1st day of spring 2012

Session: Classes Begin: Last Day for 100% Refund: Last Day for 90% Refund: Last Day for 50% 1st 8-Week Nontraditional Session, Jan 9, 2012, Jan 10, 2012. == {{int:filedesc}} == {{Information |description=In first day of spring 2012 street Brailei-Tiglina 1 |date={{Taken on|2012-03-18}} |source=http://www. Fall 2021. Fall 2021 - 16 Weeks · Fall 2021 - 1st 8 Weeks · Fall 2021 - 2nd 8 Weeks. Intersession 2021. Winter 2021 - 2 Weeks. Spring 2022.

: 1st day of spring 2012

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1st day of spring 2012
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1st day of spring 2012 -

Spring 2012

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Источник: https://healthykidsrunningseries.org/results/spring-2012/

The March Equinox

March equinox illustration
March equinox illustration

Sun Crosses Celestial Equator

The March equinox is the moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator—an imaginary line in the sky above Earth’s equator—from south to north. This happens on March 19, 20, or 21 every year.

10 facts about the March equinox

Equinox Local Time & Date

In New York, New York, USA: Sunday, 20 March 2022, 11:33 EDT(Change location)
This corresponds to Sunday, 20 March 2022, 15:33 UTC.

Why Does the Sun Move North and South?

During the course of a year, the subsolar point—the spot on the Earth's surface directly beneath the Sun—slowly moves along a north-south axis. Having reached its southernmost point at the December solstice, it starts moving northward until it crosses the equator on the day of the March equinox. The June solstice marks the northernmost point of its journey.

Earth: The living planet

The Sun: Our home star

The subsolar point moves north and south during the year because the Earth’s axis is tilted at an angle of about 23.4° in relation to the ecliptic, an imaginary plane created by Earth’s path around the Sun. In June, the Northern Hemisphere is tilted toward the Sun, and the subsolar point is north of the equator. As the Earth travels toward the opposite side of its orbit, which it reaches in December, the Southern Hemisphere gradually receives more sunlight, and the subsolar point travels south.

How do seasons work?

Equinox and solstice illustration.
Equinox and solstice illustration.

Why Is It Called “Equinox?”

On the days of the equinoxes, the Earth’s axis is perpendicular to the Sun’s rays, meaning that all regions on Earth receive about the same number of hours of sunlight. In other words, night and day are, in principle, the same length all over the world. This is the reason it’s called an “equinox,” derived from Latin, meaning “equal night.”

However, this is literal translation not entirely true. In reality, equinox days don’t have exactly 12 hours of daylight and 12 hours of dark.

Astronomical terms & definitions

The Equinoxes and the Seasons

The March and September equinoxes mark the beginning of the spring and autumn seasons on Earth, according to one definition. The equinox in March is the start of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and the beginning of fall south of the equator.

Equinox and solstice dates—years 1-2149

Measuring the Tropical Year

The March equinox can be used to measure a tropical year, the mean time it takes for the Earth to complete a full orbit around the Sun. Also known as a solar year, a tropical year is approximately 365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes, and 45 seconds long. It can vary by up to 30 minutes each year.

 DaysHoursMinutesSeconds
March 2019 – March 20203655514
March 2020 – March 202136554755
March 2021 – March 202236555554
March 2022 – March 202336555055
March 2023 – March 20243655428

Tropical years from 1900 to 2100

Why Does the Date Vary?

The date of the equinoxes and solstices varies because a year in our calendar does not exactly match the length of the tropical year—the time it takes the Earth to complete an orbit around the Sun.

Today's Gregorian calendar has 365 days in a common year and 366 days in a leap year. However, our planet takes about 365.242199 days to orbit the Sun. This means that the timing of the equinoxes and solstices slowly drifts apart from the Gregorian calendar, and the solstice happens about 6 hours later each year. Eventually, the accumulated lag becomes so large that it falls on the following date.

To realign the calendar with the tropical year, a leap day is introduced (nearly) every four years. When this happens, the equinox and solstice dates shift back to the earlier date again.

Other factors influencing the timing of the equinoxes and solstices include variations in the length of a tropical year and in the orbital and daily rotational motion of the Earth, such as the “wobble” in the Earth's axis (precession).

Topics: Astronomy, Sun, Seasons, Equinox, Earth, March

Источник: https://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/march-equinox.html

Why Has Date Changed for Start of Spring?

Avid "Seinfeld" fans might remember the episode when Jerry's friend, George, was desperately trying to find a way to postpone his impending Christmastime wedding with his fiancee, Susan. He finally comes up with a solution:

"Have the wedding on March 21 - the first day of spring!"

Unfortunately, if George had gone through with the nuptials (and Seinfeld aficionados know why he never did), he would have been a full day late. You see, in America, spring no longer falls on March 21. In 2005, for instance, the vernal equinox, the first day of spring for the Northern Hemisphere, comes on Sunday, March 20 at 12:33 GMT, or 7:33 a.m. EST (4:33 a.m. PST).

Now this doesn't seem right. I mean, when we were all growing up, the first day of spring was always on March 21, not March 20, right? Now all of a sudden spring comes on March 20.

How did that happen?

While it's true that we've traditionally celebrated the beginning of spring on March 21, astronomers and calendar manufacturers alike now say that the spring season starts one day earlier, March 20, in all time zones in North America. Unheard of? Not if you look at the statistics. In fact, did you know that during the 20th Century, March 21 was actually the exception rather than the rule?

The vernal equinox landed on March 21, only 36 out of 100 years. And from 1981 to 2102, Americans will celebrate the first day of spring no later than March 20.

In the years 2008 and 2012, those living in Alaska, Hawaii and the Pacific, Mountain and Central time zones will see spring begin even earlier: on March 19. And in 2016, it will start on March 19 for the entire United States.

There are a few reasons why seasonal dates can vary from year to year.

