Digital file organizer

digital file organizer

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Digital file organizer -

If you’re like the average person, you probably have several “unofficial” spots for the various files, papers, and documents that make their way into your life.

Your desk is a likely candidate, as is your kitchen table – and, of course, there’s the very bottom of your backpack, where papers go to die and never be recovered.

Well, prepare to kiss your average-ness – and all of the messes in these places – goodbye.

By channeling the combined spiritual energy of Marie Kondo and Leslie Knope, I have created this guide that will show you how to easily organize all of your files, documents, and papers.

We’ll start things off by figuring out which of your files should actually be on paper (rather than on your computer). Then, we’ll talk about how to organize and process those files using the Three-Location System. Finally, we’ll dig into how you can start to digitize your files.

Let’s get started.

Physical vs. Digital: How Should You Store Your Files?

Look, it’s 2019. We’re not writing down our friends’ phone numbers on Rolodexes anymore, and when the phone company leaves a phone book on our doorsteps today, we angrily tweet at them for destroying the environment.

So… should we even be talking about how to organize physical files? Shouldn’t we all be going paperless?

Well, if you’re anything like me, the answer is “mostlyyes”.

Whenever I get a piece of paper, my first instinct is to either:

  1. Recycle it (this happens to most of the mail I get)
  2. Digitize it… and then recycle (or shred) it

I don’t like keeping a whole lot of paper in my life. I’d much rather store all my files in the cloud, where they don’t take up space and can be accessed on all of my devices.

However, there are certain things that just need to be kept around in physical form. So, until we all figure out how to upload our consciousnesses into computers and adopt a fully-simulated existence (assuming we’re not already doing that now – cue X-Files music), here are some documents you should make sure you keep on-hand:

Documents You Need to Keep on Paper

Keep all of these documents in your physical file system:

  • ID documents and passports
  • Birth certificate
  • Social security cards
  • Business licenses (if you have a business)
  • Marriage license (if you’re married)
  • Vehicle titles, loan documents, and registration documents
  • House deeds and mortgage documents
  • Wills and living wills

If you’re a student, you may not have many of these kinds of documents right now; however, you’re likely to acquire some of them in the future, and you’ll want a safe place to keep them.

Additionally, you might want to keep around certain sentimental documents – clippings of newspaper articles you were mentioned in or wrote yourself, extra-special birthday cards, crayon drawings from your little brother – that kind of stuff.

Whatever it is, use the following system for organizing and storing it.

The Three-Location System for Organizing Files

When it comes to organizing physical files, I use a simple system that consists of three locations:

  1. Main file box
  2. Inbox
  3. Portable file folder

There are a couple of other optional locations you can add to your system (which I’ll cover later), but these three will cover the vast majority of your needs.

Main File Box

The main file box is the place where the majority of your physical files should eventually end up (if you’re not going to digitize them).

If you have a lot of papers you need to store, you could buy a multi-drawer filing cabinet for this purpose; however, I find that a single file box is more than enough for me.

This file box is built to store hanging folders, each of which gets a label. Most hanging folders come with labels included.

Now, when you’re creating your structure here, it’s a good idea to try to adhere to the “tree” structure you used for your digital files.

Use each hanging folder as a top-level folder. This might be all you need; if you’re like me, you won’t have a ton of physical files and won’t need to go deeper.

If you do need to go deeper, though, you’ve got a few options. The first is to simply put multiple regular folders within your hanging folders.

I actually do have an example for this; my landlord left an entire file box with the house I’m renting because she is supremely organized (honestly, she should be writing this article instead of me).

Folders inside of hanging folders

Each hanging folder is just a letter of the alphabet; in each one is a folder for each piece of the house – the garage door, security system, refrigerator, etc.

Another method is to use pieces of printer paper as dividers, and then to attach sticky flags to the edges of each one in order to create labels that stick up from the rest of your papers.

You could also use thicker construction paper if you wanted these dividers to feel more substantial than your normal papers.

Folders inside of hanging folders

This method isn’t quite as nice as using folders-within-folders, as that method allows you to take out a specific folder when you need to work with it. It is, however, cheaper – and it takes up less space.

Inbox

Be honest with me here: When you get a piece of mail that needs to go into your file box, how often do you immediately open up that file box and put it in the correct spot?

I’d wager a guess that it’s not 100% of the time, and that your kitchen table if often used as a convenient place to toss things that will get “dealt with later.”

Here’s the thing: This is fine. You probably shouldn’t be opening up your file box and finding the exact folder for each file you get at the exact moment you get it. It’s a lot more efficient to have a specific time blocked out for processing all of your unorganized files, mail, cryptic messages written in cut-out magazine letters and nailed to your door, etc.

However, your kitchen table does not deserve to be a dumping ground for all of these things in the mean time. That is a job for your Inbox.

Desktop Inbox

An inbox is a simple tray (or stack of trays if you want to get fancy) that sits on your desk. Whenever you get something that needs to be processed later, you put it in the inbox. There it will wait for processing.

At least once a week, go through everything in the inbox and decide what needs to be done with each piece – deal with it (if it represents a task, like a water bill), digitize it, recycle it, or put it into your main file system.

Portable File Folder

The final piece of your physical file organization puzzle is the one that travels with you.

When you’re out of the house and away from your file box and inbox, you still need some way to store with any papers you get at work, class, or from that guy outside your local coffee shop holding his “The End is Nigh” sign.

Now, depending on the type of work you do and classes you attend, your portable file folder can function as either a portable inbox (which you clear on a regular basis) or a mini file box that actually holds papers for a significant amount of time.

If you’re anything like me, you don’t have any physical papers that you need to carry with you. You might carry a physical notebook (maybe you’re a bullet journal user) or a novel, but you’re not actually carrying worksheets and other papers.

If that’s the case, then I recommend keeping a single folder in your bag and using it as a portable inbox. This gives you a safe place to temporarily store any papers you get while you’re out and about, and it doesn’t take up much space.

Single folder

When you get home each day, you can move any papers and end-of-the-world pamphlets you received to your main file box, your inbox, or the recycle bin.

But what if you’re a student who needs to carry around assignments and handouts?

Or what if you’re a high-powered, slick-haired business person who needs to carry around, ya know, business papers?

If this is the case, then a single folder probably isn’t going to cut the mustard. (Actually, the edge of a folder is more than capable of cutting mustard – but I digress)

Instead, look at getting a portable accordion folder (I recommend this one from Five Star). These come in tons of different designs, from ones that just have a close-able flap to ones that zip up and have built-in tabs for labels.

Portable accordion folder

All of these have one thing in common: They give you several folders in one slim, compact package, which means they act as a portable file box that you can work out of.

You can easily separate and organize all the different papers for your classes or Very Important Business Deals, and unlike old-school binders with a hard spine, they expand or contract based on how much you’re carrying.

Optional File Locations

The Three-Location System will most likely be all you need for the vast majority of your files, especially if you decide to start digitizing most of them. However, there are a few potential exceptions. Here I’m going to cover a couple that you may want to consider.

Manuals Box

One type of physical “file” that I almost never digitize are product manuals. I have manuals for my lawn mower, digital piano, camera, and various other things I’ve bought. These are often pretty thick, so they’d take up a lot of space in my main file box if I tried to store them there.

That’s why I also have a “manuals box”. In my case, it’s just a cardboard box in my basement where I store the manuals for the things I buy. It’s not very organized. Whenever I buy something and think I should keep the manual, I just toss it in the box.

Manuals Box

Of course, you can be organized with your manuals box – in fact, my landlord’s file box is, indeed, a hyper-organized manuals box. When I eventually own my own home, I’ll be building a similarly organized manuals box.

For now, though, the number of manuals I own is small enough that a single box – without folders – works just fine.

Remember, sometimes over-optimizing one tiny part of your life takes so much time that your life in general becomes less optimized.

Safety Deposit Box

For your very sensitive documents, man. Safety deposit boxes can be rented at most banks for a yearly fee, which can vary from bank to bank and location to location.

There are also companies that focus only on safety deposit boxes, and you might find them to be cheaper. One that I found here in Denver rents small boxes for $125 a year.

Personally, I don’t use a safety deposit box. For important documents, I have backup scans. However, I also live in a house where I feel my documents are fairly secure.

At other times during my life, though, I lived in dorm rooms with roommates who would often leave the door unlocked – or wide open. If you’re an a similarly insecure living situation, a safety deposit box might be a wise investment.

Organizing your paper files is a great example of analog productivity. For more analog productivity advice, check out this article.

How to Go Paperless: Digitize Your Physical Files

To round out this guide, I want to talk about something that’s even better than properly storing and organizing your paper files; namely, digitizing them and then removing the physical versions from your life.

That’s right: It’s time to adopt the (mostly) paperless lifestyle.

Digitization is the process of scanning your physical files and turning them into electronic images or PDFs. From there, you can easily slot them into your beautifully-constructed computer folder system, where they:

  • No longer take up any space in your home or backpack
  • Can be backed up and rendered invulnerable to fires, bullies, or escaped zoo gorillas
  • Are searchable (if you save them as PDFs, or…well, read on.)

Personally, I try to digitize almost every paper I get. Unless I’m dealing with a thick product manual (and can’t find a PDF online to replace it), it takes very little time to digitize a paper.

This is especially true now that almost everyone has an ultra-high-resolution camera built into their phone. In the past, the only easy ways to digitize papers were to either buy a scanner or go down to a Kinko’s or Staples and scan documents there.

Now, you can just use your phone – which means you can digitize handouts, receipts, and other papers wherever you are.

Additionally, if you’re using the right app, you can automatically send your scans into your file system.

Here’s how I digitize my files. First, I’ll note that for the most part I prefer to send all my scans into my Evernote account rather than my actual file system. If you’ve taken my productivity systems course (which is free using that link), you might know that I use Evernote as a second brain.

A scanned document in Evernote. Here, the text is searchable, and the entire document can be tagged and annotated.

All of my article research, book notes, recipes, journal entries, and other ideas go into Evernote. (Note that there are other options – Check out our Top 10 Note-Taking Apps in 2020 list to see the best ones.)

Since Evernote’s UI allows me to see the contents of an individual note right next to all my notes and notebooks (instead of forcing me to open things up in a separate program), I find it to be a much more efficient place to store ideas. That’s why I choose to send scans there as well.

There’s another reason, though – Evernote makes your scans searchable, even if they’re images.

I tend to upload my scans as PDFs, but you can also add pictures into Evernote and its optical character recognition algorithm will allow you to search any text in them (even if it’s handwriting).

The Best Free Document Scanner App

With all that being said, I actually don’t use Evernote’s built-in scanning tool to digitize the papers that I get.

Instead, I use an app called Scanbot (iOS

Q&A: Why Is File Management so Important? Plus Benefits

There are many methods that a company might use to improve its organization and efficiency. One such method is file management, which allows a company to store its files in an organized manner and ensure organization and productivity. If you believe you or your company would benefit from additional organization, you might consider implementing a file management system to store and organize your documents. In this article, we discuss what file management is, why it's important, its benefits and the key components of effective file management.

What is file management?

File management is the process of naming, storing and organizing files in a system or program that makes it easy to locate documents. Most companies use a digital form of file management, but physical file management remains beneficial for certain companies. Organizing files digitally is helpful because many systems offer the option to organize files for you, making it easier and quicker to store and locate documents. Digital file management is also helpful because you and your employees can access files on almost any device, regardless of the time or place, which is especially valuable for remote workers.

Companies usually organize their files in a hierarchical system, meaning they use secondary folders, or sub-folders, for further organization. Within your main folder, you might have multiple sub-folders that contain different categories of documents. For example, you might have a main folder for taxes and sub-folders for taxes in a specific year and other specific tax forms.

Related:Documentation in the Workplace

Why is file management important?

There are many reasons why it's important for a company to use an effective file management system, including:

Improved organization

Regardless of the size of a company, most organizations have plenty of information to store, including employee, product, inventory and financial information. File management can help store, retrieve and share information within an organization. For example, a company can store many files in one folder, which decreases the amount of clutter within a digital storing system.

Related:7 Steps To Organize Your Paperwork and Declutter Your Desk

Centralized document location

Having all of your company's documents in one centralized location can simplify the process of retrieving documents. Rather than examining hundreds of files, an employee can search for a folder name and easily find their desired document. This simplifies document organization as opposed to storing documents in multiple locations, such as email threads, personal computers or flash drives.

Increased efficiency

Time management and efficiency are essential components of a company's productivity. File management increases efficiency by reducing the time employees require to find documents. It also reduces the time spent recreating files if an employee can't find an original document. Even though retyping a document may only take a few minutes in some instances, this wasted time can become problematic if repeated multiple times in a workday. File management ensures that employees can remain productive and avoid repeating tasks.

Enhanced communication

Many file management programs include helpful communication tools such as chat boxes, tagging systems and the ability to comment on documents. This is important because employees can ask one another questions about certain documents or comment on mistakes within a document. Through these tools, employees can usually edit documents collaboratively and, therefore, understand why a team member made a certain change or suggestion.

Related:10 Document Collaboration Tools for Your Team

Reduced filing errors

File management can reduce the number of filing errors your team experiences. If a company stores its documents physically, an organized filing system is necessary to avoid misplaced documents. Misplacing documents can also occur digitally, especially if an employee names or organizes files inaccurately. A file management system reduces errors by offering clarity and guidance when searching for files.

Controlled access

Information access is important because it ensures that employees can access necessary documents to perform their tasks. Information access also helps companies control which people have the ability to view confidential data. Many digital file management systems have locks or controls that grant access solely to employees who need certain documents to work. If they require access to a certain document they're locked out of, they can ask their managers to grant them proper access.

Benefits of file management

Here are some benefits that an effective file management system can offer companies:

Standardized processes

Standardized processes are beneficial for a company because they can reduce mistakes and increase productivity. File management can help standardize a company's processes by ensuring that everyone knows how to store and retrieve documents in the same way.

Related:How To Become a Successful Document Specialist

Reduced emails

Many companies use email to communicate, which can result in large numbers of messages that clutter employees' inboxes. Having an effective file management system can reduce the number of emails sent because employees have access to the same documents and understand how to retrieve the documents they require.

Increased accountability

Companies can also increase accountability through effective file management. For example, if an employee makes a mistake on a project, their manager can help identify what went wrong by viewing relevant documents together. This can help employees learn from mistakes and improve their performance in the future.

Improved security

Misplaced files can lead to security issues for companies, especially if an employee accidentally stores an important document in a public forum. File management can help increase security by creating folders in which employees can easily store documents. If an employee knows exactly where to place files, it can reduce the chances they place them in an incorrect folder.

Components of effective file management

File management can help a company increase its organization, but to accomplish this, it's important for employees to know the components of an effective file management system. Some components of effective file management may include:

Consistency

When you're creating or organizing your file management program, it's important to be consistent with the locations in which you place your documents. This entails creating a system for your file management methodology and remaining consistent with it. For example, if you make a folder for your company's finances and title it "finances," but later, you create a similar folder and label it "budget," that might cause confusion among employees, especially if you put particular files in the first folder and others in the second.

Number of folders

An important component of file management is understanding the proper number of folders you and your company require. If you have too few folders, your employees might have to sort through many documents within the few folders you have. If you have too many folders, your employees might search through multiple folders to find the file they want. Therefore, it's important for your file management system to have enough folders to encompass your documents and clearly labeled sub-folders that naturally guide an employee who attempts to find a file.

Accurate file and folder names

Effective file management often entails accurate file and folder names. For example, if your company plans on releasing the first press release document this year, it may be beneficial to label it "Press Release #1 2021" under the folder name "Press Releases." If you're clear with your labeling practices, your employees may be more efficient and productive while completing their tasks.

