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Outer Banks

Barrier islands in North Carolina, U.S.

For the 2020 TV series, see Outer Banks (TV series).

The Outer Banks, separating the Atlantic Ocean (east) from Currituck and Albemarle Sounds (north) and Pamlico Sound (south)

The Outer Banks (frequently abbreviated OBX) are a 200-mile (320 km) string of barrier islands and spits off the coast of North Carolina and southeastern Virginia, on the east coast of the United States. They line most of the North Carolina coastline, separating Currituck Sound, Albemarle Sound, and Pamlico Sound from the Atlantic Ocean. A major tourist destination, the Outer Banks are known for their wide expanse of open beachfront and the Cape Hatteras National Seashore.[1] The seashore and surrounding ecosystem are important biodiversity zones, including beach grasses and shrubland that help maintain the form of the land.

The Outer Banks were sites of early European settlement in the United States and remain important economic and cultural sites. Most notably the English Roanoke Colony vanished from Roanoke Island in 1587 and was the first location where an English person, Virginia Dare, was born in the Americas.[2] The hundreds of shipwrecks along the Outer Banks have given the surrounding seas the nickname Graveyard of the Atlantic. The Outer Banks were also home to the Wright brothers' first flight in a controlled, powered, heavier-than-air vehicle on December 17, 1903, at Kill Devil Hills.[3] During the 20th century the region became increasingly important for coastal tourism.

The Outer Banks are particularly vulnerable to sea level rise and coastal erosion, compounding existing coastal erosion caused by poor coastal management and construction practices.[4] In some locations on the banks, sea levels rose 5 inches from 2011 to 2015.[4] Some sections have significantly eroded already, with portions of Hatteras Island at 25% of its original width as of 2014.[5]Tropical storms like Hurricane Irene in 2011 have already destroyed significant infrastructure and property.[5]

Terminology[edit]

The term "Outer Banks" refers to the islands, shoals, and spits from Cape Lookout northward, including Core Banks, and is frequently abbreviated OBX on regional tourism marketing. In recent decades, the beaches to the south of Cape Lookout have been marketing themselves as the "Southern Outer Banks", including the marketing as SOBX; this region includes the Crystal Coast beaches of Bogue Banks. The term Inner Banks and IBX is a similarly new term to refer to the mainland communities along Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds.

Geography[edit]

The Outer Banks is a string of peninsulas and barrier islands separating the Atlantic Ocean from mainland North Carolina. From north to south, the largest of these include: Bodie Island (which used to be an island but is now a peninsula due to tropical storms and hurricanes that closed inlets that separated it from the Currituck Banks), Pea Island (which has, at times, been contiguous with neighboring Bodie Island or Hatteras Island), Hatteras Island, Ocracoke Island, Portsmouth Island, and the Core Banks.[6] Over time, the exact number of islands and inlets changes as new inlets are opened up, often during a breach created during violent storms, and older inlets close, usually due to gradually shifting sands during the dynamic processes of beach evolution.

The Outer Banks stretch southward from Sandbridge in Virginia Beach down the North Carolina coastline. Sources differ regarding the southern terminus of the Outer Banks. The most extensive definition includes the state's three prominent capes: Cape Hatteras, Cape Lookout, and Cape Fear.[7][8] Other sources limit the definition to two capes (Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout) and coastal areas in four counties (Currituck County, Dare County, Hyde County, and Carteret County).[9] Some authors exclude Carteret's Bogue Banks; others exclude the county entirely.[9][10][11]

The northern part of the Outer Banks, from Oregon Inlet northward, is actually a part of the North American mainland, since the northern inlets of Bodie Island and Currituck Banks no longer exist.[12] It is separated by the Currituck Sound and the Intracoastal Waterway, which passes through the Great Dismal Swamp occupying much of the mainland west of the Outer Banks. Road access to the northern Outer Banks is cut off between Sandbridge and Corolla, North Carolina, with communities such as Carova Beach accessible only by four-wheel drive vehicles. North Carolina State Highway 12 links most of the popular Outer Banks communities in this section of the coast. The easternmost point is Rodanthe Pier in Rodanthe, NC .

Aerial view of Outer banks (looking north), with sound on the left and ocean on the right

The Outer Banks are not anchored to offshore coral reefs like some other barrier islands, and as a consequence, they often suffer significant beach erosion during major storms. In fact, their location jutting out into the Atlantic makes them the most hurricane-prone area north of Florida, for both landfalling storms and brushing storms offshore. Hatteras Island was cut in half on September 18, 2003, when Hurricane Isabel washed a 2,000 feet (600 m) wide and 15 feet (5 m) deep channel called Isabel Inlet through the community of Hatteras Village on the southern end of the island.[13] The tear was subsequently repaired and restored by sand dredging by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It was cut off once again in 2011 by Hurricane Irene. Access to the island was largely limited to boat access only from August to late October until another temporary bridge could be built.

Three state highway bridges connect the Outer Banks to the mainland, the Wright Memorial Bridge, the oldest (built in 1930, rehabilitated in 1966), carries US 158 between Point Harbor and Kitty Hawk. William B. Umstead Bridge, the second oldest (built in 1957, rehabilitated in 1966), carries US 64 between Manns Harbor on the mainland and Manteo on Roanoke Island. The newest bridge, the Virginia Dare Memorial Bridge, was completed in 2002 and carries US 64 Bypass between Manns Harbor and Roanoke Island between Manteo and Wanchese. The Melvin R. Daniels Bridge carries US 64 between Roanoke Island and Nags Head. At Whalebone Junction, the three main highways of the Outer Banks (NC 12, US 158, and US 64) all meet. Additionally, NC 615 serves as the main route along Knotts Island in the extreme north; it connects only to Virginia by land.

A number of ferries maintained by the North Carolina Department of Transportation Ferry Division also serve the Outer Banks. From north to south, these are the Knotts Island-Currituck Ferry, the Hatteras-Ocracoke Ferry, the Swan Quarter-Ocracoke Ferry, and the Cedar Island-Ocracoke Ferry. Additionally, a semi-regular emergency ferry often runs from Stumpy Point to Rodanthe to serve travelers due to frequent wash-outs of NC 12 between Nags Head and Rodanthe. Additionally, private ferries are commissioned by the National Park Service to access certain islands within the National Seashores along the outer banks, these include ferries to Portsmouth Island, to Cape Lookout Lighthouse, and various locations along Core Banks and Shackleford Banks.

Ecology[edit]

Vegetation[edit]

The vegetation of the Outer Banks has biodiversity, although it is considered the northern limit for many southern plants such as wild scrub palms. In the northern part of the Outer Banks, from Virginia Beach southward past the North Carolina border to Cape Hatteras, the main types of vegetation are sea grasses, beach grasses and other beach plants including Opuntia humifusa on the Atlantic side and wax myrtles, bays, and grasses on the Sound side with areas of pine and Spanish moss-covered live oaks. Yucca aloifolia and Yucca gloriosa can be found growing wild here in the northern parts of its range on the beach. Dwarf palmettos were once indigenous to the entire Outer Banks, and they are still successfully planted and grown. Its current most northerly known native stand is on Monkey Island in Currituck County.[14][15]

From Cape Hatteras National Seashore southward, the vegetation does include dwarf palmetto (Sabal minor), Yucca aloifolia and Yucca gloriosa; however, the area also has Cabbage palmetto (Sabal palmetto), which can be found in the north, although they are native in the southern part of the Outer Banks, specifically prevalent from Cape Hatteras and all points southward. Pindo palms and windmill palms are also planted widely throughout the Outer Banks; although, they are not indigenous to the area.

A wide variety of native plants can be found at the Elizabethan Gardens in Manteo on Roanoke Island.[16]

The Outer Banks are home to Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria), the roasted leaves of which were brewed into a high caffeine beverage called black drink by the Native Americans. The Outer Banks may be one of the few places where it is still consumed.[17]

Animal life[edit]

The islands are home to herds of feral horses, sometimes called "banker ponies", which according to local legend are descended from Spanish mustangs washed ashore centuries ago in shipwrecks. Populations are found on Ocracoke Island, Shackleford Banks, Currituck Banks, and in the Rachel Carson Estuarine Sanctuary.

Climate[edit]

The Outer Banks has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa). The outer banks have unusual weather patterns because of their unique geographical location. As the islands jut out from the eastern seaboard into the Atlantic Gulf Stream, the Outer Banks has a predisposition to be affected by hurricanes, Nor'easters (usually in the form of rain, and rarely snow or mixed precipitation), and other ocean-driven storms. The hardiness zone is 8b.

The winters are typically milder than in inland areas, averaging lows in the upper 30s and highs in the lower 50s, and are more frequently overcast than in the summer. However, the exposure of the Outer Banks makes them prone to higher winds, often causing wind chills to make the apparent temperature as cold as the inland areas. The summer months average lows from the mid-70s to highs in the upper 80s, depending on the time of the summer. The spring and fall are typically milder seasons. The fall and winter are usually warmer than areas inland, while the spring and the summer are often slightly cooler because of the moderating effects of being surrounded by water.

Although snow is possible, averaging from 3 inches in the north to less than 1/2 inch per year in the south, there are many times when years pass between snowfalls.[18] The majority of nor'easters are "born" off the coasts of the Outer Banks.

History[edit]

The Outer Banks is one of the most culturally distinctive areas of the East Coast of the United States.[19] The Outer Banks were inhabited before the arrival of Europeans, with small branches of larger tribes, such as the Algonquin speaking Chowanoke, Secotan and Poteskeet living semi-nomadic lives. Oftentimes Native Americans would use the barrier islands facing the Atlantic Ocean for fishing in the summer, and reside on Roanoke Island or the North Carolina mainland in the winter.

European explorers to the Outer Banks as far back as the 1500s noted encountering the friendly Hatteras Island and Outer Banks Natives, noting their hospitality to foreign explorers as well as their happiness and overall quality of life. European-borne diseases and migration to the mainland were likely the main causes for the decline of the Native population.[20]

Before bridges were built in the 1930s, the only form of transport between or off the islands was by boat, which allowed for the islands to stay isolated from much of the rest of the mainland. This helped to preserve the maritime culture and the distinctive Outer Banks accent or brogue, which sounds more like an English accent than it does an American accent. Many "bankers" have often been mistaken for being from England or Ireland when traveling to areas outside of the Outer Banks. The brogue is more distinctive the further south one travels on the Outer Banks, with it being the thickest on Ocracoke Island and Harkers Island.

Some residents of the Outer Banks, known as wreckers, made part of their living by scavenging wrecked ships—or by luring ships to their destruction. Horses with lanterns tied to their necks would be walked along the beach; the lanterns' up and down motion would appear to ships to represent clear water and a ship ahead; the unsuspecting captain would then drive his ship ashore following this false light.[21]Ocracoke was the last refuge of pirate Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard. It is also where the infamous pirate was killed November 22, 1718, in a fierce battle with troops from Virginia.[22]

Economy[edit]

Major industries of the region include commercial fishing, boat building and tourism. Since the 1990s, the rise of tourism has led the region to become an increasingly service-oriented economy.

Maritime industries[edit]

There has been a long history of fishing in the Outer Banks, dating back to the end of the 17th century.[23]Pirates ravaged the coast for the majority of the 1600s, but once they were ridden, the local settlers used fishing as their lifeline.[23]

In the mid-19th century, large-scale commercial fishing erupted, mostly due to the construction of the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal, which simplified shipping methods for fishermen.[23]Saltwater fishing became the cash-crop of the Outer Banks, and blossomed it into a popular tourist destination.[23] In modern times, tourists will flock to the area just for the abundance of fishing opportunities.[24] Anglers, otherwise known as fishermen, have a wide range of fishing methods, some of these methods date back to when the first settlers arrived, to choose from in the Outer Banks.[23]

Lighthouses[edit]

There are currently 6 lighthouses in the Outer Banks[25]

  • Currituck Beach Lighthouse, located in Corolla, North Carolina
  • Roanoake Marshes Lighthouse, located in Manteo, North Carolina
  • Bodie Island Lighthouse, located south of Nags Head, North Carolina
  • Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, located in Buxton, North Carolina
  • Ocracoke Island Lighthouse, located in Ocracoke, North Carolina
  • Cape Lookout Lighthouse, located in Carteret County, North Carolina

Communities[edit]

Towns and communities along the Outer Banks include (listed from north to south):

Currituck Banks[edit]

Bodie Island[edit]

Sunset over the Currituck Sound in Duck (2009)
The Bodie Island Lighthouse (October 2008)

Roanoke Island[edit]

Hatteras Island[edit]

Ocracoke Island[edit]

Core Banks[edit]

Bogue Banks[edit]

Parks[edit]

Jockey's Ridge State Park

[edit]

  • George Ackles (born 1967), professional basketball player[26]
  • Dennis Anderson (born 1960), professional Monster Truck driver and creator of Grave Digger
  • Marc Basnight (1947–2020), former member of the North Carolina State Senate
  • Emanuel Davis (born 1989), Canadian Football League defensive back[27]
  • Andy Griffith (1926–2012), actor[28]
  • Cathy Johnston-Forbes (born 1963), professional golfer[29]
  • Alexis Knapp (born 1989), actress
  • William Ivey Long (born 1947), costume designer for stage and film[30]
  • Edward Teach (1680–1718), notorious English pirate better known as "Blackbeard," raided on the North Atlantic and Caribbean Sea
  • Manteo (disappeared after 1587) influential figure in the Croatoan Nation, ambassador to England and mediator
  • Wanchese (disappeared after 1587) influential figure in the Roanoke Nation, opposed English colonization

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Campgrounds". Retrieved 1 April 2016.
  2. ^"England's First Home in the New World". Fort Raleigh National Historic Site. National Park Service.
  3. ^"Telegram from Orville Wright in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, to His Father Announcing Four Successful Flights, 1903 December 17". World Digital Library. 1903-12-17. Retrieved 2013-07-21.
  4. ^ ab"How the Outer Banks are Vanishing — and Leaving NC Defenseless Against Hurricanes". Carolina Political Review. Retrieved 2020-11-19.
  5. ^ abPEACH, SARA (July 24, 2014). "Rising Seas: Will the Outer Banks Survive?". National Geographic.
  6. ^"Geography of North Carolina". NC State Board of Education.
  7. ^"Geography of North Carolina". www.ncpublicschools.org. Retrieved 2016-04-09.
  8. ^"Library of Congress LCCN Permalink sh85096155". lccn.loc.gov. Retrieved 2016-04-10.
  9. ^ ab"North Carolina Gazetteer

    The Outer Banks Are a Perfect Year-Round Beach Destination

    Surfers in the Outer Banks. Photo: Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images

    beachist

    The Outer Banks — a 130-mile stretch of beach towns off the North Carolina coast — offer rich historical memories (it’s home to one of the first havens for freed slaves), gorgeous stretches of beaches and accompanying towns ranging from lively areas stocked with oceanside crab shacks to remote, nature-filled spots frequented mostly by year-round residents. Plus: customizable donuts, captivating bookshops, and even a handful of beer shops you can literally drive your car straight through. (Note that we’ve limited this guide to Roanoke Island and a handful of the northern beach towns.)

    Relatively mild weather means the Outer Banks are a good beach destination year-round. There’s a high season: the summer months, particularly the last two weeks of July and the first two of August, when you’ll need a miracle to score a weekend booking anywhere.

    Accommodations will be easier to find in May and September, which are known as the “newlywed and nearly dead” months (thanks to the wedding parties and empty-nesters flocking there to take advantage of lower prices and temperatures that hover around the high 70s).