  1. A year is not an even number of days and neither are the seasons. To try and achieve a value as close as possible to the exact length of the year, our Gregorian Calendar was constructed to give a close approximation to the tropical year which is the actual length of time it takes for the Earth to complete one orbit around the Sun. It eliminates leap days in century years not evenly divisible by 400, such 1700, 1800, and 2100, and millennium years that are divisible by 4,000, such as 8000 and 12000.
  2. Another reason is that the Earth's elliptical orbit is changing its orientation relative to the Sun (it skews), which causes the Earth's axis to constantly point in a different direction, called precession. Since the seasons are defined as beginning at strict 90-degree intervals, these positional changes affect the time Earth reaches each 90-degree location in its orbit around the Sun.
  3. The pull of gravity from the other planets also affects the location of the Earth in its orbit.

Winter

88.994 days

Spring

92.758 days

Summer

93.651 days

Autumn

89.842 days

DateSunriseSunsetDay's Length

March 17

6:05 a.m.

6:05 p.m.

12 hrs. 00 min.

March 18

6:03 a.m.

6:06 p.m.

12 hrs. 03 min.

March 19

6:02 a.m.

6:07 p.m.

12 hrs. 05 min.

March 20

6:00 a.m.

6:08 p.m.

12 hrs. 08 min.

  • Full Moon Fever
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Источник: https://www.space.com/881-date-changed-start-spring.html

Academic Calendar for Spring Quarter 2012

Full Term Final Examinations Begin

A & B Term Examinations Vary - See Course Syllabus

Exam Schedules

Monday, June 4, 2012Saturday, June 11, 2011 First day of ClassesMonday, March 26, 2012 Last day to drop course without a grade (if student has hold, Registration Form must be submitted to RaiderConnect on a business day)Friday, April 13, 2012 Last day to drop course with a W grade (if student has hold, Registration Form must be submitted to RaiderConnect on a business day)Friday, May 11, 2012 Memorial Day Holiday; University ClosedMonday, May 28, 2012 Last day of classesSaturday, June 2, 2012 Graduation / Commencement Saturday, June 9, 2012
Источник: https://www.wright.edu/registrar/academic-calendar/spring-quarter-2012

Spring technically starts with the vernal equinox, defined as the moment when the sun crosses the celestial equator and day and night are of equal length. That happened while most of us were sleeping, at 1:14 a.m. Eastern time today, March 20. Factor in the time change and spring actually started on Monday, March 19, for the Mountain and Pacific time zones.

This year’s vernal equinox is the earliest one since 1896, Scientific American reports. As the sun now moves north of the equator (at equinox, the sun hovered above the Indian Ocean, southeast of Sri Lanka), the technical early start to spring comes from the inexactness of our calendar and the Earth’s slightly shifting orbit in relation to the sun.

Since our calendar was designed to chop up the seasons in four orderly sections, the changing position of the Earth in relation to its orbit around the sun (which gets even more convoluted when you factor in gravitational pulls from other planets) can slightly alter the length of each season. All that tugging pulls the equinox to and fro, but leaves it hovering around March 20. It isn’t even uncalled for to have spring kick off on March 21, but that hasn’t happened for 30 years.

Of course, all this talk of spring starting a tad early is purely astronomical. What most of us really care about is having the sun shine brighter, and more often. The warm weather doesn’t hurt, either.

MORE:A Map of the Equator

Источник: https://newsfeed.time.com/2012/03/20/spring-is-officially-off-to-an-early-start-this-year/
Summer Session I 2022May 24Classes BeginMay 30Memorial Day Holiday, Classes SuspendedJune 3Substitute a Monday schedule of classesJune 17Juneteenth Holiday observed, Classes SuspendedJuly 1Last Day of ClassesSummer Session II 2022July 4Independence Day Holiday, Classes SuspendedJuly 5Classes BeginJuly 8Substitute a Monday schedule of classesAugust 12Last Day of ClassesAugust 25Summer 2022 graduationSummer Twelve-Week Session 2022May 24Classes BeginMay 30Memorial Day Holiday, Classes SuspendedJune 3Substitute a Monday schedule of classesJuly 4Independence Day Holiday, Classes SuspendedJuly 8Substitute a Monday schedule of classesAugust 12Last Day of ClassesAugust 25Summer 2022 graduationFall 2022*September 5Labor Day Holiday, Classes SuspendedSeptember 6Classes Begin; First Seven-Week Session BeginsOctober 10Indigenous People’s Day Holiday, Classes SuspendedOctober 11Substitute Monday Schedule of ClassesOctober 24First Seven-Week Session EndsOctober 25Second Seven-Week Session BeginsNovember 23 – 27Thanksgiving RecessNovember 28Classes ResumeDecember 12Last Day of Classes; Second Seven-Week Session EndsDecember 13First Day of Study PeriodDecember 21Last Day of Final Exams*Classes will be held on Veterans Day: Wednesday, November 11Spring 2023January 13Fall 2022 GraduationJanuary 16MLK Jr. Day Holiday, Classes SuspendedJanuary 19Classes Begin; First Seven-Week Session BeginsFebruary 20Presidents’ Day Holiday, Classes SuspendedFebruary 21Substitute Monday Schedule of ClassesMarch 3First Seven-Week Session EndsMarch 4 – March 12Spring RecessMarch 13Classes Resume; Second Seven-Week Session BeginsApril 17Patriots’ Day Holiday, Classes SuspendedApril 19Substitute Monday Schedule of ClassesMay 3Last Day of Classes on the Standard Calendar; Second Seven-Week Session EndsMay 4First Day of Study PeriodMay 12Last Day of Final ExamsMay 17 – 21Commencement CelebrationsMay 21All University Commencement
Источник: https://www.bu.edu/reg/calendars/

Academic Calendar for Spring Quarter 2012

Full Term Final Examinations Begin

A & B Term Examinations Vary - See Course Syllabus

Exam Schedules

Monday, June 4, 2012Saturday, June 11, 2011 First day of ClassesMonday, March 26, 2012 Last day to drop course without a grade (if student has hold, Registration Form must be submitted to RaiderConnect on a business day)Friday, April 13, 2012 Last day to drop course with a W grade (if student has 1st day of spring 2012, Registration Form must be submitted to RaiderConnect on a business day)Friday, May 11, 2012 Memorial Day Holiday; University ClosedMonday, May 28, 2012 Last day of classesSaturday, June 2, 2012 Graduation / Commencement Saturday, June 9, 2012
Источник: https://www.wright.edu/registrar/academic-calendar/spring-quarter-2012

Spring 2012

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Источник: https://healthykidsrunningseries.org/results/spring-2012/

The March Equinox

March equinox illustration
March equinox illustration

Sun Crosses Celestial Equator

The March equinox is the moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator—an imaginary line in the sky above Earth’s equator—from south to paul f tompkins cake boss. This happens on March 19, 20, or 21 every year.