Источник: https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/why-is-file-management-so-important

Best 5 File Management Softwares in 2021

File management software offers the functions to organize, edit, manage and track the workflow of files in your business. For instance, they can help you get comments from relevant parties concerning a given document. File management software also contributes to keeping a record of relevant documents in your company while users can also use digital filing software to manage all electronic files in an enterprise. In simple words, any business needs efficient file management software for smooth running and increased productivity of the firm that is why this article introduces you 5 best file software.

Top 5 File Management Software

1. eFileCabinet

eFileCabinet provides an exceptional choice for file management in small and medium businesses. It provides various functions such as scanning, tagging, workflow and cloud storage. The functions are pretty easy to use and are robust enough for any user. It harbors unlimited storage, an automated cloud backup service, and a huge template library. It provides various versions of its applications for both server-side and hosted file management software.

The file management software comes with multiple management tools thus with the help of these tools, administrators can specify a range of permissions to the employees. For example, an employee can be tasked with preventing individual employees from deleting documents. DMS features also help you manage changes to significant files. It supports Word, Excel, PDF, PowerPoint, and QuickBooks.

best file manager software

Pros:

  • It has a retention dating which allows users to store or delete expired files
  • It has a powerful ORC that makes documents to be searchable.

Cons:

  • Due to the many features, the number of options may be a bit overwhelming to understand

2. M-Files

M-Files is a unique file management software that increases the productivity of business by organizing and managing all electronic documents. It has a checkout feature that helps in keeping track of every document that is being worked on as well as tracking the changes to a document.

It is easy to implement software that helps you create, revise, organize, share and control your company’s documents. M-Files versions are available for Windows and Mac computers, and it is also compatible with Android and IOS devices making it easier to use at your convenient place. More features afforded by this software include scanning, editing, saving documents to the database and many others.

file management software for windows

Pros:

  • You can access documents through any internet-enabled device including ios and android tablets and phones

Cons:

  • You must download and install M-files to your computer for you to use, which is not convenient as a program you access and use online.

3. PDFelement for Business

PDFelement for Business allows users to create, convert, collaborate, edit and sign professional PDF files with ease not to mention the interactive document processing it affords users. With it, the company can create various PDF files by converting other documents such as Word, Excel, and PowerPoint.

file management software free

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The tool can also transform scanned files into editable and searchable PDF files for business purposes. It also has a very great OCR that recognizes images and texts in a PDF file with the help of 20 supported languages. The software also supports the combination of different PDF files into one document, and more so, a given company can split multiple files from a major PDF and store them separately for different use. The tool also promotes the security of professional documents by allowing the addition of encrypted passwords to protect the document.


4. Dokmee

Dokmee is a file management software that helps you save time and energy by giving a range of document imaging and tracking tools to help organize important electronic files in your business. It offers many desktop and website configurations at different prices.

The file software has a user-friendly interface and unique capturing and editing tools. The program integrates with office software, scanners, email programs and mobile devices. The software works with most scanners, and you can import files from your word processor and email programs. It also allows you to add metadata, tags, and other sorting information to every scanned or file imported to Dokmee Professional. You can convert PDF files, and you can merge and split PDF files with Dokmee.

software for file management

Pros:

  • You can access documents through any internet-enabled device including ios and android tablets and phones

Cons:

  • You must download and install M-files to your computer for you to use, which is not convenient as a program you access and use online.

5. PinPoint

Pinpoint is a very powerful file management software that you can run from your server or a cloud data center. It files documents automatically, and it works with Macs, PCs, and mobile devices. The set-up and installation of the software are very easy. In addition to saving the original file, the program creates a viewable PDF for the authorized users and employees, and other stakeholders can add their feedback or comments to the document.

files management software

Pros:

  • The key people can edit or offer feedback on the company’s key documents.
  • PinPoint files documents automatically without the need for intervention.

Cons:

  • The customer support hours offered by the company is limited, and you can only reach the responsible person through the phone or email.

Free Download or Buy PDFelement right now!

Free Download or Buy PDFelement right now!

Buy PDFelement right now!

Buy PDFelement right now!

Источник: https://pdf.wondershare.com/business/file-management-software.html
Android).

Scanbot does a great job at automatically detecting the edges of most documents.

I’ve found that Scanbot’s ability to quickly detect the edges of a piece of paper (or business card, or receipt, or a Magic: The Gathering card) is much better than Evernote’s, and you’re also able to scan multiple pages at once – when you’re done, the app can stitch them into a single PDF.

These features make scanning much faster, but there’s another reason I like Scanbot so much: The automatic upload feature.

Scanbot Upload Destinations

Within the app’s settings, you can choose a destination to which all new scans will be automatically uploaded. Destinations include:

  • Evernote (the one I use)
  • Google Drive
  • Dropbox
  • OneDrive
  • OneNote
  • Lots more, even including FTP and WebDAV

Moreover, you can choose a specific upload folder or notebook for most destinations. In Evernote, I’ve set mine to a notebook called !INBOX, which is also the place where I create most new text notes (I’ve named it with a “!” symbol so it sits at the top of my notebook list).

Scanbot does have one significant drawback: The Pro version has become quite expensive in recent months.

As a result, I’m planning on testing other scanning apps in the near future and updating this guide with a new recommended pick. In the meantime, check out this list for some alternatives.

Note: If you’re using a document scanner app that sends scans to Evernote, Google Drive, Dropbox, or some other cloud-synced app, then your digitized files will be reasonably backed up. However, you should make sure that they are. If your scans only exist on a single computer hard drive, they could be lost in an instant if that hard drive fails.

Create an “Inbox” Folder on Your Computer

I want to make one final note on digitization: If you choose to upload your digitized files to your computer’s native folder system, instead of an app like Evernote, then it might be a good idea for you to create an “Inbox” folder on your computer.

Inbox Computer Folder

Some people actually use a digital Inbox folder just like a physical inbox, saving all new files to it and then relocating them later on. I don’t do this for a couple of reasons:

  1. Most of my frequently-accessed folders are pinned to my Quick Access sidebar, so opening them doesn’t take much time.
  2. A lot of my work involves video editing, and video projects are full of footage, images, music and other documents. Changing the file locations for those assets can break a project.

However, using an Inbox folder for your automatic scan uploads is a really good idea, because it allows you to scan a document in seconds and move on with your life. You don’t want to be standing around in the grocery store, digging through folders in Google Drive in order to find the right one for that receipt your just scanned.

Instead, sit down once a week and process the inbox folder, just as you would do with a physical inbox. This is exactly what I do with my !INBOX notebook in Evernote as well.

When you work this way, you efficiently batch all your sorting tasks, removing as much friction as possible from the multiple times during the week when you might choose to scan a document.

Shred Sensitive Documents

Now, once you’ve digitized a document, you’re probably going to want to get rid of the paper version. You’ve got several options for doing this:

  • Recycle it – this is the best option for most things.
  • Throw it away – if you want to prove that “End is Nigh” guy right and harm the planet.
  • Burn it – check your local fire laws and current bans, and don’t burn glossy stuff! Here’s a guide if you really want to do this.
  • Eat it – if you’re a goat, you’ve already done this.

However, you should know that certain unsavory characters have been known to dig through trash and recycle bins, looking for paper that contains personal information they can steal. Don’t let your personal information fall into the hands of these unscrupulous opportunists.

Whenever you digitize anything containing account numbers, your social security number, financial data, or other personal information, make like a Ninja Turtle villain and shred it afterwards.

I use a cross-cut shredder, which is more secure than a basic strip-cut shredder since it cuts paper into small pieces instead of long strips that can easily be pasted back together (the American Embassy in Tehran learned this the hard way back in the 1970s and 80s).

It’s not too expensive, and you can keep it in a sort of always-on mode so that it instantly starts shredding when you feed in a piece of paper. And it’s definitely less work than dealing with having your information stolen! Speaking of that, you might want to listen to our podcast episode on digital security practices as well.

Organization is a Long-Term Process

As you’re probably aware, simply setting up a system for organizing your files isn’t enough: you have to actually use it.

Once you’ve finished implementing everything from this guide, make sure you actually take the time to properly organize new documents when you get them. Put them in your inbox or portable file system right away, then process them on a regular basis.

Additionally, it can be helpful to have a schedule task – once every 3-4 months, say – to go through your file system and make sure it’s working order. If anything is out of place, put it back in its place.

This process will help keep “entropy” (or chaos) from creeping into your file system – ensuring that you always know where everything is.

If you want to get even more organized, check out these articles:

Источник: https://collegeinfogeek.com/file-folder-organization/

Most of us click countless number of pictures and if you are a professional photographer or a selfie lover you end up clicking hundreds if not thousands of photos each year. As a result, of which you find yourself stuck with a large number of digital photos scattered on your Windows 10 machine. Thus, making managing and looking for digital pictures difficult.

Hence to handle such a situation we should have a dedicated photo management program installed on our electronic device. A modern-day photo organizer tool works as a lifesaver in such a situation.

You can find various photo organizing tool in market but knowing which one is best is a task. Therefore,  here we bring for you one of the best photo management software, Photo Organizer.

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It doesn’t matter if you have few images to sort through or thousands. This photo management tool provides various options and tags that make organizing digital photos simple and easy. Most importantly, even when handling collection of thousands of photos Photo Organizer is responsive. Furthermore, you can simply import photos from the entire system or selected folder, rename batch photos, undo changes and get report about organized photos.

 

Why should you use Photo Organizer?

Photos are worthless if you cannot find them when you want them.

When it comes to organizing photos on Windows 10, the best we all do is to sort them on basis of date. Due to which family photos, selfies, landscapes all get mixed. And still, the question what is the use of photo organizing application?

We all like to click photos and save them. But no one has the time to sort them as it is a time-consuming task. Therefore, we create folders based on date due to which a number of great photos gets mixed or are completely overlooked. Hence, we need a photo organizing software to tackle this problem.

Obviously, we all don’t have the same requirements when it comes to using and selecting software. Some might want to use simple software while others may like software with extra features. But still, to manage and organize tens or hundreds of thousands of photos we need photo organizing software.

The best photo manager will help you in doing all this. The most interesting part about this photo organizing tool is, it categorizes your photos based on different criteria and is designed for all type of users.

Whether you are looking for software with added features or a simple to use tool you get it all in Photo Organizer. You might not agree with me at this time. But once you download and use Photo Organizer to manage and organize images you’ll agree with what we are saying.

Download Photo Organizer Now-

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What makes Photo Organizer different?

This photo organizing tool gives centralized access to all image files. You can perform functions like batch file renaming, deleting duplicates and more. Plus, digital photos will be organized in a better way to increase productivity. Moreover, this photo organizing software allows editing metadata of images having IPTC, XMP, EXIF and other tags.

Image metadata is details stored within a file about basic camera settings, location, date, timestamp, and other things. IPTC (International Press Telecommunications Council) and XMP are a standard metadata system supported by almost all programs for tagging. But editing these tags isn’t easy. Your OS doesn’t allow editing RAW file as it doesn’t know how to re-save a RAW file.

But IPTC and XMP aren’t the only tags that generate image metadata. Besides, them another most common tag is EXIF (Exchangeable Image File). It is standard, automatic, and contains information like ISO settings, shutter speed, aperture, and so on. When an image is uploaded online this EXIF data is also uploaded with it. One who knows about it and where to look for EXIF data can know a lot about you. Certainly, the information revealed by EXIF data is harmless.

But today due to the increase in the use of Internet risk of exposing private information has also enhanced. Hence, we should change metadata.  EXIF data can lead to a privacy breach due to our carelessness. Therefore, to stay secure a close watch at image metadata should be kept and it should be edited before image is uploaded.

With this, we hope you have the answer for why to use photo organizing software and what makes Photo Organizer different.

Features of Photo Organizer:

  1. Quickly Organize And Load All Image Formats
  2. Import Photos From External Devices Like Camera, Smartphone, External Hard Drive On Windows Operating System
  3. Batch Image Renaming And Processing
  4. Import Photos either from the whole system or from selected folder
  5. Centralized Color Settings.
  6. Professional Photo Management Tool
  7. Organize Photo Library Using Various Sorting Techniques
  8. Import RAW Files
  9. Browse And View Imported Images
  10. Support All Popular Image Formats Including RAW
  11. Windows Explorer-Like User Interface
  12. Simple And Easy To User Interface
  13. Duplicate Image Finder

All these features make Photo Organizer a powerful and advanced digital photo management tool. Using this photo organizing software, you can import, organize, rename, process batch images and more in a snap. Not only this, but it also provides many options that help to organize and search images quickly.

Why is Photo Organizer one of the best image organizing Software?

It is free to use tool and you can use all its features without any restriction. Moreover, it fits into everyone’s requirement. It doesn’t matter if you’re looking for a simple or advanced tool, Photo Organizer benefits all. Once you use it, you’ll love the product. Certainly, because it is free to use tool we cannot rely on it.

Therefore, it is important to know about the program before you start using it.

Also Read:-

What Photo Organizer has to offer?

This photo organizing tool offers customizable tagging methods

Everyone is unique in its own right and same is true for photo organizing and managing software. Some might offer different tagging methods – EXIF data, keywords, rating and while some may have none. This photo organizing tool allows you to customize tags as per the requirement.

Benefits of Photo Organizer

  • Provides automatic tagging, filtering, and searching tools

Once digital images are tagged, a good filtering and searching tool is needed to find specific photos. This best photo organizing tool provides advanced searching tools and different ways to display image, to bring clarity and finesse to your collection.

When working with hundreds and thousands of high-resolution images, you would not like any hindrance like waiting for the program to respond. Sometimes the response depends on your computer, but some programs like Photo Organizer are capable of handling large files without any glitches. It is capable of reading and processing files quickly to let you focus on the task and increase productivity.

Along with responsiveness, this photo organizing software is easy to use. There’s no sense in using a tool that would ask you to get trained. A program that works for both professionals and novice and prioritizes ease of use makes working much easier.

With this photo organizing tool, you can not only organize photos but can rename multiple images too.

Naming image files according to the event, occasion, or place makes them more manageable and easier to locate. Photo Organizer allows renaming multiple photos in a go while they are being organized into sub folders based on date taken, camera model, etc.

Besides, organizing your digital photos into subfolders this image organizing and managing tool makes sure there’s no redundancy in your photo gallery. While your photos are being organized, Photo Organizer deletes duplicate images automatically in the background, making your photos collection more streamlined. What’s more, this image managing tool helps recover valuable hard disk space by deleting duplicate images.

  • Find photos without any hassle

Photo Organizer makes locating a specific image file really quick and simple. The program organizes photos as per EXIF information which can be used to find images based on several criteria like name, date taken, date modified etc.

Undo all changes and move images to the original location. If not satisfied with the changes made by Photo Organizer you can use ‘Revert’ option to send all images back to their original locations. This would remove changes made to filenames and metadata.

  • Compatible with Windows XP, 7, 8 and 10

The program is compatible with Windows. But soon it will be available for Mac users too.

How to use Photo Organizer?

When it comes to using this amazing image photo managing tool to organize photos, it’s a matter of a few clicks.

Click here to download the product.

Once the product is downloaded and installed, follow the steps to run it and organize photos.