    Aside from a small uptick in visitors at Thanksgiving and during the last two weeks of the year, October and the winter months are the slow season. So rates drop significantly — but far fewer restaurants, shops, and services will be available. Still, temperatures typically remain in the 50s through the winter.

    The biggest drawback to the Outer Banks is that there really isn’t an easy way to get there — you’ve just got to commit. The closest airport is Norfolk, Virginia (nonstop flights from NYC start at $259 in September), but then you have to rent a car and drive the remaining 82 scenic miles south. Or fly into Raleigh-Durham (nonstop flights start at $258), where you’ll have more airline options but a longer, 192-mile ride. We think having a car on the islands is a nonnegotiable point, but if you want to be fancy, hop a charter flight for up to five people with Outer Banks Air Charters. Leave from La Guardia or Teterboro and fly directly into Manteo on Roanoke Island ($2,150 per person). From there, Uber and Lyft are available on the Outer Banks and are your best options for getting around: There’s no public transportation, and hitchhiking is illegal. Cyclists can rent cruisers at Ocean Atlantic Rentals and can ride from Duck to Nags Head via bike paths and wide shoulders along Highway 12.

    All of the northern beaches have a great mix of footpaths, wooden crossovers/piers, and public parking. There’s no overwhelming difference among the beaches themselves, but here are a few distinguishing qualities to help you choose the best one for you. Unless otherwise noted, expect plenty of public parking and restrooms.

    Roanoke Island
    Roanoke Island doesn’t have an actual beach, but there is a waterfront marina in Manteo and various swimming holes along the Roanoke and Croatan Sounds. If you have access to a boat (rent a kayak from Kitty Hawk Kites), take a day trip to Banana Island, a long sandbar just off the northeast corner of Roanoke Island. It’s a sweet spot for some seclusion, snorkeling, swimming, and sunbathing.

    Duck
    Duck is a resort town known for its great beaches, restaurants, and shopping — and for being the most pet-friendly (dogs can be off-leash). Along the Currituck Sound, you’ll see folks kayaking, Jet-Skiing, and fishing, thanks to the flat waters. On the Atlantic Ocean side to the east, the beaches are beautiful but there’s no public parking, meaning that if you aren’t staying at either a house or hotel in Duck, you won’t be able to park near the beach. (You can park for free near the town-hall building, but there’s about a half-mile walk to the beach from there.)

    Southern Shores
    At just four miles long, Southern Shores has more natural vegetation and less commercial development than the other northern beaches. And there’s an above-average number of year-round residents, so you may find it a bit easier here to find an uncrowded spot on the beach than in the resort towns packed with summertime visitors. The beaches are public, but parking is limited to vacationers or residents who are staying in a home or property within town limits and using day passes or window stickers.

    Kitty Hawk and Kill Devil Hills
    Both Kitty Hawk and Kill Devil Hills are known for great surfing and skimboarding. Dogs are permitted on the beach but must be leashed. Kill Devil Hills is said to be the more crowded of the two because there are more hotels nearby — but it really depends on the day. Vehicles are allowed on the beach at Kill Devil Hills with a permit (from October 1 to April 30) but not allowed in Kitty Hawk.

    Nags Head
    At Nags Head, visit Jennette’s Pierand Outer Banks pier, both prime spots for fishing and to learn more about the area’s ecology. There’s also Jockey’s Ridge State Park, located on the sound side of the Highway 158 bypass, home to the tallest natural sand-dune system in the eastern United States.

    Coquina Beach
    For true seclusion, head to Coquina Beach, a stretch of undeveloped shoreline about eight miles south of Nags Head. If you have access to a four-wheel-drive vehicle, stop by the National Park Service to apply for an off-road-vehicle permit ($50/week; you need a driver’s license and vehicle registration) that’ll allow you to drive right up to the beach. If you don’t have a 4WD vehicle, just use the public parking — the route to the shore is quick and totally worth it for the quiet, unspoiled environment.

    May and September are the best months to visit the Outer Banks and score off-season pricing without sacrificing great weather. Otherwise: Book a hotel or resort at least three months in advance for the summer, especially if you want to stay over a weekend. Beach-house rentals are a whole different ball game. Our tips and recommendations, below.

    Overlooking the Manteo waterfront, the 25-room Tranquil House Inn is an elegant and peaceful haven from the bustle of the main beaches — but it’s still right in the heart of downtown Manteo and within walking distance of cute shops, restaurants, and ice-cream parlors. In the mornings, take your complimentary Continental breakfast to a rocking chair on the front porch; return from a day at the beaches to a wine reception. The 25 rooms and suites are all spacious, comfortable, and offer style preferences like canopies or four-poster beds. 1587, the property’s fine-dining restaurant, has a daily-changing menu of Atlantic seafood and dishes with ingredients sourced from Outer Banks purveyors (recent items included crab hush puppies; Pamlico Sound shrimp, etc.).

    For a taste of luxury in an otherwise low-key destination, head to the Sanderling Resort in Duck, which offers both typical hotel-style accommodations and luxurious home rentals for eight to 16 guests. It’s easily the most full-service resort in the entire Outer Banks, with direct beach access, fire pits, indoor and outdoor pools, and activities ranging from surf lessons to horseback-riding. It’s ideal for families but great even without the kids: The adults-only Tranquility pool, award-winning Spa at Sanderling, and romantic Kimball’s Kitchen restaurant are all major draws for couples.

    But the bread and butter of vacationing in the Outer Banks are vacation-home rentals, and there are a ton of agencies to choose from. First, narrow down your group size: Accommodations range from studios to gargantuan, 23-bedroom homes (the average is eight bedrooms). For your pick of the prime houses during the summer season, book at least a year early — yes, really. Agencies like Resort Realty, OBX Rentals, Village Realty, and Outer Banks Blue have decades of experience and dedicated teams to help you find the perfect house. In general, check-in and check-out days are Saturdays or Sundays with little to no exception, so for flexibility, try Kees Vacations, where you can check in to a property any day of the week with no seven-night-minimum stay. Prices vary based on size and quality: In Duck, Resort Realty offers both $17,000-a-week, oceanfront, private-pool-equipped nine-bedrooms and $1,500 four-bedrooms with decks overlooking the water. But rental rates also vary based on seasonality: Winter prices are generally a quarter of what you’d pay in mid-summer. Note that someone in your party must be 25 or older to rent a house in the Outer Banks.

    Many visitors pack beach equipment and gear, especially if they’re driving and staying in a house, but renting kayaks and surfboards is easy: Kitty Hawk Surf Co. can accommodate most of your gear needs and offers expert-led paddling and Jet-Ski tours and surfing classes. Kitty Hawk Kites is the place for hang-gliding and kite-boarding lessons.

    If your beach needs are more about lounging, head to one of the multiple locations of Super Wings for swimsuits, beach bags, and sunscreen. And pick up beach reads at two sister bookstores: Downtown Books in Manteo and Duck’s Cottage Coffee & Books in Duck. Owner Jamie Anderson places handwritten Post-It notes on her personal recommendations.

    Grab and Go
    All the beaches in the Outer Banks are alcohol-friendly, but glass is prohibited. You’ll find all of the typical grocery stores on the islands that you would on the mainland, but while you’re here, why not shop local? In Duck, pick up housemade salads and pastries plus deli meats and cheeses from Tommy’s Natural Food Market & Wine Shop, which offers the largest selection of local groceries in the Outer Banks. For fresh seafood, head to O’Neals Sea Harvest in Wanchese, on Roanoke Island. Along with the freshest local seafood like yellowfin tuna, blue crabs, and flounder to buy and prepare at home, it has an onsite restaurant: Pop in at lunchtime and order a soft-shell-crab basket ($11) to eat among the crowd of local fisherman. For North Carolina–made beer and wine, visit a Brew Thru in either Kitty Hawk, Kill Devil Hills, or Nags Head. Picture a drive-through car wash, but with coolers of beer on either side — you never leave your vehicle as workers grab whatever beverages and snacks you need to stock your cooler.

    Casual Meal
    For breakfast on the healthier side, go to The Spot in Nags Head for fruit smoothies and a wide selection of açai bowls (from $6). Art’s Place in Kitty Hawk is known for its burgers; you’re in the South, so try the one with pimento cheese ($11). John’s Drive In, also in Kitty Hawk, is a totally unassuming shack that boasts the best milkshakes in the Outer Banks (open May to October). And Duck Donuts, where you can customize your own made-to-order doughnut, is a must — choose a coating, topping, and drizzle from 24 options ($1.65). Our vote is for a glazed doughnut with crushed-Oreo topping and salted-caramel drizzle. You might cry. For tiki-bar vibes, visit Fish Heads Bar & Grill on the Outer Banks Fishing Pier for fried fish, clam and shrimp baskets, and 15-cent-steamed-shrimp happy hour from 4 to 6 p.m. Awful Arthur’s Oyster Bar is a relaxed place for straightforward raw and steamed seafood. Get a taste of it all with a steamed combo: Choose from oysters, clams, shrimp, crab legs, and lobster ($14 to $39).

    Get Dressed Up
    Feel free to define “dressed up” how you want: The most formal you’ll ever need to be in the Outer Banks is a sundress or khakis. The Lifesaving Station in Sanderling Resort is one of the only restaurants in the Outer Banks that’s open year-round. It’s housed in the historic Caffey’s Inlet life-saving station, constructed in 1874 to assist wayward passengers and crews aboard shipwrecked vessels. At dinner, the heirloom-tomato and burrata ($12) and crab-stuffed flounder ($32) are standouts. For a break from coastal cuisine, visit Ortega’z Grill in downtown Manteo for Southwestern cuisine like pork-belly tacos ($13) and bourbon and fiji-apple-juice brined smoked chicken ($19).

    A History of “Firsts”
    It’s pretty astonishing how many historic firsts took place on the Outer Banks. At Fort Raleigh on Roanoke Island, learn about the case of the Lost Colony, a group of New World settlers from England who came to the island in 1584 but had mysteriously vanished, with few clues as to their whereabouts, by 1590.

    Also at Fort Raleigh is a commemoration of the Freedmen’s Colony. Roanoke Island, controlled by the Union after 1862, became a haven for slaves in search of freedom during the Civil War. Many of the freed African-Americans were forced to leave Roanoke Island at the end of the war, but some remained and their descendants still live there today.

    In Kill Devil Hills, visit the site of the first successful airplane flights at the Wright Brothers National Memorial ($7 parking fee). In addition to the reverential monument, explore reconstructed camp buildings where the Wright brothers stayed while testing flights, as well the locations where they landed.

    Other Historic Sites
    Although not necessarily “firsts,” there are many other sites to see away from the beach. Climb the 214 steps to the top of the striped Bodie Island Lighthouse, just south of Nags Head, for 360-degree views of the Atlantic. On Roanoke Island, Island Farm ($8) is a living-history site interpreting daily life on the island in the mid-1800s, including a farmhouse, reconstructed slave cabin, cookhouse, kitchen garden, and sheep pasture. Actors in period clothing put daily life on the farm into historical context. Nearby, the Elizabethan Gardens ($9), home to more than 500 species of plants, is a beautiful, relaxing place to spend an afternoon.

    Virginia Tillett is a lifelong resident of Roanoke Island, former Dare County commissioner, and chairperson of the Freedmen’s Remembrance Committee, a local organization dedicated to preserving the history of the Roanoke Island Freedmen’s Colony. Mrs. Tillett has traced her ancestry back to the beginning of the Freedmen’s Colony in 1863.

    When I have friends come to visit, I like to plan a full itinerary for them. We start with breakfast at Darrell’s Seafood on Roanoke Island. Darrell’s was my first job, back in 1963! After breakfast, we’ll go to the North Carolina Aquarium. There’s a fantastic exhibit about Richard Ethridge, a former slave turned keeper of the first all-black U.S. lifesaving station, and his burial site is located there as well. Afterward, we’ll dip our feet in one of the swimming holes on the sound side of Roanoke Island, then go shopping in downtown Manteo. Roanoke Heritage Extended is a beautiful shop for ceramic pottery, painted furniture, and other unique items with a nautical theme.

    We’ll stop to eat again at Poor Richard’s Sandwich Shop before crossing the bridge to the main towns. One of my favorite places is the Nags Head Woods Preserve. It’s a very peaceful ecological reserve of ponds, marshes, and wetlands, and there are easy-to-navigate walking trails. For dinner, we must have the jumbo lump crab cakes at Lone Cedar Cafe in Nags Head.

    Why You Should Plan an OBX Trip for the FallИсточник: https://nymag.com/urbanist/article/outer-banks-beaches.html

    10 Shows Like Netflix's Outer Banks to Watch While Waiting for News About Season 3

    Season 2 of Netflix's Outer Bankswas insanely popular when it was released over the summer, but we still (tragically!) have no idea whether the soapy teen drama will be back for Season 3. The show follows a group of teenagers on the coast of North Carolina hunting for treasure and is as insane as it is fun to watch. We're crossing all our fingers that Netflix decides to renew it, but if you're looking for shows to hold you over, we've got you covered.

    TV Guide has curated the perfect post-Outer Banks viewing list featuring shows that are set in picturesque locales and are filled with more soap than a case of Irish Spring. So check out the list below and get to binge-watching your next great find.

    Looking for more recommendations of what to watch next? We have a ton of them! And if you're looking for more hand-picked recommendations based on shows you love, we have those too.



    Riverdale

    Come on, if we're talking ridiculous teen TV, what better example is there than Riverdale? What began as a fun, self-aware, occasionally eerie show about the trials and tribulations of being Archie Andrews (KJ Apa) with a murder mystery side-plot has since evolved into something so utterly insane it's actually really difficult to describe it in just one short paragraph. Seriously, it's gone in so many wild directions since its first season, sending some characters to prison, some to war, and getting others involved with the mafia (I'm honestly barely scratching the surface) that it absolutely earns the distinction of being TV's most "sure, why not!" show. You really have to suspend your disbelief and know how to laugh to watch this one, but if you enjoy Outer Banks, I have a feeling you already know how to do that. That said, Riverdale makes Outer Banks look normal, which is what it's so great. -Allison Picurro 

    Watch on Netflix



    Elite

    You know how you started Outer Banks Season 2 and thought, "Oh, right, the two main characters are literally on the run from the law"? The feeling you had at that moment speaks perfectly to the unhinged lunacy that each episode of Elite evokes. The Spanish-language series about three working-class friends who enroll in a luxe private school is the ideal mix of silly camp and actual high-stakes drama. The show centers around the inevitable culture clash between the new kids and their exorbitantly wealthy classmates, but there's also a murder mystery woven through the fabric of the show. While Elite deals with its share of socially relevant topics like homophobia and religion, it leans much more into its chaotic roots. If you're a fan of Outer Banks, I bet you're the kind of person who likes it when a show doesn't take itself too seriously. -Allison Picurro

    Watch on Netflix



    Panic

    Based on Lauren Oliver's novel, Panic is truly a teen drama for the ages. Set in a small town in Texas, every summer the graduating seniors take part in a series of challenges that guarantees them an escape from the place they grew up in -- something that seems impossible otherwise. And because this show needed even higher stakes, the first season is set during the summer the stakes become even higher and the rules of the game become more dangerous than ever. Think of it as The Hunger Games (making kids compete in life or death competitions) meets Outer Banks (teen summer). -Allison Picurro

    Watch on Amazon



    The Wilds

    Darker waters fill this Amazon Prime original, as The Wilds ditches the sun-soaked beaches of Outer Banks for an inhospitable deserted island in the middle of whoknowswhere. The group of teens at the center of this show is a diverse set of teenage girls on their way to a spiritual retreat that will supposedly put them back on the right track, except things go awry when their plane crashes near an island. Like Outer Banks, mystery and adventure await, as it's fairly obvious to say that there's more going on in The Wilds than just young women sorting out their stuff on an island. Flashbacks and flash-forwards give the characters depth and allow for the storytelling to tease revelations at every turn. It's Lost for the YA crowd, and that's a compliment.