10 facts about the March equinox

Equinox Local Time & Date

In New York, New York, USA: Sunday, 20 March 2022, 11:33 EDT(Change location)
This corresponds to Sunday, 20 March 2022, 15:33 UTC.

Why Does the Sun Move North and South?

During the course of a year, the subsolar point—the spot on the Earth's surface directly beneath the Sun—slowly moves along a north-south axis. Having reached its southernmost point at the December solstice, it starts moving northward until it 1st day of spring 2012 the equator on the day of the March equinox. The June solstice marks the northernmost point of its journey.

Earth: The living planet

The Sun: Our home star

The subsolar point moves north and south during the year because the Earth’s axis is tilted at an angle of about 23.4° in relation to the ecliptic, an imaginary plane created by Earth’s path around the Sun. In June, the Northern Hemisphere is tilted toward the Sun, and the subsolar point is north of the equator. As the Earth travels toward the opposite side of its orbit, which it reaches in December, the Southern Hemisphere gradually receives more sunlight, and the subsolar point travels south.

How do seasons work?

Equinox and solstice illustration.
Equinox and solstice illustration.

Why Is It Called “Equinox?”

On the days of the equinoxes, the Earth’s axis is perpendicular to the Sun’s rays, meaning that all regions on Earth receive about the same number of hours of sunlight. In other words, night and day are, in principle, the same length all over the world. This is the reason it’s called an “equinox,” derived from Latin, meaning “equal night.”

However, this is literal translation not entirely true. In reality, equinox days don’t have exactly 12 hours of daylight and 12 hours of dark.

Astronomical terms & definitions

The Equinoxes and the Seasons

The March and September equinoxes mark the beginning of the spring and autumn seasons on Earth, according to one definition. The equinox in March is the start of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and the beginning of fall south of the equator.

Equinox and solstice dates—years 1-2149

Measuring the Tropical Year

The March equinox can be used to measure a tropical year, the mean time it takes for the Earth to complete a full what time is wells fargo open till around the Sun. Also known as a solar year, a tropical year is approximately 365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes, and 45 seconds long. It can vary by up to 30 minutes each year.

 DaysHoursMinutesSeconds
March 2019 – March 20203655514
March 2020 – March 202136554755
March 2021 – March 202236555554
March 2022 – March 202336555055
March 2023 – March 20243655428

Tropical years from 1900 to 2100

Why Does the Date Vary?

The date of the equinoxes and solstices varies because a year in our calendar does not exactly match the length of the tropical year—the time it takes the Earth to complete an orbit around the Sun.

Today's Gregorian calendar has 365 days in a common year and 366 days in a leap year. However, our planet takes about 365.242199 days to orbit the Sun. This means that the timing of the equinoxes and solstices slowly drifts apart from the Gregorian calendar, and the solstice happens about 6 hours later each year. Eventually, the accumulated lag becomes so large that it falls on the following date.

To realign the calendar with the tropical year, a leap day is introduced (nearly) every four years. When this happens, the equinox and solstice dates jcpenney pay bill over phone back to the earlier date again.

Other factors influencing the timing of the equinoxes and solstices include variations in the length of a tropical year and in the orbital and daily rotational motion of the Earth, such as the “wobble” in the Earth's axis (precession).

Topics: Astronomy, Sun, Seasons, Equinox, Earth, March

Источник: https://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/march-equinox.html

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Why Has Date Changed for Start of Spring?

Avid "Seinfeld" fans might remember the episode when Jerry's friend, George, was desperately trying to find a way to postpone his impending Christmastime wedding with his fiancee, Susan. He finally comes up with a solution:

"Have the wedding on March 21 - the first day of spring!"

Unfortunately, if George had gone through with the nuptials (and Seinfeld aficionados know why he never did), he would have been a full day late. You see, in America, spring no longer falls on March 21. In 2005, for instance, the vernal equinox, the first day of spring for the Northern Hemisphere, comes on Sunday, March 20 at 12:33 GMT, or 7:33 a.m. EST (4:33 a.m. PST).

Now this doesn't seem right. I mean, when we were all growing up, the first day of spring was always on March 21, not March 20, right? Now all of a sudden spring comes on March 20.

How did that happen?

While it's true that we've traditionally celebrated the beginning of spring on March 21, astronomers and calendar manufacturers alike now say that the spring season starts one day earlier, March 20, in all time zones in North America. Unheard of? Not if you look at the statistics. In fact, did you know that during the 20th Century, March 21 was actually the exception rather than the rule?

The vernal equinox landed on March 21, only 36 out of 100 years. And from 1981 to 2102, Americans will celebrate the first day of spring no later than March 20.

In the years 2008 and 2012, those living in Alaska, Hawaii and the Pacific, Mountain and Central time zones will see spring begin even earlier: on March 19. And in 2016, it will start on March 19 for the entire United States.

There are a few reasons why seasonal dates can vary from year to year.

  1. A year is not an even number of days and neither are the seasons. To try and achieve a value as close as possible to alabama power pay your bill exact length of the year, our Gregorian Calendar was constructed to give a close approximation to the tropical year which is the actual length of time it takes for the Earth to complete one orbit around the Sun. It eliminates leap days in century years not evenly divisible by 400, such 1700, 1800, and 2100, and millennium years that are divisible by 4,000, such as 8000 and 12000.
  2. Another reason is that the Earth's elliptical orbit is changing its orientation relative to the Sun (it skews), which causes the Earth's axis to constantly point in a different direction, called precession. Since the seasons are defined as beginning at strict 90-degree intervals, these positional changes affect the time Earth reaches each 90-degree location in its orbit around the Sun.
  3. The pull of gravity from the other planets also affects the location of the Earth in its orbit.

Winter

88.994 days

Spring

92.758 days

Summer

93.651 days

Autumn

89.842 days

DateSunriseSunsetDay's Length

March 17

6:05 a.m.