Steps to use Photo Organizer

  1. Welcome screen with two scanning options is the first screen.
    Here you can select from either of the options:
    System Scan to scan complete system and organize all digital photos.
    Folder Scan to scan a specific folder
    Photo Organizer
  2. After selecting the scanning option click Next.
  3. Here, you’d need to specify destination folder where organized folders will be saved. By default, it is C:\<profile name>\Pictures. Also, you can customize the folder hierarchy. Once done click Next.
    Photo Organizer step-3
  4. Here you can choose to move or copy photos to an organized folder. Also, you can decide if you want to delete duplicates from the original location. Once done click Next.
    Photo Organizer -4
  5. If you wish to exclude a folder or file name you can do this from here. Once done click Next.
    Photo Organizer step-5
  6. The program will now start importing and organizing photos.
  7. Once done you’ll be able to see the report. To preview organized photos click Finish.
    Photo Organizer step-7

Now that the photos are organized based on Exif data, you can create albums, organize folders, rename photos, browse photos of a specific date, mark pictures as a favorite, edit album, add photos to an album, change image properties and much more.

We hope you’ll love using this product. This amazing tool will really help you in getting your photos under control. You can customize sub folder in the format you wish whether it is DD-MM-YYYY or YYYY-MM-DD, photo organizer will help you with it. Moreover, if you want to move all the photos into an organized folder you can do so and can even delete duplicates when the photos are being organized. Whatever, you want to do, you can do it all using Photo Organizer. This is why it is called as one of the best photo organizing software.

Источник: https://wethegeek.com/photo-organizer/

Keep it all together! I made this product to help get my speechie digital files organized. So often I'd forget what I already purchased and wanted an easy and clear way to see what I had.

It's nice and visual and grouped by categories. Included in this packet are templates and dividers for the following categories:
Articulation
Apraxia
Phonology
Language (general)
Following Directions
Vocabulary
Grammar
WH Questions
Language Concepts (i.e. main idea, fact/opinion, cause/effect, inferencing, etc.)
Figurative Language
Preschool Language
Phonological Awareness
Decoding
Social Skills
Fluency
Voice
Book Companions
Seasonal Resources - by season and month
Freebies
Miscellaneous
Blanks of each major category
Desktop Background image

I use thumbnail images of the different products and place them in the corresponding grid sheet. This product is a PowerPoint file and FULLY EDITABLE! Check out the preview for more info.

You can also view the blog post about this product HERE

Busy Bee Speech, SLP, TPT, products, resources, organizing

Источник: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Speech-Therapy-Digital-File-Organizing-Packet-1961594

10 best information organizer software to use

Madalina has been a Windows fan ever since she got her hands on her first Windows XP computer. She is interested in all things technology, especially emerging technologies -- AI and DNA computing in... Read more

  • If you want to organize yourself better and never miss a meeting again, you need a PIM tool.
  • PIM stands for Personal Information Manager, and it will help you become more efficient.
  • You can dive deep into these tools and solutions in the following list, thus choosing software that matches your needs. 
personal organizer software

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Life is simple when organized and there is a universe of organizer software that can help you reclaim your organizational mojo.

When you can’t make out the notes you scribbled at the back of a newspaper and you haven’t turned a page of your calendar since 2013, you know it’s time to get organized with digital tools.

Luckily, with the advent of personal organizational tools, mind-mapping, and digital note-taking apps, organizing your life with digital tools becomes a breeze.

Information organizer software organizes your life by creating daily to-do lists, keeping reminders, taking notes, and enabling you to achieve life goals. It serves as a planner, an address book, and a notebook all in one.

The best information organizer tools even go the extra mile by providing extra tools to back up data, set up budgets, provide driving directions, etc.

Most of these tools can be used on the desktop as well as on mobile devices. With the help of these tools, you can be more productive and get the job done with ease.

What are the best Organizer Tools?

This software solution is tailor-made for anyone who needs strong organizing tools. No matter how busy your day would be, Any.do is designed to help you get it all done.

The planner comes with all necessities regarding simple management of life. Also, the features promise professional tools like calendars, reminders, task lists, notes, and so on. In other words, you will not need anymore a bunch of apps to fulfill your daily activities.

For instance, the dynamic calendar can help your productivity enormously with its all-in-one functions. Including very practical UI and integrated services like business meetings, social events, or daily tasks to never miss a thing.

Other benefits assume conversational language reminders to always be on time or smart grocery lists for last-minute home tasks.

That being said, choosing this software will bring the difference due to its practical features, but more importantly because it makes life more enjoyable.

Any.do

Any.do

With software like Any.do the work-life balance will improve and you can enjoy valuable moments again.

Check priceVisit website

If you are looking for personal organizer software that works on all devices, then you might want to try out Todoist. With an easy to use interface and numerous collaboration tools,

Todoist is one of the most feature-rich task management apps on the market.

One thing you’ll notice once you open a Todoist account is that you have tasks, labels, filters, weekly overview, and projects due today. The filter tool is very valuable to those who juggle multiple tasks at a time.

Todoist also has a reminder system but it’s only for premium users meaning you have to pay.

Todoist

Todoist

Try out this efficient platform to handle your activities without much effort and increase productivity fast.

Check priceVisit website

AnyTime Organizer Deluxe is one of the most reputable personal organizer software and packs more than you would expect to find in organizer software. Its ability to expense reports, show driving directions and connect to Google makes it a must-have tool for business professionals.

AnyTime Organizer is bundled with a myriad of tools to enhance your personal and professional lives. Any undone task is automatically moved to the next day and you can use the calendar to keep track of important events.

You can set up reminders and the software will audibly remind you when it’s time to complete a task. You can even set the system to send a text message or email when it’s time to complete a task.

Since the tool can connect to Google, you can download NFL, NASCAR, PGA, MLB, NHL, and NBA season schedules and pin them to your daily planner.

In addition to your calendar events, you can use the tool to manage your expenses and perform other activities like import data from Microsoft Outlook.

Get Anytime Organizer Deluxe Full

C-Organizer is another powerful organizer tool that comes with extensive synchronization capabilities that allow users to access data from almost any device.

With Word Processor, password manager, address book, to-do list, and calendar, C-Organizer packs all you need to organize your personal and professional life.

This personal organizer software protects your private data by password and encryption to prevent unauthorized access. You can sync your data with Google or upload it to the cloud via Dropbox or Google Drive.

C-Organizer also lets you export data as HTML, XML, CSV, and TXT so you can easily import your software data to another application.

⇒ Get C-Organizer

Efficcess is a secure information organizer software that works across PCs and desktops making it one of the most versatile personal information manager. 

With a built-in journal, password manager, task list, address book, calendar, and an automatic backup, you would not want a better organizer software than this. You can create custom reminders so you don’t miss important events.

The calendar is equipped with drag and drop features so you can easily reschedule an appointment as well as add major holidays to your personal organizer.

Efficcess comes with a built-in recycle bin to safeguard you against permanently deleting important information erroneously.

⇒ Get Efficcess

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Anytime Organizer Standard comes with the same top-notch features as AnyTime Organizer Deluxe only that it lacks extensive synchronization abilities.

The interface is user-friendly with all the organizing tools nested on the left panel of the program.

It comes with various organizing features including a feature-rich calendar and to-do lists.

You can add priority levels to the tasks so as to major on the most important tasks first. There is a personal information manager feature that can be used as a journal or a notebook.

You will also be able to do budgeting using the provided budget template as well as track and organize your finances.

⇒ Get Anytime Organizer Standard

Though MyOrganizer Ultimate can only be accessed on a desktop, it has an assortment of features that gives it an edge against the competition. It comes with a simple and easy-to-use interface that resembles that of Microsoft Outlook.

You will find the common organizer tools such as an address book, task manager, journal, tasks list, and a planner.

You can use the custom reminders to remind you of important dates and events. In addition to the organizer features, the tool has built-in expense reports that can help you to track expenses and budgets.

It also has a password manager that can help you track all your passwords and logins. It also comes with several options for importing files including HTML, CSV, and TXT.

⇒ Get MyOrganizer Ultimate

Essential PIM takes a top spot on our list precisely because it is a powerful, full-featured Personal Information Manager for Windows. It offers email, synchronization, portability, network support, and more.

Thanks to this handy tool, you no longer have to worry about controlling appointments, to-do lists, notes, email messages, password entries, and contacts.

The interface is very handy, and it well deserves to replace other similar tools such as Outlook.

Speaking of which, if you are indeed keen on sticking with Outlook as well, you will be glad to know that EssentialPIM offers the ability to synchronize all your information with MS Outlook.

Of course, you aren’t limited to just that, since you can also sync your data with online services such as Google, iCloud, Toodledo, SyncML, CalDAV, etc.

Get EssentialPIM

When looking for a perfect virtual personal assistant, you need to speak to it directly without having to type anything. DialogFlow is pretty much Cortana after she has been promoted.

The tool lets you search the web, make calls, send texts, remind you of tasks while remembering everything on your to-do lists.

The app can be anything you want it to be, be it a personal assistant, an old professor, or even a brunette. The app will perform all tasks, answer your questions, and even give you social network updates.

All you have to do is give commands and DialogFlow will follow instructions like a dutiful son. The app is available for Windows, Android, and iOS.

⇒ Get DialogFlow

MSD Organizer is a handy tool that packs a load of attractive features.

It organizes your personal and professional information as well as music, labels, and cards. Among the many features, you will find the calendar, to-do lists, address book, task manager, journal, and a notes section.

The calendar has drag and drop functionalities that simplify the process of removing and adding tasks.

Not only does the address book provides the name, number, address, email, and picture, but also allows you to download and attach documents, reports, spreadsheets, and notes.

Other organizer tools included are property organizer, music, health records, and budget templates.

⇒ Get MSD Organizer

While organizing features and the cost of the program are the key considerations in choosing the best organizer software, you should also pay close attention to the program’s syncing capabilities.

When a program is compatible with mobile devices and tablets, it becomes more versatile since you can access all your to-do lists and other important information on the go.

Some of the programs discussed above like the C-Organizer and others do have extensive syncing abilities. We hope that you will find this information useful. Feel free to comment and share.

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Источник: https://windowsreport.com/information-organizer-software/

watch the video

10 tips to organize digital files // back to basics

Q&A: Why Is File Management so Important? Plus Benefits

There are many methods that a company might use to improve its organization and efficiency. One such method is file management, which allows a company to store its files in an organized manner and ensure organization and productivity. If you believe you or your company would benefit from additional organization, you might consider implementing a file management system to store and organize your documents. In this article, we discuss what file management is, why it's important, its benefits and the key components of effective file management.

What is file management?

File management is the process of naming, storing and organizing files in a system or program that makes it easy to locate documents. Most companies use a digital form of file management, but physical file management remains beneficial for certain companies. Organizing files digitally is helpful because many systems offer the option to organize files for you, making it easier and quicker to store and locate documents. Digital file management is also helpful because you and your employees can access files on almost any device, regardless of the time or place, which is especially valuable for remote workers.

Companies usually organize their files in a hierarchical system, meaning they use secondary folders, or sub-folders, for further organization. Within your main folder, you might have multiple sub-folders that contain different categories of documents. For example, you might have a main folder for taxes and sub-folders for taxes in a specific year and other specific tax forms.

Related:Documentation in the Workplace

Why is file management important?

There are many reasons why it's important for a company to use an effective file management system, including:

Improved organization

Regardless of the size of a company, most organizations have plenty of information to store, including employee, product, inventory and financial information. File management can help store, retrieve and share information within an organization. For example, a company can store many files in one folder, which decreases the amount of clutter within a digital storing system.

Related:7 Steps To Organize Your Paperwork and Declutter Your Desk

Centralized document location

Having all of your company's documents in one centralized location can simplify the process of retrieving documents. Rather than examining hundreds of files, an employee can search for a folder name and easily find their desired document. This simplifies document organization as opposed to storing documents in multiple locations, such as email threads, personal computers or flash drives.

Increased efficiency

Time management and efficiency are essential components of a company's productivity. File management increases efficiency by reducing the time employees require to find documents. It also reduces the time spent recreating files if an employee can't find an original document. Even though retyping a document may only take a few minutes in some instances, this wasted time can become problematic if repeated multiple times in a workday. File management ensures that employees can remain productive and avoid repeating tasks.

Enhanced communication

Many file management programs include helpful communication tools such as chat boxes, tagging systems and the ability to comment on documents. This is important because employees can ask one another questions about certain documents or comment on mistakes within a document. Through these tools, employees can usually edit documents collaboratively and, therefore, understand why a team member made a certain change or suggestion.

Related:10 Document Collaboration Tools for Your Team

Reduced filing errors

File management can reduce the number of filing errors your team experiences. If a company stores its documents physically, an organized filing system is necessary to avoid misplaced documents. Misplacing documents can also occur digitally, especially if an employee names or organizes files inaccurately. A file management system reduces errors by offering clarity and guidance when searching for files.

Controlled access

Information access is important because it ensures that employees can access necessary documents to perform their tasks. Information access also helps companies control which people have the ability to view confidential data. Many digital file management systems have locks or controls that grant access solely to employees who need certain documents to work. If they require access to a certain document they're locked out of, they can ask their managers to grant them proper access.

Benefits of file management

Here are some benefits that an effective file management system can offer companies:

Standardized processes

Standardized processes are beneficial for a company because they can reduce mistakes and increase productivity. File management can help standardize a company's processes by ensuring that everyone knows how to store and retrieve documents in the same way.

Related:How To Become a Successful Document Specialist

Reduced emails

Many companies use email to communicate, which can result in large numbers of messages that clutter employees' inboxes. Having an effective file management system can reduce the number of emails sent because employees have access to the same documents and understand how to retrieve the documents they require.

Increased accountability

Companies can also increase accountability through effective file management. For example, if an employee makes a mistake on a project, their manager can help identify what went wrong by viewing relevant documents together. This can help employees learn from mistakes and improve their performance in the future.

Improved security

Misplaced files can lead to security issues for companies, especially if an employee accidentally stores an important document in a public forum. File management can help increase security by creating folders in which employees can easily store documents. If an employee knows exactly where to place files, it can reduce the chances they place them in an incorrect folder.

Components of effective file management

File management can help a company increase its organization, but to accomplish this, it's important for employees to know the components of an effective file management system. Some components of effective file management may include:

Consistency

When you're creating or organizing your file management program, it's important to be consistent with the locations in which you place your documents. This entails creating a system for your file management methodology and remaining consistent with it. For example, if you make a folder for your company's finances and title it "finances," but later, you create a similar folder and label it "budget," that might cause confusion among employees, especially if you put particular files in the first folder and others in the second.

Number of folders

An important component of file management is understanding the proper number of folders you and your company require. If you have too few folders, your employees might have to sort through many documents within the few folders you have. If you have too many folders, your employees might search through multiple folders to find the file they want. Therefore, it's important for your file management system to have enough folders to encompass your documents and clearly labeled sub-folders that naturally guide an employee who attempts to find a file.

Accurate file and folder names

Effective file management often entails accurate file and folder names. For example, if your company plans on releasing the first press release document this year, it may be beneficial to label it "Press Release #1 2021" under the folder name "Press Releases." If you're clear with your labeling practices, your employees may be more efficient and productive while completing their tasks.

Источник: https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/why-is-file-management-so-important

Is your desktop a paragon of neatness, or is it overflowing with so many icons that you’re scared to look at it? If you’ve been putting off getting organized because the task is too huge or daunting, or you don’t know where to start, we’ve got 40 tips to get you digital file organizer the path to zen mastery of your digital filing system.

For all those readers who would like to get their files and folders organized, or, if they’re already organized, better organized—we have compiled a complete guide to getting organized and staying organized, a comprehensive article that will hopefully cover every possible tip you could want.