    Watch on Amazon



    Dawson's Creek

    Netflix advertised Outer Banks as Dawson's Creek meets The Goonies, which if you're trying to appeal to today's youth, might not have been the best idea; have today's teens seen either of these pop culture touchstones? If not, Dawson's Creek should be the first stop after watching Outer Banks. Set in the small town of Capeside, Massachusetts (but filmed in Wilmington, North Carolina), the coming-of-age drama follows Dawson (James Van Der Beek), an aspiring filmmaker; Joey (Katie Holmes), his best friend and love interest; Pacey (Joshua Jackson), his other best friend and Joey's other love interest; and Jen (Michelle Williams), the New York transplant who lives next door, who is also Dawson's love interest, as they experience the triumphs and challenges of growing apart, growing together, and growing up. There are a lot of hormones in one place, but the WB classic took a view of teens that shows rarely did at the time, which is that their problems were just as important and just as serious as those adults were facing. This often translated to Dawson and his circle of friends speaking like adults -- sometimes pretentiously so. And while there is no search for lost gold, just a great show about the trials of young adulthood, there will likely never be another show like it. 

    Watch on Netflix



    Spinning Out

    You can think of Spinning Outas the winter version of Outer Banks, in that there is a lot of ice and snow involved and there is also so much melodrama you'll be smashing the play button for the next episode even before the credits roll. Much like John B, Kaya Scodelario's Kat Baker is on a mission, only instead of seeking out buried treasure and a missing father, she's looking to find a way back to an elite figure skating career after a dangerous fall during competition forced her to make a detour. The series, which follows Kat as she attempts to revitalize her career by becoming a pairs skater with Evan Roderick's rich and naturally talented Justin, is the perfect amount of extra for those who miss Outer Banks' sheer ridiculousness, and it even features a romance between the central duo. Beneath the sparkles and illusion netting, though, is a deeper story about a fractured family and the toll mental illness can take. Spinning Out lasted just one season, which makes it low commitment (though I firmly believe it would have been renewed if Netflix had not buried it on New Year's Day), and for real world figure skating fans, you can't beat Johnny Weir playing one half of a catty rival pairs team. 

    Watch on Netflix



    Summertime

    The best thing about Outer Banks was easily its setting, which made everyone who watched it immediately want to escape to the Carolinas (although the show was set in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, it was filmed outside of Charleston, South Carolina). The Italian dramaSummertime -- yes, sorry, you'll have to read subtitles for this one -- is equally picturesque, possibly even more so, and also features an all-consuming love story. Inspired by Federico Moccia's books and set on the Adriatic coast, the show follows Summer (Coco Rebecca Edogamhe), who longs to escape her hometown but worries about the strain it would put on her family, and Ale (Ludovico Tersigni), a former motorcycle racer who decides to explore what else life has to offer after a bad fall, as they embark on a soapy summer romance in a small beach town. While Outer Banks appeared to exist only at magic hour, Summertime sizzles in the sun, with bold, bright colors that make the seaside town's clear water even more inviting. You'll want to escape into its romantic world immediately.

    Watch on Netflix



    Ragnarok

    If the working class teens fighting against the one percent was your favorite part of Outer Banks, you might enjoy the dramatics the teens get up to in Ragnarok, a Norwegian Netflix series with an environmentalist message buried inside a story that pulls from Norse mythology. The show follows Magne (David Stakston), who is the second coming of Thor, as he fights against the Jutul Corporation, which is run by other figures from Norse mythology who look like posh and impossibly beautiful humans. They are the embodiment of corporate malfeasance and, as Norway's fifth-wealthiest family, representative of the one percent. But their factories are also polluting the beautiful and picturesque town of Edda, Norway, and Thor just ain't about that. Ragnarok might not be the greatest show ever made (honestly, if you love Outer Banks, that likely isn't a problem for you), but it's only six episodes and a breeze to watch.

    Watch on Netflix



    The O.C.

    Outer Banks wasn't the first teen soap to feature a pretty rich girl falling for a hunky guy from the wrong side of the tracks, nor was it the first to do it on a sandy beach with a rich ex-boyfriend screaming and punching people. No, that honor goes to Fox's The O.C. (honestly, it probably wasn't the first either, but go with it). Set in the wealthy town of Newport Beach, California, The O.C. follows Ryan Atwood (Benjamin McKenzie), a teen from a broken home who is adopted by his public defender (Peter Gallagher) and his wife (Kelly Rowan), gaining a quick-witted but socially awkward brother (Adam Brody) and privileged girlfriend (Mischa Barton) along the way. While no one will ever be able to explain how Brody's Seth was ever seen as a dork, the show was the perfect blend of humor, melodrama, and heart. Never better than it was in that brilliant first season, which moved at the speed of light and was backed by an excellent soundtrack, the fourth and final season was a triumphant return to form. I'm not saying it's because the show finally cut the dead weight, but I'm not not saying that either.

    Watch on HBO Max



    Blood & Treasure

    A search for buried treasure drives much of the story of Outer Banks, and if the thrill of action and adventure is what you're looking for, CBS's Blood & Treasure should be the next show on your list. The series follows an art enthusiast (Matt Barr) who teams up with a fugitive (Sofia Pernas) to catch a terrorist who funds his endeavors through stolen treasure. That sounds like a TV exec threw a lot of keywords into a bowl and pulled them out to build the premise, and it's entirely possible that's what happened. But with a nice dose of mythology, a global scale, some fun performances, and the obvious influence of Indiana Jones, the series is the perfect low-key binge for summer. While it might be predictable, that is also part of its charm; it doesn't require a whole lot of brainpower, and it's easy to sit back and allow yourself to fall into the show.

    Watch on Amazon

    Источник: https://www.tvguide.com/news/10-shows-like-outer-banks-netflix-season-3/
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As Australians who grew up by the beach near Sydney and who now live in Raleigh, we are so grateful we have awesome coastal places to escape to, and down below we are sharing our favorite things to do in OBX (Outer Banks).

Things to do in OBX, North Carolina

We recently watched the Outer Banks series on Netflix with our kids, and even though we already had an Outer Banks vacation high on our North Carolina bucket list, that show gave us the extra push to go there now!

In case you don’t know, the Outer Banks (OBX) is a 100-mile stretch of barrier islands separating the Atlantic Ocean from the mainland.

These islands are dotted with some of the best beaches in North Carolina for your beach vacation, plus quaint towns, historic lighthouses, state parks, amazing sand dunes, delicious Outer Banks restaurants, fun watersports, and unique wildlife experiences!

Body boarding fun with our kids

This destination just speaks to us as a family who love nature and the great outdoors (and seafood). And being just a 3.5 hour drive, I know it’s going to be one of our top weekend getaways from Raleigh – in all seasons!

From our recent four-day visit, we came to realize that there is no shortage of fun things to do in Outer Banks, and whilst we didn’t have time for everything we think we did a good job of maximizing our time and down below we list our top suggestions for your own OBX trip!

jennettes pier outer banks 2

Whether you’re looking for relaxing beach days or adventure, casual dining or a fcfcu online romance, stunning sunrises or sunsets, the OBX has you covered. 

Read on to discover why we think this is one of the best places to visit in North Carolina, and what you should add to your itinerary! And don’t miss california bank and trust gardena out our list of 25 cool Airbnb Outer Banks vacation rentals.

Play on the Outer Banks Beaches

Things to do in OBX with kids

Most people visit the Outer Banks in the summer months for some beach time, and as Aussies we can definitely get on board with that! 

With 100-miles of wide-open shoreline, take your pick from one of the many beautiful Outer Banks beaches.

The sand is clean, the water is a perfect temperature through summer, they’re family-friendly, and they’re not too crowded – win, first commonwealth bank ardmore boulevard we were staying right on Kill Devil Hills Beach we spent most of our time on this beach (see sunrise tips down below).

Kill Devil Hills Beach, Outer Banks

But our favorite for our kids to go body-boarding would probably be Corolla Beach for the gentle waves and it seems like you can walk out forever (see stand up paddle boarding section down below). Also Nags Head Beach near the pier was great for waves too!

Kitty Hawk is also ideal for water sports, and Duck is known as one of the most pet-friendly beaches in the US. 

But keep in mind beach and wave conditions change daily, depending on where you are on the islands. 

Lifeguards are on duty on all beaches between Memorial Day and Labor Day – be mindful of the tides and currents!

If you want calmer waters, consider one of the numerous sound front water accesses on the western side of the islands.

Jockey’s Ridge State Park

Jockey’s Ridge State Park

An Outer Banks vacation is mostly about nature and coastal experiences, but not all are water based!

We love visiting unique state parks, and Jockey’s Ridge State Park is home to the tallest sand dune system in the eastern United States and is one of the most popular things to do in OBX.

The dunes here are constantly changing shape due to wind and reach up to 100 feet high from where you get spectacular views of the Carolina coastline on one side, and Roanoke Sound on the other.

Start at the visitor center and museumto learn about the ecology, then head out to explore the massive dune system by following the 360-foot boardwalk. 

things to do in outer banks with kids 2

Popular activities here include hang gliding, sand-boarding and kite flying (bring your own), nature trails, sunset viewing, and learning to hang-glide (see santander bank brooklyn locations below about our experience).

Ranger-led programs throughout the year are mostly free, but some require pre-registration. 

And during the warmer months it is highly suggested to bring your own shoes, sun protection and plenty of water – sand dunes get HOT.

There are no entrance fees to enjoy the park. But keep in mind, this is a day-use only park with no campgrounds!

Hot Locals Tip:

Go past the sand dunes to West Soundside Rd, it goes to a nice beach on the sound where you can walk in the water forever. 

Learn How to Hand Glide (safely) at Jockey’s Ridge

Hang gliding at Jockey's Ridge State Park, OBX

Looking for fun things to do in Outer Banks? This is one of the coolest family-activities we have done in a long time. 

You’re in the area where the Wright Brothers first flew a plane, so why not learn how to fly too!

And don’t worry, it’s very safe and easy. If our 8 year old Savannah can do it, you can too!

Kitty Hawk Kites www torrid comenity com been operating hang gliding lessons since 1974 with beginner, intermediate and advanced lessons from qualified instructors – who are awesome by the way!

Hang gliding in the Outer Banks

We had so much fun learning how to launch, fly, and land on the soft sands of Jockey’s Ridge with our instructor holding a rope all the way giving you a sense of safety!

Starting from $99, standard beginner lessons last 3 hours, including 1 hour of ground school.

Definitely put this on your list of OBX things to do, it’s super cool fun!

Read our full review of Kitty Hawk hang gliding.

Book your tickets here. 

Jennette’s Pier

the black keys shes long gone alt=" Jennette's Pier, OBX">

Located in Nags Head, Jennette’s Pier stretches 1,000 feet into the Atlantic ocean and is one of the must-visit Outer Banks piers during your visit. 

What’s particularly cool about this pier is that it is powered by wind (evidenced by the windmills on it) and it has an educational center and small aquarium attached. 

I visited for some beautiful sunrise photos, and we also went swimming here in the afternoon. 

jennettes pier obx 3

This is one of the top things to do in Nags Head, and is popular for fishing, or for just taking a stroll out for great views back over the coastline. 

All day walk-on fees: Adults $2, Children $1.

Explore all the Outer Banks Piers

Avon Pier, Outer Banks

You Americans love your piers, and in the Outer Banks the piers are one of the most striking features of this coastal area – there are seven in total.

Five of the piers are located in the central Outer Banks area; three in Nags Head, one in Kitty Hawk, and one in Kill Devil Hills.

The other two OBX piers are on Hatteras Island; one in Rodanthe and the other in Avon – the 600-foot long Avon Fishing Pier was the first pier on Hatteras Island. 

outer banks things to do

Our favorite is the The Outer Banks Fishing Pier in Nags Head –  we don’t fish, but we love Fish Heads Bar & Grille at the end of the pier (see more about that down below). 

Besides fishing off the piers, beach fishing is also popular in the OBX. So if you love piers too, this is one of the best things to do in Outer Banks.

See the OBX Lighthouses

Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, Outer Banks, North Carolina

Another of the popular things to do in Outer Banks is see the iconic lighthouses. 

When I think of the OBX, one of the first things that comes to mind is the lighthouses. They have guarded the coastline here for over 200 years and have played an important role in maritime history – this area is known as the Graveyard of the Atlantic for ships for its treacherous waters.

There are five lighthouses in total and each one unique:

The easily recognizable Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, with its spiraling black and white stripes, protects one of the most hazardous sections of the Atlantic Coast and was officially completed way back in 1870.

One of the most popular OBX activities is to climb to the top of the historic Hatteras lighthouse to get stunning views from the tallest brick lighthouse in North America.

Unfortunately it was closed to climbing when we visited (August 2020 due to Rona) but you can still visit the grounds and visitors center. 

Cape Hatteras National Seashore

Cape Hatteras National Seashore

This 70-mile stretch of the Outer Banks from Bodie Island to Ocracoke Island is the country’s first national seashore.

This area is home to unique beach communities, historic lighthouses, and endless activities such as beach fishing, kiteboarding, surfing, swimming, windsurfing, crabbing, shell-collecting, kayaking and paddle boarding, camping, and  beach driving.

You can explore by vehicle, bicycle, foot, or by boat. 

We didn’t spend much time down here, concentrating most of our time on the northern islands, but stopped in at above mentioned Cape Hatteras Lighthouse and a few beaches along the drive.

Cape Hatteras

For more tips on things to do in Hatteras, go here. 

The north entrance to Cape Hatteras is located in Nags Head at the intersection of U.S. Highway 64 and NC Highway 12, and there are many roadside public pull-offs along Highway 12 with beach access. 

Hatteras Village is home to locally owned and operated restaurants. 

Go Stand Up Paddle Boarding

Stand up paddle boarding, Outer Banks, North Carolina

If you’ve been following our travels for a while, you’ll know that stand-up paddle boarding is one of our favorite family-activities.

We recently bought two inflatable BodyGlove paddle boards, and couldn’t wait to use them in the OBX.

One suggested spot from the locals was Corolla Beach due to it’s gentle waves and shallow water, and it proved to be a great spot, although my balance needs work as I kept falling off – ocean paddling is different to lake or river supping!

Stand up paddle boarding, Outer Banks, North Carolina

Another popular place for paddle boarding/kayaking is the Historic Corolla Park at the Whalehead Club – there’s a public launch spot for small boats/kayaks/SUPs and there are shallow canals to paddle in. 

In Nags Head, we got recommended West Soundside Road as another good soundside location – it’s close to Jockey’s Ridge. 

If you don’t own your own SUP boards, consider a tour. 

Drink and Eat at Fish Heads Bar and Grill

Fish Heads Bar and Grill

Listen up Santa Monica Pier. THIS is how you do a pier! 

Back in our home country of Australia, we don’t have piers at our beaches (well, very few) and Aussies are most familiar with Santa Monica Pier.

But we think that pier in LA is super tacky, crowded and just a flat out tourist trap!

We’ve also been to many other piers on our travels across the USA and we think we have found our favorite pier right here in North Carolina – the Outer Banks Fishing Pier. And it’s mostly to do with Fish Heads Bar and Grill at the end of this pier.

