located at 40 Kenmare Street at the corner of Elizabeth Street (212-256-9280;kimikanyc.com)

Silver Apricot

Black Sesame Panna Cotta, at Silver Apricot ($11)

how to get a fake phone number for verification Black Sesame Panna Cotta, at Silver Apricot ($11)

Chef Simone Tong and Emmeline Zhao's lovely follow up to their acclaimed Little Tong (RIP) opened in early August after a long COVID-related delay, and at this point in the restaurant's timeline there are heaters both curbside and out back in the garden, Tong had her baby (congratulations!), and the Silver Apricot menu is a luxurious joy to make your way through. The melt-in-your-mouth Honeynut Squash Wontons, the charred Brussels Sprouts flecked with Chinese Sausage, the Skirt Steak dabbed in dali herb-sesame relish, the knee-buckling Black Sesame Panna Cotta. all ridiculously good. Great vibes too.

Located at 20 Cornelia Street between Bleecker and West 4th Streets (929-367-8664;silverapricot.nyc)

14 Of The Best Dishes At NYC Newcomers

Monkey Bread at Winner

Park Slope's favorite new cafe opened days before the shutdown, but fortunately for Daniel Eddy, his vision of just being a local spot enabled an easy pivot to takeout, with a menu of breakfast pastries and loaves of bread, picnic-worthy sandwiches to bring to nearby Prospect Park, and roasted chicken for best food to get in nyc. My favorite thing here, though, is chef Ali Spahr's decadent slab of croissant Monkey Bread, glistening and sticky with sugar, a crumbly cinnamon topping adding further delight.

Located at 367 Seventh Avenue at the corner of 11th Street (winnernyc.com)

Ill Papa at Troppo Stretto

This cheeky sandwich shop from L.A. has settled in nicely here in NYC, now running three pop-ups within three different bars in Brooklyn and Queens. Get whatever you feel like, they're all fat and messy and made with a lot of love, but my favorite so far is the Ill Papa, a kind of Italian-Spanish beast stuffed with funky mortadella and capocollo, spicy chorizo, strong manchego, "shredduce", vinegary giardiniera (which also adds crunch to the party), and a creamy dijonnaise.

Located at 27-24 Jackson Avenue in LIC, 42 Hoyt Street in Downtown Brooklyn, and 709 Lorimer Street in Williamsburg (strettobros.com)

Steak Burrito at Nene's Deli

The Birria Tacos are going to get all of the attention here at this tiny, semi-hidden Mexican spot in the back of a Bushwick bodega, but my money will always be on owner and chef Andrés Tonatiuh Galindo Maria's Steak Burrito, just a huge, gooey masterpiece of the form, packed with rice, avocado, melted cheese, and lots of tender beef in a cheesy shell. Pour on a bit of the super spicy red sauce or slightly milder green sauce before each bite, and you've got one of the best $10 dinners in town.

Located at 54 Irving Avenue between Starr and Troutman Streets (347-789-5745;@nenestaqueria)

Pha Lau at Banh Shop House

Pha Lau <div><h2>The top foods to try in New York</h2><div><p>Along with the Statue of Liberty, yellow cabs and skyscrapers, food is a quintessential component of New York City. Its status as a cultural melting pot means you can eat your way across the globe within the confines of one city, taking in some iconic dishes along the way.</p><h3>Don’t leave New York without trying…</h3><h3>1. Gnocchi</h3><p><br> When it comes to pasta, New Yorkers love gnocchi, and both rustic and modern versions are available city-wide. Clay, a farm-to-table restaurant in uptown Manhattan, offers gnocchi served with mildly sweet butternut squash, crunchy hazelnuts, fresh sage, maitake mushrooms and pickled Fresno chillies.</p><h3>2. Nasi lemak</h3><br>New York’s food scene will take you around the world. Look out for Singaporean hawker-style venues that fuse intensely flavourful Chinese, Indian and Malay cuisines. Be sure to try nasi lemak, a fragrant rice dish cooked in coconut milk served with spicy lamb curry, crispy fried anchovies, a hard-boiled egg and fresh sliced cucumber. <h3>3. Ramen</h3><p><br> Going out for ramen on a cold or rainy day in New York is a local pastime. The Japanese staple of wheat noodles in a meat or fish-based hot broth is typically flavoured with soy sauce, miso, or garlic oil and heightened with toppings like sliced pork belly, <i>best food to get in nyc</i> seaweed, bamboo shoots and soft-boiled egg.Almost every ramen noodle soup in New York offers its own variation, from the Okinawa (a chicken broth seasoned with yuzu and sake lees) served at ROKC to the tonkotsu (pork bone broth) found on Jin Ramen’s menu.</p><h3>4. Fiery cocktails</h3><p>Setting fire to a cocktail is a great way for creative bartenders to impress patrons. But experienced mixologists know that the flames aren’t just for showing off – to do this right, it takes finesse, precision and an understanding of how the fire can enhance the flavours of the liquor used in a cocktail. The Honeywell does it best with the cinnamon torched cocoa butter in their Disco Inferno, a drink made with rum, beer, orange oils and agave.</p><h3>5. Milkshake</h3><p><br> This classic is more of a dessert than a drink. You can find the standard chocolate, strawberry or vanilla-flavoured milkshakes at almost every ice cream shop in the city, but if you’re looking for something special, with over-the-top candy and ice cream flavours, be sure to visit Black Tap.</p><h3>6. Shawarma platter</h3><br>Over the past few decades, New York City has seen a rise in halal cart street food vendors. They’ve become one of the most iconic outdoor dining destinations in the city, offering platters like seasoned lamb, chicken or falafel over rice.While halal carts might all look the same, every vendor adds their own flair to set themselves apart. It’s definitely a grab-and-go scenario, which is perfect if you want to savour cheap eats while people-watching on a bench. Spicy food lovers should say yes to the <a href=watch good morning america live red sauce.

7. Bagels


A long-rise yeast bread with a ring shape, bagels are boiled before they’re baked, creating a shiny exterior that yields to a doughy centre (legend credits local water for the unique NY bagel taste). It was Eastern European Jewish immigrants that brought bagels to New York in the late 1800s. Like pizza, bagels give New Yorkers a reason to brag. In most bagel shops or corner delis, you can find flavours like poppy seed, sesame, cinnamon raisin and a New York favourite called “everything”, topped with poppy seeds, toasted sesame seeds, dried garlic, dried onion and salt.With their thick crust and fluffy centre, fresh bagels can be eaten plain, with butter, or smeared with cream cheese. For those who want to start their day with a filling breakfast or early lunch, a bagel with lox (smoked salmon), cream cheese, red onions, tomatoes and capers is the best way to go.

8. Pizza

Everyone knows that you can’t visit the Big Apple without devouring a slice, or let’s be honest, an entire pizza pie (yes, New Yorkers call them pizza pies). New York pizza boasts a thin crust topped with sweet marinara sauce flecked with heaps of oregano and a heavy hand of mozzarella. Pizza spots dot the city’s streets, perfect for picking up “a slice,” as locals do, at any time of day or late into the night. Neapolitan immigrants landing in NY in the late 1800s are credited for bringing pizza to the city – it was Gennaro Lombardi who opened the city’s first pizzeria in 1897, and Lombardi’s on Spring Street still stands today. There are walk-in spots that offer traditional New York or square Sicilian (thick crust) slices for $1 to $4 each; perfect for eating while on-the-go and if you’re travelling with a tight budget.

For those who want to unwind with a glass of wine and try a more personalized pizza pie – for example, a gluten-free crust, vegan-friendly options, or toppings like meatballs or ricotta – places like Arturo’s, Rubirosa, mls guest search Lucali are a few local top picks. Urban legend says that the city’s tap water used to make the crust is part of the reason why the signature item reigns supreme here.

Try making your own Margherita pizza at home with our ultimate next level recipe.

9. Ropa vieja and plantains

Ropa vieja, a Cuban stew of slow-cooked shredded beef, chillies and peppers, is the ultimate comfort food. The name means ‘old clothes’, which perhaps doesn’t sound very appetising, but your taste buds will thank you for pairing the tender, vinegary meat with Caribbean-inspired black beans, yellow rice and plantains. It’s the national dish of Cuba and most Cuban-Americans will tell you that their mum’s or grandma’s recipe can’t be beaten. Try it at Latin Cabana in Queens.

10. Oysters


It doesn’t matter what time of year you visit, there are a plethora of excellent places to enjoy oysters in New York – best paired with a cold glass of prosecco or white wine. Be sure to always look for the money-saving raw bar happy hours that give you even more reason to indulge.