Signs that Your Computer is Poorly Organized

If your computer is a mess, you’re probably already aware of it.  But just in case you’re not, here are some tell-tale signs:

  • Your Desktop has over 40 icons on it
  • “My Documents” contains over 300 files and 60 folders, including MP3s and digital photos
  • You use the Windows’ built-in search facility whenever you need to find a file
  • You can’t find programs digital file organizer the out-of-control list of programs in your Start Menu
  • You save all your Word documents in one folder, all your spreadsheets in a second folder, etc
  • Any given file that you’re looking for may be in any one of four different sets of folders

But before we start, here are some quick notes:

  • We’re going to assume you know what files and folders are, and how to create, save, rename, copy and delete them
  • The organization principles described in this article apply equally to all computer systems.  However, the screenshots here will reflect how things look on Windows (usually Windows 7).  We will also mention some useful features of Windows that can help you get organized.
  • Everyone has their own favorite methodology of organizing and filing, and it’s all too easy to get into “My Way is Better than Your Way” arguments.  The reality is that there is no perfect way of getting things organized.  When I wrote this article, I tried to keep a generalist digital file organizer objective viewpoint.  I consider myself to be unusually well organized (to the point of obsession, truth be told), and I’ve had 25 years experience in collecting and organizing files on computers.  So I’ve got a lot to say on the subject.  But the tips I have described here are only one way of doing it.  Hopefully some of these tips will work for you too, but please don’t read this as any sort of “right” way to do it.

At the end of the article we’ll be asking you, the reader, for your own organization tips.

Why Bother Organizing At All?

For some, the answer to this question is self-evident. And yet, in this era of powerful desktop search software (the search capabilities built into the Windows Vista and Windows 7 Start Menus, and third-party programs like Google Desktop Search), the question does need to be asked, and answered.

I have a friend who puts every file he ever creates, receives or downloads into his My Documents folder and doesn’t bother filing them into subfolders at all.  He relies on the search functionality built into his Windows operating system to help him find whatever he’s looking for.  And he always finds it.  He’s a Search Samurai.  For him, filing is a waste of valuable time that could be spent enjoying life!

It’s tempting to follow suit.  On the face of it, why would anyone bother to take the time to organize their hard disk when such excellent search software is available?  Well, if all you ever want to do with the files you own is to locate and open them individually (for listening, editing, etc), then there’s no reason to ever bother doing one scrap of organization.  But consider these common tasks that are not achievable with desktop search software:

  • Find files manually.  Often it’s not convenient, speedy or even possible to utilize your desktop search software to find what you want.  It doesn’t work 100% of the time, or you may not even have it installed.  Sometimes its just plain faster to go straight microsoft office 2016 crack - Crack Key For U the file you want, if you know it’s in a particular sub-folder, rather than trawling through hundreds of search results.
  • Find groups of similar files (e.g. all your “work” files, all the photos of your Europe holiday in 2008, all your music videos, all the MP3s from Dark Side of the Moon, all your letters you wrote to your wife, all your tax returns).  Clever naming of the files will only get you so far.  Sometimes it’s the date the file was created that’s important, other times it’s the file format, and other times it’s the purpose of the file.  How do you name a collection of files so that they’re easy to isolate based on any of the above criteria?  Short answer, you can’t.
  • Move files to a new computer.  It’s time to upgrade your computer.  How do you quickly grab all the files that are important to you?  Or you decide to have two computers now – one for home and one for work.  How do you quickly isolate only the work-related files to move them to the work computer?
  • Synchronize files to other computers.  If you have more than one computer, and you need to mirror some of your files onto the other computer (e.g. your music collection), then you need a way to quickly determine which files are to be synced and which are not.  Surely you don’t want to synchronize everything?
  • Choose which files to back up.  If your backup regime calls for multiple backups, or requires speedy backups, then you’ll need to be able to specify which files are to be backed up, and which are not.  This is not possible if they’re all in the same folder.

Finally, if you’re simply someone who takes pleasure in being organized, tidy and ordered (me! me!), then you don’t even need a reason.  Being disorganized is simply unthinkable.

Tips on Getting Organized

Here we present our 40 best tips on how to get organized.  Or, if you’re already organized, to get better organized.

Tip #1.  Choose Your Organization System Carefully

The reason that most people are not organized is that it takes time.  And the first thing that takes time is deciding upon a system of organization.  This is always a matter of personal preference, and is not something that a geek on a website can tell you.  You should always choose your own system, based on how your own brain is organized (which makes the assumption that your brain is, in fact, organized).

We can’t instruct you, but we can make suggestions:

  • You may want to start off with a system based on the users of the computer.  i.e. “My Files”, “My Wife’s Files”, My Son’s Files”, etc.  Inside “My Files”, you might then break it down into “Personal” and “Business”.  You may then realize that there are overlaps.  For example, everyone may want to share access to the music library, or the photos from the school play.  So you may create another folder called “Family”, for the “common” files.
  • You may decide that the highest-level breakdown of your files is based on the “source” of each file.  In other words, who created the files.  You could have “Files created by ME (business or personal)”, “Files created by people I know (family, friends, etc)”, and finally “Files created by the rest of the world (MP3 music files, downloaded or ripped movies or TV shows, software installation files, gorgeous desktop wallpaper images you’ve collected, etc).”  This system happens to be the one I use myself.  See below:Tixati 2.76 Free Download with Crack height="248">
    Mark is for files created by me
    VC is for files created by my company (Virtual Creations)
    Others is for files created by my friends and family
    Data is the rest of the world
    Also, Settings is where I store the configuration files and other program data files for my installed software (more on this in tip #34, below).
  • Each folder will present its own particular set of requirements for further sub-organization.  For example, you may decide to organize your music collection into sub-folders based on the artist’s name, while your digital photos might get organized based on the date they were taken.  It can be different for every sub-folder!
  • Another strategy would be based on “currentness”.  Files you have yet to open and look at live in one folder.  Ones that have been looked at but not yet filed live in another place.  Current, active projects live in yet another place.  All other files (your “archive”, if you like) would live in a fourth folder. (And of course, within that last folder you’d need to create a further sub-system based on one of the previous bullet points).

Put some thought into this – changing it when it proves incomplete can be a big hassle!  Before you go to the trouble of implementing any system you come up with, examine a wide cross-section of the files you own and see if they will all be able to find a nice logical place to sit within your system.

Tip #2.  When You Decide on Your System, Stick to It!

There’s nothing more pointless than going to all the trouble of creating a system and filing all your files, and then whenever you create, receive or download a new file, you simply dump it onto your Desktop.  You need to be disciplined – forever!  Every new file you get, spend those extra few seconds to file it where it belongs!  Otherwise, in just a month or two, you’ll be worse off than before – half your files will be organized and half will be disorganized – and you won’t know which is which!

Tip #3.  Choose the Root Folder of Your Structure Carefully

Every data file (document, photo, music file, crack downloads that you create, own or is important to you, no matter where it came from, should be found within one single folder, and that one single folder should be located at the root of your C: drive (as a sub-folder of C:\).  In other words, do not base your folder structure in standard folders like “My Documents”.  If you do, then you’re leaving it up to the operating system engineers to decide what folder structure is best for you.  And every operating system has a different system!  In Windows 7 your files are found in C:\Users\YourName, whilst on Windows XP it was C:\Documents and Settings\YourName\My Documents.  In UNIX systems it’s often /home/YourName.

These standard default folders tend to fill up with junk files and folders that are not at all important to you.  “My Documents” is the worst offender.  Every second piece of software you install, it seems, likes to create its own folder in the “My Documents” folder.  These folders usually don’t fit within your organizational structure, so don’t use them!  In fact, don’t even use the “My Documents” folder at all.  Allow it to fill up with junk, and then simply ignore it.  It sounds heretical, but: Don’t ever visit your “My Documents” folder!  Remove your icons/links to “My Documents” and replace them with links to the folders you created and you care about!

Create your own file system from scratch!  Probably the best place to put it would be on your D: drive – if you have one.  This way, all your files live on one drive, while all the operating system and software component files live on the C: drive – simply and elegantly separated.  The benefits of dvdfab 8 crack free download - Crack Key For U are profound.  Not only are there obvious organizational benefits (see tip #10, below), but when it comes to migrate your data to a new computer, you can (sometimes) simply unplug your D: drive and plug it in as the D: drive of your new computer (this implies that the D: drive is actually a separate physical disk, and not a partition on the same disk as C:).  You also get a slight speed improvement (again, only if your C: and D: drives are on separate physical disks).

Warning:  From tip #12, below, you will see that it’s actually a good idea to have exactly the same file system structure – including the drive it’s filed on – on all of the computers you own.  So if you decide to use the D: drive as the storage system for your own files, make sure you are able to use the D: drive on all the computers you own.  If you can’t ensure that, then you can still use a clever geeky trick to store your files on the D: drive, but still access them all via the C: drive (see tip #17, below).

If you only have one hard disk (C:), then create a dedicated folder that will contain all your files – something like C:\Files.  The name of the folder is not important, but make it a single, brief word.

There are several reasons for this:

  • When creating a backup regime, it’s easy to decide what files should be backed up – they’re all in the one folder!
  • If you ever decide to trade in your computer for a new one, you know exactly which files to migrate
  • You will always know where to begin a search for any file
  • If you synchronize files with other computers, it makes your synchronization routines very simple.   It also causes all your shortcuts to continue to work on the other machines (more about this in tip #24, below).

Once you’ve decided where your files should go, then put all your files in there – Everything!  Completely disregard the standard, default folders that are created for you by the operating system (“My Music”, “My Pictures”, etc).  In fact, you can actually relocate many of those folders into your own structure (more about that below, in tip #6).

The more completely you get all your data files (documents, photos, music, etc) and all your configuration settings into that one folder, then the easier it will be to perform all of the above tasks.

Once this has been done, and all your files live in one folder, all the other folders in C:\ can be thought of as “operating system” folders, and therefore of little day-to-day interest for us.

Here’s a screenshot of a nicely organized C: drive, where all user aimersoft video converter for mac free download are located within the \Files folder:

Tip #4.  Use Sub-Folders

This would be our simplest and most obvious tip.  It almost goes without saying.  Any organizational system you decide upon (see tip #1) will require that you create sub-folders for your files.  Get used to creating folders on a regular basis.

Tip #5.  Don’t be Shy About Depth

Create as many levels of sub-folders as you need.  Don’t be scared to do so.  Every time you notice an opportunity to group a set of related files into a sub-folder, do so.  Examples might include:  All the MP3s from one music CD, all the photos from one holiday, or all the documents from one client.

It’s perfectly okay to put files into a folder called C:\Files\Me\From Others\Services\WestCo Bank\Statements\2009.  That’s only seven levels deep.  Ten levels is not uncommon.  Of course, it’s possible to take this too far.  If you notice yourself creating a sub-folder to hold only one file, then you’ve probably become a little over-zealous.  On the other hand, if you simply create a structure with only two levels (for example C:\Files\Work) then you really haven’t achieved any level of organization at all (unless you own only six files!).  Your “Work” folder will have become a dumping ground, just like your Desktop was, with most likely hundreds of files in it.

Tip #6.  Move the Standard User Folders into Your Own Folder Structure

Most operating systems, including Windows, create a set of standard folders for each of its users.  These folders then become the default location for files such as documents, music files, digital photos and downloaded Internet files.  In Windows 7, the full list is shown below:

Some of these folders you may never use nor care about (for example, the Favorites folder, if you’re not using Internet Explorer as your browser).  Those ones you can leave where they are.  But you may be using some of the other folders to store files that are important to you.  Even if you’re not using them, Windows will still often treat them as the default storage location for many types of files.  When you go to save a standard file type, it can become annoying to be automatically prompted to save it in a folder that’s not part of your own file structure.

But there’s a simple solution:  Move the folders you care about into your own folder structure!  If you do, then the next time you go to save a file of the corresponding type, Windows will prompt you to save it in the new, moved location.

Moving the folders is easy.  Simply drag-and-drop them to the new location.  Here’s a screenshot of the default My Music folder being moved to my custom personal folder (Mark):

Tip #7.  Name Files and Folders Intelligently

This is another one that almost goes without saying, but we’ll say it anyway:  Do not allow files to be created that have meaningless names like Document1.doc, or folders called New Folder (2).  Take that extra 20 seconds and come up with a meaningful name for the file/folder – one that accurately divulges its contents without repeating the entire contents in the name.

Tip #8.  Watch Out for Long Filenames

Another way to tell if you have not yet created enough depth to your folder hierarchy is that your files often require really long names.  If you need to call a file Johnson Sales Figures March 2009.xls (which might happen to live in the same folder as Abercrombie Budget Report 2008.xls), then you might want to create some sub-folders so that the first file could be simply called March.xls, and living in the Clients\Johnson\Sales Figures\2009 folder.

A well-placed file needs only a brief filename!

Tip #9.  Use Shortcuts!  Everywhere!

This is probably the single most useful and important tip we can offer.  A shortcut allows a file to be in two places at once.

Why would you want that?  Well, the file and folder structure of every popular operating system on the market today is hierarchical.  This means that all objects (files and folders) always live within exactly one parent folder.  It’s a bit like a tree.  A tree has branches (folders) and leaves (files).  Each leaf, and each branch, is supported by exactly one parent branch, all the way back to the root of the tree (which, incidentally, is exactly why C:\ is called the “root folder” of the C: drive).

That hard disks are structured this way may seem obvious and even necessary, but it’s only one way of organizing data.  There are others:  Relational databases, for example, organize structured data entirely differently.  The main limitation of hierarchical filing structures is that a file can only ever be in one branch of the tree – in only one folder – at a time.  Why is this a problem?  Well, there are two main reasons why this limitation is a problem for computer users:

  1. The “correct” place for a file, according to our organizational rationale, is very often a very inconvenient place for that file to be located.  Just because it’s correctly filed doesn’t mean it’s easy to get to.  Your file may be “correctly” buried six levels deep in your sub-folder structure, but you may need regular and speedy access to this file every day.  You could always move it to a more convenient location, but that would mean that you would need to re-file back to its “correct” location it every time you’d finished working on it.  Most unsatisfactory.
  2. A file may simply “belong” in two or more different locations within your file structure.  For example, say you’re an accountant and you have just completed the 2009 tax return for John Smith.  It might make sense to you to call this file 2009 Tax Return.doc and file it under Clients\John Smith.  But it may also be important to you to have the 2009 tax returns from all your clients together in the one place.  So you might also want to call the file John Smith.doc and file it under Tax Returns\2009.  The problem is, in a purely hierarchical filing system, you can’t put it in both places.  Grrrrr!

Fortunately, Windows (and most other operating systems) offers a way for you to do exactly that:  It’s called a “shortcut” (also known as an “alias” on Macs and a “symbolic link” on UNIX systems).  Shortcuts allow a file to exist in one place, and an icon that represents the file to be created and put anywhere else you please.  In fact, you can create a dozen such icons and scatter them all over your hard disk.  Double-clicking on one of these icons/shortcuts opens up the original file, just as if you had double-clicked on the original file itself.

Consider the following two icons:

The one on the left is the actual Word document, while the one on the right is a shortcut that represents the Word document.  Double-clicking on either icon will open the same file.  There are two main visual differences between the icons:

  1. The shortcut will have a small arrow in the lower-left-hand corner (on Windows, anyway)
  2. The shortcut is allowed to have a name that does not include the file extension (the “.docx” part, in this case)

You can delete the shortcut at any time without losing any actual data.  The original is still intact.  All you lose is the ability to get to that data from wherever the shortcut was.

So why are shortcuts so great?  Because they allow us to easily overcome the main limitation of hierarchical file systems, and put a file Final Cut Pro Crack 10.5.2 With Activation Code 2021 two (or more) places at the same time.  You will always have files that don’t play nice with your organizational rationale, and can’t be filed in only one place.  They demand to exist in two places.  Shortcuts allow this!  Furthermore, they allow you to collect your most often-opened files and folders together in one spot for convenient access.  The cool part is that the original files stay where they are, safe forever in their perfectly organized location.