6:05 p.m.

12 hrs. 00 min.

March 18

6:03 a.m.

6:06 p.m.

12 hrs. 03 min.

March 19

6:02 a.m.

6:07 p.m.

12 hrs. 05 min.

March new modern mobile homes for sale

6:00 a.m.

6:08 p.m.

12 hrs. 08 min.

  • Full Moon Fever
  • Astrophotography 101
  • Sky Calendar & Moon Phases
  • 10 Steps to Rewarding Stargazing
  • Understanding the Ecliptic and the Zodiac
  • False Dawn: All about the Zodiacal Light
  • Reading Weather in the Sun, Moon and Stars
  • How and Why the Night Sky Changes with the Seasons
  • Night Sky Main Page: More Skywatching News & Features
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Starry Night software brings the universe to your desktop. Map the government travel card citibank application from your cub tcf near me, or just sit back and let the cosmos come to you.

Joe Rao serves as an instructor and guest lecturer at New York's Hayden Planetarium. He writes about astronomy for The New York Times and other publications, and he is also an on-camera meteorologist for News 12 Westchester, New York.

Join our Space Forums to keep talking space on the where can i make food donations 1st day of spring 2012, night sky and more! And if you have a news tip, correction or comment, let us know at: [email protected]

Joe Rao is Space.com's skywatching columnist, as well as a veteran meteorologist and eclipse chaser who also serves as an instructor and guest lecturer at New York's Hayden Planetarium. He writes about astronomy for Natural History magazine, the Farmers' Almanac and other publications.

Источник: https://www.space.com/881-date-changed-start-spring.html

youtube video

First Day Of Spring 2012 1st day of spring 2012

1st day of spring 2012 -

First Day of Spring 2021: The Spring Equinox

In 2021, the spring equinox occurs on Saturday, March 20. This event marks the astronomical first day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere. What does equinox mean? What happens on the equinox? What determines the first day of spring? Before you try to balance that egg, read this!

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What Is the Spring Equinox?

In the Northern Hemisphere, the March equinox (aka spring equinox or vernal equinox) occurs when the Sun crosses the equator line, heading north. This event marks the start of spring in the northern half of the globe. After this date, the Northern Hemisphere begins to be tilted more toward the Sun, resulting in increasing daylight hours and warming temperatures. (In the Southern Hemisphere, it's the opposite: the March equinox marks the start of autumn, as the Southern Hemisphere begins to be tilted away from the Sun.)

→ What sort of weather will spring bring? Check out our Spring Forecast to find out!

When Is the First Day of Spring?

In 2021, the March equinox happens on Saturday, March 20, at 5:37 A.M. EDT. In the Northern Hemisphere, this date marks the start of the spring season.

In the Southern Hemisphere, the March equinox marks the start of autumn, while the September equinox marks the start of spring.

YearSpring Equinox (Northern Hemisphere)
2021Saturday, March 20, at 5:37 A.M. EDT
2022Sunday, March 20, at 11:33 A.M. EDT
2023Monday, March 20, at 5:24 P.M. EDT
2024Tuesday, March 19, at 11:06 P.M. EDT

What Does Spring "Equinox" Mean, Exactly?

The word equinox comes from the Latin words for "equal night"—aequus (equal) and nox (night). 

On the equinox, the length of day and night is nearly equal in all parts of the world. 

With the equinox, enjoy an increasing amount of sunlight hours, with earlier dawns and later sunsets! See your personalized Sun rise and set calculator.

Equinox diagram

What Happens on the March Equinox?

On the March equinox, the Sun crosses the celestial equator going south to north. It's called the "celestial" equator because it's an imaginary line in the sky above the Earth's equator.

If you were standing on the equator, the Sun would pass directly overhead on its way north. 

Equinoxes are the only two times each year that the Sun rises due east and sets due west for all of us on Earth!

While the Sun passes overhead, the tilt of the Earth is zero relative to the Sun, which means that Earth’s axis neither points toward nor away from the Sun. (Note, however, that the Earth never orbits upright, but is always tilted on its axis by about 23.5 degrees.)

After the spring equinox, the Northern Hemisphere tilts toward the Sun. Although in most locations (the North Pole and Equator being exceptions) the amount of daylight had been increasing each day after the winter solstice, after the spring equinox, many places will experience more daylight than darkness in each 24-hour day. The amount of daylight each day will continue to increase until the summer solstice in June, during which the longest period of daylight occurs.

Read more about the reason for the seasons.

Crocus field in spring

Spring Equinox FAQs

Q: Does Spring Begin on March 1 or on the Equinox?

A: Well, both. The answer depends on your definition of "spring." Both dates are accurate; they're just from different perspectives. We'll explain . . .

Astronomically speaking, the first day of spring is marked by the spring equinox, which falls on March 19, 20, or 21 every year. The equinox happens at the same moment worldwide, although our clock times reflect a different time zone. And, as mentioned above, this date only signals spring's beginning in the Northern Hemisphere; it announces fall's arrival in the Southern Hemisphere.

Interestingly, due to time zone differences, there isn't a March 21 equinox in mainland U.S. during the entire 21st century! We won't see a March 21 equinox again until 2101.

Meteorologically speaking, the official first day of spring is March 1 (and the last is May 31). Weather scientists divide the year into quarters to make it easier to compare seasonal and monthly statistics from one year to the next. The meteorological seasons are based on annual temperature cycles rather than on the position of Earth in relation to the Sun, and they more closely follow the Gregorian calendar. Using the dates of the astronomical equinoxes and solstices for the seasons would present a statistical problem, as these dates can vary slightly each year.

Daffodils in field

Q: Are Day and Night Equal on the Equinox?

A: No, but they are quite close to equal. In reality, day and night are not exactly equal on the equinox for two reasons: First, daytime begins the moment any part of the Sun appears over the horizon and is not finished until the last part of the Sun disappears below the horizon. If the Sun were to shrink to a starlike point and we lived in a world without air, the spring and fall equinoxes would truly have equal nights.

Read about more fun facts in the Almanac Astronomer's post, "Vernal Equinox Oddities."

Multicolored tulip flowers

Q: According to folklore, you can stand a raw egg on its end on the equinox. Is this true?