11. Hot dogs


Hot dogs are as ubiquitous to New York as yellow taxis. Traditionally made of ground pork, beef or both, these frankfurter-style sausages are flavoured with garlic, mustard and nutmeg before being encased, cured, smoked and cooked. Trek to Brooklyn to visit Original Nathan’s Famous Frankfurters, opened in 1915 by German-born Charles Feltman who conceived of the hot dog while pushing a pie cart along Coney Island’s boardwalk. Or stop by the street carts on city corners for garlicky hot dogs with grainy mustard and tangy sauerkraut.Try making your own… Cumberland hot dogs with charred tomato salsa or sweet chilli dogs

12. Chicken and waffles

Fried chicken served atop breakfast waffles is a combination that mystifies – until you take a bite. The earliest chicken and waffle meet-up appeared in Pennsylvania, but a Southern food-inspired take on the dish splashed onto the scene at the Wells Supper Club in Harlem in the mid-1900s. Though the restaurant’s doors are now shuttered, the salty-meets-sweet dish lives on in New York’s best soul food joints.

13. Pastrami on rye


Thinly-sliced pastrami piled mile-high and served hot on toasted caraway-flaked rye bread is more than worthy of your NY culinary bucket list. Originally brought to New York from Romania as goose pastrami, today’s best Jewish delis, like Katz’s, opt for pastrami made of beef brisket that’s cured in brine then seasoned with garlic, coriander and loads of black pepper. Enjoy it with a side of classic dill pickles for a perfect New York lunch.Try making your own… hot pastrami bagels

14. Cheesecake


New York cheesecake is known for its simplicity: cream cheese, cream, eggs and sugar are all that go into a local batch. Diners throughout the city dish out towering ivory slices, though the most iconic is found at Junior’s Cheesecake in Brooklyn. Opened in 1950, Junior’s has used the same recipe for three generations and is a cult favourite, well worth the journey to the boroughs.Try making… this classic New York cheesecake or make a version that’s a little lighter

15. Black-and-white cookies

These half-black, half-white iced cookies are more of a sponge cake than a proper biscuit. Hailing from upstate New York in the early 20th century, the biscuits were the result of leftover cake batter, mixed with a touch of extra flour to hold their shape. Skip the plastic shrink-wrapped variety and opt for those freshly made at local bakeries, with a vanilla cake base and fudge icing on one side, vanilla on the other.

16. Knishes


Derived from the Yiddish word for dumpling, a knish is thick, dense dough that is baked, grilled or deep-fried. Potato knishes with spicy brown mustard are a NY classic, though mushroom, spinach and other vegetables often find their way into its doughy centre. Another Eastern European gift from the 1900s, knishes are commonly sold at diners, Jewish delis, butcher shops and street vendors from Brooklyn to the Bronx.

17. Spumoni


Wash down your pizza with a scoop of cold, colourful spumoni. A cross between an Italian ice and an ice cream, spumoni originated in Naples as the ancestor to the Napoleon ice cream. Spumoni, like its descendent, is a trio of flavours, typically chocolate, pistachio and cherry, though vanilla, cannoli or cremelata often make an appearance in place of the cherry.

Try making… this spumoni-inspired recipe

18. General Tso’s Chicken

New Yorkers love to dip chopsticks into those iconic white boxes, slurping out General Tso’s Hershey state bank north platte nebraska. Made of chopped, dark meat chicken that is battered, deep-fried and coated in a sugary-sweet, rich garlic hoisin sauce, speckled with hot chilli peppers and sesame, General Tso’s epitomises Chinese-American cuisine. Though the General did exist, Chinese-born Peng Chang-kuei is credited with inventing the dish, which was introduced to NY and subsequently Americanised during the 1970s Hunan craze in the city. A mainstay in Chinese-American takeout, General Tso’s is best chased with a fortune cookie baked in Brooklyn.

Check out more must-read guides at our travel hub.

Top 10 foodie things to try in Rome
The top foods to try in Paris
Top 10 foodie things to try in Tokyo
The top foods to try in Lisbon

What’s your top tip for living like a local in New York? Leave a comment below…

Источник: https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/top-10-foods-try-new-york

Alphabet City's home
away from home

restaurant clicks: Where to Get Brunch in New York City

Blocks away from Tompkins Square Park in Alphabet City, Poco boasts bottomless brunch every Friday, Saturday, Sunday for a set price per person. This is a party place where you gather with friends for loud laughs and stories. Abe Lopez, a winner of Chopped, designed the menu, so you’re sure to find something creative and delicious whenever you visit.

The infatuation: The Best Bottomless Brunches in NYC

Poco is a loud, crowded, and fun spot for party time brunch. Thirty dollars will get you an entree, fnb internet banking login page south africa unlimited mimosas, Bloody Marys, and sangria. You probably aren’t coming here for the food, but the Latin twists on brunch basics will get the job done. Take note: it’s cash only.

Time Out New York review by boozy brunch goer Maria M

After coming to the weekend boozy brunch, I now understand why this place is on every list of best NYC boozy brunch. A group of four of us went on a Friday afternoon (major plus is that this place's weekend brunch includes Friday!) and the place was busy but not too packed. We all got mimosas, which are supposed to only be served for 1.5 hours, but I guess because it wasn't that busy they let us sit there for FOUR hours. and continued to serve us for those four hours. Our waiter (Aron? I can't remember his name after drinking countless mimosas) was super nice and accommodating. Everyone's dishes were great, though mine was only okay. Highly recommend the lobster guac and lobster Mac & cheese. Also the music was on point.


Foursquare review by boozy brunch goer Byron Flores

The lobster Mac and cheese is awesome! $30 for bottomless mimosa, sangria, and a few other best food to get in nyc plus an entree. The mimosas weren't strong but still worth the $30. Great atmosphere and music.

Best Products: BOTTOMLESS-BRUNCH RESTAURANTS IN NYC THAT TURN YOUR SATURDAY INTO AN ALL-DAY PARTY

Poco's menu is so good, it's worth the $32 for just one and a half hours of unlimited mimosas, bloody marys, and sangria. It'll be a tough decision to choose between the lobster mac, lobster grilled cheese, and French toast. Just a heads up: It's cash only.


Refinery 29 review: The Right Way To Do Bottomless Brunch In NYC

This East Village brunch institution is perfect for groups looking to get their drink on without compromising taste. With several filling and delicious options from Lobster Mac and Cheese to Guacamole Benedict, there are options for the whole crowd. This place gets pretty packed on weekends, so be sure to plan ahead.
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THE BEST TOTALLYFREE/UNDERGROUND COMEDY SHOWS IN NYC

“LET’S SEE, WHAT ELSE” AT POCO
Wednesdays at 8pm

Local comedians Tom Delgado and Missy Baker host a new batch of both rising and established comedians in this restaurant’s intimate downstairs cellar every week (there’s a bar down there, relax!) -- which means you could quite literally be rubbing elbows with reputable comics like Nick Vatterott (Comedy Central, Late Night With Jimmy Fallon) and SNL cast member Sasheer Zamata.  

Gotham Best food to get in nyc 6 Vegan Comfort Food Dishes That Won't Make You Miss the Real Thing

"Smoked Truffle Mac & Cheese

Local gourmands have spoken: Poco owner Sara Grizzle was declared the winner of the Natural Gourmet Institute’s vegan mac and cheese cook-off in October. And now New Yorkers can taste the winning recipe any night of the week at her Alphabet City restaurant. Expect a big bowl of oversized shells mixed with cashew cheese, november 2020 holiday packages broccoli, sautéed mushrooms, and garlic spinach covered with a crunchy layer of truffled panic."

 

Источник: http://www.poconyc.com/
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Are you wondering what to eat in New York City during your first trip to the Big Apple? Read on to discover ten must-eat New York food favorites that you simply should not miss during your Gotham adventure.

Bagel and Lox in New York

Start spreading the word. The highlight of any trip to New York City is the food in one of the country’s best food cities.

Let’s face it, eating in New York is the best thing to do in the city that doesn’t sleep. This is a city where you can eat great food from the crack of dawn until … the crack of dawn.

Laminated Pastry at Win Son in Brooklyn

Sure, the US megacity has fabulous museums and sights that all travelers should visit during their first visit. Travelers who buy a New York Pass never regret checking out the Statue of Liberty, Empire State Building and 9/11 Tribute Center too. As for art, we recommend the Met, MOMA and Neue Galerie.

What can we say? After living and working in Manhattan for a combined 17 years followed by too many visits to count on our fingers and toes, we now focus on finding the best food every time we return to New York.

New York Food Favorites

Eggs with Morels and Spring Peas at Le Coucou in New York

Food travelers can find New York food favorites throughout the city from the tip of the Bronx to the bottom of Staten Island. And the best part? Savvy diners don’t have to spend a lot of money to eat well in New York.

In many ways, New York is a city of immigrants and millionaires. The immigrants, many who arrived over a century ago, brought all kinds of food traditions that continue to this day. As for the millionaires, let’s just say that they like to eat well. Accordingly, food in New Capital one cafe logo ranges from global cheap eats to the echelon of fine dining.