So your collection of most often-opened files can – and should – become a collection of shortcuts!

If you’re still not convinced of the utility of shortcuts, consider the following well-known areas of a typical Windows computer:

  • The Start Menu (and all the programs that live within it)
  • The Quick Launch bar (or the Superbar in Windows 7)
  • The “Favorite folders” area in the top-left corner of the Windows Explorer digital file organizer (in Windows Vista or Windows 7)
  • Your Internet Explorer Favorites or Firefox Bookmarks

Each item in each of these areas is a shortcut!  Each of those areas exist for one purpose only:  For convenience – to provide you with a collection of the files and folders you access most often.

It should be easy to see by now that shortcuts are designed for one single purpose:  To make accessing your files more convenient.  Each time you double-click on a shortcut, you are saved the hassle of locating the file (or folder, or program, or drive, or control panel icon) that it represents.

Shortcuts allow us to invent a golden rule of file and folder organization:

“Only ever have one copy of a file – never have two copies of the same file.  Use a shortcut instead”

(this rule doesn’t apply to copies created for backup purposes, of course!)

There are also lesser rules, like “don’t move a file into your work area – create a shortcut there instead”, and “any time you find yourself frustrated with how long it takes to locate a file, create a shortcut to it and place that shortcut in a convenient location.”

So how to we create these massively useful shortcuts?  There are two main ways:

  1. “Copy” the original file or folder (click on it and type Ctrl-C, or right-click on it and select Copy):

    Then right-click in an empty area of the destination folder (the place where you want the shortcut to go) and select Paste shortcut:
  2. Right-drag (drag with the right mouse button) the file from the source folder to the destination folder.  When you let go of the mouse button at the destination folder, a menu pops up:

    Select Create shortcuts here.

Note that when shortcuts are created, they are often named something like Shortcut to Budget Detail.doc (windows XP) or Budget Detail – Shortcut.doc (Windows 7).   If you don’t like those extra words, you can easily rename the shortcuts after they’re created, or you can configure Windows to never insert the extra words in the first place (see our article on how to do this).

And of course, you can create shortcuts to folders too, not just to files!

Bottom line:

Whenever you have a file that you’d like to access from somewhere else (whether it’s convenience you’re after, or because the file simply belongs in two places), create a shortcut to the original file in the new location.

Tip #10.  Separate Application Files from Data Files

Any digital organization guru will drum this rule into you.  Application files are the components of the software you’ve installed (e.g. Microsoft Word, Adobe Photoshop or Internet Explorer).  Data files are the files that you’ve created for yourself using that software (e.g. Word Documents, digital photos, emails or playlists).

Software gets installed, uninstalled and upgraded all the time.  Hopefully you always have the original installation media (or downloaded set-up file) kept somewhere safe, and can thus reinstall your software at any time.  This means that the software component files are of little importance.  Whereas the files you have created with that software is, by definition, important.  It’s a good rule to always separate unimportant files from important files.

So when your software prompts you to save a file you’ve just created, take a moment and check out where it’s suggesting that you save the file.  If it’s suggesting that you save the file into the same folder as the software itself, then definitely don’t follow that suggestion.  File it in your own folder!  In fact, see if you can find the program’s configuration option that determines where files are saved by default (if it has one), and change it.

Tip #11.  Organize Files Based on Purpose, Not on File Type

If you have, for example a folder called Work\Clients\Johnson, and within that folder you have two sub-folders, Word Documents and Spreadsheets (in other words, you’re separating “.doc” files from “.xls” files), then chances are that you’re not optimally organized.  It makes little sense to organize your files based on the program that created them.  Instead, create your sub-folders based on the purpose of the file.  For example, it would make more sense to create sub-folders called Correspondence and Financials.  It may well be that all the files in a given sub-folder are of the same file-type, but this should be more of a coincidence and less of a design feature of your organization system.

Tip #12.  Maintain the Same Folder Structure on All Your Computers

In other words, whatever organizational system you create, apply it to every computer that you can.  There are several benefits to this:

  • There’s less to remember.  No matter where you are, you always know where to look for your files
  • If you copy or synchronize files from one computer to another, then setting up the synchronization job becomes very simple
  • Shortcuts can be copied or moved from one computer to another with ease (assuming the original files are also copied/moved).  There’s no need to find the target of the shortcut all over again on the second computer
  • Ditto for linked files (e.g Word documents that link to data in a separate Excel file), playlists, and any files that reference the exact file locations of other files.

This applies even to the drive that your files are stored on.  If your files are stored on C: on one computer, make sure they’re stored on C: on all your computers.  Otherwise all your shortcuts, playlists and linked files will stop working!

Tip #13.  Create an “Inbox” Folder

Create yourself a folder where you store all files that you’re currently working on, or that you haven’t gotten around to filing yet.  You can think of this folder as your “to-do” list.  You can call it “Inbox” (making it the same metaphor as your email system), or “Work”, or “To-Do”, or “Scratch”, or whatever name makes sense to you.  It doesn’t matter what you call it – just make sure you have one!

Once you have finished working on a file, you then move it from the “Inbox” to its correct location within your organizational structure.

You may want to use your Desktop as this “Inbox” folder.  Rightly or wrongly, most people do.  It’s not a bad place to put such files, but be careful:  If you do decide that your Desktop represents your “to-do” list, then make sure that no other files find their way there.  In other words, make sure that your “Inbox”, wherever it is, Desktop or otherwise, is kept free of junk – stray files that don’t belong there.

So where should you put this folder, which, almost by definition, lives outside the structure of the rest of your filing system?  Well, first and foremost, it has to be somewhere handy.  This will be one of your most-visited folders, so convenience is key.  Putting it on the Desktop is a great option – especially if you don’t have any other folders on your Desktop:  the folder then becomes supremely easy to find in Windows Explorer:

You would then create shortcuts to this folder in convenient spots all over your computer (“Favorite Links”, “Quick Launch”, etc).

Tip #14.  Ensure You have Only One “Inbox” Folder

Once you’ve created your “Inbox” folder, don’t use any other folder location as your “to-do list”.  Throw every incoming or created file into the Inbox folder as you create/receive it.  This keeps the rest of your computer pristine and free of randomly created or downloaded junk.  The last thing you want to be doing is checking multiple folders to see all your current tasks and projects.  Gather them all together into one folder.

Here are some tips to help ensure you only have one Inbox:

  • Set the default “save” location of all your programs to this folder.
  • Set the default “download” location for your browser to this folder.
  • If this folder is not your desktop (recommended) then also see if you can make a point of not putting “to-do” files on your desktop.  This keeps your desktop uncluttered and Zen-like:

(the Inbox folder is in the bottom-right corner)

Tip #15.  Be Vigilant about Clearing Your “Inbox” Folder

This is one of the keys to staying organized.  If you let your “Inbox” overflow (i.e. allow there to be more than, say, 30 files or folders in there), then you’re probably going to start feeling like you’re overwhelmed:  You’re not keeping up with your to-do list.  Once your Inbox gets beyond a certain point (around 30 files, studies have shown), then you’ll simply start to avoid it.  You may continue to put files in there, but you’ll be scared to look at it, fearing the “out of control” feeling that all overworked, chaotic or just plain disorganized people regularly feel.

So, here’s what you can do:

  • Visit your Inbox/to-do folder regularly (at least five times per day).
  • Scan the folder regularly for files that you have completed working on and are ready for filing.  File them immediately.
  • Make it a source of pride to keep the number of files in this folder as small as possible.  If you value peace of mind, then make the emptiness of this folder one of your highest (computer) priorities
  • If you know that a particular file has been in the folder for more than, say, six weeks, then admit that you’re not actually going to get around to processing it, and move it to its final resting place.

Tip #16.  File Everything Immediately, and Use Shortcuts for Your Active Projects

As soon as you create, receive or download a new file, store it away in its “correct” folder immediately.  Then, whenever you need to work on it (possibly straight away), create a shortcut to it in your “Inbox” (“to-do”) folder or your desktop.  That way, all your files are always in their “correct” locations, yet you still have immediate, convenient access to your current, active files.  When you finish working on a file, simply delete the shortcut.

Ideally, your “Inbox” folder – and your Desktop – should contain no actual files or folders.  They should simply contain shortcuts.

Tip #17.  Use Directory Symbolic Links (or Junctions) to Maintain One Unified Folder Structure

Using this tip, we can get around a potential hiccup that we can run into when creating our organizational structure – the issue of having more than one drive on our computer (C:, D:, etc).  We might have files we need to store on the D: drive for space reasons, and yet want to base our organized folder structure on the C: drive (or vice-versa).

Your chosen organizational structure may dictate that all your files must be accessed from the C: drive (for example, the root folder of all your files may be something like C:\Files).  And yet you may still have a D: drive and wish to take advantage of the hundreds of spare Gigabytes that it offers.  Did you know that it’s actually possible to store your files on the D: drive and yet access them as if they were on the C: drive?  And no, we’re not talking about shortcuts here (although the concept is very similar).

By using the shell command mklink, you can essentially take a folder that lives on one drive and create an alias for it on a different drive (you can do lots more than that with mklink – for a full rundown on this programs capabilities, see our dedicated article).  These aliases are called directory symbolic links (and used to be known as junctions).  You can think of them as “virtual” folders.  They function exactly like regular folders, except they’re physically located somewhere else.

For example, you may decide that your entire D: drive contains your complete organizational file structure, but that you need to reference all those files as if they were on the C: drive, under C:\Files.  If that was the case you could create C:\Files as a directory symbolic link – a link to D:, as follows:

mklink /d c:\files d:\

Or it may be that the only files you wish to store on the D: drive are your movie collection.  You could locate all your movie files in the root of your D: drive, and then link it to C:\Files\Media\Movies, as follows:

mklink /d c:\files\media\movies d:\

(Needless to say, you must run these commands from a command prompt – click the Start button, type cmd and press Enter)

Tip #18. Customize Your Folder Icons

This is not strictly speaking an organizational tip, but having unique icons for each folder does allow you to more quickly visually identify which folder is which, and thus saves you time when you’re finding files.  An example is below (from my folder that contains all files downloaded from the Internet):

To learn how to change your folder icons, please refer to our dedicated article on the subject.

Tip #19.  Tidy Your Start Menu

The Windows Start Menu is usually one of the messiest parts of any Windows computer.  Every program you install seems to adopt a completely different approach to placing icons in this menu.  Some simply put a single program icon.  Others create a folder based on the name of the software.  And others create a folder based on the name of the software manufacturer.  It’s chaos, and can make it hard to find the software you want to run.

Thankfully we can avoid this chaos with useful operating system features like Quick Launch, the Superbar or pinned start menu items.

Even so, it would make a lot of sense to get into the guts of the Start Menu itself and give it a good once-over.  All you really need to decide is how you’re going to organize your applications.  A structure based on the purpose of the application is an obvious candidate.  Below is an example of one such structure:

In this structure, Utilities means software whose job it is to keep the computer itself running smoothly (configuration tools, backup software, Zip programs, etc).  Applications refers to any productivity software that doesn’t fit under the headings Multimedia, Graphics, Internet, etc.

In case you’re not aware, every icon in your Start Menu is a shortcut and can be manipulated like any other shortcut (copied, moved, deleted, etc).

With the Windows Start Menu (all version of Windows), Microsoft has decided that there be two parallel folder structures to store your Start Menu shortcuts.  One for you (the logged-in user of the computer) and one for all users of the computer.  Having two parallel structures can often be redundant:  If you are the only user of the computer, then having two parallel structures is totally redundant.  Even if you have several users that regularly log into the computer, most of your installed software will need to be made available to all users, and should thus be moved out of the “just you” version of the Start Menu and into the “all users” area.

To take control of your Start Menu, so you can start organizing it, you’ll need to know how to access the actual folders and shortcut files that make up the Start Menu (both versions of it).  To find these folders and files, click the Start button and then right-click on the All Programs text (Windows XP users should right-click on the Start button itself):

The Open option refers to the “just you” version of the Start Menu, while the Open All Users option refers to the “all users” version.  Click on the one you want to organize.

A Windows Explorer window then opens with your chosen version of the Start Menu selected.  From there it’s easy.  Double-click on the Programs folder and you’ll see all your folders and shortcuts.  Now you can delete/rename/move until it’s just the way you want it.

Note:  When you’re reorganizing your Start Menu, you may want to have two Explorer windows open at the same time – one showing the “just you” version and one showing the “all users” version.  You can drag-and-drop between the windows.

Tip #20KeepYour Start Menu Tidy

Once you have a perfectly organized Start Menu, try to be a little vigilant about keeping it that way.  Every time you install a new piece of software, the icons that get created will almost certainly violate your organizational structure.

So to keep your Start Menu pristine and organized, make sure you do the following whenever you install a new piece of software:

  • Check whether the software was installed into the “just you” area of the Start Menu, or the “all users” area, and then move it to the correct area.
  • Remove all the unnecessary icons (like the “Read me” icon, the “Help” icon (you can always open the help from within the software itself when it’s running), the “Uninstall” icon, the link(s)to the manufacturer’s website, etc)
  • Rename the main icon(s) of the software to something brief that makes sense to you.  For example, you might like to rename Microsoft Office Word 2010 to simply Word
  • Move the icon(s) into the correct folder based on your Start Menu organizational structure

And don’t forget:  when you uninstall a piece of software, the software’s uninstall routine is no longer going to be able to remove the software’s icon from the Start Menu (because you moved and/or renamed it), so you’ll need to remove that icon manually.

Tip #21.  Tidy C:\

The root of your C: drive (C:\) is a common dumping ground for files and folders – both by the users of your computer and by the software that you install on your computer.  It can become a mess.

There’s almost no software these days that requires itself to be installed in C:\.  99% of the time it can and should be installed into C:\Program Files.  And as for your own files, well, it’s clear that they can (and almost always should) be stored somewhere else.

In an ideal world, your C:\ folder should look like this (on Windows 7):

Note that there are some system files and folders in C:\ that are usually and deliberately “hidden” (such as the Windows virtual memory file pagefile.sys, the boot loader file bootmgr, and the System Volume Information folder).  Hiding these files and folders is a good idea, as they need to stay where they are and are almost never needed to be opened or even seen by you, the user.  Hiding them prevents you from accidentally messing with them, and enhances your sense of order and well-being when you look at your C: drive folder.

Tip #22.  Tidy Your Desktop

The Desktop is probably the most abused part of a Windows computer (from an organization point of view).  It usually serves as a dumping ground for all incoming files, as well as holding icons to oft-used applications, plus some regularly opened files and folders.  It often ends up becoming an uncontrolled mess.  See if you can avoid this.  Here’s why…

  • Application icons (Word, Internet Explorer, etc) are often found digital file organizer the Desktop, but it’s unlikely that this is the optimum place for them.  The “Quick Launch” bar (or the Superbar in Windows 7) is always visible and so represents a perfect location to put your icons.  You’ll only be able to see the icons on your Desktop when all your programs are minimized.  It might be time to get your application icons off your desktop…
  • You may have decided that the Inbox/To-do folder on your computer (see tip #13, above) should be your Desktop.  If so, then enough said.  Simply be vigilant about clearing it and preventing it from being polluted by junk files (see tip #15, above).  On the other hand, if your Desktop is not acting as your “Inbox” folder, then there’s no reason for it to have any data files or folders on it at all, except perhaps a couple of shortcuts to often-opened files and folders (either ongoing or current projects).  Everything else should be moved to your “Inbox” folder.