A: This egg folklore became popular in 1945 following a LIFE article about the spring practice. "The origins of this myth are attributed to stories that the ancient Chinese would create displays of eggs standing on end during the first day of spring," according to John Millis, assistant professor of physics and astronomy at Anderson University in South Carolina. "The ancient Chinese celebrated the first day of spring about six weeks earlier than the equinox"—not just on the equinox itself.

As with most folklore, it's only partly true. You should be able to balance an egg on its end on the equiox, but it's possible to balance an egg on other days, too!

Folklore or not, this egg trick sounded like fun to us. One spring, a few minutes before the vernal equinox, several Almanac editors tried this trick. For a full workday, 17 out of 24 eggs stood on end. Three days later, we tried this trick again and found similar results. Perhaps three days after the equinox was still too near. Perhaps the equinox has nothing to do with it. Perhaps we just don't like to take ourselves too seriously!

Try this yourself and let us know what happens. (Tip: You'll probably have better luck balancing an egg if you try it on a rough surface or use an egg that has a bumpy end.)

Spring bird bath

Q: Which Day Has the Most Sunlight in North America?

A:  The Summer—or "June"—Solstice is called the "longest" day of the year! The date of the longest day actually varies from June 20 to June 22, depending on the year, and the local time zone. By "longest day," we mean the day that gets the most daylight (versus darkness). See our Summer Solstice page.

How Do You Celebrate the Vernal Equinox?

To us, the vernal equinox signals new beginnings and nature’s renewal in the Northern Hemisphere.

Many cultures celebrate with spring festivals, such as Easter and Passover.

Observe nature around you!

  • Are worms and grubs reappearing? (The March Full Moon is called the "Worm Moon" for this very reason!)
  • Watch the arc of the Sun across the sky as it shifts toward the north. Birds are migrating northward, along with the path of the Sun.
  • Are you noticing that the days are getting longer? Did you know that the increasing sunlight inspires birds to sing? Cool, eh? Enjoy our Bird Songs page.
  • Are daffodils poking up their heads? Trees, shrubs, and flowers are sensitive to temperature and day length, too! Since ancient days, people have used natural events as indicators of when the weather is right for planting. For example: Blooming crocus are your cue to plant radishes, parsnips, and spinach. See more of nature's signs.
  • Can you feel the Sun getting stronger? The longer days bring high temperatures. Both we and the animals around us discard our warm clothes and heavy coats!
  • Do you plan to garden? See which days are the best planting dates according to your local frost dates or consult our Vegetable Gardening for Beginners guide for gardening tips!
  • Are you craving fresh foods after a long winter? A Spring Tonic, using the early greens of spring, may be just the thing you need! Also, find some new spring recipes using what's fresh and seasonal!

Rabbit with clover flower

Ancient Equinox Traditions: The Snake of Sunlight

Scientific explanation aside, our ancestors were more connected to the Sun than we are today. They observed its pathway across the sky, and they tracked how the sunrise, sunset, and day length changed, using the Sun (and Moon) as a clock and calendar.

There are many ancient sites that mark the equinoxes (and solstices). One of the most famous ancient Spring equinox celebrations took place at Chichen Itza in Mexico. The Mayans built a huge pyramid around the year A.D. 1000. Even today, the way the Sun’s light falls on it signals the beginning of the seasons. On the spring equinox, it looks like a huge snake is slithering down the steps. Mayans called this day “the return of the Sun serpent.”

chichen-itza_full_width_0.jpg

See more examples of ancient seasonal markers.

Spring Verse, Quotes, and Sayings

Verse

  • For glad Spring has begun,
    And to the ardent sun
    The earth, long time so bleak,
    Turns a frost-bitten cheek.

    - Celia Thaxter, American poet (1835–94)
     
  • Spring-time sweet!
    The whole Earth smiles, thy coming to greet. 
    - Unknown
     
  • Never yet was a springtime,
    Late though lingered the snow,
    That the sap stirred not at the whisper
    Of the southwind, sweet and low.

    - Margaret Elizabeth Sangster, American writer (1838–1912)

Quotes

  • Spring is nature's way of saying, "Let's party!"
    - Robin Williams (1951–2014)

Sayings

  • Bluebirds are a sign of spring; warm weather and gentle south breezes they bring.
  • One swallow does not make a spring.
  • In spring, no one thinks of the snow that fell last year.
  • When the dandelions bloom early in spring, there will be a short season. When they bloom late, expect a dry summer. 
  • Don’t say that spring has come until you can put your foot on nine daisies.

equinox-nature-3106216_1920_full_width.jpg

Learn More About the First Days of Seasons

The First Days of the Seasons are marked by four astronomical events:

Look around! Observe! What are the signs of spring in your region? Please share in the comments below!

Источник: https://www.almanac.com/content/first-day-spring-vernal-equinox

Spring equinox heralds official end of winter

The Earth drifted through a major astronomical checkpoint at 5.14am GMT on Tuesday, marking the official onset of spring in the northern hemisphere.

The spring, or vernal, equinox marks the point in space and time when the sun moves across the celestial equator, an imaginary circle projected into the sky above the real equator.

In the northern hemisphere, the sun moves south to north in the spring equinox, and days grow longer and nights shorter. For those in the southern hemisphere, the same equinox marks the arrival of autumn and longer nights.

Seasons on Earth are driven by the planet's orbit and 23.5 degree tilt from the vertical axis. As the Earth circles the sun, it can show more of its northern or southern poles to the sun. But when the Earth passes through an equinox, both poles receive equal sunlight, because the planet is tilted neither towards or away from the sun.

While the equinox signals a time when day and night are equal, the moment when both share 12 hours apiece happens days earlier, because of atmospheric effects.

"The Earth's atmosphere delays the sunset and makes the sunrise earlier," said Robert Massey at the Royal Astronomical Society. "When the sun is on the horizon, light is bent round because we have a thick atmosphere, and that appears to raise the sun in the sky. So when the sun appears on the horizon, it would actually have set if we had no atmosphere."

The date of the spring equinox varies from 19 to 21 March depending on location and corrections due to the mismatch between the Gregorian calendar, which logs 365 days a year, and the duration of Earth's orbit around the sun, which takes 365.25 days to complete.