Feeling overwhelmed? We recommend that you take a deep breath and start your culinary exploration with the following iconic New York food favorites:

1. Bagels

New York Bagels

Bagels weren’t invented in New York but they’re better in the big apple than anywhere else in the world. Sorry, Montreal – we like New York’s jumbo, crunchy, dense bagels better than your smaller, sweeter version.

Eastern European Jews brought their bagel recipes to New York at the turn of the 20th century. Since then, bagels have become a worldwide phenomenon enjoyed by food lovers from Edinburgh to Shanghai.

In New York, bakers hand roll bagels using a special twisting and shaping method before boiling them in a mixture of water and malt syrup and then baking them to a dark, crusty brown. Many people incorrectly attribute the New York bagel’s magnificent qualities to local water, but we attribute the New York bagel’s excellence to bagel-making methods refined over a century or more.

Discover 29 more iconic American food favorites you need to eat at least once in your life.

A New York bagel is a wonderful vessel for cream cheese, lox and other fixings. Popular bagel flavors include sesame, salt, poppy, onion and garlic as well as everything bagels that have all of the above.

Most New Yorkers are loyal to their favorite neighborhood bagel shops. Visit a few so that you can find your personal favorite too.

Insider Tip: Order a Black & White Cookie as part of your bagel experience. The two-colored glazed cookie is available at most bagel shops.

Where to Eat Bagels in New New orleans garden district homes for sale City
Absolute Bagels, Bagel Corner (Riverdale), Ess-A-Bagel and Murray’s Bagels

2. Pizza

New York Pizza Slice with Pepperoni

With thousands of pizzerias in New York, pizza is the food that fuels America’s biggest city. From dollar slices to loaded pies, pizza is a common denominator among the classes that rarely disappoints.

New Yorkers now claim the ubiquitous food favorite as their own and for good reason – those thousands of pizza parlors make it difficult to find bad pizza in NYC. Although New York’s version is distinctly different from the kind served in Italy, the American city can take some credit for pizza’s global popularity.

Italian immigrants like Gennaro Lombardi imported the pizza tradition when they moved to NYC at the end of the 19th century. Lombardi opened the still operating Lombardi’s, a coal-oven pizzeria, in 1897. New York visitors can eat pizza at joints like Lombardi’s or sample several during a pizza tour.

Read our New York pizza guide with pizzerias in all five boroughs.

Plan to eat New York pizza with your hands, carefully folding each slice before gleefully stuffing it into your mouth. First, though, sprinkle enough oregano, grated cheese and red chili flakes to achieve your own version of pizza perfection.

3. Hot Dogs

New York Hot Dog

Though they’re as American as baseball and apple pie, hot dogs are another classic New York food brought over by immigrants – in this case, Germans and Austrians. One of those German immigrants, Charles Feltman, opened Nathan’s Famous in Coney Island back in 1915. Although his original pushcart business now has locations around the world, the best location remains in Brooklyn.

You won’t have to look hard for a New York hot dog. They’re all over the city in street carts, at Gray’s Payaya stands and at the aforementioned Nathan’s. There’s really no more classic hot dog experience than enjoying it while watching baseball, America’s pastime, at a Yankees or Mets game.

Add plenty of mustard to your dog as well as relish and (untraditionally) ketchup if you must. You can even add sauerkraut if that’s how you roll.

Where to Eat Hot Dogs in New York City
Nathan’s Famous, Papaya King and carts around the city

4. Pastrami Sandwiches

New York Pastrami Sandwich

Popular for over a century, pastrami sandwiches hit the worldwide zeitgeist in 1989 thanks to a memorable scene in the movie When Harry Met Sally. Today, passionate food travelers make a pilgrimage to the Lower East Side to “have what she’s having” a/k/a a hand-carved pastrami sandwich.

Eastern Europeans brought the Jewish deli concept from countries like Poland and Romania when they fled their homes in search of the American dream. Made with cured and smoked beef brisket, a pastrami sandwich is the classic deli item with its thin layers of pastrami piled high between two slices of seeded rye bread.

Discover the 20 best sandwiches in America.

Plan to share your Pastrami Sandwich unless you’re starving. Good ones are both expensive and huge. Add brown mustard and dill pickles for optimal satisfaction.

While in New York, you can also enjoy Pastrami’s cousin – the Corned Beef Sandwich on rye. You can simply add Russian dressing or opt for a Reuben, the semi-Jewish, non-kosher classic sandwich loaded with Swiss cheese (the unkosher part), sauerkraut, and Russian dressing.

5. Burgers

New York Hamburger at The Grill

Although the hamburger’s roots may loosely trace back to Hamburg, New Yorkers have fully embraced the meaty sandwich and made it their own. Teenagers, businessmen and ‘ladies who lunch’ eat juicy burgers all over the city from fast-casual eateries to some of the finest New York restaurants.

In New York, no two hamburgers are identical, with each chef adding his own twist. In just a day, hamburger fans can have two totally different experiences by eating a juicy smashed patty burger at Shake Shack or a beefy, thick Black Label Burger at Keith McNally’s Minetta Tavern.

Most of the city’s best gastropubs source their meat from legendary New Jersey butcher Pat LaFrieda who creates a special blend ground beef and fat. Get a burger made to order, preferably medium-rare, and enjoy every juicy bite.

Where to Eat Burgers in New York City
Shake Shake (budget), Ear Inn (good value), JG Melon (expensive), Minetta Tavern (expensive) and The Grill (luxury)

6. Brunch

Brunch at Russ and Daughters Cafe in New York

The origins of brunch are a mystery. The mid-day meal may have originated with English hunters, churchgoing Catholics or Jews just looking for a good ‘nosh.’ It hit our personal radar in the 1990s when Sarabeth’s was all the rage on Manhattan’s Upper West Side.

Today, brunchers don’t have to look hard for a spot to eat the best meal of the day on a leisurely Saturday or Sunday. And the choices run the gamut with the likes of dim sum in Chinatown, soul food in Harlem, hipster grub in Greenpoint and ‘cheffy’ food in Angel victoria secret card payment Park.

Despite all the brunch choices, there’s one particular brunch that’s unique to NYC – bagels and lox. Though you can buy all the ingredients to make a brunch feast in your hotel room, we recommend Russ & Daughters Cafe located in Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Order a fish board to share and savor a quintessential New York food experience.

Insider Tip: Start your Russ & Daughters brunch with a Super Heebster Bagel Toast topped with whitefish & baked salmon salad, wasabi-infused fish roe and horseradish dill cream cheese.

Where to Eat Brunch in New York City
Russ & Daughters Cafe

7. Chinese Food

New York Dumplings

Chinese food is yet another popular cuisine that’s not indigenous to NYC. Chinese restaurants first popped up in the 1870s when Chinese immigrants started moving from the West Coast after the Gold Rush ended.

Some of the city’s best Chinese restaurants are still located in the city’s original Chinatown in lower Manhattan; however, the more exciting Chinese food hub is now in Flushing. Intrepid food chas logo 2018 will want to hop on the subway for a culinary trip to China via Queens.

A visit to NYC is the time to expand your Chinese food horizons. Start by slurping soup juicy dumplings at Joe’s Shanghai and devouring hand-pulled noodles m facebook login sign in Xi’an Famous Foods.

8. Fine Dining

Quenelle de Brochet at Le Coucou in NYC

With more than fifty Michelin-starred restaurants, New York has enough upscale restaurants to satisfy both lords of industry and wandering gourmands. When it comes to eating well in New York, the options are practically endless so long as your credit limit can handle it.

Top establishments like Eleven Madison Park and Le Bernardin have set the culinary bar not just in NYC but in kitchens around the globe. However, don’t discount more innovative establishments like Momofuku Ko and high-end sushi bars like Sushi Nakazawa.

Fine dining isn’t for everybody, but if you’re going to splurge on a meal, it might as well best food to get in nyc in New York. Do your research, make an advance reservation and enjoy the experience.

Where to Experience Fine Dining in New York City
Le Bernardin, Le Coucou and Gramercy Tavern

9. Cronuts and Other Fun Pastries

Cronut at Dominique Ansel Bakery

Pairing donuts with coffee has been a thing in New York for decades. In recent years, artisan bakers have pushed the envelope with exciting pastry creations, none more notable than the cronut.

Invented in NYC by French baker Dominique Ansel and sold in his self-named bakery, cronuts stormed the city when they debuted in 2013. Crowds still queue each morning for their chance to buy the croissant-donut hybrid.

Discover the 25+ best donuts in America.

Just to be clear, cronuts are not the only dessert game in town. The city is filled with bakeries selling cupcakes, cookie dough and crack pie. However, if you want a simple donut, you can easily find that too. You can even take a donut tour and try several.

10. Cheesecake

New York Cheesecake

As much fun as it is to eat creative pastries, there’s something about digging into an old-school slice of New York cheesecake. Although the diner staple is available all over the city, nobody does it better than Junior’s at the original Brooklyn location.

Discover 100 more of the best desserts around the world.

A good New York cheesecake is filled with ingredients like eggs, heavy cream, sugar and the most important ingredient – cream cheese.