In an ideal world, it might look like this:

Tip #23.  Move Permanent Items on Your Desktop Away from the Top-Left Corner

When files/folders are dragged onto your desktop in a Windows Explorer window, or when shortcuts are created on your Desktop from Internet Explorer, those icons are always placed in the top-left corner – or as close as they can get.  If you have other files, folders or shortcuts that you keep on the Desktop permanently, then it’s a good idea to separate these permanent icons from the transient ones, so that you can quickly identify which ones the transients are.  An easy way to do this is to move all your permanent icons to the right-hand side of your Desktop.  That should keep them separated from incoming items.

Tip #24.  Synchronize

If you have more than one computer, you’ll almost certainly want to share files between them.  If the computers are permanently attached to the same local network, then there’s no need to store multiple copies of any one file or folder – shortcuts will suffice.  However, if the computers are not always on the same network, then you will at some point need to copy files between them.  For files that need to permanently live on both computers, the ideal way to do this is to synchronize the files, as opposed to simply copying them.

We only have room here to write a brief summary of synchronization, not a full article.  In short, there are several different types of synchronization:

  1. Where the contents of one folder are accessible anywhere, such as with Dropbox
  2. Where the contents of any number of folders are accessible anywhere, such as with Windows Live Mesh
  3. Where any files or folders from anywhere on your computer are synchronized with exactly one other computer, such as with the Windows “Briefcase”, Microsoft SyncToy, or (much more powerful, yet still free) SyncBack from 2BrightSparks.  This only works when both computers are on the same local network, at least temporarily.

A great advantage of synchronization solutions is that once you’ve got it configured the way you want it, then the sync process happens automatically, every time.  Click a button (or schedule it to happen automatically) and all your files are automagically put where they’re supposed to be.

If you maintain the same file and folder structure on both computers, then you can also sync files depend upon the correct location of other files, like shortcuts, playlists and office documents that link to other office documents, and the synchronized files still work on the other computer!

Tip #25.  Hide Files You Never Need to See

If you have your files well organized, you will often be able to tell if a file is out of place just by glancing at the contents of a folder (for example, it should be pretty obvious if you look in a folder that contains all the MP3s from one music CD and see a Word document in there).  This is a good thing – it allows you to determine if there are files out of place with a quick glance.  Yet sometimes there are files in a folder that seem out of place but actually need to be there, such as the “folder art” JPEGs in music folders, and various files in the root of the C: drive.  If such files never need to be opened by you, then a good idea is to simply hide them.  Then, the next time you glance at the folder, you won’t have to remember whether that file was supposed to be there or not, because you won’t see it at all!

To hide a file, simply right-click on it and choose Properties:

Then simply tick the Hidden tick-box:

Tip #26.  Keep Every Setup File

These days most software is downloaded from the Internet.  Whenever you download a piece of software, keep it.  You’ll never know when you need to reinstall the software.

Further, keep with it an Internet shortcut that links back to the website where you originally downloaded it, in case you ever need to check for updates.

See tip #33 below for a full description of the excellence of organizing your setup files.

Tip #27.  Try to Minimize the Number of Folders that Contain Both Files and Sub-folders

Some of the folders in your organizational structure will contain only files.  Others will contain only sub-folders.  And you will also have some folders that contain both files and sub-folders.  You will notice slight improvements in how long it takes you to locate a file if you try to avoid this third type of folder.  It’s not always possible, of course – you’ll always have some of these folders, but see if you can avoid it.

One way of doing this is to take all the leftover files that didn’t end up getting stored in a sub-folder and create a special “Miscellaneous” or “Other” folder for them.

Tip #28.  Starting a Filename with an Underscore Brings it to the Top of a List

Further to the previous tip, if you name that “Miscellaneous” or “Other” folder in such a way that its name begins with an underscore “_”, then it will appear at the top of the list of files/folders.

The screenshot below is an example of this.  Each folder in the list contains a set of digital photos.  The folder at the top of the list, _Misc, contains random photos that didn’t deserve their own dedicated folder:

Tip #29.  Clean Up those CD-ROMs and (shudder!) Floppy Disks

Have you got a pile of CD-ROMs stacked on a shelf of sibelius ultimate crack mac - Activators Patch office?  Old photos, or files you archived off onto CD-ROM (or even worse, floppy disks!) because you didn’t have enough disk space at the time?  In the meantime have you upgraded your computer and now have 500 Gigabytes of space you don’t know what to do with?  If so, isn’t it time you tidied up that stack of disks and filed digital file organizer into your gorgeous new folder structure?

So what are you waiting for?  Bite the bullet, copy them all back onto your computer, file them in their appropriate folders, and then back the whole lot up onto a shiny new 1000Gig external hard drive!

Useful Folders to Create

This next section suggests some useful folders that you might want to create within your folder structure.  I’ve personally found them to be indispensable.

The first three are all about convenience – handy folders to create and then put somewhere that you can always access instantly.  For each one, it’s not so important where the actual folder is located, but it’s very important where you put the shortcut(s) to the folder.  You might want to locate the shortcuts:

  • On your Desktop
  • In your “Quick Launch” area (or pinned to your Windows 7 Superbar)
  • In your Windows Explorer “Favorite Links” area

Tip #30.  Create an “Inbox” (“To-Do”) Folder

This has already been mentioned in depth (see tip #13), but we wanted to reiterate its importance here.  This folder contains all the recently created, received or downloaded files that you have not yet had a chance to file away properly, and it also may contain files that you have yet to process.  In effect, it becomes a sort of “to-do list”.  It doesn’t have to be called “Inbox” – you can call it whatever you want.

Tip #31.  Create a Folder where Your Current Projects are Collected

Rather than going hunting for them all the time, or dumping them all on your desktop, create a special folder where you put links (or work folders) for each of the projects you’re currently working on.

You can locate this folder in your “Inbox” folder, on your desktop, or anywhere at all – just so long as there’s a way of getting to it quickly, such as putting a link to it in Windows Explorer’s “Favorite Links” area:

Tip #32.  Create a Folder for Files and Folders that You Regularly Open

You will always have a few files that you open regularly, whether it be a spreadsheet of your current accounts, or a favorite playlist.  These are not necessarily “current projects”, rather they’re simply files that you always find yourself opening.  Typically such files would be located on your desktop (or even better, shortcuts to those files).  Why not collect all such shortcuts together and put them in their own special folder?

As with the “Current Projects” folder (above), you would want to locate that folder somewhere convenient.  Below is an example of a folder called “Quick links”, with about seven files (shortcuts) in it, that is accessible through the Windows Quick Launch bar:

See tip #37 below for a full explanation of the power of the Quick Launch bar.

Tip #33.  Create a “Set-ups” Folder

A typical computer has dozens of applications installed on it.  For each piece of software, there are often many different pieces of information you need to keep track of, including:

  • The original installation setup file(s).  This can be anything from a simple 100Kb setup.exe file you downloaded from a website, all the way up to a 4Gig ISO file that you copied from a DVD-ROM that you purchased.
  • The home page of the software manufacturer (in case you need to look up something on their support pages, their forum or their online help)
  • The page containing the download link for your actual file (in case you need to re-download it, or download an upgraded version)
  • The serial number
  • Your proof-of-purchase documentation
  • Any other template files, plug-ins, themes, etc that also need to get installed

For each piece of software, it’s a great idea to gather all of these files together and put them in a single folder.  The folder can be the name of the software (plus possibly a very brief description of what it’s for – in case you can’t remember what the software does based in its name).  Then you would gather all of these folders together into one place, and call it something like “Software” or “Setups”.

If you have enough of these folders (I have several hundred, being a geek, collected over 20 years), then you may want to further categorize them.  My own categorization structure is based on “platform” (operating system):

The last seven folders each represents one platform/operating system, while _Operating Systems contains set-up files for installing the operating systems themselves.  _Hardware contains ROMs for hardware I own, such as routers.

Within the Windows folder (above), you can see the beginnings of the vast library of software I’ve compiled over the years:

An example of a typical application folder looks like this:

Tip #34.  Have a “Settings” Folder

We all know that our documents are important.  So are our photos and music files.  We save all of these files into folders, and then locate them afterwards and double-click on them to open them.  But there are many files that are important to us that can’t be saved into folders, and then searched for and double-clicked later on.  These files certainly contain important information that we need, but are often created internally by an application, and saved wherever that application feels is appropriate.

A good example of this is the “PST” file that Outlook creates for us and uses to store all our emails, contacts, appointments and so forth.  Another example would be the collection of Bookmarks that Firefox stores on your behalf.

And yet another example would be the customized settings and configuration files of our all our software.  Granted, most Windows programs store their configuration in the Registry, but there are still many programs that use configuration files to store their settings.

Imagine if you lost all of the above files!  And yet, when people are backing up their computers, they typically only back up the files they know about – those that are stored in the “My Documents” folder, etc.  If they had a hard disk failure or their computer was lost or stolen, their backup files would not include some of the most vital files they owned.  Also, when migrating to a new computer, it’s vital to ensure that these files make the journey.

It can be a very useful idea to create yourself a folder to store all your “settings” – files that are important to you but which you never actually search for by name and double-click on to open them.  Otherwise, next time you go to set up a new computer just the way you want it, you’ll need to spend hours recreating the configuration of your previous computer!

So how to we get our important files into this folder?  Well, we have a few options:

  • Some programs (such as Outlook and its PST files) allow you to place these files wherever you want.  If you delve into the program’s options, you will find a setting somewhere that controls the location of the important settings files (or “personal storage” – PST – when it comes to Outlook)
  • Some programs do not allow you to change such locations in any easy way, but if you get into the Registry, you can sometimes find a registry key that refers to the location of the file(s).  Simply move the file into your Settings folder and adjust the registry key to refer to the new location.
  • Some programs stubbornly refuse to allow their settings files to be placed anywhere other then where they stipulate.  When faced with programs like these, you have three choices:  (1) You can ignore those files, (2) You can copy the files into your Settings folder (let’s face it – settings don’t change very often), or (3) you can use synchronization software, such as the Windows Briefcase, to make synchronized copies of all your files in your Settings folder.  All you then have to do is to remember to run your sync software periodically (perhaps just before you run your backup software!).

There are some other things you may decide to locate inside this new “Settings” folder:

  • Exports of registry keys (from the many applications that store their configurations in the Registry).  This is useful for backup purposes or for migrating to a new computer
  • Notes you’ve made about all the specific customizations you have made to a particular piece of software (so that you’ll know how to do it all again on your next computer)
  • Shortcuts to webpages that detail how to tweak certain aspects of your operating system or applications so they are just the way you like them (such as how to remove the words “Shortcut to” from the beginning of newly created shortcuts).  In other words, you’d want to create shortcuts to half the pages on the How-To Geek website!

Here’s an example of a sam broadcaster 4.2.2 full crack - Free Activators folder:

Windows Features that Help with Organization

This section details some of the features of Microsoft Windows that are a boon to anyone hoping to stay optimally organized.

Tip #35.  Use the “Favorite Links” Area to Access Oft-Used Folders

Once you’ve created your great new filing system, work out which folders you access most regularly, or which serve as great starting points for locating the rest of the files in your folder structure, and then put links to those folders in your “Favorite Links” area of the left-hand side of the Windows Explorer window (simply called “Favorites” in Windows 7):

Some ideas for folders you might want to add there include:

  • Your “Inbox” folder WiFiSpoof 3.5 Crack Change your WiFi MAC Address Free whatever you’ve called it) – most important!
  • The base of your filing structure (e.g. C:\Files)
  • A folder containing shortcuts to often-accessed folders on other computers around the network (shown above as Network Folders)
  • A folder containing shortcuts to your current projects (unless that folder is in your “Inbox” folder)

Getting folders into this area is very simple – just locate the folder you’re interested in and drag it there!

Tip #36.  Customize the Places Bar in the File/Open and File/Save Boxes

Consider the screenshot below:

The highlighted icons (collectively known as the “Places Bar”) can be customized to refer to any folder location you want, allowing instant access to any part of your organizational structure.

Note:  These File/Open and File/Save boxes have been superseded by new versions that use the Windows Vista/Windows 7 “Favorite Links”, but the older versions (shown above) are still used by a surprisingly large number of applications.

The easiest way to customize these icons is to use the Group Policy Editor, but not everyone has access to this program.  If you do, open it up and navigate to:

User Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Windows Explorer > Common Open File Dialog

If you don’t have access to the Group Policy Editor, then you’ll need to get into the Registry.  Navigate to:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER \ Software \ Microsoft  \ Windows \ CurrentVersion \ Policies \ comdlg32 \ Placesbar

It should then be easy to make the desired changes.  Log off and log on again to allow the changes to take effect.

Tip #37.  Use the Quick Launch Bar as a Application and File Launcher

That Quick Launch bar (to the right of the Start button) is a lot more useful than people give it credit for.  Most people simply have half a dozen icons in it, and use it to digital file organizer just those programs.  But it can actually be used to instantly access just about anything in your filing system:

For complete instructions on how to set this up, visit our dedicated article on this topic.

Tip #38.  Put a Shortcut to Windows Explorer into Your Quick Launch Bar

This is only necessary in Windows Vista and Windows XP.  The Microsoft boffins finally got wise and added it to the Windows 7 Superbar by default.

Windows Explorer – the program used for managing your files and folders – is one of the most useful programs in Windows.  Anyone who considers themselves serious about being organized needs instant access to this program at any time.  A great place to create a shortcut to this program is in the Windows XP and Windows Vista “Quick Launch” bar:

To get it there, locate it in your Start Menu (usually under “Accessories”) and then right-drag it down into your Quick Launch bar (and create a copy).

Tip #39.  Customize the Starting Folder for Your Windows 7 Explorer Superbar Icon

If you’re on Windows 7, your Superbar will include a Windows Explorer icon.  Clicking on the icon will launch Windows Explorer (of course), and will start you off in your “Libraries” folder.  Libraries may be fine as a starting point, but if you have created yourself an “Inbox” folder, then it would probably make more sense to start off in this folder every time you launch Windows Explorer.

To change this default/starting folder location, then first right-click the Explorer icon in the Superbar, and then right-click Properties:

Then, in Target field of the Windows Explorer Properties box that appears, type %windir%\explorer.exe followed by the path of the folder you wish to start in.  For example:

%windir%\explorer.exe C:\Files

If that folder happened to be on the Desktop (and called, say, “Inbox”), then you would use the following cleverness:

%windir%\explorer.exe shell:desktop\Inbox

Then click OK and test it out.

Tip #40.  Ummmmm….

No, that’s it.  I can’t think of another one.  That’s all of the tips I can come up with.  I only created this one because 40 is such a nice round number…

Case Study – An Organized PC

To finish off the article, I have included a few screenshots of my (main) computer (running Vista).  The aim here is twofold:

  1. To give you a sense of what it looks like when the above, sometimes abstract, tips are applied to a real-life computer, and
  2. To offer some ideas about folders and structure that you may want to steal to use on your own PC.

