john f kennedy jr images

Matthew's Cathedral on its way to the President's final resting place JFK Jr. stepped forward and raised his small hand in salute, an image that broke the. JFK Jr. and Carolyn Bessette had been married for less than three years when they were killed in a plane crash on July 16, 1999. Getty Images. 1 of 30. John F. Kennedy Jr. exploring his father's desk in 1962. Photograph, People, Standing, Snapshot, Child.

John f kennedy jr images -

JFK Jr. would’ve been 60 today — a look back on his life

“John-John” Fitzgerald Kennedy should’ve turned 60 this week.

The handsome son of former President John F. Kennedy died more than two decades ago, but his legacy lives on, with friends and colleagues honoring his would-be birthday by recalling his cut-short life.

“His legacy was really about who he would’ve become,” former Manhattan Assistant District Attorney Brian Steel, who worked with Kennedy, told Today this week. “But I just think America and maybe the world would have been a better place” if he had lived longer.

In his 38 years, JFK Jr. became a trained lawyer, launched a magazine and managed a media spotlight perpetually focused on him since childhood. His life came to an abrupt end when, on July 16, 1999, he died alongside his wife, Carolyn Bessette, and sister-in-law, Lauren Bessette, after the private plane he was piloting plummeted into the Atlantic.

“If John knew he would be gone at 38 years old, I don’t think John would have wanted to be forgotten,” former magazine executive assistant Rosemarie Terenzio told Today.

On what would’ve been his 60th birthday, some highlights from a life curtailed.

john-f-kennedy-jrBettmann Archive
john-f-kennedy-jrBettmann Archive
john-f-kennedy-jrBettmann Archive

JFK Jr. was born Nov. 25, 1960, just two weeks after his father was elected president. The nickname “John-John,” developed after a reporter misheard JFK refer to John, and became a popular diminutive for him in the media — although his family didn’t adopt it.

John Jr. grew up at the White House until his father’s 1963 assassination. On his third birthday, in a moment which was captured in an iconic photograph which would become representative of the decade, he rendered a final salute during his father’s state funeral procession.

john-f-kennedy-jrBettmann Archive
john-f-kennedy-jrBettmann Archive
john-f-kennedy-jrGetty Images

Following Robert F. Kennedy’s 1968 assassination , Jackie Kennedy took John and his older sister Caroline out of the US, fearing for their lives. That same year she married Greek shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis, and the family proceeded to live on his private island, Skorpios.

john-f-kennedy-jrGetty Images
john-f-kennedy-jrBettmann Archive
john-f-kennedy-jrGetty Images

JFK Jr. spent most of his elementary, middle and high school years at elite Manhattan private schools. After graduation, he traveled widely and volunteered before attending Brown University, where he continued to be politically involved in helping the causes he was most moved by, including civil rights and gun control.

john-f-kennedy-jrGetty Images
john-f-kennedy-jrLawrence Schwartzwald

In his short adult life, John managed to become a lawyer, worked in the Manhattan District Attorney’s office as a prosecutor, for the New York Times as a journalist, as an actor at Manhattan’s Irish Arts Center and, in 1995, co-founded the political lifestyle magazine George, which folded in 2001.

john-f-kennedy-jrRon Galella Collection via Getty
john-f-kennedy-jrAFP via Getty Images

On July 16, 1999, JFK Jr.’s plane was reported missing while en route to Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts. A search commenced, but within days a Coast Guard admiral admitted to the family that there was no hope of finding John, Carolyn or Lauren alive.

Fragments of the plane were discovered on July 19, and on July 21 all three of the passengers’ bodies were recovered.

Hundreds came to pay their respects at the July 23 funeral at Manhattan’s St. Thomas More Church.

Mourners outside the Church of St. Thomas More after a private memorial mass for  John F. Kennedy Jr., and his wife Carolyn Bessette Kennedy on July 23, 1999 in New York.

In Sen. Edward Kennedy’s eulogy of his nephew at the service, he noted that JFK Jr. had not even lived long enough to comb a gray hair.

“I think that was probably the line that took us all out,” Terenzio told Today. “Now you look back, and you think of what might have been.”

Источник: https://nypost.com/2020/11/25/jfk-jr-wouldve-been-60-today-a-look-back-on-his-life/

John F. Kennedy Jr.

American magazine publisher and lawyer, son of President John F. Kennedy

"John-John" and "John Kennedy Jr." redirect here. For people named John John, see John John. For other people named John Kennedy Jr., see John Kennedy (disambiguation).