Although Kraft’s Philadelphia Brand is famous around the world for cream cheese, cheesecake’s key ingredient was actually invented in Chester, NY – just 60 miles from New York City. (Apparently, in the late 1800s, Philadelphia was known for luxury. Something we, as former Philadelphians, find laughable today.)

Don’t despair if you don’t have time to take a quick trip to Brooklyn. You can eat cheesecake at Junior’s in the heart of the action on Times Square.

Where to Eat Cheesecake in New York City
Junior’s and Diners Around the City

Useful New York Facts

Smoked Salmon at Russ and Daughters Cafe in New York City
  • The largest city in New York State, New York City is the largest city in the USA.
  • The USA is in North America.
  • The USA’s currency is the US Dollar.
  • English is the USA’s official language.
  • Tips are expected and comprise a large component of a server’s compensation. The standard is 15-20%.

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About the Authors

About the Authors

Daryl & Mindi Hirsch

Saveur Magazine’s BEST TRAVEL BLOG award winners Daryl and Mindi Hirsch share their culinary travel experiences and recipes on the 2foodtrippers website and YouTube. The married Food and Travel content creators live in Lisbon, Portugal.

Disclosure

We update our articles regularly. Some updates are major while others are minor link changes and spelling corrections. Let us know if you see anything that needs to be updated in this article.

Important Update
Some businesses may revise their hours and menus due to COVID-19. Others may close, either temporarily or permanently, without notice. Be sure to check websites for updated information and make advance reservations where possible.

Источник: https://www.2foodtrippers.com/new-york-food-favorites/
New York Where to Eat Now

A Meal for Every Occasion

Twelve short months ago, members of the city’s restaurant cognoscenti were still huddled in poky little rooms, picking at warmed-over barbecued ribs and platters of frites, gamely singing the praises of neighborhood restaurants and comfort food. Not anymore. The great restaurant boom that began in the nineties but fizzled out at the beginning of the new millennium has exploded all over again. Overnight, the meatpacking district has blown up into a chaotic gastronomic version of Bourbon Street. Grand old French restaurants have been replaced by baroque new corporate venues, extravagant wine bars, and Pan-Asian food palaces as big as bus depots. Out in Brooklyn, little mom-and-pop joints are serving foie gras and salting their dishes with black truffles, and in Manhattan, diners can blow $180 on a single entrée of Kobe-beef “Châteaubriand,” and $13,000 for a magnum of 1899 Château Lafite-Rothschild. Organic food is big business in the city these days, fancy Shanghai banquets are all the rage among Chinese connoisseurs, and down on the Bowery, the hot new restaurants are doing what the fancy uptown joints do: They’re serving an elaborate champagne brunch.

The Big Splurge

I’m not normally in favor of spending $350 on a single meal, but if you have a fat year-end bonus to blow, take the elevator up past the Aveda store to the fourth floor of the Time Warner Center, bow politely to the security guard patrolling the area, and take a seat at the glowing blond Hinoki-wood bar at Masa. If you find yourself face-to-face with a wry, middle-aged, vaguely monkish-looking gentleman, don’t lift a finger—Masa Takayama will do the rest. yama will do the rest. Maybe you’d enjoy a bowl of truffled uni risotto, or tuna rolls stuffed with milky pink tuna belly, and it’s perfectly permissible to close your eyes in quiet ecstasy when you take your first bite of Masa’s “Foie Gras Shabu Shabu.” But if by chance you don’t see Masa at the bar, or if they try to seat you at one of the small, dimly lit tables, do what my wife did when she first glimpsed our bill: complain bitterly, and threaten to turn on your heel and go spend all that cash at the Bose store downstairs.

Next door, at Per Se, the décor is pristine in an icy sort of way, the service is immaculate, and even if Thomas Keller isn’t actually in New York that day, he’s always connected to his palatial East Coast kitchen via videophone. The specialty of the house (following a bowl of truffled popcorn at the bar) is a profusion of small, preciously wrought, archly named dishes, many of which might be considered pretentious if they weren’t so damn delicious. Try the “Bacon and Eggs” (bits of braised calf’s head molded in a cake, with a poached quail egg wobbling on top), a sinful fat man’s treat called “Chaud Froid” (soft foie gras confit, apple purée, brioche croutons, and sweet cipollini onions), and anything you can find containing lobster, scallops, or snails.

If you tire of murmuring waiters and pious, fat-cat connoisseurs, then ride the escalator down to the third floor and join the party at Café Gray. Gray Kunz’s long-awaited second act is notable for old Lespinasse-style favorites like the lightly creamy lobster chowder, bowls of classically dense mushroom risotto, and tender, blocky short ribs braised down to their rich, beefy essence. But the real star of the show is the room itself: a sparkling, mirrored fun house, with a swanky bar area and a long, open kitchen that spreads before the rows of white-topped tables like a Broadway stage. Beyond the kitchen is a wall of windows looking out over Columbus Circle and Central Park. Suddenly, you don’t feel like you’re dining in a glorified corporate food mall anymore. You’re back, again, in glittering New York.

Japan Chic

I don’t know about you,” one of my food-professional friends whispered the other evening, “but I grow weary of raw fish.” Or edamame, he might have said, or friendly Caucasian waiters dressed in ill-fitting samurai outfits, or any multisyllabic cocktail name containing the word geisha. It’s all on display at the city’s new wave of Japanese restaurants, plus much, much more. At the mammoth EN Japanese Brasserie, on Hudson Street, the specialty is freshly made tofu, ladled from lacquer boxes with big wooden dippers, along with an ingenious “miso sampler” served with a pile of iced-cabbage crudités. On the opposite end of the spectrum, there’s Megu, in Tribeca, where Kobe-beef addicts can sit in the shadow of a giant dripping Buddha ice sculpture and addle themselves with Kobe-beef meatballs stuffed with foie gras ($5 per piece), Kobe-beef short ribs, and, for a cool $180, decorous cuts of Kobe-beef “Châteaubriand” finished with soy butter and exotic black sesame seeds jetted in from Kyoto.

The glittering Fiji-stone sushi bar is the place to sit at Geisha, on 61st Street, where I spent a hectic evening, not long ago, nibbling on decent though unspectacular sushi, and watching silent anime splatter films projected on the wall, next to a wild-eyed Upper East Side matron clutching a fur-lined purse. With its great vaulted dining hall and long, runway-style sushi bar, Matsuri, in the bottom of the Maritime Hotel in Chelsea, is still the most elegant of the new big-box Japanese establishments. Though Jeffrey Chodorow’s latest culinary-theme-park, Ono, has similarly impressive, mothlike paper lanterns suspended from the ceiling; addictive shot-glass shooters composed of Kumamoto oysters, ponzu sauce, and a single raw quail egg; plus the services of Sakiko, the very knowledgeable “sake sommelier.” Best of all, though, is the fully automated Japanese push-button toilet (on the second floor), complete with pop-up lid; a subtle, expertly aimed blow-dryer; and a whole range of cleansing water-jet options, including Regular, Oscillating, and Pulsating.

You’ll find no such gizmos uptown at Sushi of Gari, where the city’s most discerning sushi monks still stampede the tiny bar to taste Gari’s inventive, much-imitated raw-fish creations. The cramped modernist bar at Riingo is my favorite spot in midtown for Kobe beef sushi. But whenever I’m loitering around downtown and feel the need for a shot of pure protein, I’ll duck into a new restaurant called Hedeh, on Great Jones Street, for a bite of tuna belly or, perhaps, a helping of the lightly caramelized house foie gras, before ambling down Second Avenue to the tiny new Jewel Bako outlet called Makimono. This closet-sized establishment is hidden behind a discreet façade of brushed cement, and if you bring your uptown expense account with you, you can sample three generally superior grades of toro (o-toro for $12, chu for $8, aka for $4); an elegant, Atkins-friendly salad made with quail egg, tuna sashimi, hijiki, and red plum; and an almost perfect “inside-out” maki roll made with bay scallops and creamy avocado, spiked with yuzu, and speckled on its exterior with crunchy, golden caviar.

Blue Hill in New York's Where to Eat

Organic Chic

In these politically correct times, you’re not a self-respecting member of the foodie aristocracy unless you know who Carlo Petrini is (he’s the founding father of the ever-expanding Slow Food sect), what “self-sustaining” means, or the true definition of that hazy term biodynamic. And if you pass the test, chances are you’ve also made the pilgrimage up the Hudson to Blue Hill at Stone Barns, where the industrious Barber brothers (Dan and David) have set up (with the help of the fine chef Michale Anthony and generous amounts of Rockefeller cash) their own fully organic Shangri-la amid the rolling hills and meadows of the old Rockefeller country estate in Pocantico Hills, New York. In season, you’ll find several varieties of asparagus on the menu, and all eggs are produced, in time-honored Slow Food tradition, by the restaurant’s own flock of hyperorganic chickens. Even the nourishing, exceptionally porky-tasting pork comes from a band of Berkshire hogs who feed in a stand of acorn trees near the restaurant, where they are attended, during visiting hours, by crowds of thankful, slightly mournful-looking gastronomes.