When we first arrived at the beach here, there was a long line waiting (social distancing) to get onto the pier and we thought, “what’s going on here?” 

Turns out, it was happy hour shrimp at Fish Heads which means 15 CENT SHRIMP between 4pm – 6pm. We put our names down immediately!

fish heads

Not only that, but Fish Heads offers a great beer selection (40 beers in total), killer ocean views, chilled local vibe and music, and serves breakfast, lunch and dinner. 

Don’t miss it. This is a super cool local spot, and one of our best memories from our Outer Banks vacation!

Wright Brothers National Memorial

You’re in the place that had the first successful Wright Brothers flight, and if you value airplane travel like us, why not go and honor the birthplace of flying at the Wright Brothers National Memorial

In case you don’t know, the Wright Brothers (Orville and Wilbur) piloted four successful flights with their powered, heavier-than-air flying machine in Kitty Hawk, and you can visit the historic site to see a monument.

You can also see the historic sand dune where they did most of their gliding, and the location they lived whilst experimenting.

Unfortunately the Visitor Center and ranger talks are currently closed until at least September 11, 2020 (due to Rona), but the outdoor area is open.

Check the website for up to date info and costs.

Since we’d been here before, we decided to skip it on this visit, but if you haven’t been it’s one of the must do OBX attractions.

Watch a Sunrise by the Ocean

Sunrise at Kill Devil Hills Beach

Sunrise in the Outer Banks is definitely worth getting up for! 

We know, when you’re on vacation rolling out of bed early can be tough. But we’re always grateful when we make the effort, especially when rewarded with a stunning sunrise like this at Kill Devil Hills Beach.

Sunrise is actually one of our favorite times of day. It’s peaceful, our kids are usually still asleep, and it just gives us so much more time in the day to do things. 

HOT TIP: 

When staying in the OBX do your best to stay on the ocean so you can just roll out of bed and walk onto the beach, or even sit on your deck and watch the magic happen!

Sunset Drinks at Miller’s Waterfront Restaurant

Miller's Waterfront Restaurant, OBX

Looking for one of those famous OBX sunsets? You can’t go wrong here. 

Miller’s is actually a highly recommended place to eat with a lot of positive reviews, but we felt our food fell a little flat. We dined downstairs in the restaurant, but next time we’d like to try upstairs at the Sunset Bar & Grill.

However, the sunset stole the show and at the very least come here for sunset drinks, sit outside on the grass area and watch the magic happen over the sound – it seems to be an Outer Banks tradition.

Go Surfing

Surfers waiting for a set at Nags Head

Looking to carve up some waves? The Outer Banks are known for having the largest waves on the East Coast of the US and is well known by surfers around the world.

Because the OBX coastline is uniquely situated, it receives swells from multiple directions with wintertime conan the barbarian tv show amazon excellent conditions along the east facing beaches, whilst summertime swells sweep into the south side beaches.

Kitty Hawk Beach and Kill Devil Hills Beach are known for goodwave surfing (and skimboarding), and typically have the biggest waves of the Northern Beaches.

We saw a few surfers enjoying the waves near Nags Head Pier, and a frequent visitor told us that Cape Hatteras has the best surfing when it’s on. 

Want to learn how to surf? Consider a surfing lesson in OBX.

Explore Manteo

manteo obx 1

Manteo was our first stop when we arrived in the Outer Banks driving in from Raleigh, and it’s definitely worth a look.

We found it to be much quieter than other places in OBX with a few interesting points of interest. 

There’s a nice waterfront area to walk along – the town wraps around Shallowbag Bay on the eastern side of Roanoke Island. 

Way back in 1587, 117 English men, women and children came ashore on Roanoke Island to establish the first English settlement. But, In 1590, when English ships returned, they found the island deserted, hence the name the Lost Colony. 

In normal times, there’s a Lost Colony Drama performed on the site but this season obx beach cancelled due to the pandemic. 

The small main street has a few shops and the Lost Colony Brewery (we had lunch here – the burgers are good). 

Lost Colony Brewery

Other highly suggested OBX attractions here is the Roanoke Island Maritime Museum and the Elizabethan Gardens

Outer Banks Brewing Station

Outer Banks Brewing Station

We are always up for a good brewery, especially a family-friendly one, and the Outer Banks Brewing Station in Kill Devil Hills is a must-visit. 

This brewery is the first wind-powered brewery in America – how cool is that – and there’s a great beer garden obx beach out the back with plenty of room for the kids to run around.

The draft beer selection selection is top notch (I suggest the LemonGrass Wheat Ale or Hugh Hefeweizen), plus there’s wine and specialty cocktails.

Outer Banks Brewing Station

The food is well above average, and they have live music – what’s not to love. In “normal times” there’s a jam-packed events calendar. Check their website for current events.

Walk the Duck Boardwalk

Duck Boardwalk

This was one of the top recommended things to do in Duck NC, but I think we did this at the wrong time, just after lunch on a HOT day and I’m guessing this would be best to do either early morning or early evening at sunset.

Regardless, it’s a pretty walk and easy for kids and stretches 0.6 miles. with plenty of places to stop and eat near the water (eat at NC Coast Grill & Bar by the way), their poutine and fish tacos are incredible.

The boardwalk begins at the southern end of the Village near Christopher Drive and continues to end at the Waterfront Shops

Best accessed from Town Park and other locations throughout the Town’s Village Commercial District.

Donutz on a Stick

Donutz on a Stick, Outer Banks, North Carolina

Ok guys. When most donut lovers visit the Outer Banks, they go to the original Duck Donuts in the town of Care credit bill pay, we promised our kids a visit too (even though we can walk to a Duck Donuts near our house in Cary). 

But when I typed in the address in Google maps, it said the store closed at 1pm (it closes at 1pm each day) which I thought was crazy!

Luckily, one of our very good local followers on Instagram who had been providing excellent tips during our stay, suggested we go to Donutz on a Stick. He said it’s family-owned, not super busy, and better! And it turned out to be a great suggestion, trust us, our kids will tell you!

They serve up made to order donuts and donut sundaes which our kids had (two donuts topped with ice cream and whipped cream). 

Plus sandwiches, gluten-free and vegan offerings, coffee, espresso, gifts and souvenirs.

We even got severed by David, the owner, and he is a super nice guy. Tell him we sent you, and be sure to put this on your list of things to do in the Outer Banks with kids!

Breakfast at Fresh Fit Cafe

Fresh Fit Cafe, OBX

Come for the healthy food, stay for the awesome water views! 

We’re pretty health conscious with our diet, and we particularly like to start off our day with a healthy breakfast and we’re glad we found this place during our research.

Freshfit Cafe is located on the Nags Head-Manteo Causeway and is a health-oriented cafe and juice bar.

They serve breakfast and lunch daily with an awesome waterfront setting, and we thoroughly enjoyed our hearty omelettes – one of the best we’ve had actually!

Also on the menu is organic coffee, espresso, a full juice bar, detox drinks and smoothies, and they accommodate vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free diets.

Mulligan’s Grille in Historic Cottage Row

Mulligan's OBX

This place is cool, and as soon as we walked in we had the feeling, “yeah, this could be our local”. 

Mulligan’s offers several dining and drinking areas, but we ate in the casual and chilled Tiki Bar upstairs (we love Tiki bars). 

With distant views of the beach, fresh coastal breezes, and a fun vibe, it was hard to leave and could have sat there for hours.

The burgers are great, they have good local seafood, there’s a nice selection of beers, a downstairs bar, and indoor and outdoor seating with views of Jockey’s Ridge (Note: Mulligan’s is operating under current Covid restrictions).   

Car Beach Driving

Outer Banks, North Carolina

If you want to go beach driving, it’s another of the popular OBX things to do and offers a fun and different perspective for exploring the ocean beaches.

Beach driving is allowed year round on Hatteras Island, and October 1-April 30 in Nags Head and Kill Devil Hills.

For current Cape Hatteras Off Road Vehicle (ORV) use, click here. For Nags Head here, and Kill Devil Hills here. 

More Things to Do in OBX

As mentioned, we only had four days for our Outer Banks vacation, so missed many things. 

Below are highly suggested OBX activities and places to eat in Outer Banks from locals in the know, and the tourism board, that we plan to tick off on a return visit:

If you didn’t previously know what to do in Outer Banks, I hope this post helps you with your own planning to visit Outer Banks. 

We’ll definitely be back many times, so why not join our email community and bank of america 14th street washington dc us on Instagram to see what we get up to on future visits, and all our other North Carolina adventures!

Pin Below To Save To Pinterest:

  • Don't visit North Carolina without considering the Outer Banks. Here you will find some of the best beaches in North Carolina, fresh seafood, wildlife, sunrises and sunsets, and fun for all the family. Here are 20 of the best things to do in the Outer Banks for your Outer Banks vacation.
  • When you visit North Carolina, don't miss the Outer Banks. Here you will find some of the best beaches in North Carolina, fresh seafood, wildlife, sunrises and sunsets, and fun for all the family. Here are 20 of the best things to do in the Outer Banks NC.

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Источник: https://thisisraleigh.com/things-to-do-in-obx/
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See all 3,683 pet friendly apartments in Oklahoma City, OK currently available for rent. Accepting new appointments. 2018 Pets allowed only at specific locations; restrictions and fees may apply. Oklahoma city no lease, no credit check, no deposit. Energy rating e. Looking for a pet-friendly apartment? With pet-centric perks and amenities, Boardwalk is the perfect choice for cat and dog lovers looking for a new  In the final days of BC's Rental Housing Task Force, Pets OK BC has been given a stakeholder consultation meeting, to communicate their analysis and  Learn more about the cat- and dog-friendly apartments in Philadelphia available from We love your pets, and they love living the Lindy lifestyle in our  Are you looking for a pet-friendly vacation rental in Vista Cay? Pets are allowed at Vista Cay Resort, but it will depend on the home you are renting as to  Moving does not mean losing your pets! If you need to move for any reason, DO NOT leave your pet behind or let them go into the streets. 1,293 square feet ft². org/pet-friendly-housing-resources Pet-friendly rental properties in the Portland, OR area ». Call the property manager for  26 dic. Contains 3D Tour. Find a Pet-Friendly rental in Oklahoma City with Apartment Guide. Sponsored. 2020 Take note that rental properties might stipulate certain breeds of dog are not allowed or limited by weight. Maximum weight of 80 lbs. $950 /month. Rental Unit in Yorkville. Your Best Friend Needs a Vacation Too -- Book a Pet-friendly Rental Today!Your pets are very welcome at these Silver Sands Vacation Rental Properties! We understand the importance of vacationing with the whole family and that includes your dog (and your cat, in some cottages). favorite this post Sep 18. Fortunately, you don't have to worry about pet sitters or kennels when you vacation with us, as Sun Realty offers the largest selection of pet-friendly vacation rentals along the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Find properties for rent listings at the best price. Rent. Apartments can be quite large, but pet-friendly apartments tend to be a bit more spacious by default. Sample letters of recommendation for landlords »  1. obx beach House, Bedroom(s): 4, Max Guests: 12. com listing has verified availability, rental rates, photos, floor plans and more. Pet Friendly Apartments for Rent island chain, United States". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 2016-04-10.
  • ^"Corolla History". Retrieved 1 April 2016.
  • ^"Shoring Up N. Carolina Islands: A Losing Battle?". Retrieved 1 April 2016.
  • ^"Monkey Island Sabal Minor". Old Dominion University. Retrieved 1 November 2013.
  • ^"Gary's Nursery". Gary Hollar. Retrieved 1 November 2013.
  • ^"Elizabethan Gardens - Welcome to Our Lovely Gardens". Elizabethan Gardens. Retrieved 1 April 2016.
  • ^Dough, Wynne. "Yaupon". NCpedia. Retrieved 24 January 2017.
  • ^"Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge VA Weather Forecast". WillyWeather. Retrieved 3 September 2019.
  • ^Wolfram, Walt; Reaser, Jeffrey (2014). Talkin' Tar Heel : How Our Voices Tell the Story of North Carolina. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press. p. 101. ISBN .
  • ^"First Settlers". OuterBanks.com.
  • ^"Graveyard of the Atlantic - North Carolina Digital History". Retrieved 1 April 2016.
  • ^D. Moore. (1997) "A General History of Blackbeard the Pirate, the Queen Anne's Revenge and the Adventure". In Tributaries, Volume VII, 1997. pp. 31–35. (North Carolina Maritime History Council)
  • ^ abcde"Gloucester vs. Outer Banks". National Geographic Channel. Retrieved 1 April 2016.
  • ^"Outer Banks Fishing". The Outer Banks of North Carolina. Retrieved 21 January 2016.
  • ^"Outer Banks Lighthouses". OuterBanks.com.
  • ^DraftExpress - George Ackles
  • ^Emanuel Davis retires from CFL. thecoastlandtimes.com. Retrieved Aug 3, 2020.
  • ^Vincent, Mal (February 17, 2008). "The real Andy Griffith lives among us, quietly". The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved September 20, 2009.
  • ^Cathy Johnston Forbes – Greater Wilmington Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved Aug 31, 2020.
  • ^Speckman, Emma. (Mar 6, 2018). Get inside the mind (and studio) of one of NC’s most prolific creators, costume designer William Ivey Long. Charlotte Five. Retrieved Aug 3, 2020.
  • External links[edit]

    Media related to Outer Banks at Wikimedia Commons Outer Banks travel guide from Wikivoyage

    Coordinates: 35°22′25″N75°29′43″W / 35.37365°N 75.49530°W / 35.37365; -75.49530

    Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outer_Banks

    Outer Banks

    Barrier islands in North Carolina, U.S.

    For the 2020 TV series, see Outer Banks (TV series).

    The Outer Banks, separating the Atlantic Ocean (east) from Currituck and Albemarle Sounds (north) and Pamlico Sound (south)

    The Outer Banks (frequently abbreviated OBX) are a 200-mile (320 km) string of barrier islands and spits off the coast of North Carolina and southeastern Virginia, on the east coast of the United States. They line most of the North Carolina coastline, separating Currituck Sound, Albemarle Sound, and Pamlico Sound from the Atlantic Ocean. A major tourist destination, the Outer Banks are known for their wide expanse of open beachfront and the Cape Hatteras National Seashore.[1] The seashore and surrounding ecosystem are important biodiversity zones, including beach grasses and shrubland that help maintain the form of the land.

    The Outer Banks were sites of early European settlement in the United States and remain important economic and cultural sites. Most notably the English Roanoke Colony vanished from Roanoke Island in 1587 and was the first location where an English person, Virginia Dare, was born in the Americas.[2] The hundreds of shipwrecks along the Outer Banks have given the surrounding seas the nickname Graveyard of the Atlantic. The Outer Banks were also home to the Wright brothers' first flight in a controlled, powered, heavier-than-air vehicle on December 17, 1903, at Kill Devil Hills.[3] During the 20th obx beach the region became increasingly important for coastal tourism.

    The Outer Banks are particularly vulnerable to sea level rise and coastal erosion, compounding existing coastal erosion caused by poor coastal management and construction practices.[4] In some locations on the banks, sea levels rose 5 inches from 2011 to 2015.[4] Some sections have significantly eroded already, with portions of Hatteras Island at 25% of its original width as of 2014.[5]Tropical storms like Hurricane Irene in 2011 have already destroyed significant infrastructure and property.[5]

    Terminology[edit]

    The term "Outer Banks" refers to the islands, shoals, and spits from Cape Lookout northward, including Core Banks, and is frequently abbreviated OBX on regional tourism marketing. In recent decades, the beaches to the south of Cape Lookout have been marketing themselves as the "Southern Outer Banks", including the marketing as SOBX; this region includes the Crystal Coast beaches of Bogue Banks. The term Inner Banks and IBX is a similarly new term to refer to the mainland communities along Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds.