John Fitzgerald Kennedy Jr. (November 25, 1960 – July 16, 1999), often referred to as John-John or JFK Jr., was an American lawyer, journalist, and magazine publisher. He was a son of the 35th U.S. president John F. Kennedy and First LadyJacqueline Kennedy, and a younger brother of Caroline Kennedy. Three days before his third birthday, his father was assassinated.

From his childhood years at the White House, Kennedy was heavily covered by media, and later became a popular social figure in Manhattan. Trained as a lawyer, he worked as a New York City assistant district attorney for almost four years. In 1995, Kennedy launched George magazine, using his political and celebrity status to publicize it. He died in a plane crash in 1999 at the age of 38.

Early life[edit]

John Fitzgerald Kennedy Jr. was born at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital on November 25, 1960, two weeks after his father, Massachusetts senator John F. Kennedy, was elected president. His father took office exactly eight weeks after John Jr. was born. His parents had a stillborn daughter named Arabella four years before John Jr.'s birth. John Jr. had an older sister, Caroline, and a younger brother, Patrick, who died two days after his premature birth in 1963. His putative nickname, "John-John", came from a reporter who misheard JFK calling him "John" twice in quick succession; the name was not used by his family.[1]

John Jr. lived in the White House during the first three years of his life and remained in the public spotlight as a young adult. His father was assassinated on November 22, 1963, and the state funeral was held three days later on John Jr.'s third birthday. At his mother's prompting, John Jr. saluted the flag-draped casket as it was carried out from St. Matthew's Cathedral.[2] NBC News vice-president Julian Goodman called the video of the salute "the most impressive...shot in the history of television," which was set up by NBC Director Charles Jones, who was working for the press pool.[3]Lyndon B. Johnson wrote his first letter as president to John Jr. and told him that he "can always be proud" of his father.[4]Stan Stearns, who took an iconic photograph of the salute, served as chief White House photographer during the Johnson administration. Over the years, Stearns showed Johnson the image as it was a symbol of what Johnson said in his letter to John Jr. The family continued with their plans for a birthday party to demonstrate that the Kennedys would go on despite the death of the president.[5]

After President Kennedy was assassinated in 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy moved her family, after a brief residency in the Georgetown area of Washington, to a luxury apartment on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City, where Kennedy Jr. grew up. In 1967, his mother took him and Caroline on a six-week "sentimental journey" to Ireland, where they met PresidentÉamon de Valera and visited the Kennedy ancestral home in Dunganstown.[6]

Mother's remarriage[edit]

After JFK's brother Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated in 1968, Jackie took Caroline and John Jr. out of the United States, saying: "If they're killing Kennedys, then my children are targets ... I want to get out of this country."[7] The same year, she married Greek shipping tycoon Aristotle Onassis, and the family went to live on his private island of Skorpios. Kennedy is said to have considered his stepfather "a joke".[8] When Onassis died in 1975, he left Kennedy $25,000, though Jacqueline was able to renegotiate the will and acquired $20 million for herself and her children.[citation needed]

In 1971, Kennedy returned to the White House with his mother and sister for the first time since the assassination. President Richard Nixon's daughters gave Kennedy a tour that included his old bedroom, and Nixon showed him the Resolute desk under which his father had let him play.[9]

Education[edit]

Kennedy's ninth grade photo in the 1975 Collegiate School yearbook

Kennedy attended private schools in Manhattan, starting at Saint David's School and moving to Collegiate School, which he attended from third through tenth grade.[6] He completed his education at Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. After graduating, he accompanied his mother on a trip to Africa. He rescued his group while on a pioneering course, which had gotten lost for two days without food or water.[10]

In 1976, Kennedy and his cousin visited an earthquake disaster zone at Rabinal in Guatemala, helping with heavy building work and distributing food. The local priest said that they "ate what the people of Rabinal ate and dressed in Guatemalan clothes and slept in tents like most of the earthquake victims," adding that the two "did more for their country's image" in Guatemala "than a roomful of ambassadors."[11] On his sixteenth birthday, Kennedy's Secret Service protection ended[12] and he spent the summer of 1978 working as a wrangler in Wyoming.[13] In 1979, the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston was dedicated, and Kennedy made his first major speech, reciting Stephen Spender's poem "I Think Continually of Those Who Were Truly Great."[14]