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2012/mar/20/spring-equinox-end-of-winter

Academic Calendars

Future Calendars

2023-2024 Academic Calendar

Fall Semester 2023
DateDayEvent
August 21 - 25Tuesday - FridayFaculty Meetings
August 28MondayClasses Begin
September 4MondayLabor Day (university closed)
November 22WednesdayThanksgiving Break Begins
(no classes on Wednesday)
November 27MondayClasses Resume
December 9SaturdayClasses End
December 11 - 16Monday - SaturdayFinal Examinations
December 16SaturdayFall Graduate Commencement
December 17SundayFall Undergraduate Commencement
Spring Semester 2024
DateDayEvent
January 8 - 12Monday - FridayFaculty Meetings
January 15MondayMartin Luther King, Jr. Birthday (university closed)
January 16TuesdayClasses Begin
March 10 - 17Sunday - SundaySpring Recess
March 18MondayClasses Resume
April 21SundayHonors Day
May 2ThursdayClasses End
May 3FridayReading Day
May 4, 6 - 10Saturday, Monday - FridayFinal Examinations
May 10FridaySpring Graduate Commencement
May 11SaturdaySpring Undergraduate Commencement
Summer Semester 2024
DateDayEvent
June 17MondayClasses Begin
July 4TuesdayIndependence Day (university closed)
August 11SundaySummer Session Ends

Approved by University Council - April 2, 2014


2024-2025 Academic Calendar

Fall Semester 2024
DateDayEvent
August 19 - 23Tuesday - FridayFaculty Meetings
August 26MondayClasses Begin
September 2MondayLabor Day (university closed)
November 27WednesdayThanksgiving Break Begins
(no classes on Wednesday)
December 2MondayClasses Resume
December 7SaturdayClasses End
December 9 - 14Monday - SaturdayFinal Examinations
December 14SaturdayFall Graduate Commencement
December 15SundayFall Undergraduate Commencement
Spring Semester 2025
DateDayEvent
January 6 - 10Monday - FridayFaculty Meetings
January 13MondayClasses begin
January 20TuesdayMartin Luther King, Jr. Birthday (university closed)
March 9 - 16Sunday - SundaySpring Recess
March 17MondayClasses Resume
April 13SundayHonors Day
May 1ThursdayClasses End
May 2FridayReading Day
May 3, 5 - 9Saturday, Monday - FridayFinal Examinations
May 9FridaySpring Graduate Commencement
May 10SaturdaySpring Undergraduate Commencement
Summer Semester 2025
DateDayEvent
June 16MondayClasses Begin
July 4TuesdayIndependence Day (university closed)
August 10SundaySummer Session Ends

 

Approved by University Council - February 25, 2015.


2025-2026 Academic Calendar

Fall Semester 2025
DateDayEvent
August 18 - 22Monday - FridayFaculty Meetings
August 25MondayClasses Begin
September 1MondayLabor Day (university closed)
November 26WednesdayThanksgiving Break Begins
(no classes on Wednesday)
December 1MondayClasses Resume
December 6SaturdayClasses End
December 8 - 13Monday - SaturdayFinal Examinations
December 13SaturdayFall Graduate Commencement
December 14SundayFall Undergraduate Commencement

Spring Semester 2026

DateDayEvent
January 5 - 9Monday - FridayFaculty Meetings
January 12MondayClasses begin
January 19MondayMartin Luther King, Jr. Birthday (university closed)
March 8- 15Sunday - SundaySpring Recess
March 16MondayClasses Resume
April 19SundayHonors Day
April 30ThursdayClasses End
May 1FridayReading Day
May 2, 4 - 8Saturday, Monday - FridayFinal Examinations
May 8FridaySpring Graduate Commencement
May 9SaturdaySpring Undergraduate Commencement

Summer Semester 2026

DateDayEvent
June 15MondayClasses Begin
July 3FridayIndependence Day (university closed)
August 9SundaySummer Session Ends

 

Approved by University Council - April 6, 2016.


2026-2027 Academic Calendar

Fall Semester 2026
DateDayEvent
August 17 - 21Monday-FridayFaculty Meetings
August 24MondayClasses Begin
September 7MondayLabor Day university closed)
November 25WednesdayThanksgiving Break Begins
(no classes on Wednesday)
November 30MondayClasses Resume
December 5SaturdayClasses End
December 7-12Monday-SaturdayFinal Examinations
December 12SaturdayFall Graduate Commencement
December 13SundayFall Undergraduate Commencement

Spring Semester 2027

DateDayEvent
January 4-8Monday-FridayFaculty Meetings
January 11MondayClasses begin
January 18MondayMartin Luther King, Jr. Birthday
(university closed)
March 7-14Sunday-SundaySpring Recess
March 15MondayClasses Resume
April 18SundayHonors Day
April 29ThursdayClasses End
April 30FridayReading Day
May 1, 3-7Saturday, Monday-FridayFinal Examinations
May 7FridaySpring Graduate Commencement
May 8SaturdaySpring Undergraduate Commencement

Summer Semester 2027

DateDayEvent
June 14MondayClasses Begin
July 5MondayIndependence Day
(university closed)
August 8SundaySummer Session Ends

 

Approved by University Council - March 1, 2017.


2027-2028 Academic Calendar

Fall Semester 2027
DateDayEvent
August 16 - 22Monday-FridayFaculty meetings
August 23MondayClasses begin
September 6MondayLabor Day university closed)
November 24WednesdayThanksgiving break begins
(no classes on Wednesday)
November 29MondayClasses resume
December 4SaturdayClasses end
December 6-11Monday-SaturdayFinal examinations
December 11SaturdayFall graduate commencement
December 12SundayFall undergraduate commencement

Spring Semester 2028

DateDayEvent
January 10-14Monday-FridayFaculty meetings
January 17MondayMartin Luther King, Jr. Birthday
(university closed)
January 18TuesdayClasses begin
March 12-19Sunday-SundaySpring recess
March 20MondayClasses resume
April 23SundayHonors Day
May 4ThursdayClasses end
May 5FridayReading Day
May 6, 8-12Saturday, Monday-FridayFinal examinations
May 12FridaySpring graduate commencement
May 8SaturdaySpring undergraduate commencement

Summer Semester 2028

DateDayEvent
June 12MondayClasses begin
July 4TuesdayIndependence Day observed
(university closed)
August 6SundaySummer session ends

 

Approved by University Council - April 4, 2018.