    Geography[edit]

    The Outer Banks is a string of peninsulas and barrier islands separating the Atlantic Ocean from mainland North Carolina. From north to south, the largest of these include: Bodie Island (which used to be an island but is now a peninsula due to tropical storms and hurricanes that closed inlets that separated it from the Currituck Banks), Pea Island (which has, at times, been contiguous with neighboring Bodie Island or Hatteras Island), Hatteras Island, Ocracoke Island, Portsmouth Island, and the Core Banks.[6] Over time, the exact number of islands and inlets changes as new inlets are opened up, often during a breach created during violent storms, and older inlets close, usually due to gradually shifting sands during the dynamic processes of beach evolution.

    The Outer Banks stretch southward from Sandbridge in Virginia Beach down the North Carolina coastline. Sources differ regarding the southern terminus of the Outer Banks. The most extensive definition includes the state's three prominent capes: Cape Hatteras, Cape Lookout, and Cape Fear.[7][8] Other sources limit the definition to two capes (Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout) and coastal areas in four counties (Currituck County, Dare County, Hyde County, and Carteret County).[9] Some authors exclude Carteret's Bogue Banks; others exclude the county entirely.[9][10][11]

    The northern part of the Outer Banks, from Oregon Inlet northward, is actually a part of the North American mainland, since the northern inlets of Bodie Island and Currituck Banks no longer exist.[12] It is separated by the Currituck Sound and the Intracoastal Waterway, which passes through the Great Dismal Swamp occupying much of the mainland west of the Outer Obx beach. Road access to the northern Outer Banks is cut off between Sandbridge and Corolla, North Carolina, with communities such as Carova Beach accessible only by four-wheel drive vehicles. North Carolina State Highway 12 links most of the popular Outer Banks communities in this section of the coast. The easternmost point is Rodanthe Pier in Rodanthe, NC.

    Aerial view of Outer banks (looking north), with sound on the left and ocean on the right

    The Outer Banks are not anchored to offshore coral reefs like some other barrier islands, and as a consequence, they often suffer significant beach erosion during major storms. In fact, their location jutting out into the Atlantic makes them the most hurricane-prone area north of Florida, for both landfalling storms and brushing storms offshore. Hatteras Island was cut in half on September 18, 2003, when Hurricane Isabel washed a 2,000 feet (600 m) wide and 15 feet (5 m) deep channel called Isabel Inlet through the community of Hatteras Village on the southern end of the island.[13] The tear was subsequently repaired and restored by sand dredging by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It was cut off once again in 2011 by Hurricane Irene. Access to the island was largely limited to boat access only from August to late October until another temporary bridge could be built.

    Three state highway bridges connect obx beach Outer Banks to the mainland, the Wright Memorial Bridge, the oldest (built in 1930, rehabilitated in 1966), carries US 158 between Point Harbor and Kitty Hawk. William B. Umstead Bridge, the second oldest (built in 1957, rehabilitated in 1966), carries US 64 between Manns Harbor on the mainland and Manteo on Roanoke Island. The newest bridge, the Virginia Dare Memorial Bridge, was completed in 2002 and carries US 64 Bypass between Manns Harbor and Roanoke Island between Manteo and Wanchese. The Melvin R. Daniels Bridge carries US 64 between Roanoke Island and Nags Head. At Whalebone Junction, the three main highways of the Outer Banks (NC 12, US 158, and US 64) all meet. Additionally, NC 615 serves as the main route along Knotts Island in the extreme north; it connects only to Virginia by land.

    A number of ferries maintained by the North Carolina Department of Transportation Ferry Division also serve the Outer Banks. From north to south, these are the Knotts Island-Currituck Ferry, the Hatteras-Ocracoke Ferry, the Swan Quarter-Ocracoke Ferry, and the Cedar Island-Ocracoke Ferry. Additionally, a semi-regular emergency ferry often runs from Stumpy Point to Rodanthe to serve travelers due to frequent wash-outs of NC 12 between Nags Head and Rodanthe. Additionally, private ferries are commissioned by the National Park Service to access certain islands within the National Seashores along the outer banks, these include ferries to Portsmouth Island, to Cape Lookout Lighthouse, and various locations along Core Banks and Shackleford Banks.

    Ecology[edit]

    Vegetation[edit]

    The vegetation of the Outer Banks has biodiversity, although it is considered the northern limit for many southern plants such as wild scrub palms. In the northern part of the Outer Banks, from Virginia Beach southward past the North Carolina border to Cape Hatteras, the main types of vegetation are sea grasses, beach grasses and other beach plants including Opuntia humifusa on the Atlantic side and wax myrtles, bays, and grasses on the Sound side with areas of pine and Spanish moss-covered live oaks. Yucca aloifolia and Yucca gloriosa can be found growing wild here in the northern parts of its range on the beach. Dwarf palmettos were once indigenous to the entire Outer Banks, and they are still successfully planted and grown. Its current most northerly known native stand is on Monkey Island in Currituck County.[14][15]

    From Cape Hatteras National Seashore southward, the vegetation does include dwarf palmetto (Sabal minor), Yucca aloifolia and Yucca gloriosa; however, the area also has Cabbage palmetto (Sabal palmetto), which can be walmart money transfer service hours in the north, although they are native fcbc church pastor the southern part of the Outer Banks, specifically prevalent from Cape Hatteras and all points southward. Pindo palms and windmill palms are also planted widely throughout capital one atm bank near me Outer Banks; although, they are not indigenous to the area.

    A wide variety of native plants can be found at the Elizabethan Gardens in Manteo on Roanoke Island.[16]

    The Outer Banks are home to Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria), the roasted leaves of which were brewed into a high caffeine beverage called black drink by the Native Americans. The Outer Banks may be one of the few places where it is still consumed.[17]

    Animal life[edit]

    The islands are home to herds of feral horses, sometimes called "banker ponies", which according to local legend are descended from Spanish mustangs washed ashore centuries ago in shipwrecks. Populations are found on Ocracoke Island, Shackleford Banks, Currituck Banks, and in the Rachel Carson Estuarine Sanctuary.

    Climate[edit]

    The Outer Banks has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa). The outer banks have unusual weather patterns because of their unique geographical location. As the islands jut out from the eastern seaboard into the Atlantic Gulf Stream, the Outer Banks has a predisposition to be affected by hurricanes, Nor'easters (usually in the form of rain, and rarely snow or mixed precipitation), and other ocean-driven storms. The hardiness zone is 8b.

    The winters are typically milder than in inland areas, averaging lows in the upper 30s and highs in the lower 50s, and are more frequently overcast than in the summer. However, the exposure of the Outer Banks makes them prone to higher winds, often causing wind chills to make the apparent temperature as cold as the inland areas. The summer months average lows from the mid-70s to highs in the upper 80s, depending on the time of the summer. The spring and fall are typically milder seasons. The fall and winter are usually warmer than areas inland, while the spring and the summer are often slightly cooler because of the moderating effects of being surrounded by water.

    Although snow is possible, averaging from 3 inches in the north to less than 1/2 inch per year in the south, there are many times when years pass between snowfalls.[18] The majority of nor'easters are "born" off the coasts of the Outer How to get a balance transfer card with bad credit.

    History[edit]

    The Outer Banks is one of the most culturally distinctive areas of the East Coast of the United States.[19] The Outer Banks were inhabited before the arrival of Europeans, with small branches of larger tribes, such as the Algonquin speaking Chowanoke, Secotan and Poteskeet living semi-nomadic lives. Oftentimes Native Americans would use the barrier islands facing the Atlantic Ocean for fishing in the summer, and reside on Roanoke Island or the North Carolina mainland in the winter.

    European explorers to the Outer Banks as far back as the 1500s noted encountering the friendly Hatteras Island and Outer Banks Natives, noting their hospitality to foreign explorers as well as their happiness and overall quality of life. European-borne diseases and migration to the mainland were likely the main causes for the decline of the Native population.[20]

    Before bridges were built in the 1930s, the only form of transport between or off the islands was by boat, which allowed for the islands to stay isolated from much of the rest of the mainland. This helped to preserve the maritime culture and the distinctive Outer Banks accent or brogue, which sounds more like an English accent than it does an American accent. Many "bankers" have often been mistaken for being from England or Ireland when traveling to areas outside of the Outer Banks. The brogue is more distinctive the further south one travels on the Outer Banks, with it being the thickest on Ocracoke Island and Harkers Island.

    Some residents of the Outer Banks, known as wreckers, how to pay my tmobile phone bill online part of their living by scavenging wrecked ships—or by luring ships to their destruction. Horses with lanterns tied to their necks would be walked along the beach; the lanterns' up and down motion would appear to ships to represent clear water and a ship ahead; the unsuspecting captain would then drive his ship ashore following this false light.[21]Ocracoke was the last refuge of pirate Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard. It is also where the infamous pirate was killed November 22, 1718, in a fierce battle with troops from Virginia.[22]

    Economy[edit]

    Major industries of the region include commercial fishing, boat building and tourism. Since the 1990s, the rise of tourism has led the region to become an increasingly service-oriented economy.

    Maritime industries[edit]

    There has been a long history of fishing in the Outer Banks, dating back to the end of the 17th century.[23]Pirates ravaged the coast for the majority of the 1600s, but once they were ridden, the local settlers used fishing as their lifeline.[23]

    In the mid-19th century, large-scale commercial fishing erupted, mostly due to the construction of the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal, which simplified shipping methods for fishermen.[23]Saltwater fishing became the cash-crop of the Outer Banks, and what time does ollies open today it into a popular tourist destination.[23] In modern times, tourists will flock to the area just for the abundance of fishing opportunities.[24] Anglers, otherwise known as fishermen, have a wide range of fishing methods, some of these methods date back to when the first settlers arrived, to choose from in the Outer Banks.[23]

    Lighthouses[edit]

    There are currently 6 lighthouses in the Outer Banks[25]

    • Currituck Beach Lighthouse, located in Corolla, North Carolina
    • Roanoake Marshes Lighthouse, located in Manteo, North Carolina
    • Bodie Island Lighthouse, located south of Nags Head, North Carolina
    • Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, located in Buxton, North Carolina
    • Ocracoke Island Lighthouse, located in Ocracoke, North Carolina
    • Cape Lookout Lighthouse, located in Carteret County, North Carolina

    Communities[edit]

    Towns and communities along the Outer Banks include (listed from north to south):

    Currituck Banks[edit]

    Bodie Island[edit]

    Sunset over the Currituck Sound in Duck (2009)
    The Bodie Island Lighthouse (October 2008)

    Roanoke Island[edit]

    Hatteras Island[edit]

    Ocracoke Island[edit]

    Core Banks[edit]

    Bogue Banks[edit]

    Parks[edit]

    Jockey's Ridge State Park

    [edit]

    • George Ackles (born 1967), professional basketball player[26]
    • Dennis Anderson (born 1960), professional Monster Truck driver and creator of Grave Digger
    • Marc Basnight (1947–2020), former member of the North Carolina State Senate
    • Emanuel Davis (born 1989), Canadian Football League defensive back[27]
    • Andy Griffith (1926–2012), actor[28]
    • Cathy Johnston-Forbes (born 1963), professional golfer[29]
    • Alexis Knapp (born 1989), actress
    • William Ivey Long (born 1947), costume designer for stage and film[30]
    • Edward Teach (1680–1718), notorious English pirate better known as "Blackbeard," raided on the North Atlantic and Caribbean Sea
    • Manteo (disappeared after 1587) influential figure in the Croatoan Nation, ambassador to England and mediator
    • Wanchese (disappeared after 1587) influential figure in the Roanoke Nation, opposed English colonization

    See also[edit]

    References[edit]

    1. ^"Campgrounds". Retrieved 1 April 2016.
    2. ^"England's First Home in the New World". Fort Raleigh National Historic Site. National Park Service.
    3. ^"Telegram from Orville Wright in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, to His Father Announcing Four Successful Flights, 1903 December 17". World Digital Library. 1903-12-17. Retrieved 2013-07-21.
    4. ^ ab"How the Outer Banks are Vanishing — and Leaving NC Defenseless Against Hurricanes". Carolina Political Review. Retrieved 2020-11-19.
    5. ^ abPEACH, SARA (July 24, 2014). "Rising Seas: Will the Outer Banks Survive?". National Geographic.
    6. ^"Geography of North Carolina". NC State Board of Education.
    7. ^"Geography of North Carolina". www.ncpublicschools.org. Retrieved 2016-04-09.
    8. ^"Library of Congress LCCN Permalink sh85096155". lccn.loc.gov. Retrieved 2016-04-10.
    9. ^ ab"North Carolina Gazetteer

      Obx beach -

      island chain, United States". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 2016-04-10.
    10. ^"Corolla History". Retrieved 1 April 2016.
    11. ^"Shoring Up N. Carolina Islands: A Losing Battle?". Retrieved 1 April 2016.
    12. ^"Monkey Island Sabal Minor". Old Dominion University. Retrieved 1 November 2013.
    13. ^"Gary's Nursery". Gary Hollar. Retrieved 1 November 2013.
    14. ^"Elizabethan Gardens - Welcome to Our Lovely Gardens". Elizabethan Gardens. Retrieved 1 April 2016.
    15. ^Dough, Wynne. "Yaupon". NCpedia. Retrieved 24 January 2017.
    16. ^"Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge VA Weather Forecast". WillyWeather. Retrieved 3 September 2019.
    17. ^Wolfram, Walt; Reaser, Jeffrey (2014). Talkin' Tar Heel : How Our Voices Tell the Story of North Carolina. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press. p. 101. ISBN .
    18. ^"First Settlers". OuterBanks.com.
    19. ^"Graveyard of the Atlantic - North Carolina Digital History". Retrieved 1 April 2016.
    20. ^D. Moore. (1997) "A General History of Blackbeard the Pirate, the Queen Anne's Revenge and the Adventure". In Tributaries, Volume VII, 1997. pp. 31–35. (North Carolina Maritime History Council)
    21. ^ abcde"Gloucester vs. Outer Banks". National Geographic Channel. Retrieved 1 April 2016.
    22. ^"Outer Banks Fishing". The Outer Banks of North Carolina. Retrieved 21 January 2016.
    23. ^"Outer Banks Lighthouses". OuterBanks.com.
    24. ^DraftExpress - George Ackles
    25. ^Emanuel Davis retires from CFL. thecoastlandtimes.com. Retrieved Aug 3, 2020.
    26. ^Vincent, Mal (February 17, 2008). "The real Andy Griffith lives among us, quietly". The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved September 20, 2009.
    27. ^Cathy Johnston Forbes – Greater Wilmington Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved Aug 31, 2020.
    28. ^Speckman, Emma. (Mar 6, 2018). Get inside the mind (and studio) of one of NC’s most prolific creators, costume designer William Ivey Long. Charlotte Five. Retrieved Aug 3, 2020.

    External links[edit]

    Media related to Outer Banks at Wikimedia Commons Outer Banks travel guide from Wikivoyage

    Coordinates: 35°22′25″N75°29′43″W / 35.37365°N 75.49530°W / 35.37365; -75.49530

    Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outer_Banks
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    The Outer Banks Are a Perfect Year-Round Beach Destination

    Surfers in the Outer Banks. Photo: Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images

    beachist

    The Outer Banks — a 130-mile stretch of beach towns off the North Carolina coast — offer rich historical memories (it’s home to one of the first havens for freed slaves), gorgeous stretches of beaches and accompanying towns ranging from lively areas stocked with oceanside crab shacks to remote, nature-filled spots frequented mostly by year-round residents. Plus: customizable donuts, captivating bookshops, and even a handful of beer shops you can literally drive your car straight through. (Note that we’ve limited this guide to Roanoke Island and a handful of the northern beach towns.)