Let’s start with the C: drive itself.  Very minimal.  All my files are contained within C:\Files.  I’ll confine the rest of the case study to this folder:

That folder contains the following:

  • Mark: My personal files
  • VC: My business (Virtual Creations, Australia)
  • Others contains files created by friends and family
  • Data contains files from the rest of the world (can be thought of as “public” files, usually downloaded from the Net)
  • Settings is described above in tip #34

The Data folder contains the following sub-folders:

  • Audio:  Radio plays, audio books, podcasts, etc
  • Development:  Programmer and developer resources, sample source code, etc (see below)
  • Humour:  Jokes, funnies (those emails that we all receive)
  • Movies:  Downloaded and ripped movies (all legal, of course!), their scripts, DVD covers, etc.
  • Music:  (see below)
  • Setups:  Installation files for software (explained in full in tip #33)
  • System:  (see below)
  • TV:  Downloaded TV shows
  • Writings:  Books, instruction manuals, etc (see below)

The Music folder contains the following sub-folders:

  • Album covers:  JPEG scans
  • Guitar tabs:  Text files of guitar sheet music
  • Lists:  e.g. “Top 1000 songs of all time”
  • Lyrics:  Text files
  • MIDI:  Electronic music files
  • MP3 (representing 99% of the Music folder):  MP3s, either ripped from CDs or downloaded, sorted by artist/album name
  • Music Video:  Video clips
  • Sheet Music:  usually PDFs

The Data\Writings folder contains the following sub-folders:

(all pretty self-explanatory)

The Data\Development folder contains the following sub-folders:

Again, all pretty self-explanatory (if you’re a geek)

The Data\System folder contains the following sub-folders:

These are usually themes, plug-ins and other downloadable program-specific resources.

The Mark folder contains the following sub-folders:

  • From Others:  Usually letters that other people (friends, family, etc) have written to me
  • For Others:  Letters and other things I have created for other people
  • Green BookNone of your business
  • Playlists:  M3U files that I have compiled of my favorite songs (plus one M3U playlist file for every album I own)
  • Writing:  Fiction, philosophy and other musings of mine
  • Mark Docs:  Shortcut to C:\Users\Mark
  • Settings:  Shortcut to C:\Files\Settings\Mark

The Others folder contains the following sub-folders:

The VC (Virtual Creations, my business – I develop websites) folder contains the following sub-folders:

And again, all of those are pretty self-explanatory.

Conclusion

These tips have saved my sanity and helped keep me a productive geek, but what about you? What tips and tricks do you have to keep your files organized?  Please share them with us in the comments.  Come on, don’t be shy…

Источник: https://www.howtogeek.com/howto/15677/zen-and-the-art-of-file-and-folder-organization/

What Is an Electronic Filing System?

Keeping your documents organized in today's super-digitized, speedy world can be difficult and time-consuming. Whether you use local storage on your computers or mobile devices, or the increasingly popular cloud storage option, it's important to implement a computerized filing system that enables your business to create, store, manage, and share documents and other files with ease.

This article will explain what a computerized filing system is, how it differs from a traditional filing system and how you can create an electronic filing system for your business.

What is a computerized filing system?

A computerized or electronic filing system organizes and stores your business's files on a hard drive or network space. The system can be software- or internet-based, or a simple desktop folder/file system on a computer.

Why are computerized filing systems used?

The primary reason why people use a computerized filing system is it's an easy way to safely store and organize files. This organization largely comes in the form of indexing, which categorizes and registers every document entered into the system based on specific properties that you can customize, such as file size or function.

Computerized systems also offer greater options for securing your files and sharing them, making it easier for team members to collaborate on shared documents.

Editor's note: Looking for document management software for your business? Fill out the questionnaire below to have our vendor partners contact you about your needs.

Differences between traditional and computerized databases

Traditional systems are generally paper-based and manually organized, whereas electronic systems – as the name suggests – are digital, with documents organized and stored digitally.

Traditional filing systems tend to take up a lot of physical space – all of those papers require boxes or filing cabinets to store them – and these systems are susceptible to physical damage like fading, fire, flooding redshift 3.0.12 crack other damage.

Computerized or electronic filing systems are generally more budget-friendly, they free up physical space, and offer many benefits that help you organize your documents and share them across your company with ease.

Switching from a traditional to a computerized filing system can greatly increase your system's functionality by automating many aspects of the process, like indexing and tracking.

Benefits of a computerized filing system

Here are seven ways that implementing a digital filing system can help your business manage documents more efficiently.

  1. Automatic indexing: Indexing registers, categorizes, and then organizes files based on specific criteria that you can customize, such as file function or size, making it easy to retrieve and organize documents.

  2. Security: Electronic filing helps protect your information since a data breach or storage issue could be disastrous for your business. Using a computerized filing system provides safeguards such as managed access control, audit trails, automatic backups and password protection. If a disaster strikes, like a fire or flood, your files are stored safely in the cloud, away from physical harm.

  3. Regulatory compliance support: If you operate in a regulated industry, such as healthcare, electronic filing offers regulatory compliance support for HIPAA, Sarbanes-Oxley, Good Manufacturing Practices by the FDA or ISO 9000/9001. This capability provides your business with invaluable protection and peace of mind as you process critical or sensitive documents.

  4. Scalability: A major benefit of computerized filing versus traditional filing is the ability to scale, or grow, the system alongside your business. Think about which advanced features you'll want as your business grows. It is important that you choose software that grows with your business so you do not have to go through the process of switching software. [Read related article: Advice for Choosing a Small Business Document Management System]

  5. Collaboration: An electronic filing system makes it simple for users to share and collaborate on documents. Look for tools such as live editing, file sharing, plugin integrations and access restriction.

  6. Integrations: If your business uses a CRM application or ERP database, look for filing software that integrates with these programs – this will make your daily life much easier. Of course, you can use filing software that does not integrate with your CRM or ERP, but it may limit your workflow capabilities; that is, it may inhibit your team's ability to access, edit, back up, and monitor documents that are created within your CRM or ERP. Many document management solutions integrate with email programs such as Microsoft Outlook. [Read related article: How to Choose the Best Microsoft Document Management System]

  7. Quick, easy document retrieval: Searching for the right document – when you have an entire business's worth to go through – can be a nightmare and can even cost you money. PricewaterhouseCoopers estimates that the process of finding one lost document costs a company $122 on average. Further, PWC estimates that of the 10,000-plus documents the average business handles, 7.5% are lost. With the right indexing procedures in place, finding a document takes mere seconds, and employees can remotely access the documents they need as well.

How to create a computerized filing system

Creating your own computerized filing system takes time, but it is well worth the time and effort. The result is a well-thought-out and organized system.

Here are six steps to creating a computerized filing system for your business.

1. Decide who will have ownership of your filing system.

If you are not overseeing the filing process, assign an administrative staff member to be responsible. Make sure your whole team is aware of what changes are being implemented and who is responsible for overseeing the process. This lets employees know whom they should go to with questions and who is designated as the point person in keeping track of important documents.

2. Get organized.

Take an inventory of all the documents you have, how big they are, what their function is, how long they need to be stored, etc. Next, loosely organize them accordingly. This is the kick-off of your actual filing process, so think carefully about how you organize documents.

Keep your main goal in mind: to make it as easy as possible for someone to find a document quickly. Folders should have a clear sense of order, they should not be cluttered, and they should not hinder your compnay's workflow. Be consistent in your labeling and separating.

3. Use subfolders.

You don't need MiniTool Partition Wizard Technician Crack 12.5 With Serial Key folder for every small subgroup. For example, you can make one folder for "Medical Records," and create subfolders within that folder categories by month or by year to keep your system orderly and uncluttered.

4. Decide on a naming system, and stick to it.

Naming your files is a vital part of the filing process. Proper and consistent naming makes it easy for anyone in your organization to quickly find a document, because they have a well-founded assumption of what the file might be named and where it might be stored.

Make sure the file name makes sense and includes the most important information regarding what the document is or says.

5. Integrate paper and electronic documents in your filing system.

If you have important paper documents that must be retained permanently, create a dedicated place within your filing system for those documents. Consider making electronic copies of the paper originals, or if you must store the paper documents, organize them according to your system.

6. Inform your team about how the filing system works.

Once your filing is complete, make sure your entire organization is clear on how the system works and how documents must be named, filed and stored going forward. Create a document that outlines all of your filing guidelines. Keep it in your files, and include training on your filing process as part of your onboarding process.

How to name files on your computer

Naming your files effectively is one of the most important aspects of an efficient filing system. Without a consistent file-naming convention in place, finding documents becomes confusing, difficult and frustrating. If you start with good habits, you set your business up for success.

To start, understand that there are two types of files on your computer – the ones you create and the ones you collect.

Create a system that differentiates these two file types in a way that makes sense, whether that's marking it in the file name or dictating where the file is stored.

Next, decide on a naming system. What works best varies from business to business. You have to determine the best naming system for your organization. Many businesses use a combination of name and date so documents are easy to find according to how old they are.

Here are a few suggestions to follow when naming your files:

  • Be descriptive
  • Be consistent
  • Avoid special characters (%, *, @, etc.)
  • Use dates
  • Include version numbers, if applicable
Источник: https://www.business.com/articles/computerized-filing-system/
Android).

Scanbot does a great job at automatically detecting the edges of most documents.

I’ve found that Scanbot’s ability to quickly detect the edges of a piece of paper (or business card, or receipt, or a Magic: The Gathering card) is much better than Evernote’s, and you’re also able to scan multiple pages at once – when you’re done, the app can stitch them into a single PDF.

These features make scanning much faster, but there’s another reason Autodesk 3ds max serial number like Scanbot so much: The automatic upload feature.

Scanbot Upload Destinations

Within the app’s settings, you can choose a destination to which all new scans will be automatically uploaded. Destinations include:

  • Evernote (the one I use)
  • Google Drive
  • Dropbox
  • OneDrive
  • OneNote
  • Lots more, even including FTP and WebDAV

Moreover, you can choose a specific upload folder or notebook for most destinations. In Evernote, I’ve set mine to a notebook called !INBOX, which is also the place where I create most new text notes (I’ve named it with a “!” symbol so it sits at the top of my notebook list).

Scanbot does have one significant drawback: The Pro version has become quite expensive in recent months.

As a result, I’m planning on testing other scanning apps digital file organizer the near future and updating this guide with a new recommended pick. In the meantime, check out this list for some alternatives.

Note: If you’re using a document scanner app that sends scans to Evernote, Google Drive, Dropbox, or some other cloud-synced app, then your digitized files will be reasonably backed up. However, you should make sure that they are. If your scans only exist on a single computer hard drive, they could be lost in an instant if that hard drive fails.

Create an “Inbox” Folder on Your Computer

I want to make one final note on digitization: If you choose to upload your digitized files to your computer’s native folder system, instead of an app like Evernote, then it might be a good idea for you to create an “Inbox” folder on your computer.

Inbox Computer Folder

Some people actually use a digital Inbox folder just like a physical inbox, saving all new files to it and then relocating them later on. I don’t do this for a couple of reasons:

  1. Most of my frequently-accessed folders are pinned to my Quick Access sidebar, so opening them doesn’t take much time.
  2. A lot of my work involves video editing, and video projects are full of footage, images, music and other documents. Changing the file locations for those assets can break a project.

However, using an Inbox folder for your automatic scan uploads is a really good idea, because it allows you to scan a document in seconds and move on with your life. You don’t want to be standing around in the grocery store, digging through folders in Google Drive in order to find the right one for that receipt your just scanned.

Instead, sit down once a week and process the inbox folder, just as you would do with a physical inbox. This is exactly what I do with my !INBOX notebook in Evernote as well.

When you work this way, you efficiently batch all your sorting tasks, removing as much friction as possible from the multiple times during the week when you might choose to scan a document.

Shred Sensitive Documents

Now, once you’ve digitized a document, you’re probably going to want to get rid of the paper version. You’ve got several options for doing this:

  • Recycle it – this is the best option for most things.
  • Throw it away – if you want to prove that “End is Nigh” guy right and harm the planet.
  • Burn it – check your local fire laws and current bans, and don’t burn glossy stuff! Here’s a guide if you really want to do this.
  • Eat it – if you’re a goat, you’ve already done this.

However, you should know that certain unsavory characters have been known to dig through trash and recycle bins, looking for paper that contains personal information they can steal. Don’t let your personal information fall into the hands of these unscrupulous opportunists.

Whenever you digitize anything containing account numbers, your social security number, financial data, or other personal information, make like a Ninja Turtle villain and shred it afterwards.

I use a cross-cut shredder, which is more secure than a basic strip-cut shredder since it cuts paper into small pieces instead of long strips that can easily be pasted back together (the American Embassy in Tehran learned this the hard way back in the 1970s and 80s).

It’s not too expensive, and you can keep it in a sort of always-on mode so that it instantly starts shredding when you feed in a piece of paper. And it’s definitely less work than dealing with having your information stolen! Speaking of that, you might want to listen to our podcast episode on digital security practices as well.

Organization is a Long-Term Process

As you’re probably aware, simply setting up a system for organizing your files isn’t enough: you have to actually use it.

Once you’ve finished implementing everything from this guide, make sure you actually take the time to properly organize new documents when you get them. Put them in your inbox or portable file system right away, then process them on a regular basis.

Additionally, it can be helpful to have a schedule task – once every 3-4 months, say – to go through your file system and make sure it’s working order. If anything is out of place, put it back in its place.

This process will help keep “entropy” (or chaos) from creeping into your file system – ensuring that you always know where everything is.

If you want to get even more organized, check out these articles:

Источник: https://collegeinfogeek.com/file-folder-organization/

10 best information organizer software to use

Madalina has been a Windows fan ever since she got her hands on her first Windows XP computer. She is interested in all things technology, especially emerging technologies -- AI and DNA computing in. Read more

  • If you want to organize yourself better and never miss a meeting again, you need a PIM tool.
  • PIM stands for Personal Information Manager, and it will help you become more efficient.
  • You can dive deep into these tools and solutions in the following list, thus choosing software that matches your needs. 
personal organizer software

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Life is simple when organized and there is a universe of organizer software that can help you reclaim your organizational mojo.

When you can’t make out the notes you scribbled at the back of a newspaper and you haven’t turned a page of your calendar since 2013, you know it’s time to get organized with digital tools.

Luckily, with the advent of personal organizational tools, mind-mapping, and digital note-taking apps, organizing your life with digital tools becomes a breeze.

Information organizer software organizes your life by creating daily to-do lists, keeping reminders, taking notes, and enabling you to achieve life goals. It serves as a planner, an address book, and a notebook all in one.

The best information organizer tools even go the extra mile by providing extra tools to back up data, set up budgets, provide driving directions, etc.

Most of these tools can be used on the desktop as well as on mobile devices. With the help of these tools, you can be more productive and get the job done with ease.

What are the best Organizer Tools?

This software solution is tailor-made for anyone who needs strong organizing tools. No matter how busy your day would be, Any.do is designed to help you get it all done.

The planner comes with all necessities regarding simple management of life. Also, the features promise professional tools digital file organizer calendars, reminders, task lists, notes, and so on. In other words, you will not need anymore a bunch of apps to fulfill your daily activities.

For instance, the dynamic calendar can help your productivity enormously with its all-in-one functions. Including very practical UI and integrated services like business meetings, social events, or daily tasks to never miss a thing.

Other benefits assume conversational language reminders to always be on time or smart grocery lists for last-minute home tasks.

That being said, choosing this software will bring the difference due to its practical features, but more importantly because it makes life more enjoyable.

Any.do

Any.do

With software like Any.do the work-life balance will improve and you can enjoy valuable moments again.

Check priceVisit website

If you are looking for personal organizer software that works on all devices, then you might want to try out Todoist. With an easy to use interface and numerous collaboration tools,

Todoist is one of the most feature-rich task management apps on the market.

One thing you’ll notice once you open a Todoist account is that you have tasks, labels, filters, weekly overview, and projects due today. The filter tool is very valuable to those who juggle multiple tasks at a time.

Todoist also has a reminder system but it’s only for premium users meaning you have to pay.

Todoist

Todoist

Try out this efficient platform to handle your activities without much effort and increase productivity fast.

Check priceVisit website

AnyTime Organizer Deluxe is one of the most reputable personal organizer software and packs more than you would expect to find in organizer software. Its ability to expense reports, show driving directions and connect to Google makes it a must-have tool for business professionals.