2028-2029 Academic Calendar

Fall Semester 2028
DateDayEvent
August 21 - 25Monday-FridayFaculty meetings
August 28MondayClasses begin
September 4MondayLabor Day (university closed)
November 22WednesdayThanksgiving break begins
(no classes on Wednesday)
November 27MondayClasses resume
December 9SaturdayClasses end
December 11-16Monday-SaturdayFinal examinations
December 16SaturdayFall graduate commencement
December 17SundayFall undergraduate commencement

Spring Semester 2029

DateDayEvent
January 8-12Monday-FridayFaculty meetings
January 15MondayMartin Luther King, Jr. Birthday
(university closed)
January 16TuesdayClasses begin
March 11-18Sunday-SundaySpring recess
March 19MondayClasses resume
April 22SundayHonors Day
May 3ThursdayClasses end
May 4FridayReading Day
May 5, 7-11Saturday, Monday-FridayFinal examinations
May 11FridaySpring graduate commencement
May 12SaturdaySpring undergraduate commencement

Summer Semester 2029

DateDayEvent
June 11MondayClasses begin
July 4WednesdayIndependence Day observed
(university closed)
August 5SundaySummer session ends

Approved by University Council - February 27, 2019.


2029-2030 Academic Calendar

Fall Semester 2029
DateDayEvent
August 20-24Monday-FridayFaculty meetings
August 27MondayClasses begin
September 3MondayLabor Day (university closed)
November 21WednesdayThanksgiving break begins
(no classes on Wednesday)
November 26MondayClasses resume
December 8SaturdayClasses end
December 10-15Monday-SaturdayFinal examinations
December 15SaturdayFall graduate commencement
December 16SundayFall undergraduate commencement

Spring Semester 2030

DateDayEvent
January 7-11Monday-FridayFaculty meetings
January 14MondayClasses begin
January 21MondayMartin Luther King, Jr. Birthday
(university closed)
March 10-17Sunday-SundaySpring recess
March 18MondayClasses resume
April 14SundayHonors Day
May 2ThursdayClasses end
May 3FridayReading Day
May 4, 6-10Saturday, Monday-FridayFinal examinations
May 10FridaySpring graduate commencement
May 11SaturdaySpring undergraduate commencement

Summer Semester 2030

DateDayEvent
June 17MondayClasses begin
July 4ThursdayIndependence Day observed
(university closed)
August 11SundaySummer session ends
 

Approved by University Council - January 29, 2020.


2030-2031 Academic Calendar

Fall Semester 2030
DateDayEvent
August 19-23Monday-FridayFaculty meetings
August 26MondayClasses begin
September 2MondayLabor Day (university closed)
November 27WednesdayThanksgiving break begins
(no classes on Wednesday)
December 2 MondayClasses resume
December 7SaturdayClasses end
December 9-14Monday-SaturdayFinal examinations
December 14SaturdayFall graduate commencement
December 15SundayFall undergraduate commencement

Spring Semester 2031

DateDayEvent
January 6-10Monday-FridayFaculty meetings
January 13MondayClasses begin
January 20MondayMartin Luther King, Jr. Birthday
(university closed)
March 9-16Sunday-SundaySpring recess
March 17MondayClasses resume
April 20SundayHonors Day
May 1ThursdayClasses end
May 2FridayReading Day
May 3, 5-9Saturday, Monday-FridayFinal examinations
May 9FridaySpring graduate commencement
May 10SaturdaySpring undergraduate commencement

Summer Semester 2031

DateDayEvent
June 16MondayClasses begin
July 4FridayIndependence Day observed
(university closed)
August 10SundaySummer session ends
 

Approved by Faculty Senate - January 20, 2021.

Источник: https://www.niu.edu/academics/calendars/index.shtml

Spring technically starts with the vernal equinox, defined as the moment when the sun crosses the celestial equator and day and night are of equal length. That happened while most of us were sleeping, at 1:14 a.m. Eastern time today, March 20. Factor in the time change and spring actually started on Monday, March 19, for the Mountain and Pacific time zones.

This year’s vernal equinox is the earliest one since 1896, Scientific American reports. As the sun now moves north of the equator (at equinox, the sun hovered above the Indian Ocean, southeast of Sri Lanka), the technical early start to spring comes from the inexactness of our calendar and the Earth’s slightly shifting orbit in relation to the sun.

Since our calendar was designed to chop up the seasons in four orderly sections, the changing position of the Earth in relation to its orbit around the sun (which gets even more convoluted when you factor in gravitational pulls from other planets) can slightly alter the length of each season. All that tugging pulls the equinox to and fro, but leaves it hovering around March 20. It isn’t even uncalled for to have spring kick off on March 21, but that hasn’t happened for 30 years.

Of course, all this talk of spring starting a tad early is purely astronomical. What most of us really care about is having the sun shine brighter, and more often. The warm weather doesn’t hurt, either.

MORE:A Map of the Equator

Источник: https://newsfeed.time.com/2012/03/20/spring-is-officially-off-to-an-early-start-this-year/

The March Equinox

March equinox illustration
March equinox illustration

Sun Crosses Celestial Equator

The March equinox is the moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator—an imaginary line in the sky above Earth’s equator—from south to north. This happens on March 19, 20, or 21 every year.

10 facts about the March equinox

Equinox Local Time & Date

In New York, New York, USA: Sunday, 20 March 2022, 11:33 EDT(Change location)
This corresponds to Sunday, 20 March 2022, 15:33 UTC.

Why Does the Sun Move North and South?

During the course of a year, the subsolar point—the spot on the Earth's surface directly beneath the Sun—slowly moves along a north-south axis. Having reached its southernmost point at the December solstice, it starts moving northward until it crosses the equator on the day of the March equinox. The June solstice marks the northernmost point of its journey.