    Relatively mild weather means the Outer Banks are a good beach destination year-round. There’s a high season: the summer months, particularly the last two weeks of July and the first two of August, when you’ll need a miracle to score a weekend booking anywhere.

    Accommodations will be easier to find in May and September, which are known as the “newlywed and nearly dead” months (thanks to the wedding parties and empty-nesters flocking there to take advantage of lower prices and temperatures that hover around the high 70s).

    Aside from a small uptick in visitors at Thanksgiving and during the last two weeks of the year, October and the winter months are the slow season. So rates drop significantly — but far fewer restaurants, shops, and services will be available. Still, temperatures typically remain in the 50s through the winter.

    The biggest drawback to the Outer Banks is that there really isn’t an easy way to get there — you’ve just got to commit. The closest airport is Norfolk, Virginia (nonstop flights from NYC start at $259 in September), but then you have to rent a car and drive the remaining 82 scenic miles south. Or fly into Raleigh-Durham (nonstop flights start at $258), where you’ll have more airline options but a longer, 192-mile ride. We think having a car on the islands is a nonnegotiable point, but if you want to be fancy, hop a charter flight for up to five people with Outer Banks Air Charters. Leave from La Guardia or Teterboro and fly directly into Manteo on Roanoke Island ($2,150 per person). From there, Uber and Lyft are available on the Outer Banks and are your best options for getting around: There’s no public transportation, and hitchhiking is illegal. Cyclists can rent cruisers at Ocean Atlantic Rentals and can ride from Duck to Nags Head via bike paths and wide shoulders along Highway 12.

    All of the northern beaches have a great mix of footpaths, wooden crossovers/piers, and public parking. There’s no overwhelming difference among the beaches themselves, but here are a few distinguishing qualities to help you choose the best one for you. Unless otherwise noted, expect plenty of public parking and restrooms.

    Roanoke Island
    Roanoke Island doesn’t have an actual beach, but there is a waterfront marina in Manteo and various swimming holes along the Roanoke and Croatan Sounds. If you have access to a boat (rent a kayak from Kitty Hawk Kites), take a day trip to Banana Island, a long sandbar just off the northeast corner of Roanoke Island. It’s a sweet spot for some seclusion, snorkeling, swimming, and sunbathing.

    Duck
    Duck is a resort town known for its great beaches, restaurants, and shopping — and for being the most pet-friendly (dogs can be off-leash). Along the Currituck Sound, you’ll see folks kayaking, Jet-Skiing, and fishing, thanks to the flat waters. On the Atlantic Ocean side to the east, the beaches are beautiful but there’s no public parking, meaning that if you aren’t staying at either a house or hotel in Duck, you won’t be able to park near the beach. (You can park for free near the town-hall building, but there’s about a half-mile walk to the beach from there.)

    Southern Shores
    At just four miles long, Southern Shores has more natural vegetation and less commercial development than the other northern beaches. And there’s an above-average number of year-round residents, so you may find it a bit easier here to find an uncrowded spot on the beach than in the resort towns packed with summertime visitors. The beaches are public, but parking is limited to vacationers or residents who are staying in a home or property within town limits and using day passes or window stickers.

    Kitty Hawk and Kill Devil Hills
    Both Kitty Hawk and Kill Devil Hills are known for great surfing and skimboarding. Dogs are permitted on the beach but must be leashed. Kill Devil Hills is said to be the more crowded of the two because there are more hotels nearby — but it really depends on the day. Vehicles are allowed on the beach at Kill Devil Hills with a permit (from October 1 to April 30) but not allowed in Kitty Hawk.

    Nags Head
    At Nags Head, visit Jennette’s Pierand Outer Banks pier, both prime spots for fishing and to learn more about the area’s ecology. There’s also Jockey’s Ridge State Park, located on the sound side of the Highway 158 bypass, home to the tallest natural sand-dune system in the eastern United States.

    Coquina Beach
    For true seclusion, head to Coquina Beach, a stretch of undeveloped shoreline about eight miles south of Nags Head. If you have access to a four-wheel-drive vehicle, stop by the National Park Service to apply for an off-road-vehicle permit ($50/week; you need a driver’s license and vehicle registration) that’ll allow you to drive right up to the beach. If you don’t have a 4WD vehicle, just use the public parking — the route to the shore is quick and totally worth it for the quiet, unspoiled environment.

    May and September are the best months to visit the Outer Banks and score off-season pricing without sacrificing great weather. Otherwise: Book a hotel or resort at least three months in advance for the summer, especially if you want to stay over a weekend. Beach-house rentals are a whole different ball game. Our tips and recommendations, below.

    Overlooking the Manteo waterfront, the 25-room Tranquil House Inn is an elegant and peaceful haven from the bustle of the main beaches — but it’s still right in the heart of downtown Manteo and within walking distance of cute shops, restaurants, and ice-cream parlors. In the mornings, take your complimentary Continental breakfast to a rocking chair on the front porch; return from a day at the beaches to a wine reception. The 25 rooms and suites are all spacious, comfortable, and offer style preferences like canopies or four-poster beds. 1587, the property’s fine-dining restaurant, has a daily-changing menu of Atlantic seafood and dishes with ingredients sourced from Outer Banks purveyors (recent items included crab hush puppies; Pamlico Sound shrimp, etc.).

    For a taste of luxury in an otherwise low-key destination, head to the Sanderling Resort in Duck, which offers both typical hotel-style accommodations and luxurious home rentals for eight to 16 guests. It’s easily the most full-service resort in the entire Outer Banks, with direct beach access, fire pits, indoor and outdoor pools, and activities ranging from surf lessons to horseback-riding. It’s ideal for families but great even without the kids: The adults-only Tranquility pool, award-winning Spa at Sanderling, and romantic Kimball’s Kitchen restaurant are all major draws for couples.

    But the bread and butter of vacationing in the Outer Banks are vacation-home rentals, and there are a ton of agencies to choose from. First, narrow down your group size: Accommodations range from studios to gargantuan, 23-bedroom homes (the average is eight bedrooms). For your pick of the prime houses during the summer season, book at least a year early — yes, really. Agencies like Resort Realty, OBX Rentals, Village Realty, and Outer Banks Blue have decades of experience and dedicated teams to help you find the perfect house. In general, check-in and check-out days are Saturdays or Sundays with little to no exception, so for flexibility, try Kees Vacations, where you can check in to a property any day of the week with no seven-night-minimum stay. Prices vary based on size and quality: In Duck, Resort Realty offers both $17,000-a-week, oceanfront, private-pool-equipped nine-bedrooms and $1,500 four-bedrooms with decks overlooking the water. But rental rates also vary based on seasonality: Winter prices are generally a quarter of what you’d pay in mid-summer. Note that someone in your party must be 25 or older to rent a house in the Outer Banks.

    Many visitors pack beach equipment and gear, especially if they’re driving and staying in a house, but renting kayaks and surfboards is easy: Kitty Hawk Surf Co. can accommodate most of your gear needs and offers expert-led paddling and Jet-Ski tours and surfing classes. Kitty Hawk Kites is the place for hang-gliding and kite-boarding lessons.

    If your beach needs are more about lounging, head to one of the multiple locations of Super Wings for swimsuits, beach bags, and sunscreen. And pick up beach reads at two sister bookstores: Downtown Books in Manteo and Duck’s Cottage Coffee & Books in Duck. Owner Jamie Anderson places handwritten Post-It notes on her personal recommendations.

    Grab and Go
    All the beaches in the Outer Banks are alcohol-friendly, but glass is prohibited. You’ll find all of the typical grocery stores on the islands that you would on the mainland, but while you’re here, why not shop local? In Duck, pick up housemade salads and pastries plus deli meats and cheeses from Tommy’s Natural Food Market & Wine Shop, which offers the largest selection of local groceries in the Outer Banks. For fresh seafood, head to O’Neals Sea Harvest in Wanchese, on Roanoke Island. Along with the freshest local seafood like yellowfin tuna, blue crabs, and flounder to buy and prepare at home, it has an onsite restaurant: Pop in at lunchtime and order a soft-shell-crab basket ($11) to eat among the crowd of local fisherman. For North Carolina–made beer and wine, visit a Brew Thru in either Kitty Hawk, Kill Devil Hills, or Nags Head. Picture a drive-through car wash, but with coolers of beer on either side — you never leave your vehicle as workers grab whatever beverages and snacks you need to stock your cooler.

    Casual Meal
    For breakfast on the healthier side, go to The Spot in Nags Head for fruit smoothies and a wide selection of açai bowls (from $6). Art’s Place in Kitty Hawk is known for its burgers; you’re in the South, so try the one with pimento cheese ($11). John’s Drive In, also in Kitty Hawk, is a totally unassuming shack that boasts the best milkshakes in the Outer Banks (open May to October). And Duck Donuts, where you can customize your own made-to-order doughnut, is a must — choose a coating, topping, and drizzle from 24 options ($1.65). Our vote is for a glazed doughnut with crushed-Oreo topping and salted-caramel drizzle. You might cry. For tiki-bar vibes, visit Fish Heads Bar & Grill on the Outer Banks Fishing Pier for fried fish, clam and shrimp baskets, and 15-cent-steamed-shrimp happy hour from 4 to 6 p.m. Awful Arthur’s Oyster Bar is a relaxed place for straightforward raw and steamed seafood. Get a taste of it all with a steamed combo: Choose from oysters, clams, shrimp, crab legs, and lobster ($14 to $39).

    Get Dressed Up
    Feel free to define “dressed up” how you want: The most formal you’ll ever need to be in the Outer Banks is a sundress or khakis. The Lifesaving Station in Sanderling Resort is one of the only restaurants in the Outer Banks that’s open year-round. It’s housed in the historic Caffey’s Inlet life-saving station, constructed in 1874 to assist wayward passengers and crews aboard shipwrecked vessels. At dinner, the heirloom-tomato and burrata ($12) and crab-stuffed flounder ($32) are standouts. For a break from coastal cuisine, visit Ortega’z Grill in downtown Manteo for Southwestern cuisine like pork-belly tacos ($13) and bourbon and fiji-apple-juice brined smoked chicken ($19).

    A History of “Firsts”
    It’s pretty astonishing how many historic firsts took place on the Outer Banks. At Fort Raleigh on Roanoke Island, learn about the case of the Lost Colony, a group of New World settlers from England who came to the island in 1584 but had mysteriously vanished, with few clues as to their whereabouts, by 1590.

    Also at Fort Raleigh is a commemoration of the Freedmen’s Colony. Roanoke Island, controlled by the Union after 1862, became a haven for slaves in search of freedom during the Civil War. Many of the freed African-Americans were forced to leave Roanoke Island at the end of the war, but some remained and their descendants still live there today.

    In Kill Devil Hills, visit the site of the first successful airplane flights at the Wright Brothers National Memorial ($7 parking fee). In addition to the reverential monument, explore reconstructed camp buildings where the Wright brothers stayed while testing flights, as well the locations where they landed.

    Other Historic Sites
    Although not necessarily “firsts,” there are many other sites to see away from the beach. Climb the 214 steps to the top of the striped Bodie Island Lighthouse, just south of Nags Head, for 360-degree views of the Atlantic. On Roanoke Island, Island Farm ($8) is a living-history site interpreting daily life on the island in the mid-1800s, including a farmhouse, reconstructed slave cabin, cookhouse, kitchen garden, and sheep pasture. Actors in period clothing put daily life on the farm into historical context. Nearby, the Elizabethan Gardens ($9), home to more than 500 species of plants, is a beautiful, relaxing place to spend an afternoon.

    Virginia Tillett is a lifelong resident of Roanoke Island, former Dare County commissioner, and chairperson of the Freedmen’s Remembrance Committee, a local organization dedicated to preserving the history of the Roanoke Island Freedmen’s Colony. Mrs. Tillett has traced her ancestry back to the beginning of the Freedmen’s Colony in 1863.

    When I have friends come to visit, I like to plan a full itinerary for them. We start with breakfast at Darrell’s Seafood on Roanoke Island. Darrell’s was my first job, back in 1963! After breakfast, we’ll go to the North Carolina Aquarium. There’s a fantastic exhibit about Richard Ethridge, a former slave turned keeper of the first all-black U.S. lifesaving station, and his burial site is located there as well. Afterward, we’ll dip our feet in one of the swimming holes on the sound side of Roanoke Island, then go shopping in downtown Manteo. Roanoke Heritage Extended is a beautiful shop for ceramic pottery, painted furniture, and other unique items with a nautical theme.

    We’ll stop to eat again at Poor Richard’s Sandwich Shop before crossing the bridge to the main towns. One of my favorite places is the Nags Head Woods Preserve. It’s a very peaceful ecological reserve of ponds, marshes, and wetlands, and there are easy-to-navigate walking trails. For dinner, we must have the jumbo lump crab cakes at Lone Cedar Cafe in Nags Head.

    Why You Should Plan an OBX Trip for the FallИсточник: https://nymag.com/urbanist/article/outer-banks-beaches.html

    Outer Banks

    Barrier islands in North Carolina, U.S.

    For the 2020 TV series, see Outer Banks (TV series).

    The Outer Banks, separating the Atlantic Ocean (east) from Currituck and Albemarle Sounds (north) and Pamlico Sound (south)

    The Outer Banks (frequently abbreviated OBX) are a 200-mile (320 km) string of barrier islands and spits off the coast of North Carolina and southeastern Virginia, on the east coast of the United States. They line most of the North Carolina coastline, separating Currituck Sound, Albemarle Sound, and Pamlico Sound from the Atlantic Ocean. A major tourist destination, the Outer Banks are known for their wide expanse of open beachfront and the Cape Hatteras National Seashore.[1] The seashore and surrounding ecosystem are important biodiversity zones, including beach grasses and shrubland that help maintain the form of the land.

    The Outer Banks were sites of early European settlement in the United States and remain important economic and cultural sites. Most notably the English Roanoke Colony vanished from Roanoke Island in 1587 and was the first location where an English person, Virginia Dare, was born in the Americas.[2] The hundreds of shipwrecks along the Outer Banks have given the surrounding seas the nickname Graveyard of the Atlantic. The Outer Banks were also home to the Wright brothers' first flight in a controlled, powered, heavier-than-air vehicle on December 17, 1903, at Kill Devil Hills.[3] During the 20th century the region became increasingly important for coastal tourism.

    The Outer Banks are particularly vulnerable to sea level rise and coastal erosion, compounding existing coastal erosion caused by poor coastal management and construction practices.[4] In some locations on the banks, sea levels rose 5 inches from 2011 to 2015.[4] Some sections have significantly eroded already, with portions of Hatteras Island at 25% of its original width as of 2014.[5]Tropical storms like Hurricane Irene in 2011 have already destroyed significant infrastructure and property.[5]

    Terminology[edit]

    The term "Outer Banks" refers to the islands, shoals, and spits from Cape Lookout northward, including Core Banks, and is frequently abbreviated OBX on regional tourism marketing. In recent decades, the beaches to the south of Cape Lookout have been marketing themselves as the "Southern Outer Banks", including the marketing as SOBX; this region includes the Crystal Coast beaches of Bogue Banks. The term Inner Banks and IBX is a similarly new term to refer to the mainland communities along Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds.