Kennedy attended Brown University, where he majored in American studies.[15] There, he co-founded a student discussion group that focused on contemporary issues such as apartheid in South Africa, gun control, and civil rights. Visiting South Africa during a summer break, he was appalled by apartheid, and arranged for U.N. ambassador Andrew Young to speak about the topic at Brown.[16] By his junior year at Brown, he had moved off campus to live with several other students in a shared house,[17] and spent time at Xenon, a club owned by Howard Stein. Kennedy was initiated into Phi Psi, a local social fraternity that had been the Rhode Island Alpha Chapter of national Phi Kappa Psi fraternity until 1978.[18]

In January 1983, Kennedy's Massachusetts driver's license was suspended after he received more than three speeding summonses in a twelve-month period, and failed to appear at a hearing.[19][20] The family's lawyer explained he most likely "became immersed in exams and just forgot the date of the hearing."[21] He graduated that same year with a bachelor's degree in American studies, and then took a break, traveling to India and spending some time at the University of Delhi where he did his post graduation work and he met Mother Teresa. He also worked with some of the Kennedy special interest projects, including the East Harlem School at Exodus House and Reaching Up.[citation needed]

Career[edit]

After the 1984 Democratic Convention in San Francisco, Kennedy returned to New York and earned $20,000 a year in a position at the Office of Business Development, where his boss reflected that he worked "in the same crummy cubbyhole as everybody else. I heaped on the work and was always pleased."[22] From 1984 to 1986, he worked for the New York City Office of Business Development and served as deputy director of the 42nd Street Development Corporation in 1986,[23] conducting negotiations with developers and city agencies. In 1988, he became a summer associate at Manatt, Phelps, Rothenberg & Phillips, a Los Angeles law firm with strong connections to the Democratic Party. There, Kennedy worked for Charlie Manatt, his uncle Ted Kennedy's law school roommate.[22]

From 1989, Kennedy headed Reaching Up, a nonprofit group which provided educational and other opportunities for workers who helped people with disabilities. William Ebenstein, executive director of Reaching Up, said, "He was always concerned with the working poor, and his family always had an interest in helping them."

In 1989, Kennedy earned a J.D. degree from the New York University School of Law.[24] He then failed the New York bar exam twice, before passing on his third try in July 1990.[25] After failing the exam for a second time, Kennedy vowed that he would take it continuously until he was ninety-five years old or passed.[26] If he had failed a third time, he would have been ineligible to serve as a prosecutor in the Manhattan District Attorney's Office, where he worked for the next four years.[27][28] On August 29, 1991, Kennedy won his first case as a prosecutor.[29]

In the summer of 1992, he worked as a journalist and was commissioned by The New York Times to write an article about his kayaking expedition to the Åland Archipelago, where he saved one of his friends from the water when his kayak capsized.[30] He then considered creating a magazine with his friend, public-relations magnate Michael J. Berman—a plan which his mother thought too risky. In his 2000 book The Day John Died, Christopher Andersen wrote that Jacqueline had also worried that her son would die in a plane crash, and asked her longtime companion Maurice Tempelsman "to do whatever it took to keep John from becoming a pilot".[31]

Acting[edit]

Meanwhile, Kennedy had done a bit of acting, which was one of his passions (he had appeared in many plays while at Brown). He expressed interest in acting as a career, but his mother strongly disapproved of it, considering it an unsuitable profession.[32] On August 4, 1985, Kennedy made his New York acting debut in front of an invitation-only audience at the Irish Theater on Manhattan's West Side. Executive director of the Irish Arts Center, Nye Heron, said that Kennedy was "one of the best young actors I've seen in years".[23] Kennedy's director, Robin Saex, stated, "He has an earnestness that just shines through." Kennedy's largest acting role was playing a fictionalized version of himself in the eighth-season episode of the sitcom Murphy Brown, called "Altered States". In this episode, Kennedy visits Brown at her office, in order to promote a magazine he is publishing.

George magazine[edit]

In 1995, Kennedy and Michael Berman founded George, a glossy, politics-as-lifestyle and fashion monthly, with Kennedy controlling 50 percent of the shares.[32] Kennedy officially launched the magazine at a news conference in Manhattan on September 8 and joked that he had not seen so many reporters in one place since he failed his first bar exam.[33]

Each issue of the magazine contained an editor's column and interviews written by Kennedy,[34] who believed they could make politics "accessible by covering it in an entertaining and compelling way" which would allow "popular interest and involvement" to follow.[35] Kennedy did interviews with Louis Farrakhan, Billy Graham, Garth Brooks, and others.[35]

The first issue was criticized for its image of Cindy Crawford posing as George Washington in a powdered wig and ruffled shirt. In defense of the cover, Kennedy stated that "political magazines should look like Mirabella."[36]