Next stop on the rickety Greenmarket bandwagon is Galen Zamarra’s stylish, faithfully organic restaurant Mas, in Greenwich Village, where the glowing little room has been painstakingly constructed to resemble the inside of a (very rich) peasant’s farmhouse in the south of France, and even the rigorously seasonal menus are tied together with bits of twine. After that it’s on to Better Burger, for a bite of the leathery ostrich burger (with a spot of curry-flavored “Karma Ketchup”), before we decamp to Quartino Bottega Organica, in the East Village, to sit on one of the chaste wooden pews along the best food to get in nyc and sip cups of pomegranate juice, while picking at helpings of wholly organic pesto or brittle, supremely healthy slices of whole-wheat pizza or, best of all, the superior house focaccia, shot through with slabs of melted Stracchino cheese.

You won’t find any cheese at all at Pure Food and Wine, in Gramercy Park, where the room smells vaguely of pulped cabbage, and wistful, glossy pictures of happy ducks and smiling sheep adorn the orange walls. Nothing on the all-vegan menu is cooked to over 118 degrees, which doesn’t keep the summery tomato tartare from looking uncannily like tuna tartare, or the impressive raw-food lasagne (made with tomatoes, strips of raw zucchini, crushed basil, and pistachio pesto) from tasting uncannily like a cooler, healthier version of the real thing. The chase com mortgage login is true of the non-fish but curiously fishy “Cape Cod Cakes” (they’re tofu-based) available at Counter, in the East Village, which I enjoyed one placid evening while sipping on a glass of biodynamic Pinot Grigio from Slovenia, and smugly observing the parade of unenlightened sad sacks trooping in and out of the very large McDonald’s across the street.

Hot Spots

When we called to secure a table at Spice Market, the kindly voice on the other end of the line suggested the wait would be five weeks. Next, we joined the great roiling meatpacking-district mob and attempted to batter our way into the joint. After intense negotiation, we secured a couple of seats at the long cantilevered bar, where, to our vast surprise, San jose cabo airport Vongerichten’s street-food fusion menu lived up to all the outlandish, possibly even insane, hype. Maybe you’ll begin your little gastronomic tour like we did, with chicken wings drizzled in a sticky, sweet chili sauce, followed by white bowls of curried duck or pork vindaloo (laced with long red chilies, cumin, garlic, and cinnamon), before progressing to the short ribs, which are softened in a mass of garlic and green chilies and served, for delicate eaters, with a pair of silver tongs.

My other favorite meatpacking-district destination is the chaotic townhouse dining room at Ninth, where, on select evenings, Zak Pelaccio serves up his ingenious “pork fries” (tender pork strips rolled in bread crumbs, then fried) with a sweet chaser of bourbon. Glittery fusion establishments like Jefferson, and Bao 111 continue to pack in crowds of revelers, but for a slightly more soothing, feng shui–approved brand of trendiness, this year’s choice is Kittichai, where a pod of auspicious goldfish guard the narrow entrance, and lucky coins are taped under many of the tables. The food, by the accomplished Thai chef Ian Chalermkittichai, is generally auspicious, too, particularly the shiny little baby pork ribs lacquered with chocolate, the bowls of cool, peppery beef salad dusted with crunchy rice powder, and the braised loin of lamb tossed with tiny round Thai eggplants and melting, very un-Thai-like cubes of foie gras.

Further uptown, my demure, usually unflappable mother has stopped agitating for her annual luncheons at Swifty’s or The Four Seasons’ Grill Room and demands to be taken instead to the glass-walled dining room at Asiate, high in the sky over Columbus Circle at the new Mandarin Oriental Hotel in the Time Warner Center. If that’s all booked up, we’ll pay our $20 to get into the refurbished MoMA to get a peek at Danny Meyer’s fancy new museum canteen, The Modern, which opens later this month for dinner. After that, we’ll make a beeline for davidburke & donatella, where it’s always amusing to watch the local neighborhood swells chattering in their colorful gowns and dark charcoal suits while fighting for tastes of Mr. Burke’s foie gras terrine (sweetened with kumquats), his bristling “Crisp and Angry Lobster Cocktail” (a whole lobster rolled in Cajun spices and spiked on a flower holder), and the simple baked salmon, which is piled with ginger and sweet Chinese sausages and served with a tall shot glass brimming with the kind of spicy, fishy, freshly made XO sauce you rarely ever see in the vicinity of Bloomingdale’s.

The Return of the Tasting Menu

Jaded, semi-corpulent restaurant critics like myself usually consider tasting menus to be an overly mannered, overpriced waste of time. But the new mania for small plates has made every dinner a tasting event, and the city is brimming with so many inventive chefs that the only way to track their endless experiments is to submit, now and then, to a gut-busting, marathon meal. Take Sumile, in the West Village, where Josh DeChellis offers a multicourse omakase feast containing, among other things, little rounds of Dungeness crab capped with caviar and yuzu gelée, a pod of crunchy, Chiclit-size duck tongues (served with smoked trout), and an impossibly smooth thimbleful of panna cotta flavored with chamomile tea. Then there’s Dévi, in the Flatiron district, where the well-traveled Indian chefs Suvir Saran and Hemant Mathur manage to turn a pile of ordinary vegetables into a multicultural tasting extravaganza (seven courses for $95, with wine pairings) replete with tall spicy thatches of crisp frizzled okra, fat rice puffs called poha and soaked in mint curry, and a delicious Indo-Chinese cauliflower dish smothered, like some ethereal version of sweet-and-sour pork, in a tangy tomato sauce.

Compared to the numerous big-ticket items in the impressive 65,000-bottle wine “portfolio” at Cru, chef Shea Gallante’s $75 tasting menu is a relative bargain. My recent dinner there began with a whole rainbow of à la carte crudi (arctic char tipped with vanilla, tuna spiked with espresso, etc.); progressed through a variety of choice gnocchi (with oxtail), risottos (with uni), and pastas; and then, before the wine obliterated all memory, reached a grand finale with a perfectly cooked piece of sturgeon laced with a crème fraîche and caviar sauce. At Wylie Dufresne’s restaurant wd-50, the mad genius of Clinton Street shuffles foie gras with slivers of caramel-covered nori, decks his venison tartare with scoops of deliciously smooth edamame ice cream, and serves up thin ribbons of beef tongue with dice-size cubes of fried mayonnaise, which melt in the mouth in a most pleasing way. Then there are Sam Mason’s pyrotechnic desserts, like tequila-flavored ice cream served with wedges of pineapple. My menu indicated the pineapple had been smoked in tea, but when I sampled this curiously addictive dish (it was on the summer menu), the pineapple wedges tasted somehow stronger, more bracing, and more interesting than that, as if they had been soaked for a week, and possibly longer, in a particularly potent form of bong water.

The Brooklyn Boom

I confess i used to be one of those Manhattanites who quietly turn up their noses whenever their Brooklyn friends begin babbling about the beautifully articulated pork chop they’ve just enjoyed on Smith Street, or the quaint little wine bar that’s just opened on their block. But the steak tartare at 360, on Van Brunt Street in Red Hook, is still the best I’ve tasted in the city. The clean, well-lit Haitian establishment Kombit, on Flatbush Avenue, wins this year’s prize for the best fried goat in town (they also serve an exemplary dish of fried pork called grillot, with big smashed plantains). And if you’re craving an old-fashioned infusion of jerk chicken or medallions of hot, jellied oxtail poured over rice and a pile of butter beans, I suggest you hail a taxi and direct your driver to a diminutive West Indian joint on the northernmost fringes of Polish Greenpoint called Bleu Drawes Café.

In a borough known for its pizza meccas, Franny’s, on Flatbush Avenue, is the latest big thing. The pies are charred in a wood oven, of bb&t hsa account login, and you can peruse the Greenmarket pedigrees of the various toppings (oregano from Stokes Farms in Old Tappan, basil from the Farm at Miller’s Crossing in Claverack, etc.) on the menu while wells fargo financial institution address for direct deposit wait for your order to arrive. The pizzas are superior, particularly the one covered with four cheeses (mozzarella, ricotta, Gorgonzola, fontina) and the one covered with nothing much at all (olive oil, rosemary, and garlic only), but if you’re wise, you’ll save room for appetizers like rigorously organic piles of mashed chicken liver heaped on rounds of crostini, or long strips of soft, vaguely charred eggplant drizzled with pine nuts and flakes of ricotta cheese.