Earth: The living planet

The Sun: Our home star

The subsolar point moves north and south during the year because the Earth’s axis is tilted at an angle of about 23.4° in relation to the ecliptic, an imaginary plane created by Earth’s path around the Sun. In June, the Northern Hemisphere is tilted toward the Sun, and the subsolar point is north of the equator. As the Earth travels toward the opposite side of its orbit, which it reaches in December, the Southern Hemisphere gradually receives more sunlight, and the subsolar point travels south.

How do seasons work?

Equinox and solstice illustration.
Equinox and solstice illustration.

Why Is It Called “Equinox?”

On the days of the equinoxes, the Earth’s axis is perpendicular to the Sun’s rays, meaning that all regions on Earth receive about the same number of hours of sunlight. In other words, night and day are, in principle, the same length all over the world. This is the reason it’s called an “equinox,” derived from Latin, meaning “equal night.”

However, this is literal translation not entirely true. In reality, equinox days don’t have exactly 12 hours of daylight and 12 hours of dark.

Astronomical terms & definitions

The Equinoxes and the Seasons

The March and September equinoxes mark the beginning of the spring and autumn seasons on Earth, according to one definition. The equinox in March is the start of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and the beginning of fall south of the equator.

Equinox and solstice dates—years 1-2149

Measuring the Tropical Year

The March equinox can be used to measure a tropical year, the mean time it takes for the Earth to complete a full orbit around the Sun. Also known as a solar year, a tropical year is approximately 365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes, and 45 seconds long. It can vary by up to 30 minutes each year.

 DaysHoursMinutesSeconds
March 2019 – March 20203655514
March 2020 – March 202136554755
March 2021 – March 202236555554
March 2022 – March 202336555055
March 2023 – March 20243655428

Tropical years from 1900 to 2100

Why Does the Date Vary?

The date of the equinoxes and solstices varies because a year in our calendar does not exactly match the length of the tropical year—the time it takes the Earth to complete an orbit around the Sun.

Today's Gregorian calendar has 365 days in a common year and 366 days in a leap year. However, our planet takes about 365.242199 days to orbit the Sun. This means that the timing of the equinoxes and solstices slowly drifts apart from the Gregorian calendar, and the solstice happens about 6 hours later each year. Eventually, the accumulated lag becomes so large that it falls on the following date.

To realign the calendar with the tropical year, a leap day is introduced (nearly) every four years. When this happens, the equinox and solstice dates shift back to the earlier date again.

Other factors influencing the timing of the equinoxes and solstices include variations in the length of a tropical year and in the orbital and daily rotational motion of the Earth, such as the “wobble” in the Earth's axis (precession).

Topics: Astronomy, Sun, Seasons, Equinox, Earth, March

Источник: https://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/march-equinox.html

Why Has Date Changed for Start of Spring?

Avid "Seinfeld" fans might remember the episode when Jerry's friend, George, was desperately trying to find a way to postpone his impending Christmastime wedding with his fiancee, Susan. He finally comes up with a solution:

"Have the wedding on March 21 - the first day of spring!"

Unfortunately, if George had gone through with the nuptials (and Seinfeld aficionados know why he never did), he would have been a full day late. You see, in America, spring no longer falls on March 21. In 2005, for instance, the vernal equinox, the first day of spring for the Northern Hemisphere, comes on Sunday, March 20 at 12:33 GMT, or 7:33 a.m. EST (4:33 a.m. PST).

Now this doesn't seem right. I mean, when we were all growing up, the first day of spring was always on March 21, not March 20, right? Now all of a sudden spring comes on March 20.

How did that happen?

While it's true that we've traditionally celebrated the beginning of spring on March 21, astronomers and calendar manufacturers alike now say that the spring season starts one day earlier, March 20, in all time zones in North America. Unheard of? Not if you look at the statistics. In fact, did you know that during the 20th Century, March 21 was actually the exception rather than the rule?

The vernal equinox landed on March 21, only 36 out of 100 years. And from 1981 to 2102, Americans will celebrate the first day of spring no later than March 20.

In the years 2008 and 2012, those living in Alaska, Hawaii and the Pacific, Mountain and Central time zones will see spring begin even earlier: on March 19. And in 2016, it will start on March 19 for the entire United States.

There are a few reasons why seasonal dates can vary from year to year.

  1. A year is not an even number of days and neither are the seasons. To try and achieve a value as close as possible to the exact length of the year, our Gregorian Calendar was constructed to give a close approximation to the tropical year which is the actual length of time it takes for the Earth to complete one orbit around the Sun. It eliminates leap days in century years not evenly divisible by 400, such 1700, 1800, and 2100, and millennium years that are divisible by 4,000, such as 8000 and 12000.
  2. Another reason is that the Earth's elliptical orbit is changing its orientation relative to the Sun (it skews), which causes the Earth's axis to constantly point in a different direction, called precession. Since the seasons are defined as beginning at strict 90-degree intervals, these positional changes affect the time Earth reaches each 90-degree location in its orbit around the Sun.
  3. The pull of gravity from the other planets also affects the location of the Earth in its orbit.

Winter

88.994 days

Spring

92.758 days

Summer

93.651 days

Autumn

89.842 days

DateSunriseSunsetDay's Length

March 17

6:05 a.m.

6:05 p.m.

12 hrs. 00 min.

March 18

6:03 a.m.

6:06 p.m.

12 hrs. 03 min.

March 19

6:02 a.m.

6:07 p.m.

12 hrs. 05 min.

March 20

6:00 a.m.

6:08 p.m.

12 hrs. 08 min.

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Joe Rao serves as an instructor and guest lecturer at New York's Hayden Planetarium. He writes about astronomy for The New York Times and other publications, and he is also an on-camera meteorologist for News 12 Westchester, New York.

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Joe Rao is Space.com's skywatching columnist, as well as a veteran meteorologist and eclipse chaser who also serves as an instructor and guest lecturer at New York's Hayden Planetarium. He writes about astronomy for Natural History magazine, the Farmers' Almanac and other publications.

Источник: https://www.space.com/881-date-changed-start-spring.html

3 Replies to “1st day of spring 2012”

  1. 🅰𝚴Ꭰ𝐘𝗚🅰𝘙◎𝟷👽🅰𝗚𝟷 says:

    Did u resolve this issue? What address did u use?

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