In July 1997, Vanity Fair had published a profile of New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani, claiming that the mayor was sleeping with his press secretary (which both parties denied). Although tempted to follow up on this story, Kennedy decided against it.[37] The same month, Kennedy wrote about meeting Mother Teresa, declaring that the "three days I spent in her presence was the strongest evidence this struggling Catholic has ever had that God exists."[34]

The September 1997 issue of George centered on temptation, and featured two of Kennedy's cousins, Michael LeMoyne Kennedy and Joseph P. Kennedy II. Michael had been accused of having an affair with his children's underaged babysitter, while Joe had been accused by his ex-wife of having bullied her. John declared that both his cousins had become "poster boys for bad behavior"—believed to be the first time a member of the Kennedy family had publicly attacked another Kennedy. He said he was trying to show that press coverage of the pair was unfair, due to them being Kennedys.[38] But Joe paraphrased John's father by stating, "Ask not what you can do for your cousin, but what you can do for his magazine."[39]

Decline[edit]

By early 1997, Kennedy and Berman found themselves locked in a power struggle, which led to screaming matches, slammed doors, and even one physical altercation. Eventually Berman sold his share of the company, and Kennedy took on Berman's responsibilities himself. Though the magazine had already begun to decline in popularity before Berman left, his departure was followed by a rapid drop in sales.[40]

David Pecker, CEO of Hachette Filipacchi Magazines who were partners in George, said the decline was because Kennedy refused to "take risks as an editor, despite the fact that he was an extraordinary risk taker in other areas of his life." Pecker said, "He understood that the target audience for George was the eighteen-to-thirty-four-year-old demographic, yet he would routinely turn down interviews that would appeal to this age group, like Princess Diana or John Gotti Jr., to interview subjects like Dan Rostenkowski or Võ Nguyên Giáp."[40] Shortly before his death, Kennedy had been planning a series of online chats with the 2000 presidential candidates. Microsoft was to provide the technology and pay for it while receiving advertising in George.[41] After his death, the magazine was bought out by Hachette,[42] but folded in early 2001.[43]

Later life[edit]

Family activity[edit]

Kennedy addressed the 1988 Democratic National Convention in Atlanta, introducing his uncle, Senator Ted Kennedy. He invoked his father's inaugural address, calling "a generation to public service", and received a two-minute standing ovation.[44] Republican consultant Richard Viguerie said he did not remember a word of the speech, but remembered "a good delivery" and added, "I think it was a plus for the Democrats and the boy. He is strikingly handsome."[45][46]

Kennedy participated in his cousin Patrick J. Kennedy's campaign for a seat in the Rhode Island House of Representatives by visiting the district.[47] He sat outside the polling booth and had his picture taken with "would-be" voters. The polaroid ploy worked so well in the campaign that Patrick J. Kennedy used it again in 1994.

Kennedy also campaigned in Boston for his uncle's re-election to the U.S. Senate against challenger Mitt Romney in 1994. "He always created a stir when he arrived in Massachusetts," remarked Senator Kennedy.[48]

Relationships[edit]

While attending Brown University, Kennedy met Sally Munro, whom he dated for six years, and they visited India in 1983. While he was a student at Brown, he also met socialite Brooke Shields,[49] with whom he was later linked.

Kennedy also dated models Cindy Crawford and Julie Baker, as well as actress Sarah Jessica Parker,[50] who said she enjoyed dating Kennedy but realized he "was a public domain kind of a guy." Parker claimed to have no idea what "real fame" was until dating Kennedy and felt that she should "apologize for dating him" since it became the "defining factor in the person" she was.[51]

Kennedy had known actress Daryl Hannah since their two families had vacationed together in St. Maarten in the early '80s. After meeting again at the wedding of his aunt Lee Radziwill in 1988, they dated for five and a half years, though their relationship was complicated by her feelings for singer Jackson Browne, with whom she had lived for a time.

Also during this time, Kennedy dated Christina Haag. They had known each other as children, and she also attended Brown University.