An unlikely bistro called Ici serves the best chicken-liver schnitzel in all of Fort Greene—or anywhere else, for that matter—and if you happen to drop by when the braised pork shoulder is on the menu (it’s served with Brussels sprouts folded with bits of bacon, and a pile of the most refined organic grits from South Carolina), you should order that too. Pork is also one of the specialties at Applewood, newly opened on a quiet, leafy street in Park Slope. The room was filled with smiling children on the night I visited, which didn’t detract from the quality of the spoon-soft pork belly or my short ribs, which were wrapped in a rich layer of caul fat, or my wife’s special sturgeon, which was crisped on top and flavored, in the new Brooklyn style, with a hint of truffles.

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Fatso Dreams

Like racing jockeys and opera stars, food critics are doomed to a succession of diets. I endured a lengthy stretch of abstinence recently, and while I sat in grand restaurants gnawing on carrot sticks and gently pushing dessert plates aside, I passed the time hallucinating about meals that might have been. I dreamt of bellying up to the bar at Casa Mono, near Gramercy Park, and hoovering down towers of salty, charred lamb chops, and Andy Nusser’s special sweetbreads, which are fried and rolled in crushed almonds. I fantasized about the puffy, fresh-made bread at Taboon, and bowls of the steamy, sweet shrimp-and-corn risotto served with all sorts of other southern delicacies at the East Village bayou joint Natchez. I dreamt of barbecue in all its forms, particularly the greasy cuts of brisket at Blue Smoke, and the Texas beef chili sold in cups at my local Daisy Mae’s BBQ USA cart (it’s on the corner of 39th and Broadway), which I used to supplement, during the course of long-ago binges, with sandwiches of Carolina pulled pork tasting faintly of citrus.

During my bleak days of no snacking, I also pondered fat Niman Ranch hot dogs from the new East Village branch of Westville; the wet, gravy-infused, uncannily tender roast-beef sandwiches at the new Manhattan outpost of Roll ’N’ Roaster; and the impressive “Fourth of July Picnic” (cole slaw, fried-chicken strips, and bourbon-flavored mayonnaise squeezed between a messy baguette), which is just one of the inventive creations available at a clean little shop called Carve Unique Sandwiches, on a raffish corner of Eighth Avenue and 47th Street. I imagined devouring a brace or two of toasty, compact pork-chop banh mi (sweet pork, pickled carrots, mayonnaise, and cilantro stuffed in a hot, crunchy t mobile refill account at Nicky’s Vietnamese Sandwiches, on the Lower East Side, before creeping uptown to demolish the great, toppling “Skyscraper Burger,” the most formidable of several pleasing burger options at the bustling lower Park Avenue outlet of New York Burger Co.

Speaking of hamburgers, I’ve whiled away long abstemious afternoons pining for Tom Valenti’s structurally impressive new Ouest Burger, served at lunchtime only, at Ouest, or the zeppelin-sized roquefort cheeseburger at The Spotted Pig, which is best enjoyed, for maximum caloric damage, with a bowl of pillowy gnudi (little ricotta dumplings rolled in semolina and drowned in brown butter) and several dizzying tankards of very fattening Old Speckled Hen Ale. The burger at Danny Meyer’s seasonal fast-food boutique, Shake Shack (try the Triple Shack Burger when the restaurant opens again in the spring), is pretty good, too, although what I craved most of all as I tossed and turned in bed, listening to the unhappy sounds of my gurgling belly, was the four-dip, four-topping, frozen-custard extravaganza called the “Shackapalooza” (Valrhona-chocolate chunks, hot caramel sauce, and coconut macaroons, please), presented with proper ceremony in a decorous pail, with a plastic shovel.

Bar Crazy

As the revelers celebrating the 150th anniversary of the great McSorley’s Old Ale House can attest, dining at the bar is an ancient New York custom. But what began as the preference of a few solitary gin hounds seems to have blossomed into a full-blown culinary fad. The highbrow simplicity of Craft gave birth to Craftbar, which, late last year, produced Hearth. Former Craft chef’s Marco Canora’s East Village restaurant has plenty of tables, but the best seats in the house are at the narrow three-seat bar overlooking the what was yesterdays national holiday. All sorts of fine food (consistently good house gnocchi, braised pork, olive-oil cake) is available from the regular menu, but that’s where eager downtown gourmets gather each evening like seagulls on a wharf, jockeying for delicious scraps (pork ends, little morsels of monkfish wrapped in pancetta) thrown up from the stove by the busy cooks.

If you don’t feel like dropping a month’s wages at Masa Takayama’s flagship restaurant, you can take a seat next door at Bar Masa and order a bowl of truffle-and-uni-laced risotto for a mere $68. At the long bar at Alta, in Greenwich Village, you and your friends can order the entire menu for $300 (called “The Whole Shebang”) and receive a tsunami of tapas-style dishes like sweet dates wrapped in bacon, lamb meatballs with yogurt sauce, and tender little pieces of hanger steak rolled in a spicy mix of crushed chilies from Aleppo. The whole menu at the superior noodle bar Momofuko, in the East Village, costs around $130, and whenever I repair there I like to blow another $20 on a nice bottle of sake, followed by plate after plate of the deliciously steamy Chinese buns stuffed with crisp chicken (with shredded cucumbers and greens), or deposits of sugary Cantonese braised pork.

Ham, in all its thinly sliced, multitudinous Eurocentric forms, is the main theme at Bar Jamón, where the Lilliputian-sized, fourteen-stool room gets so crowded on weekend nights that plates of Serrano ham or wedges of the excellent Tortilla Catalan get passed around over the heads of the diners, like at some raucous frat-house event. And if you want to expand on this Iberian-bar-food experience, the place is Tia Pol, in Chelsea, where on any given evening you’ll find legions of artsy-looking eaters balanced on little bar stools, best food to get in nyc prim bites of pork-loin sandwiches, perfectly tender calamari simmered in their own salty black ink, golden croquettes laced with slices of ham, and thin coins of red-hot chorizo served on slices of bread spread with chocolate.

The Indestructible Brasserie

As the town’s old, grande dame French restaurants continue to expire, the city’s great classically trained chefs are frantically hedging their bets. Along with Daniel, a neighborhood café (Café Boulud), and a distinguished midtown burger joint (DB Bistro Moderne), the Boulud empire will soon include a new restaurant in that superchef’s Valhalla, Las Vegas. Jean-Georges’s original flagship has more international outlets these days than the Hong Kong Shanghai Bank, and Mix in New York, the poor cousin to Alain Ducasse’s woefully overpriced Alain Ducasse at the Essex House, recently began serving a new bistro-oriented menu containing a newfangled version of banquette du veau. But the most conspicuous downmarket transformation has taken place on 55th Street, where La Côte Basque has morphed into Brasserie LCB, an agggresively casual establishment with rustling potted palm fronds and yards of brass railings all polished to a glittering sheen in the fashionably faux, Balthazar style. Luckily, there’s nothing fake about Jean-Jacques Rachou’s menu, which contains old La Côte Basque favorites like cassoulet plus an impressive roster of hearty old-fashioned dishes like calf’s-liver Lyonnaise, tournedos Rossini, and an exceptional rendition of tripes à l’Armagnac, cooked in veal stock and brandy and served with all the grandness it deserves, under a great silver warmer.

Frogs’ legs are my favorite dish at Gavroche, newly opened on a clamorous stretch of 14th Street, and if you don’t like the sound of rumbling buses, and if weather permits, you can eat them alfresco, in a shaded little garden covered in flagstones. Dave Pasternack, the resident seafood expert at Esca, also turns out to be a closet Francophile, and his new Batali-backed restaurant, Bistro Du Vent, attempts to replicate the simple culinary glories of old Provence, like socca (a kind of chickpea pancake); a thick, bone-sticking version of pistou; and even salade Niçoise. For full-on French immersion, however, I like to travel down to Le Quinze, on Houston Street, where it’s a curious pleasure to slouch at the little round café tables with the rest of the louche downtown café lizards and puzzle over back issues of the sports paper L’Equipe (the owners are former French rugby players) while sampling the chunky foie gras terrine, cannelloni stuffed with monkfish, and, if it’s lunchtime, the most illustrious croque monsieur in the city, stuffed with big flaps of ham and covered in melted Gruyère cheese.

Casual Italian

The great rustic-Italian-food binge, which began with the superb Batali-Bastianich restaurants Babbo and Lupa and reached a thundering crescendo last year with the opening of Tom Valenti’s ’Cesca, on the Upper West Side, seems to have abated. But if you’re still salivating for multiple varieties of risotto or six kinds of pasta, Pace, in Tribeca, is the new place to go. For more dainty eaters, there’s also Abboccato, recently opened on the old 55th Street restaurant row, where numerous fat-man Italian staples (tripe, suckling pig, veal cheeks) are reproduced in a most civilized uptown way. My order of trippa grigliata turned out to be little ribbons of grilled calf’s stomach served with croutons of polenta and a mild mint salsa, and the veal cheeks I sampled were scented with perhaps too much vanilla. But the suckling pig had a soft, candied quality (it’s simmered in milk and hazelnuts), and the actual desserts (pomegranate panna cotta, buffalo milk-ricotta torta with honeycomb, Friulian dumplings filled with crushed nuts) seemed to have descended from some great Italian pastry chef in the sky.