    Geography[edit]

    The Outer Banks is a string of peninsulas and barrier islands separating the Atlantic Ocean from mainland North Carolina. From north to south, the largest of these include: Bodie Island (which used to be an island but is now a peninsula due to tropical storms and hurricanes that closed inlets that separated it from the Currituck Banks), Pea Island (which has, at times, been contiguous with neighboring Bodie Island or Hatteras Island), Hatteras Island, Ocracoke Island, Portsmouth Island, and the Core Banks.[6] Over time, the exact number of islands and inlets changes as new inlets are opened up, often during a breach created during violent storms, and older inlets close, usually due to gradually shifting sands during the dynamic processes of beach evolution.

    The Outer Banks stretch southward from Sandbridge in Virginia Beach down the North Carolina coastline. Sources differ regarding the southern terminus of the Outer Banks. The most extensive definition includes the state's three prominent capes: Cape Hatteras, Cape Lookout, and Cape Fear.[7][8] Other sources limit the definition to two capes (Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout) and coastal areas in four counties (Currituck County, Dare County, Hyde County, and Carteret County).[9] Some authors exclude Carteret's Bogue Banks; others exclude the county entirely.[9][10][11]

    The northern part of the Outer Banks, from Oregon Inlet northward, is actually a part of the North American mainland, since the northern inlets of Bodie Island and Currituck Banks no longer exist.[12] It is separated by the Currituck Sound and the Intracoastal Waterway, which passes through the Great Dismal Swamp occupying much of the mainland west of the Outer Banks. Road access to the northern Outer Banks is cut off between Sandbridge and Corolla, North Carolina, with communities such as Carova Beach accessible only by four-wheel drive vehicles. North Carolina State Highway 12 links most of the popular Outer Banks communities in this section of the coast. The easternmost point is Rodanthe Pier in Rodanthe, NC .

    Aerial view of Outer banks (looking north), with sound on the left and ocean on the right

    The Outer Banks are not anchored to offshore coral reefs like some other barrier islands, and as a consequence, they often suffer significant beach erosion during major storms. In fact, their location jutting out into the Atlantic makes them the most hurricane-prone area north of Florida, for both landfalling storms and brushing storms offshore. Hatteras Island was cut in half on September 18, 2003, when Hurricane Isabel washed a 2,000 feet (600 m) wide and 15 feet (5 m) deep channel called Isabel Inlet through the community of Hatteras Village on the southern end of the island.[13] The tear was subsequently repaired and restored by sand dredging by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It was cut off once again in 2011 by Hurricane Irene. Access to the island was largely limited to boat access only from August to late October until another temporary bridge could be built.

    Three state highway bridges connect the Outer Banks to the mainland, the Wright Memorial Bridge, the oldest (built in 1930, rehabilitated in 1966), carries US 158 between Point Harbor and Kitty Hawk. William B. Umstead Bridge, the second oldest (built in 1957, rehabilitated in 1966), carries US 64 between Manns Harbor on the mainland and Manteo on Roanoke Island. The newest bridge, the Virginia Dare Memorial Bridge, was completed in 2002 and carries US 64 Bypass between Manns Harbor and Roanoke Island between Manteo and Wanchese. The Melvin R. Daniels Bridge carries US 64 between Roanoke Island and Nags Head. At Whalebone Junction, the three main highways of the Outer Banks (NC 12, US 158, and US 64) all meet. Additionally, NC 615 serves as the main route along Knotts Island in the extreme north; it connects only to Virginia by land.

    A number of ferries maintained by the North Carolina Department of Transportation Ferry Division also serve the Outer Banks. From north to south, these are the Knotts Island-Currituck Ferry, the Hatteras-Ocracoke Ferry, the Swan Quarter-Ocracoke Ferry, and the Cedar Island-Ocracoke Ferry. Additionally, a semi-regular emergency ferry often runs from Stumpy Point to Rodanthe to serve travelers due to frequent wash-outs of NC 12 between Nags Head and Rodanthe. Additionally, private ferries are commissioned by the National Park Service to access certain islands within the National Seashores along the outer banks, these include ferries to Portsmouth Island, to Cape Lookout Lighthouse, and various locations along Core Banks and Shackleford Banks.

    Ecology[edit]

    Vegetation[edit]

    The vegetation of the Outer Banks has biodiversity, although it is considered the northern limit for many southern plants such as wild scrub palms. In the northern part of the Outer Banks, from Virginia Beach southward past the North Carolina border to Cape Hatteras, the main types of vegetation are sea grasses, beach grasses and other beach plants including Opuntia humifusa on the Atlantic side and wax myrtles, bays, and grasses on the Sound side with areas of pine and Spanish moss-covered live oaks. Yucca aloifolia and Yucca gloriosa can be found growing wild here in the northern parts of its range on the beach. Dwarf palmettos were once indigenous to the entire Outer Banks, and they are still successfully planted and grown. Its current most northerly known native stand is on Monkey Island in Currituck County.[14][15]

    From Cape Hatteras National Seashore southward, the vegetation does include dwarf palmetto (Sabal minor), Yucca aloifolia and Yucca gloriosa; however, the area also has Cabbage palmetto (Sabal palmetto), which can be found in the north, although they are native in the southern part of the Outer Banks, specifically prevalent from Cape Hatteras and all points southward. Pindo palms and windmill palms are also planted widely throughout the Outer Banks; although, they are not indigenous to the area.

    A wide variety of native plants can be found at the Elizabethan Gardens in Manteo on Roanoke Island.[16]

    The Outer Banks are home to Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria), the roasted leaves of which were brewed into a high caffeine beverage called black drink by the Native Americans. The Outer Banks may be one of the few places where it is still consumed.[17]

    Animal life[edit]

    The islands are home to herds of feral horses, sometimes called "banker ponies", which according to local legend are descended from Spanish mustangs washed ashore centuries ago in shipwrecks. Populations are found on Ocracoke Island, Shackleford Banks, Currituck Banks, and in the Rachel Carson Estuarine Sanctuary.

    Climate[edit]

    The Outer Banks has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa). The outer banks have unusual weather patterns because of their unique geographical location. As the islands jut out from the eastern seaboard into the Atlantic Gulf Stream, the Outer Banks has a predisposition to be affected by hurricanes, Nor'easters (usually in the form of rain, and rarely snow or mixed precipitation), and other ocean-driven storms. The hardiness zone is 8b.

    The winters are typically milder than in inland areas, averaging lows in the upper 30s and highs in the lower 50s, and are more frequently overcast than in the summer. However, the exposure of the Outer Banks makes them prone to higher winds, often causing wind chills to make the apparent temperature as cold as the inland areas. The summer months average lows from the mid-70s to highs in the upper 80s, depending on the time of the summer. The spring and fall are typically milder seasons. The fall and winter are usually warmer than areas inland, while the spring and the summer are often slightly cooler because of the moderating effects of being surrounded by water.

    Although snow is possible, averaging from 3 inches in the north to less than 1/2 inch per year in the south, there are many times when years pass between snowfalls.[18] The majority of nor'easters are "born" off the coasts of the Outer Banks.

    History[edit]

    The Outer Banks is one of the most culturally distinctive areas of the East Coast of the United States.[19] The Outer Banks were inhabited before the arrival of Europeans, with small branches of larger tribes, such as the Algonquin speaking Chowanoke, Secotan and Poteskeet living semi-nomadic lives. Oftentimes Native Americans would use the barrier islands facing the Atlantic Ocean for fishing in the summer, and reside on Roanoke Island or the North Carolina mainland in the winter.

    European explorers to the Outer Banks as far back as the 1500s noted encountering the friendly Hatteras Island and Outer Banks Natives, noting their hospitality to foreign explorers as well as their happiness and overall quality of life. European-borne diseases and migration to the mainland were likely the main causes for the decline of the Native population.[20]

    Before bridges were built in the 1930s, the only form of transport between or off the islands was by boat, which allowed for the islands to stay isolated from much of the rest of the mainland. This helped to preserve the maritime culture and the distinctive Outer Banks accent or brogue, which sounds more like an English accent than it does an American accent. Many "bankers" have often been mistaken for being from England or Ireland when traveling to areas outside of the Outer Banks. The brogue is more distinctive the further south one travels on the Outer Banks, with it being the thickest on Ocracoke Island and Harkers Island.

    Some residents of the Outer Banks, known as wreckers, made part of their living by scavenging wrecked ships—or by luring ships to their destruction. Horses with lanterns tied to their necks would be walked along the beach; the lanterns' up and down motion would appear to ships to represent clear water and a ship ahead; the unsuspecting captain would then drive his ship ashore following this false light.[21]Ocracoke was the last refuge of pirate Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard. It is also where the infamous pirate was killed November 22, 1718, in a fierce battle with troops from Virginia.[22]

    Economy[edit]

    Major industries of the region include commercial fishing, boat building and tourism. Since the 1990s, the rise of tourism has led the region to become an increasingly service-oriented economy.

    Maritime industries[edit]

    There has been a long history of fishing in the Outer Banks, dating back to the end of the 17th century.[23]Pirates ravaged the coast for the majority of the 1600s, but once they were ridden, the local settlers used fishing as their lifeline.[23]

    In the mid-19th century, large-scale commercial fishing erupted, mostly due to the construction of the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal, which simplified shipping methods for fishermen.[23]Saltwater fishing became the cash-crop of the Outer Banks, and blossomed it into a popular tourist destination.[23] In modern times, tourists will flock to the area just for the abundance of fishing opportunities.[24] Anglers, otherwise known as fishermen, have a wide range of fishing methods, some of these methods date back to when the first settlers arrived, to choose from in the Outer Banks.[23]

    Lighthouses[edit]

    There are currently 6 lighthouses in the Outer Banks[25]

    • Currituck Beach Lighthouse, located in Corolla, North Carolina
    • Roanoake Marshes Lighthouse, located in Manteo, North Carolina
    • Bodie Island Lighthouse, located south of Nags Head, North Carolina
    • Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, located in Buxton, North Carolina
    • Ocracoke Island Lighthouse, located in Ocracoke, North Carolina
    • Cape Lookout Lighthouse, located in Carteret County, North Carolina

    Communities[edit]

    Towns and communities along the Outer Banks include (listed from north to south):

    Currituck Banks[edit]

    Bodie Island[edit]

    Sunset over the Currituck Sound in Duck (2009)
    The Bodie Island Lighthouse (October 2008)

    Roanoke Island[edit]

    Hatteras Island[edit]

    Ocracoke Island[edit]

    Core Banks[edit]

    Bogue Banks[edit]

    Parks[edit]

    Jockey's Ridge State Park

    [edit]

    • George Ackles (born 1967), professional basketball player[26]
    • Dennis Anderson (born 1960), professional Monster Truck driver and creator of Grave Digger
    • Marc Basnight (1947–2020), former member of the North Carolina State Senate
    • Emanuel Davis (born 1989), Canadian Football League defensive back[27]
    • Andy Griffith (1926–2012), actor[28]
    • Cathy Johnston-Forbes (born 1963), professional golfer[29]
    • Alexis Knapp (born 1989), actress
    • William Ivey Long (born 1947), costume designer for stage and film[30]
    • Edward Teach (1680–1718), notorious English pirate better known as "Blackbeard," raided on the North Atlantic and Caribbean Sea
    • Manteo (disappeared after 1587) influential figure in the Croatoan Nation, ambassador to England and mediator
    • Wanchese (disappeared after 1587) influential figure in the Roanoke Nation, opposed English colonization

    See also[edit]

    References[edit]

    1. ^"Campgrounds". Retrieved 1 April 2016.
    2. ^"England's First Home in the New World". Fort Raleigh National Historic Site. National Park Service.
    3. ^"Telegram from Orville Wright in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, to His Father Announcing Four Successful Flights, 1903 December 17". World Digital Library. 1903-12-17. Retrieved 2013-07-21.
    4. ^ ab"How the Outer Banks are Vanishing — and Leaving NC Defenseless Against Hurricanes". Carolina Political Review. Retrieved 2020-11-19.
    5. ^ abPEACH, SARA (July 24, 2014). "Rising Seas: Will the Outer Banks Survive?". National Geographic.
    6. ^"Geography of North Carolina". NC State Board of Education.
    7. ^"Geography of North Carolina". www.ncpublicschools.org. Retrieved 2016-04-09.
    8. ^"Library of Congress LCCN Permalink sh85096155". lccn.loc.gov. Retrieved 2016-04-10.
    9. ^ ab"North Carolina Gazetteer

      As Australians who grew up by the beach near Sydney and who now live in Raleigh, we are so grateful we have awesome coastal places to escape to, and down below we are sharing our favorite things to do in OBX (Outer Banks).

      Things to do in OBX, North Carolina

      We recently watched the Outer Banks series on Netflix with our kids, and even though we already had an Outer Banks vacation high on our North Carolina bucket list, that show gave us the extra push to go there now!

      In case you don’t know, the Outer Banks (OBX) is a 100-mile stretch of barrier islands separating the Atlantic Ocean from the mainland.

      These islands are dotted with some of the best beaches in North Carolina for your beach vacation, plus quaint towns, historic lighthouses, state parks, amazing sand dunes, delicious Outer Banks restaurants, fun watersports, and unique wildlife experiences!

      Body boarding fun with our kids

      This destination just speaks to us as a family who love nature and the great outdoors (and seafood). And being just a 3.5 hour drive, I know it’s going to be one of our top weekend getaways from Raleigh – in all seasons!

      From our recent four-day visit, we came to realize that there is no shortage of fun things to do in Outer Banks, and whilst we didn’t have time for everything we think we did a good job of maximizing our time and down below we list our top suggestions for your own OBX trip!

      jennettes pier outer banks 2

      Whether you’re looking for relaxing beach days or adventure, casual dining or a little romance, stunning sunrises or sunsets, the OBX has you covered. 

      Read on to discover why we think this is one of the best places to visit in North Carolina, and what you should add to your itinerary! And don’t miss checking out our list of 25 cool Airbnb Outer Banks vacation rentals.

      Play on the Outer Banks Beaches

      Things to do in OBX with kids

      Most people visit the Outer Banks in the summer months for some beach time, and as Aussies we can definitely get on board with that! 

      With 100-miles of wide-open shoreline, take your pick from one of the many beautiful Outer Banks beaches.

      The sand is clean, the water is a perfect temperature through summer, they’re family-friendly, and they’re not too crowded – win, win.

      As we were staying right on Kill Devil Hills Beach we spent most of our time on this beach (see sunrise tips down below).

      Kill Devil Hills Beach, Outer Banks

      But our favorite for our kids to go body-boarding would probably be Corolla Beach for the gentle waves and it seems like you can walk out forever (see stand up paddle boarding section down below). Also Nags Head Beach near the pier was great for waves too!

      Kitty Hawk is also ideal for water sports, and Duck is known as one of the most pet-friendly beaches in the US. 

      But keep in mind beach and wave conditions change daily, depending on where you are on the islands. 

      Lifeguards are on duty on all beaches between Memorial Day and Labor Day – be mindful of the tides and currents!

      If you want calmer waters, consider one of the numerous sound front water accesses on the western side of the islands.

      Jockey’s Ridge State Park

      Jockey’s Ridge State Park

      An Outer Banks vacation is mostly about nature and coastal experiences, but not all are water based!

      We love visiting unique state parks, and Jockey’s Ridge State Park is home to the tallest sand dune system in the eastern United States and is one of the most popular things to do in OBX.

      The dunes here are constantly changing shape due to wind and reach up to 100 feet high from where you get spectacular views of the Carolina coastline on one side, and Roanoke Sound on the other.