Marriage[edit]

After his relationship with Daryl Hannah ended, Kennedy cohabitated with Carolyn Bessette, who worked in the fashion industry. They were engaged for a year, though Kennedy consistently denied reports of this. On September 21, 1996, they married in a private ceremony on Cumberland Island, Georgia,[52] where his sister, Caroline, was matron of honor and his cousin Anthony Radziwill was best man.[53]

The next day, Kennedy's cousin Patrick revealed that the pair had married. When they returned to their Manhattan home, a mass of reporters was on the doorstep. One of them asked Kennedy if he had enjoyed his honeymoon, to which he responded: "Very much." He added "Getting married is a big adjustment for us, and for a private citizen like Carolyn even more so. I ask you to give her all the privacy and room you can."[54]

But Carolyn was, in fact, badly disoriented by the constant attention from the paparazzi. The couple was permanently on show, both at fashionable Manhattan events, and on their travels to visit celebrities such as Mariuccia Mandelli and Gianni Versace.[55] She also complained to her friend, journalist Jonathan Soroff, that she could not get a job without being accused of exploiting her fame.[56]

In June 2019, Billy Noonan, a longtime friend of John F. Kennedy Jr., released a video tape of the secret wedding that had taken place on the remote island.[57][58]

Piloting[edit]

Kennedy took flying lessons at the Flight Safety Academy in Vero Beach, Florida.[38] In April 1998, he received his pilot's license, which he had aspired to since he was a child.[33]

The death of his cousin Michael in a skiing accident[59] prompted John to take a hiatus from his piloting lessons for three months. His sister Caroline hoped this would be permanent, but when he resumed, she did little to stop him.[60]

Death[edit]

Main article: John F. Kennedy Jr. plane crash

On July 16, 1999, Kennedy departed from Fairfield, New Jersey, at the controls of his Piper Saratoga light aircraft. He was traveling with his wife Carolyn and sister-in-law Lauren Bessette to attend the wedding of his cousin Rory Kennedy at Hyannis Port, Massachusetts, after having picked Lauren up in Martha's Vineyard. He had purchased the plane on April 28, 1999, from Air Bound Aviation.[61] Carolyn and Lauren were passengers sitting in the second row of seats.[62] Kennedy had checked in with the control tower at the Martha's Vineyard Airport, but the plane was reported missing after it failed to arrive on schedule.[63]

Officials were not hopeful about finding survivors after aircraft debris and a black suitcase belonging to Bessette were recovered from the Atlantic Ocean.[64] President Bill Clinton gave his support to the Kennedy family during the search for the three missing passengers.[64]

On July 18, a Coast Guard admiral declared an end to hope that Kennedy, his wife and her sister could be found alive.[65] On July 19, the fragments of Kennedy's plane were found by the ship NOAAS Rude using side-scan sonar. The next day, Navy divers descended into the 62 °F (17 °C) water. The divers found part of the shattered plane strewn over a broad area of seabed 120 feet (37 m) below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean.[66] The search ended in the late afternoon of July 21, when the three bodies were recovered from the ocean floor by Navy divers and taken by motorcade to the county medical examiner's office.[67] The discovery was made from high-resolution images of the ocean bottom.[68] Divers found Carolyn's and Lauren's bodies near the twisted and broken fuselage while Kennedy's body was still strapped into the pilot's seat.[63] Admiral Richard M. Larrabee of the Coast Guard said that all three bodies were "near and under" the fuselage, still strapped in.[69]

On the evening of July 21, the bodies were autopsied at the county medical examiner's office; the findings revealed that the crash victims had died upon impact. At the same time, the Kennedy and Bessette families announced their plans for memorial services.[67] On July 21, the three bodies were taken from Hyannis to Duxbury, Massachusetts, where they were cremated in the Mayflower Cemetery crematorium.[70][71]Ted Kennedy favored a public service for John, while Caroline Kennedy insisted on family privacy.[72] On the morning of July 22, their ashes were scattered at sea from the Navy destroyerUSS Briscoe off the coast of Martha's Vineyard.[73]

A memorial service was held for Kennedy on July 23, 1999, at the Church of St. Thomas More, which was a parish that Kennedy had often attended with his mother and sister. The invitation-only service was attended by hundreds of mourners, including President Bill Clinton, who presented the family with photo albums of John and Carolyn on their visit to the White House from the previous year.[74] Other guests at the church were Ted Kennedy, Arnold Schwarzenegger with Maria Shriver, John Kerry, Lee Radziwill, Maurice Tempelsman and Muhammad Ali.[75]

Kennedy's last will and testament stipulated that his personal belongings, property, and holdings were to be "evenly distributed" among his sister Caroline Kennedy's three children, who were among fourteen beneficiaries in his will.[63]

Legacy[edit]