They don’t serves frites yet at Barbuto, or profiteroles smothered in chocolate sauce, but with its clean, streamlined café chairs and scruffy fashionista clientele, Jonathan Waxman’s latest restaurant threatens to become something new to the world of dining: an Italian brasserie. It hasn’t taken much time for the talented, itinerant chef to master the art of the brick oven, so try his crackly-skinned chicken (covered with spoonfuls of lemony salsa verde), or, if you crave pasta, order the spaghetti carbonara flecked with bits of guinciale. Hot pressed panini in all its forms is still what my wife and I order whenever we find ourselves wandering by ’Inoteca, on the Lower East Side. And whenever we feel the desperate need for an infusion of hipness, we rush to Bivio, on Hudson Street, to squint through the nightclub gloom at the wall-size chalkboard scrawled with elegant house specials like duck-confit salad and the formidable beef-ragù lasagne, which is served piping-hot and spread, like a chocolate-cream cake, with layers of oozing béchamel sauce.

I haven’t detected béchamel sauce yet on any of Mario Batali’s ingenious pizza creations at Otto Enoteca Pizzeria, but the last time I checked, the mercurial Vincent Scotto was putting pumpkin on his grilled pizza a couple of blocks away at Gonzo. A mind-boggling 40 toppings are available at the new thin-crust-pizza outpost on lower Second Avenue called Posto, so it was a relief when my gregarious waiter insisted I put down my menu and order the “Shroomtown,” an excellent concoction of shiitake, portobello, and button mushrooms all spritzed with white-truffle oil. You’ll find no spritzing of pies at Una Pizza Napoletana, or slicing of pies, or even, God forbid, pies baked to go. The owner, Anthony Mangieri, is a pizza scholar of the most severe Neapolitan school, and to give his pizza dough the proper attention, his East Village parlor is open only four days a week. He bakes only four kinds of pies in his perfectly calibrated wood-fired brick oven, the best of which is the superbly chaste pizza bianca, blooming with pools of melted buffalo mozzarella flown in specially from old Napoli.

Steaks

During the course of the long, tired Atkins boom, chefs of the highest distinction have busied themselves tinkering with the profitable steakhouse formula. So it’s no surprise that Jean-Georges himself has been spotted in the kitchen of his baroque new establishment V Steakhouse grimly broiling gourmet lamb chops and great hunks of prime (though overpriced and indifferent-tasting) porterhouse steak. Former seafood wizard Laurent Tourondel does a better job massaging all this beef into something new and interesting at his own midtown restaurant BLT Steak. His steak tartare has a smooth, dessert-like texture, as do soups like cream of mushroom and clam chowder. But the real key, it seems, is to serve all sorts www mtb bike com things besides plenty of good steak, like Dover sole poured with brown butter, rose-colored lobsters the size of puppy dogs, and crispy roasted chicken, served in a cast-iron pot, with savory deposits of bread crumbs and rosemary stuffed under the skin.

Among neighborhood joints, Ian, on the eastern fringes of 86th Street, is home to the estimable “Dirty Drunken Ribeye” (a tender, deboned piece of meat soaked in sherry, soy sauce, and garlic, rubbed with spices, and glazed with honey), and Landmarc, in Tribeca, produces a very fine version of boudin noir, along with a whole potpourri of other trencherman’s products. For the grandiose Manhattan-steakhouse experience, I’ll still take the New York strip at Sparks, or a few slabs of the porterhouse served by Wolfgang Zwiener and his band of Peter Luger’s apostates at Wolfgang’s, on lower Park Avenue. The room is about four sizes too small, especially on Friday nights, when members of the city’s red-faced steak-house fraternity gather four-deep at the bar. But the steak sauce is an almost exact Luger facsimile, and the serving platters are suitably scuffed around the edges from incessant cooking and tipped forward at the table, in the classic Luger way, to showcase all the sizzling juices. Then there’s the fat, corn-fed, decidedly un-organic steak, which is baked to a proper salty crunch and comes with rafts of creamed spinach, thatches of onion rings, and boats of venerable fried German potatoes tossed with sweet onions.

Chinese Food

Until Anita Lo (Annisa) opens her long-awaited Rickshaw Dumpling Bar on 23rd Street later this month, Dumpling Man, in the East Village, is the place for a whole variety of inventive pot stickers made by tag teams of reassuringly surly dumpling ladies (good dumpling ladies, in my experience, are always surly) from locations as distant as Shanghai. Jean-Georges’s 66 is still my favorite place in town for a bite of antiseptic, highly inauthentic, perfectly tasty Sunday-morning dim sum, and for a fancy Shanghai feast, this year’s choice is Shanghai Pavilion, on the Upper East Side. My discerning banker friends always call the day before to order the Beggar’s Chicken, although when I wandered in off the street not long ago with a friend from Shanghai, a feast materialized before our eyes. It was composed of an opening salvo of soup dumplings, followed by tender pieces of carp belly served up in a slightly peppery red sauce. There were nuggets of sugary, crispy-fried baby chicken, that great Shanghai specialty, sautéed snow-pea leaves, and, for dessert, a bite or two of fried soup, made with cubes of jellied water chestnuts, which look like candy but turn to liquid as they dissolve in the mouth.

“I enjoy the pig’s-blood cakes and chives, but I don’t think you will,” piped the sweet lady who took my order at the old Queens standby Spicy & Tasty, which recently reopened in fancy new digs on a quiet back street in Flushing. She was right, although my dish of cold chili-soaked rabbit was good enough, as were the wontons, poured with a strangely sweet chili sauce infused with mouth-numbing amounts of the famous Sichuan pepper called ma. The fractious Grand Sichuan International empire has a new East Village branch, although my favorite outlet is still the one on Ninth Avenue between 50th and 51st Streets. If you work close to midtown, however, and desire a quick fix of sinus-clearing tripe loaded with fresh cilantro, I commend Szechuan Gourmet, the new Manhattan outpost of another well-known restaurant in Queens. There’s a separate menu for devotees of obscure local specialties like duck tongues in chili pepper or sliced fish with pork blood pudding, so squeamish diners should stick to old standards like spicy lamb and delicious ribbons of twice-cooked pork tossed with fresh scallions in the classic Chen Du style.

Seafood

If you’re one of those people who’ve had their fill of precious, exorbitantly priced servings of crudo, then I’m afraid you’re out of luck. The movement’s new high priest is Scott Conant, who’s taken time out from his labors at the fine Italian restaurant L’Impero to open Bar Tonno, a diminutive, stylish bar and restaurant off Lafayette Street. The menu is contact chime representative entirely to the cult of what the chef reverently calls “Italian sashimi.” On the evenings I visited, the crudo hounds sat at the long, elegant bar in contemplative silence, taking finicky bites of bay scallops touched with olive oil, pink slices of red orata (sea bream), and mounds of admittedly fine Maine lobster painted with a thick Sicilian tomato sauce. If this doesn’t sound like much food, do what I did and just keep ordering. The entire menu costs roughly as much as a single (very good) ticket to the opera.

The crudo craze has spread all the way up to 79th Street, on the gastronomically challenged Upper West Side, where raw meze items (uni and beets, scallops with yogurt and anise) have insinuated themselves into the big, jumbled menu at the ambitious new Greek restaurant called Onera. Raw fish is also featured at Lure Fish Bar, the swank new nautically appointed fish palace in Soho. With its polished-teak walls and beamy white leather banquettes, the place looks like some billionaires’ boat club in Cap Ferrat. The crudi I sampled were perfectly okay, particularly the arctic char and the lobster, served on buttery squares of garlic bread. There are also oddly successful skewers of Hamachi, foie gras, and grilled pineapple and a whole range of simple, surprisingly fine fish dishes, particularly the Dourade (marinated in country herbs) and a fresh, perfectly grilled piece of red snapper balanced on a pile of spinach with a wedge of lemon on the side.

Curried-eggplant-and-lobster soup and something called a “Crispy Cod Dog” (deep-fried cod, served with a lemon-caper rémoulade) are just a few of the tasty new dishes at The Mermaid Inn. From a pure price-to-pleasure ratio, the best piece of fish I had anywhere last year was a whole orata, doused with a mixture of citrus, olive oil, and herbs, and baked in a brick oven, at August, in the West Village. Among the regal midtown fish parlors, the fancy Mexican seafood at Pampano is still almost as good as the fat shrimp burritos and spicy fish tacos sold at the restaurant’s tiny taqueria out back. rm seems to be going strong despite the momentary absence of Rick Moonen (who’s opening a new restaurant in Las Vegas), and at Le Bernardin, Eric Ripert continues his ethereal seafood experiments with dishes like “Hamachi Tandoori” (lightly seared yellowtail rolled in tandoori spices) and something called “Lobster Choucroute,” poached lobster and bits of bacon folded in a delicate net of champagne-braised sauerkraut.