      Start at the visitor center and museumto learn about the ecology, then head out to explore the massive dune system by following the 360-foot boardwalk. 

      things to do in outer banks with kids 2

      Popular activities here include hang gliding, sand-boarding and kite flying (bring your own), nature trails, sunset viewing, and learning to hang-glide (see down below about our experience).

      Ranger-led programs throughout the year are mostly free, but some require pre-registration. 

      And during the warmer months it is highly suggested to bring your own shoes, sun protection and plenty of water – sand dunes get HOT.

      There are no entrance fees to enjoy the park. But keep in mind, this is a day-use only park with no campgrounds!

      Hot Locals Tip:

      Go past the sand dunes to West Soundside Rd, it goes to a nice beach on the sound where you can walk in the water forever. 

      Learn How to Hand Glide (safely) at Jockey’s Ridge

      Hang gliding at Jockey's Ridge State Park, OBX

      Looking for fun things to do in Outer Banks? This is one of the coolest family-activities we have done in a long time. 

      You’re in the area where the Wright Brothers first flew a plane, so why not learn how to fly too!

      And don’t worry, it’s very safe and easy. If our 8 year old Savannah can do it, you can too!

      Kitty Hawk Kites have been operating hang gliding lessons since 1974 with beginner, intermediate and advanced lessons from qualified instructors – who are awesome by the way!

      Hang gliding in the Outer Banks

      We had so much fun learning how to launch, fly, and land on the soft sands of Jockey’s Ridge with our instructor holding a rope all the way giving you a sense of safety!

      Starting from $99, standard beginner lessons last 3 hours, including 1 hour of ground school.

      Definitely put this on your list of OBX things to do, it’s super cool fun!

      Read our full review of Kitty Hawk hang gliding.

      Book your tickets here. 

      Jennette’s Pier

       Jennette's Pier, OBX

      Located in Nags Head, Jennette’s Pier stretches 1,000 feet into the Atlantic ocean and is one of the must-visit Outer Banks piers during your visit. 

      What’s particularly cool about this pier is that it is powered by wind (evidenced by the windmills on it) and it has an educational center and small aquarium attached. 

      I visited for some beautiful sunrise photos, and we also went swimming here in the afternoon. 

      jennettes pier obx 3

      This is one of the top things to do in Nags Head, and is popular for fishing, or for just taking a stroll out for great views back over the coastline. 

      All day walk-on fees: Adults $2, Children $1.

      Explore all the Outer Banks Piers

      Avon Pier, Outer Banks

      You Americans love your piers, and in the Outer Banks the piers are one of the most striking features of this coastal area – there are seven in total.

      Five of the piers are located in the central Outer Banks area; three in Nags Head, one in Kitty Hawk, and one in Kill Devil Hills.

      The other two OBX piers are on Hatteras Island; one in Rodanthe and the other in Avon – the 600-foot long Avon Fishing Pier was the first pier on Hatteras Island. 

      outer banks things to do

      Our favorite is the The Outer Banks Fishing Pier in Nags Head –  we don’t fish, but we love Fish Heads Bar & Grille at the end of the pier (see more about that down below). 

      Besides fishing off the piers, beach fishing is also popular in the OBX. So if you love piers too, this is one of the best things to do in Outer Banks.

      See the OBX Lighthouses

      Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, Outer Banks, North Carolina

      Another of the popular things to do in Outer Banks is see the iconic lighthouses. 

      When I think of the OBX, one of the first things that comes to mind is the lighthouses. They have guarded the coastline here for over 200 years and have played an important role in maritime history – this area is known as the Graveyard of the Atlantic for ships for its treacherous waters.

      There are five lighthouses in total and each one unique:

      The easily recognizable Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, with its spiraling black and white stripes, protects one of the most hazardous sections of the Atlantic Coast and was officially completed way back in 1870.

      One of the most popular OBX activities is to climb to the top of the historic Hatteras lighthouse to get stunning views from the tallest brick lighthouse in North America.

      Unfortunately it was closed to climbing when we visited (August 2020 due to Rona) but you can still visit the grounds and visitors center. 

      Cape Hatteras National Seashore

      Cape Hatteras National Seashore

      This 70-mile stretch of the Outer Banks from Bodie Island to Ocracoke Island is the country’s first national seashore.

      This area is home to unique beach communities, historic lighthouses, and endless activities such as beach fishing, kiteboarding, surfing, swimming, windsurfing, crabbing, shell-collecting, kayaking and paddle boarding, camping, and  beach driving.

      You can explore by vehicle, bicycle, foot, or by boat. 

      We didn’t spend much time down here, concentrating most of our time on the northern islands, but stopped in at above mentioned Cape Hatteras Lighthouse and a few beaches along the drive.

      Cape Hatteras

      For more tips on things to do in Hatteras, go here. 

      The north entrance to Cape Hatteras is located in Nags Head at the intersection of U.S. Highway 64 and NC Highway 12, and there are many roadside public pull-offs along Highway 12 with beach access. 

      Hatteras Village is home to locally owned and operated restaurants. 

      Go Stand Up Paddle Boarding

      Stand up paddle boarding, Outer Banks, North Carolina

      If you’ve been following our travels for a while, you’ll know that stand-up paddle boarding is one of our favorite family-activities.

      We recently bought two inflatable BodyGlove paddle boards, and couldn’t wait to use them in the OBX.

      One suggested spot from the locals was Corolla Beach due to it’s gentle waves and shallow water, and it proved to be a great spot, although my balance needs work as I kept falling off – ocean paddling is different to lake or river supping!

      Stand up paddle boarding, Outer Banks, North Carolina

      Another popular place for paddle boarding/kayaking is the Historic Corolla Park at the Whalehead Club – there’s a public launch spot for small boats/kayaks/SUPs and there are shallow canals to paddle in. 

      In Nags Head, we got recommended West Soundside Road as another good soundside location – it’s close to Jockey’s Ridge. 

      If you don’t own your own SUP boards, consider a tour. 

      Drink and Eat at Fish Heads Bar and Grill

      Fish Heads Bar and Grill

      Listen up Santa Monica Pier. THIS is how you do a pier! 

      Back in our home country of Australia, we don’t have piers at our beaches (well, very few) and Aussies are most familiar with Santa Monica Pier.

      But we think that pier in LA is super tacky, crowded and just a flat out tourist trap!

      We’ve also been to many other piers on our travels across the USA and we think we have found our favorite pier right here in North Carolina – the Outer Banks Fishing Pier. And it’s mostly to do with Fish Heads Bar and Grill at the end of this pier.

      When we first arrived at the beach here, there was a long line waiting (social distancing) to get onto the pier and we thought, “what’s going on here?” 

      Turns out, it was happy hour shrimp at Fish Heads which means 15 CENT SHRIMP between 4pm – 6pm. We put our names down immediately!

      fish heads

      Not only that, but Fish Heads offers a great beer selection (40 beers in total), killer ocean views, chilled local vibe and music, and serves breakfast, lunch and dinner. 

      Don’t miss it. This is a super cool local spot, and one of our best memories from our Outer Banks vacation!

      Wright Brothers National Memorial

      You’re in the place that had the first successful Wright Brothers flight, and if you value airplane travel like us, why not go and honor the birthplace of flying at the Wright Brothers National Memorial

      In case you don’t know, the Wright Brothers (Orville and Wilbur) piloted four successful flights with their powered, heavier-than-air flying machine in Kitty Hawk, and you can visit the historic site to see a monument.

      You can also see the historic sand dune where they did most of their gliding, and the location they lived whilst experimenting.

      Unfortunately the Visitor Center and ranger talks are currently closed until at least September 11, 2020 (due to Rona), but the outdoor area is open.

      Check the website for up to date info and costs.

      Since we’d been here before, we decided to skip it on this visit, but if you haven’t been it’s one of the must do OBX attractions.

      Watch a Sunrise by the Ocean

      Sunrise at Kill Devil Hills Beach

      Sunrise in the Outer Banks is definitely worth getting up for! 

      We know, when you’re on vacation rolling out of bed early can be tough. But we’re always grateful when we make the effort, especially when rewarded with a stunning sunrise like this at Kill Devil Hills Beach.

      Sunrise is actually one of our favorite times of day. It’s peaceful, our kids are usually still asleep, and it just gives us so much more time in the day to do things. 

      HOT TIP: 

      When staying in the OBX do your best to stay on the ocean so you can just roll out of bed and walk onto the beach, or even sit on your deck and watch the magic happen!

      Sunset Drinks at Miller’s Waterfront Restaurant

      Miller's Waterfront Restaurant, OBX

      Looking for one of those famous OBX sunsets? You can’t go wrong here. 

      Miller’s is actually a highly recommended place to eat with a lot of positive reviews, but we felt our food fell a little flat. We dined downstairs in the restaurant, but next time we’d like to try upstairs at the Sunset Bar & Grill.

      However, the sunset stole the show and at the very least come here for sunset drinks, sit outside on the grass area and watch the magic happen over the sound – it seems to be an Outer Banks tradition.

      Go Surfing

      Surfers waiting for a set at Nags Head

      Looking to carve up some waves? The Outer Banks are known for having the largest waves on the East Coast of the US and is well known by surfers around the world.

      Because the OBX coastline is uniquely situated, it receives swells from multiple directions with wintertime providing excellent conditions along the east facing beaches, whilst summertime swells sweep into the south side beaches.

      Kitty Hawk Beach and Kill Devil Hills Beach are known for goodwave surfing (and skimboarding), and typically have the biggest waves of the Northern Beaches.

      We saw a few surfers enjoying the waves near Nags Head Pier, and a frequent visitor told us that Cape Hatteras has the best surfing when it’s on. 

      Want to learn how to surf? Consider a surfing lesson in OBX.

      Explore Manteo

      manteo obx 1

      Manteo was our first stop when we arrived in the Outer Banks driving in from Raleigh, and it’s definitely worth a look.

      We found it to be much quieter than other places in OBX with a few interesting points of interest. 

      There’s a nice waterfront area to walk along – the town wraps around Shallowbag Bay on the eastern side of Roanoke Island. 

      Way back in 1587, 117 English men, women and children came ashore on Roanoke Island to establish the first English settlement. But, In 1590, when English ships returned, they found the island deserted, hence the name the Lost Colony. 

      In normal times, there’s a Lost Colony Drama performed on the site but this season is cancelled due to the pandemic. 

      The small main street has a few shops and the Lost Colony Brewery (we had lunch here – the burgers are good). 

      Lost Colony Brewery

      Other highly suggested OBX attractions here is the Roanoke Island Maritime Museum and the Elizabethan Gardens

      Outer Banks Brewing Station

      Outer Banks Brewing Station

      We are always up for a good brewery, especially a family-friendly one, and the Outer Banks Brewing Station in Kill Devil Hills is a must-visit. 

      This brewery is the first wind-powered brewery in America – how cool is that – and there’s a great beer garden area out the back with plenty of room for the kids to run around.

      The draft beer selection selection is top notch (I suggest the LemonGrass Wheat Ale or Hugh Hefeweizen), plus there’s wine and specialty cocktails.

      Outer Banks Brewing Station

      The food is well above average, and they have live music – what’s not to love. In “normal times” there’s a jam-packed events calendar. Check their website for current events.

      Walk the Duck Boardwalk

      Duck Boardwalk

      This was one of the top recommended things to do in Duck NC, but I think we did this at the wrong time, just after lunch on a HOT day and I’m guessing this would be best to do either early morning or early evening at sunset.

      Regardless, it’s a pretty walk and easy for kids and stretches 0.6 miles. with plenty of places to stop and eat near the water (eat at NC Coast Grill & Bar by the way), their poutine and fish tacos are incredible.

      The boardwalk begins at the southern end of the Village near Christopher Drive and continues to end at the Waterfront Shops

      Best accessed from Town Park and other locations throughout the Town’s Village Commercial District.

      Donutz on a Stick

      Donutz on a Stick, Outer Banks, North Carolina

      Ok guys. When most donut lovers visit the Outer Banks, they go to the original Duck Donuts in the town of Duck. 

      Admittedly, we promised our kids a visit too (even though we can walk to a Duck Donuts near our house in Cary). 

      But when I typed in the address in Google maps, it said the store closed at 1pm (it closes at 1pm each day) which I thought was crazy!

      Luckily, one of our very good local followers on Instagram who had been providing excellent tips during our stay, suggested we go to Donutz on a Stick. He said it’s family-owned, not super busy, and better! And it turned out to be a great suggestion, trust us, our kids will tell you!

      They serve up made to order donuts and donut sundaes which our kids had (two donuts topped with ice cream and whipped cream). 

      Plus sandwiches, gluten-free and vegan offerings, coffee, espresso, gifts and souvenirs.

      We even got severed by David, the owner, and he is a super nice guy. Tell him we sent you, and be sure to put this on your list of things to do in the Outer Banks with kids!

      Breakfast at Fresh Fit Cafe

      Fresh Fit Cafe, OBX

      Come for the healthy food, stay for the awesome water views! 

      We’re pretty health conscious with our diet, and we particularly like to start off our day with a healthy breakfast and we’re glad we found this place during our research.

      Freshfit Cafe is located on the Nags Head-Manteo Causeway and is a health-oriented cafe and juice bar.

      They serve breakfast and lunch daily with an awesome waterfront setting, and we thoroughly enjoyed our hearty omelettes – one of the best we’ve had actually!

      Also on the menu is organic coffee, espresso, a full juice bar, detox drinks and smoothies, and they accommodate vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free diets.

      Mulligan’s Grille in Historic Cottage Row

      Mulligan's OBX

      This place is cool, and as soon as we walked in we had the feeling, “yeah, this could be our local”. 

      Mulligan’s offers several dining and drinking areas, but we ate in the casual and chilled Tiki Bar upstairs (we love Tiki bars). 

      With distant views of the beach, fresh coastal breezes, and a fun vibe, it was hard to leave and could have sat there for hours.

      The burgers are great, they have good local seafood, there’s a nice selection of beers, a downstairs bar, and indoor and outdoor seating with views of Jockey’s Ridge (Note: Mulligan’s is operating under current Covid restrictions).   

      Car Beach Driving

      Outer Banks, North Carolina

      If you want to go beach driving, it’s another of the popular OBX things to do and offers a fun and different perspective for exploring the ocean beaches.

      Beach driving is allowed year round on Hatteras Island, and October 1-April 30 in Nags Head and Kill Devil Hills.

      For current Cape Hatteras Off Road Vehicle (ORV) use, click here. For Nags Head here, and Kill Devil Hills here. 

      More Things to Do in OBX

      As mentioned, we only had four days for our Outer Banks vacation, so missed many things. 

      Below are highly suggested OBX activities and places to eat in Outer Banks from locals in the know, and the tourism board, that we plan to tick off on a return visit:

      If you didn’t previously know what to do in Outer Banks, I hope this post helps you with your own planning to visit Outer Banks. 

      We’ll definitely be back many times, so why not join our email community and follow us on Instagram to see what we get up to on future visits, and all our other North Carolina adventures!

      Pin Below To Save To Pinterest:

      • Don't visit North Carolina without considering the Outer Banks. Here you will find some of the best beaches in North Carolina, fresh seafood, wildlife, sunrises and sunsets, and fun for all the family. Here are 20 of the best things to do in the Outer Banks for your Outer Banks vacation.
      • When you visit North Carolina, don't miss the Outer Banks. Here you will find some of the best beaches in North Carolina, fresh seafood, wildlife, sunrises and sunsets, and fun for all the family. Here are 20 of the best things to do in the Outer Banks NC.

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      Источник: https://thisisraleigh.com/things-to-do-in-obx/

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