In 2000, Reaching Up, the organization which Kennedy founded in 1989, joined with The City University of New York to establish the John F. Kennedy Jr. Institute.[76] In 2003, the ARCO Forum at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government was renamed to the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum of Public Affairs. An active participant in Forum events, Kennedy had been a member of the Senior Advisory Committee of Harvard's Institute of Politics for fifteen years. Kennedy's paternal uncle, Ted, said the renaming symbolically linked Kennedy and his father while his sister, Caroline, stated the renaming represented his love of discussing politics.[77]

A drawing of three-year-old JFK Jr. saluting his father's coffin, placed on a memorial wall for him shortly after his death

On the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy Jr.'s father in 2013, the New York Daily News re-ran the famous photograph of the three-year-old John F. Kennedy Jr. saluting his father's coffin during the funeral procession. Photographer Dan Farrell, who took the photo, called it "the saddest thing I've ever seen in my whole life".[78]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^Kennedy Year in ReviewArchived May 13, 2006, at the Wayback MachineCNN.
  2. ^Lucas, Dean (July 22, 2007). "Famous Pictures Magazine – JFK Jr salutes JFK". Famous Pictures Magazine. Retrieved May 21, 2013.
  3. ^NBC Executive Julian Goodman on NBC's coverage of President Kennedy's funeral-EMMYTVLEGENDS on YouTube
  4. ^Miller, Merle (1980). Lyndon: An Oral Biography. New York: Putnam. p. 323.
  5. ^Leamer, p. 1.
  6. ^ abHeymann, pp. 145–146.
  7. ^Seely, Katherine (July 19, 1999). "John F. Kennedy Jr., Heir to a Formidable Dynasty". The New York Times. Retrieved November 8, 2009.
  8. ^Davis, p. 690.
  9. ^Shane, Scott (July 18, 1999). "A life lived in celebrity". Baltimore Sun.
  10. ^Leigh, p. 235.
  11. ^Leigh, pp. 195–196.
  12. ^Leigh, p. 137.
  13. ^Landau, p. 77.
  14. ^Leigh, p. 251.
  15. ^Leigh, pp. 236–237.
  16. ^Landau, p. 78.
  17. ^Landau, p. 82.
  18. ^Robert T. Littell, The Men We Became: My Friendship With John F. Kennedy, Jr. (St. Martin's Press 2004), passim.
  19. ^Gillon, Steven M. (July 7, 2020). America's Reluctant Prince: The Life of John F. Kennedy Jr. Dutton. pp. 148–149. ISBN .
  20. ^Heymann, C. David (July 10, 2007). American Legacy: The Story of John and Caroline Kennedy. Atria Books. p. 218. ISBN .
  21. ^Gillon, Steven M. (July 7, 2020). America's Reluctant Prince: The Life of John F. Kennedy Jr. Dutton. p. 149. ISBN .
  22. ^ abGross, Michael (March 20, 1989). "Favorite Son". New York Magazine.
  23. ^ abBly, p. 279.
  24. ^Heymann, Clemens David (2007). American Legacy: The Story of John & Caroline Kennedy. Simon and Schuster. pp. 323. ISBN .
  25. ^Blow, Richard; Bradley, Richard (2002). American Son: A Portrait of John F. Kennedy, Jr. Macmillan. pp. 17. ISBN .
  26. ^"JOHN KENNEDY JR. FAILS BAR EXAM 2ND TIME; SAYS HE'LL TAKE IT AGAIN". Desert News. May 1, 1990.
  27. ^"John F. Kennedy Jr. Passes Bar Exam". Los Angeles Times. November 4, 1990.
  28. ^Spoto, Donald (2000). Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis: A Life. Macmillan. p. 330. ISBN .
  29. ^Sullivan, Ronald (August 30, 1991). "Prosecutor Kennedy Wins First Trial, Easily". The New York Times.
  30. ^Andersen, Christopher (2014). The Good Son: JFK Jr. and the Mother He Loved. Gallery Books. pp. 266–267. ISBN .
  31. ^"Book: JFK. Jr's Death Foretold". ABC News. July 11, 2000.
  32. ^ abA&E Biography
  33. ^ abLandau, p. 117.