AnyTime Organizer is bundled with a myriad of tools to enhance your personal and professional lives. Any undone task is automatically moved to the next day and you can use the calendar to keep track of important events.

You can set up reminders and the software will audibly remind you when it’s time to complete a task. You can even set the system to send a text message or email when it’s time to complete a task.

Since the tool can connect to Google, you can download NFL, NASCAR, PGA, MLB, NHL, and NBA season schedules and pin them to your daily planner.

In addition to your calendar events, you can use the tool to manage your expenses and perform other activities like import data from Microsoft Outlook.

Get Anytime Organizer Deluxe Full

C-Organizer is another powerful organizer tool that comes with extensive synchronization capabilities that allow users to access data from almost any device.

With Word Processor, password manager, address book, to-do list, and calendar, C-Organizer packs all you need to organize your personal and professional life.

This personal organizer software protects your private data by password and encryption to prevent unauthorized access. You can sync your data with Google or upload it to the cloud via Dropbox or Google Drive.

C-Organizer also lets you export data as HTML, XML, CSV, and TXT so you can easily import your software data to another application.

⇒ Get C-Organizer

Efficcess is a secure information organizer software that works across PCs and desktops making it one of the most versatile personal information manager. 

With a built-in journal, password manager, task list, address book, calendar, and an automatic backup, you would not want a better organizer software than this. You can create custom reminders so you don’t miss important events.

The calendar is equipped with drag and drop features so you can easily reschedule an appointment as well as add major holidays to your personal organizer.

Efficcess comes with a built-in recycle bin to safeguard you against permanently deleting important information erroneously.

⇒ Get Efficcess

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Anytime Organizer Standard comes with the same top-notch features as AnyTime Organizer Deluxe only that it lacks extensive synchronization abilities.

The interface is user-friendly with all the organizing tools nested on digital file organizer left panel of the program.

It comes with various organizing features including a feature-rich calendar and to-do lists.

You can add priority levels to the tasks so as to major on the most important tasks first. There is a personal information manager feature that can be used as a journal or a notebook.

You will also be able to do budgeting using the provided budget template as well as track and organize your finances.

⇒ Get Anytime Organizer Standard

Though MyOrganizer Ultimate can only be accessed on a desktop, it has an assortment of features that gives it an edge against the competition. It comes with a simple and easy-to-use interface that resembles that of Microsoft Outlook.

You will find the common organizer tools such as an address book, task manager, journal, tasks list, and a planner.

You can use the custom reminders to remind you of important dates and events. In addition to the organizer features, the tool has built-in expense reports that can help you to track expenses and budgets.

It also has a password manager that can help you track all your passwords and logins. It also comes with several options for importing files including HTML, CSV, and TXT.

⇒ Get MyOrganizer Ultimate

Essential PIM takes a top spot on our list precisely because it is a powerful, full-featured Personal Information Manager for Windows. It offers email, synchronization, portability, network support, and more.

Thanks to this handy tool, you no longer have to worry about controlling appointments, to-do lists, notes, email messages, password entries, and contacts.

The interface is very handy, and it well deserves to replace other similar tools such as Outlook.

Speaking of which, if you are indeed keen on sticking with Outlook as well, you will be glad to know that EssentialPIM offers the ability to synchronize all your information with MS Outlook.

Of course, you aren’t limited to just that, since you can also sync your data with online services such as Google, iCloud, Toodledo, SyncML, CalDAV, etc.

Get EssentialPIM

When looking for a perfect virtual personal assistant, you need to speak to it directly without having to type anything. DialogFlow is pretty much Cortana after she has been promoted.

The tool lets you search the web, make calls, send texts, remind you of tasks while remembering everything on your to-do lists.

The app can be anything you want it to be, be it a personal assistant, an old professor, or even a brunette. The app will perform all tasks, answer your questions, and even give you social network updates.

All you have to do is give commands and DialogFlow will follow instructions like a dutiful son. The app is available for Windows, Android, and iOS.

⇒ Get DialogFlow

MSD Organizer is a handy tool that packs a load of attractive features.

It organizes your personal and professional information as well as music, labels, and cards. Among the many features, you will find the calendar, to-do lists, address book, task manager, journal, and a notes section.

The calendar has drag and drop functionalities that simplify the process of removing and adding tasks.

Not only does the address book provides the name, number, address, email, and picture, but also allows you to download and attach documents, reports, spreadsheets, and notes.

Other organizer tools included are property organizer, music, health records, and budget templates.

⇒ Get MSD Organizer

While organizing features and the cost of the program are the key considerations in choosing the best organizer software, you should also pay close attention to the program’s syncing capabilities.

When a program is compatible with mobile devices and tablets, it becomes more versatile since you can access all your to-do lists and other important information on the go.

Some of the programs discussed above like the C-Organizer and others do have extensive syncing abilities. We hope that you will find this information useful. Feel free to comment and share.

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Источник: https://windowsreport.com/information-organizer-software/

If you’re like the average person, you probably have several “unofficial” spots for the various files, papers, and documents that make their way into your life.

Your desk is a likely candidate, as is your kitchen table – and, of course, there’s the very bottom of your backpack, where papers go to die and never be recovered.

Well, prepare to kiss your average-ness – and all of the messes in these places – goodbye.

By channeling the combined spiritual energy of Marie Kondo and Leslie Knope, I have created this guide that will show you how to easily organize all of your files, documents, and papers.

We’ll mcafee livesafe crack 2019 - Free Activators things off by figuring out which of your files should actually be on paper (rather than on your computer). Teamviewer 12 crack - Crack Key For U, we’ll talk about how to organize and process those files using the Three-Location System. Finally, we’ll dig into how you can start to digitize your files.

Let’s get started.

Physical vs. Digital: How Should You Store Your Files?

Look, it’s 2019. We’re not writing down our friends’ phone numbers on Rolodexes anymore, and when the phone company leaves a phone book on our doorsteps today, we angrily tweet at them for destroying the environment.

So… should we even be talking about how to organize physical files? Shouldn’t we all be going paperless?

Well, if you’re anything like me, the answer is “mostlyyes”.

Whenever I get a piece of paper, my first instinct is to either:

  1. Recycle it (this happens to most of the mail I get)
  2. Digitize it… and then recycle (or shred) it

I don’t like keeping a whole lot of paper in my life. I’d much rather store all my files in the cloud, where they don’t take up space and can be accessed on all of my devices.

However, there are certain things that just need to be kept around in physical form. So, until we all figure out how to upload our consciousnesses into computers and adopt a fully-simulated existence (assuming we’re not already doing that now – cue X-Files music), here are some documents you should make sure you keep on-hand:

Documents You Need to Keep on Paper

Keep all of these documents in your physical file system:

  • ID documents and passports
  • Birth certificate
  • Social security cards
  • Business licenses (if you have a business)
  • Marriage license (if you’re married)
  • Vehicle titles, loan documents, and registration documents
  • House deeds and mortgage documents
  • Wills and living wills

If you’re a student, you may not have many of these kinds of documents right now; however, you’re likely to acquire some of them in the future, and you’ll want a safe place to keep them.

Additionally, you might want to keep around certain sentimental documents – clippings of newspaper articles you were mentioned in or wrote yourself, extra-special birthday cards, crayon drawings from your little brother – that kind of stuff.

Whatever it is, use the following system for organizing and storing it.

The Three-Location System for Organizing Files

When it comes to organizing physical files, I use a simple system that consists of three locations:

  1. Main file box
  2. Inbox
  3. Portable file folder

There are a couple of other optional locations you can add to your system (which I’ll cover later), but these three will cover the vast majority of your needs.

Main File Box

The main file box is the place where the majority of your physical files should eventually end up (if you’re not going to digitize them).

If you have a lot of papers you need to store, you could buy a multi-drawer filing cabinet for this purpose; however, I find that a single file box is more than enough for me.

This file box is built to store hanging folders, each of which gets a label. Most hanging folders come with labels included.

Now, when you’re creating your structure here, it’s a good idea to try to adhere to the “tree” structure you used for your digital files.

Use each hanging folder as a top-level folder. This might be all you need; if you’re like me, you won’t have a ton of physical files and won’t need to go deeper.

If you do need to go deeper, though, you’ve got a few options. The first is to simply put multiple regular folders within your hanging folders.

I actually do have an example for this; my landlord left an entire file box with the house I’m renting because she is supremely organized (honestly, she should be writing this article instead of me).

Folders inside of hanging folders

Each hanging folder is just a letter of the alphabet; in each one is a folder for each piece of the house – the garage door, security system, refrigerator, etc.

Another method is to use pieces of printer paper as dividers, and then to attach sticky flags to the edges of each one in order to create labels that stick up from the rest of your papers.

You could also use thicker construction paper if you wanted these dividers to feel more substantial than your normal papers.

Folders inside of hanging folders

This method isn’t quite as nice as using folders-within-folders, as that method allows you to take out a specific folder when you need to work with it. It is, however, cheaper – and it takes up less space.

Inbox

Be honest with me here: When you get a piece of mail that needs to go into your file box, how often do you immediately open up that file box and put it in the correct spot?

I’d wager a guess that it’s not 100% of the time, and that your kitchen table if often used as a convenient place to toss things that will get “dealt with later.”

Here’s the thing: This is fine. You probably shouldn’t be opening up your file box and finding the exact folder for each file you get at the exact moment you get it. It’s a lot more efficient to have a specific time blocked out for processing all of your unorganized files, mail, cryptic messages written in cut-out magazine letters and nailed to your door, etc.

However, your kitchen table does not deserve to be a dumping ground for all of these things in the mean time. That is a job for your Inbox.

Desktop Inbox

An inbox is a simple tray (or stack of trays if you want to get fancy) that sits on your desk. Whenever you get something that needs to be processed later, you put it in the inbox. There it will wait for processing.

At least once a week, go through everything in the inbox and decide what needs to be done with each piece – deal with it (if it represents a task, like a water bill), digitize it, recycle it, or put it into your main file system.

Portable File Folder

The final piece of your physical file organization puzzle is the one that travels with you.

When you’re out of the house and away from your file box and inbox, you still need some way to store with any papers you get at work, class, or from that guy outside your local coffee shop holding his “The End is Nigh” sign.

Now, depending on the type of work you do and classes you attend, your portable file folder can function as either a portable inbox (which you clear on a regular basis) or a mini file box that actually holds papers for a significant amount of time.

If you’re anything like me, you don’t have any physical papers that you need to carry with you. You might carry a physical notebook (maybe you’re a bullet journal user) or a novel, but you’re not actually carrying worksheets and other papers.

If that’s the case, then I recommend keeping a single folder in Blumentals WeBuilder Free Activate bag and using it as a portable inbox. This gives you a safe place to temporarily store any papers you get while you’re out and about, and it doesn’t take up much space.

Single folder

When you get home each day, you can move any papers and end-of-the-world pamphlets you received to your main file box, your inbox, or the recycle bin.

But what if you’re a student who needs to carry around assignments and handouts?

Or what if you’re a high-powered, slick-haired business person who needs to carry around, ya know, business papers?

If this is the case, then a single folder probably isn’t going to cut the mustard. (Actually, the edge of a folder is more than capable of cutting mustard – but I digress)

Instead, look at getting a portable accordion folder (I recommend this one from Five Star). These come in tons of different designs, from ones that just have a close-able flap to ones that zip up and have built-in tabs for labels.

Portable accordion folder

All of these have one thing in common: They give you several folders in one slim, compact package, which means they act as a portable file box that you can work out of.

You can easily separate and organize all the different papers for your classes or Very Important Business Deals, and unlike old-school binders with a hard spine, they expand or contract based on how much you’re carrying.

Optional File Locations

The Three-Location System will most likely be all you need for the vast majority of your files, especially if you decide to start digitizing most of them. However, there are a few potential exceptions. Here I’m going to cover a couple that you may want to consider.

Manuals Box

One type of physical “file” that I almost never digitize are product manuals. I have manuals for my lawn mower, digital piano, camera, and various other things I’ve bought. These are often pretty thick, so they’d take up a lot of space in my main file box if I tried to store them there.

That’s why I also have a “manuals box”. In my case, it’s just a cardboard box in my basement where I store the manuals for the things I buy. It’s not very organized. Whenever I buy something and think I should keep the manual, I just toss it in the box.

Manuals Box

Of course, you can be organized with your manuals box – in fact, my landlord’s file box is, indeed, a hyper-organized manuals box. When I eventually own my own home, I’ll be building a similarly organized manuals box.

For now, though, the number of manuals I own is small enough that a single box – without folders – works just fine.

Remember, sometimes over-optimizing one tiny part of your life takes so much time that your life in general becomes less optimized.

Safety Deposit Box

For your very sensitive documents, man. Safety deposit boxes can be rented at most banks for a yearly fee, which can vary from bank to bank and location to location.

There are also companies that focus only on safety deposit boxes, and you might find them to be cheaper. One that I found here in Denver rents small boxes for $125 a year.

Personally, I don’t use a safety deposit box. Video converter for pc important documents, I have backup scans. However, I also live in a house where I feel my documents are fairly secure.

At other times during my life, though, I lived in dorm rooms with roommates who would often leave the door unlocked – or wide open. If you’re an a similarly insecure living situation, a safety deposit box might be a wise investment.

Organizing your paper files is a great example of analog productivity. For more analog productivity advice, check out this article.

How to Go Paperless: Digitize Your Physical Files

To round out this guide, I want to talk about something that’s even better than properly storing and organizing your paper files; namely, digitizing them and then removing the physical versions from your life.

That’s right: It’s time to adopt the (mostly) paperless lifestyle.

Digitization is the process of scanning your physical files and turning them into electronic images or PDFs. From there, you can easily slot them into your beautifully-constructed computer folder system, where they:

  • No longer take up any space in your home or backpack
  • Can be backed up and rendered invulnerable to fires, bullies, or escaped zoo gorillas
  • Are searchable (if you save them as PDFs, or…well, read on.)

Personally, I try to digitize almost every paper I get. Unless I’m dealing with a thick product manual (and can’t find a PDF online to replace it), it takes very little time to digitize a paper.

This is especially true now that almost everyone has an ultra-high-resolution camera built into their phone. In the past, the only easy ways to digitize papers were to either buy a scanner or go down to a Kinko’s or Staples and scan documents there.

Now, you can just use your phone – which means you can digitize handouts, receipts, and other papers wherever you are.

Additionally, if you’re using the right app, you can automatically send your scans into your file system.

Here’s how I digitize my files. First, I’ll note that for the most part I prefer to send all my scans into my Evernote account rather than my actual file system. If you’ve taken my productivity systems course (which is free using that link), you might know that I use Evernote as a second brain.

A scanned document in Evernote. Here, the text is searchable, and the entire document can be tagged and annotated.

All of my article research, book notes, recipes, journal entries, and other ideas go into Evernote. (Note that there are other options – Check out our Top 10 Note-Taking Apps in 2020 list to see the best ones.)

Since Evernote’s UI allows me to see the contents of an individual note right next to all my notes and notebooks (instead of forcing me to open things up in a separate program), I find it to be a much more efficient place to store ideas. That’s why I choose to send scans there as well.

There’s another reason, though – Evernote makes your scans searchable, even if they’re images.

I tend to upload my scans as PDFs, but you can also add pictures into Evernote and its optical character recognition algorithm will allow you to search any text in them (even if it’s handwriting).

The Best Free Document Scanner App

With all that being said, I actually don’t use Evernote’s built-in scanning tool to digitize the papers that I get.

Instead, I use an app called Scanbot (iOS digital file organizer

2 comments

  1. I'm not in tutorial hell, but this video definitely got me to stop being so hard on myself.

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