Downtown Brunch Fever. . .

Once upon a time, weekend brunch was the official province of dazed yuppie couples and the vast roaming baby-stroller hordes of the Upper West Side. These days, however, my raffish downtown friends all agree that the best time to visit Schiller’s Liquor Bar is on weekend mornings, when Keith McNally serves fruity Pimm’s Cups to his bleary clientele, plus fresh-made dollar doughnuts and a thick hazelnut waffle doused in bourbon-flavored maple syrup. At Public, in Nolita, the excellent weekend brunch includes bowls of freshly baked muffins along with novel delicacies like corn, saffron and blueberry pancakes and tea-smoked salmon covered in spoonfuls of hollandaise spiked with yuzu. And then there’s Freemans, the suddenly chic cubbyhole of a restaurant at the end of a narrow street called Freeman Alley, on the Lower East Side. The Rum Swizzle (Haitian rum, lime juice, syrup, bitters) is one of the finer cocktails in town, but if you don’t feel like battling for one during the raucous evening hours, do what I do and order one (or two) on a peaceful Sunday afternoon, along with a bowl of the stewed plums (with Greek yogurt and vanilla syrup), a slab or two of excellent wild-boar terrine, and a fat lamb-sausage patty served with watercress salad, two poached eggs, and thick slices of sourdough.

There are myriad trendy brunch options up in the West Village, but my choice is Snack Taverna, on Bedford Street, where the lovely waitresses dress all in black, like sorrowful Greek widows. This doesn’t detract from the quality of the puffy bourekis (minced lamb in phyllo pastry), the grilled loukaniko (country sausage), or the fine avga me hirino, which, in case you didn’t know, consists of two poached eggs served with braised pork and a mess of cranberry beans. Similar Mediterranean brunch delicacies are on display in midtown at the newly renovated San Domenico NY, where every table is stocked with a pitcher of orange juice mixed with Prosecco, and the aggressively priced menu includes clouds of whipped baccalà served over polenta, and giant cotecchino pork sausages swimming in lentils. And if you feel like braving the Upper West Side brunch scrum, take a number and go to the end of the line outside Nice Matin, where I like to supplement my Sunday-morning pissaladière (the Provencal tart made with sweet onions, anchovies and black olives) with a bite of healthful Swiss-chard frittata, followed by a platter of scrambled eggs tossed with a generous crumbling of spicy merguez sausage.

… And a Few Favorite Desserts

Dad, it’s yummy” is the ultimate compliment my 5-year-old daughter bestows on any dessert. I haven’t exposed her yet to the supreme chocolate fondant at Asiate (served with a raspberry granita and fromage blanc in a ceramic Japanese teacup), or the excellently dense apple-walnut strudel produced (with maple ice cream and a spoonful of schlag) by the Austrian pastry wizards at Wallsé. When I took her and a few of her nursery-school classmates for a farewell dinner at Le Cirque 2000, they were struck mute when a tray of towering Napoleons arrived, and refused to lift their spoons until the waiters produced a communal bowl of vanilla ice cream. The same thing happened at the pocket-sized, perpetually crowded, dessert-only establishment ChicKaLicious, in the East Village, where we presented our coats with the coat-check man, took our seats at the glossy white bar, and watched in silent wonder as the two industrious lady proprietors whipped up an elegant apple pudding cake (with Granny Smith–apple sorbet) and a batch of sweet figs steamed in parchment paper, with a sidecar of port-wine ice cream.

Next stop on the great father-daughter dessert ramble is our local downtown branch of the Cold Stone Creamery, where on busy evenings, the line of rotund, eagerly salivating ice-cream fanatics spills out the door onto the sidewalk. The specialties of the house are elaborate “mix-ins” like Oreo Overload (cream-flavored ice cream, chocolate fudge, double-size Oreos, chocolate chips) or the profound Cookie Don’t You Want Some (vanilla ice cream, chocolate chips, cookie dough, fudge, caramel), all prepared to order on a frozen granite stone. From there, we’ll nip around the corner to our neighborhood Beard Papa Sweets Café, the eccentric Japanese establishment where the preparation of excellent cream puffs (a warm choux-pastry shell injected with custard folded with vanilla beans hand-picked in Madagascar and dusted with powdered sugar) has been raised to the level of wacky performance art. And, at long last, we’ll conclude our annual sugar binge at Jacques Torres Chocolate Haven, the cavernous new chocolate factory recently opened at the bottom of Hudson Street by the city’s own Willie Wonka, Jacques Torres. Through the tall glass windows, my daughter observed the making of chocolate fruit drops and batches of Love Potion No. 9, before proclaiming her favorite treat of all: a simple graham cracker, covered in chocolate. “It’s really yummy,” she announced between earnest chipmunk-size bites. “Now, where can we go next, Dad?”

The Best of 2005

Best Famous MealWorth the Price
Prix Fixe at Per Se
The atmosphere’s a little stilted,but Thomas Keller’s cooking sure is good. If possible, begin with is sugar free yogurt good for you and Pearls,” and first convenience bank in walmart hours sure to save room for the“Coffee and Doughnuts” dessert.







Best Way to Impress Your Boss
The Wine List at Cru
Peruse the restaurant’s vast 65,000-bottle “wine portfolio,” and pretend you’re familiar with the ’85 Chambertain Grand Crus fnb internet banking login page south africa Chateau Leroy ($1,950) and the rare magnum of 1899 Lafite Rothschild ($13,000). Be sure to mention the food’s pretty good, too.





Best MealUnder $10
The BBQ Pork Buns at Momofuko
The trendy new East Village version of the Wimpy burger. They’re pocket-size, portable, and good for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Eat five in one sitting, or maybe ten.







Best Tasting Menu
wd-50
Who knew that grand savings bank decatur went with chocolate powder, or that fried mayonnaise tasted good? Wylie Dufresne is the city’s most inventive homegrown chef, and his eponymous restaurant is as good as it’s ever been.







Best Pizza
Franny’s Tomato and Mozzarella
The unadorned pie (extra-virgin olive oil, rosemary, and garlic) is a classic of its kind. If it’s cheese you desire, order the “Quattro Formaggio.”







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Best Lobster
Crisp and Angry Lobster Cocktailat Davidburke & Donatella
at long last, a New York lobsterdish that requires our full attention and respect. Tackle this spicy monster with your hands and a bib tucked under your collar.







Best NouveauxSteak Dinner
Porterhouse at BLT Steak
Laurent Tourendot cuts this 40-ounce piece of beef lengthwise and serves it in a cast-iron pot. There are myriad newfangled sauces to choose from, but you still can’t go wrong with top model.







Best New Bistro Dish
Chicken Liver Schnitzel at Ici
The kitchen produces plenty of fine food at this sleek little French bistro in Fort Greene. If you’re a liver connoisseur, this dish alone is worth the trip.







Best Highbrow Dessert
Chocolate Fondant with Raspberry Grantie at Asiate
This decadent, soothing, andbeautifully presented dish is a perfect compliment to the restaurant’s dazzling views of Central Park.







Best Meal, Period
Omakase at Masa
Chef Masa Takayama’s fusion masterpieces like “UniRisotto” and “Foie Gras Shabu Shabu” give new meaning to the oft-used foodie adjective melting. Unfortunately, you’ll have to pay $350 for a taste.







PHOTOGRAPHED BY KENNETH CHEN.

The Overrated List
Adam Platt’s least-favorite food trends.

Speck The prosciutto of the new millennium, only milder, more leathery, and less appetizing.

Edamame Paying $8 for a plate of gourmet lima beans gets tired after a while.

The Boisterously Jolly Japanese Salute In Japan, it’s quaint custom. In jumpy Manhattan, having eighteen Japanese guys yell at you when you walk in the door can be a little unsettling.

Fancy Tea Menus Who knew you could get Sencha Reserve organic tea at Le Bernardin? Who cares?

Wagyu Beef The poor cousin of Kobe beef, which, as everyone knows, ascended to the overrated Hall of Fame several decades ago.

Really Tiny Kitchens If you can see an electric range and the whites of the chef’s eyes, the drinks had better be really good, because the food probably isn’t.

Small Plates The current haute-restaurant term for price-gouging.

Wine Pairings The current sommelier term for price-gouging.

Romanesco This year’s version of ramps.

Cocoa Nibs If you don’t know what this exotic dessert item is, you’re not alone. What ever happened to chocolate chips?

Unisex Bathrooms Like chicken coops and airplane toilets, they promote messiness, overcrowding, and confusion.

The Communal Hand-Washing Moat This fashionable new feature makes washing your hands at a glamorous restaurant feel perilously close to scrubbing up after a day at the dairy barn.

Eat Here Now

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Virgil Abloh, Designer and Off-White Founder, Dead at 41 He had been “battling a rare, aggressive form of cancer.”
Источник: https://nymag.com/nymetro/food/guides/wheretoeat2005/10724/
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