  34. ^ abSumner, David E. (2010). The Magazine Century: American Magazines Since 1900. Peter Lang International Academic Publishers. pp. 201. ISBN .
  35. ^ abLandau, pp. 100–102.
  36. ^Landau, p. 99.
  37. ^Blow, pp. 174–175.
  38. ^ abAndersen, p. 316.
  39. ^Leigh, pp. 322–323.
  40. ^ abHeymann, p. 438.
  41. ^Blow, p. 274.
  42. ^Bercovici, Jeff (2001). "Hachette delivers death ax to George"Archived September 30, 2007, at the Wayback Machine. Media Life Magazine.
  43. ^"Reliable Sources: 'George' Folds"Archived April 18, 2016, at the Wayback Machine. CNN. January 6, 2001.
  44. ^Selye, Katherine Q. (July 19, 1999). "John F. Kennedy Jr., Heir To a Formidable Dynasty". The New York Times.
  45. ^Wadler, Joyce (September 12, 1988). "The Sexiest Kennedy".
  46. ^"John F. Kennedy Jr. introduces his uncle Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.) at the 1988 Democratic Nation" – via www.youtube.com.
  47. ^Bly, p. 297.
  48. ^Kennedy, Edward (July 23, 1999). "The History Place – Great Speeches Collection: Ted Kennedy Speech – Tribute to JFK Junior". www.historyplace.com. Retrieved July 5, 2021.
  49. ^O'Neill, Liisa (May 25, 2009). "Actress and former model Brooke Shields reveals that she didn't lose her virginity until she was 22". New York Daily News.
  50. ^Landau, pp. 94–95.
  51. ^Specter, Michael (September 20, 1992). "FILM; Bimbo? Sarah Jessica Parker Begs to Differ". The New York Times.
  52. ^Landau, Elaine (2000). John F. Kennedy, Jr. Twenty-First Century Books. p. 117. ISBN .
  53. ^Heymann, Clemens David (2007). American Legacy: The Story of John & Caroline Kennedy. Simon and Schuster. pp. 458. ISBN .
  54. ^Heymann, p. 463.
  55. ^Heymann, p. 447.
  56. ^Heymann, pp. 472–473.
  57. ^Hines, Ree (June 26, 2019). "See rare footage from JFK Jr. and Carolyn Bessette's fairy-tale wedding". TODAY.com.
  58. ^Puente, Maria (July 14, 2019). "When JFK Jr. and Carolyn got married: Never before seen tapes on TV for first time". USA Today.
  59. ^Blow, p. 301.
  60. ^Heymann, p. 478-479.
  61. ^Heymann, p. 32.
  62. ^Heymann, p. 36.
  63. ^ abcHeymann, p. 499.
  64. ^ abGrunwald, Michael (July 18, 1999). "JFK Jr. Feared Dead in Plane Crash". The Washington Post.
  65. ^Gellman, Barton (July 19, 1999). "No Hope of Survivors, Admiral Tells Families". The Washington Post.
  66. ^Klein, p. 222.
  67. ^ ab"Crash and Search Time Line". The Washington Post. July 22, 1999. Retrieved November 29, 2012.
  68. ^"Divers Found Bodies". Chicago Tribune. July 22, 1999.
  69. ^Allen, Mike (July 22, 1999). "Bodies From Kennedy Crash Are Found". The New York Times.
  70. ^Maxwell, Paula (July 28, 1999). "Kennedy cremated in Duxbury"(PDF). Duxbury Clipper. Duxbury, MA. Retrieved November 29, 2012.
  71. ^Doing this wrong, but the preceding link is dead. Here's a copy of that report.
  72. ^Landau, p. 20.
  73. ^Gellman, Barton; Ferdinand, Pamela (July 23, 1999). "Kennedy, Bessettes Given Shipboard Rites". The Washington Post. pp. A1. Retrieved May 22, 2008.
  74. ^Landau, p. 23.
  75. ^Kleinfield, N. R. (July 24, 1999). "THE KENNEDY MEMORIAL: THE SERVICE; Doors Closed, Kennedys Offer Their Farewells". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved July 5, 2021.
  76. ^"JFK, JR. INSTITUTE FOR WORKER EDUCATION". Archived from the original on May 22, 2015. Retrieved September 13, 2014.
  77. ^Kicenuik, Kimberly A. (September 22, 2003). "ARCO Forum at IOP Renamed In Honor of John F. Kennedy Jr". The Harvard Crimson.
  78. ^"Daily News' iconic photo of JFK Jr.'s salute to dad's coffin still haunts". New York Daily News. November 17, 2013.

Works cited[edit]

  • Blow, Richard (2002). American Son: A Portrait of John F. Kennedy, Jr. St. Martin's Paperbacks. ISBN .
  • Bly, Nellie (1996). The Kennedy Men: Three Generations of Sex, Scandal and Secrets. Kensington. ISBN .
  • Davis, John H. (1993). The Kennedys: Dynasty and Disaster. S.P.I. Books. ISBN .
  • Heymann, C. David (2008). American Legacy: The Story of John and Caroline Kennedy. Atria Books. ISBN .
  • Landau, Elaine (2000). John F. Kennedy, Jr. Millbrook Press. ISBN .
  • Leamer, Laurence (2005). Sons of Camelot: The Fate of an American Dynasty. William Morrow Paperbacks. ISBN .

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_F._Kennedy_Jr.

On July 16, 1999, John F. Kennedy, Jr.; his wife, Carolyn Bessette Kennedy; and her sister, Lauren Bessette, die when the single-engine plane that Kennedy was piloting crashes into the Atlantic Ocean near Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts.

John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Jr., was born on November 25, 1960, just a few weeks after his father and namesake was elected the 35th president of the United States. On his third birthday, “John-John” attended the funeral of his assassinated father and was photographed saluting his father’s coffin in a famous and searing image. Along with his sister, Caroline, he was raised in Manhattan by his mother, Jacqueline. After graduating from Brown University and a very brief acting stint, he attended New York University Law School. He passed the bar on his third try and worked in New York as an assistant district attorney, winning all six of his cases. In 1995, he founded the political magazine George, which grew to have a circulation of more than 400,000.

READ MORE: The Final Days of John F. Kennedy Jr.

Always in the media spotlight, he was celebrated for the good looks that he inherited from his parents. In 1988, he was named the “Sexiest Man Alive” by People magazine. He was linked romantically with several celebrities, including the actress Daryl Hannah, whom he dated for five years. In September 1996, he married girlfriend Carolyn Bessette, a fashion publicist. The two shared an apartment in New York City, where Kennedy was often seen inline skating in public. Known for his adventurous nature, he nonetheless took pains to separate himself from the more self-destructive behavior of some of the other men in the Kennedy clan.

On July 16, 1999, however, with about 300 hours of flying experience, Kennedy took off from Essex County airport in New Jersey and flew his single-engine plane into a hazy, moonless night. He had turned down an offer by one of his flight instructors to accompany him, saying he “wanted to do it alone.” To reach his destination of Martha’s Vineyard, he would have to fly 200 miles—the final phase over a dark, hazy ocean—and inexperienced pilots can lose sight of the horizon under such conditions. Unable to see shore lights or other landmarks, Kennedy would have to depend on his instruments, but he had not qualified for a license to fly with instruments only. In addition, he was recovering from a broken ankle, which might have affected his ability to pilot his plane.

At Martha’s Vineyard, Kennedy was to drop off his sister-in-law Lauren Bessette, one of his two passengers. From there, Kennedy and his wife, Carolyn, were to fly on to the Kennedy compound on Cape Cod’s Hyannis Port for the marriage of Rory Kennedy, the youngest child of the late Robert F. Kennedy. The Piper Saratoga aircraft never made it to Martha’s Vineyard. Radar data examined later showed the plane plummeting from 2,200 feet to 1,100 feet in a span of 14 seconds, a rate far beyond the aircraft’s safe maximum. It then disappeared from the radar screen.

Kennedy’s plane was reported missing by friends and family members, and an intensive rescue operation was launched by the Coast Guard, the navy, the air force, and civilians. After two days of searching, the thousands of people involved gave up hope of finding survivors and turned their efforts to recovering the wreckage of the aircraft and the bodies. Americans mourned the loss of the “crown prince” of one of the country’s most admired families, a sadness that was especially poignant given the relentless string of tragedies that have haunted the Kennedy family over the years.

On July 21, navy divers recovered the bodies of JFK Jr., his wife, and sister-in-law from the wreckage of the plane, which was lying under 116 feet of water about eight miles off the Vineyard’s shores. The next day, the cremated remains of the three were buried at sea during a ceremony on the USS Briscoe, a navy destroyer. A private mass for JFK Jr. and Carolyn was held on July 23 at the Church of St. Thomas More in Manhattan, where the late Jackie Kennedy Onassis worshipped. President Bill Clinton and his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton, were among the 300 invited guests. The Kennedy family’s surviving patriarch, Senator Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts, delivered a moving eulogy: “From the first day of his life, John seemed to belong not only to our family, but to the American family. He had a legacy, and he learned to treasure it. He was part of a legend, and he learned to live with it.”

Investigators studying the wreckage of the Piper Saratoga found no problems with its mechanical or navigational systems. In their final report released in 2000, the National Transportation Safety Board concluded that the crash was caused by an inexperienced pilot who became disoriented in the dark and lost control.

WATCH: Biography: JFK Jr. on HISTORY Vault

Источник: https://www.history.com

JFK Jr. has stubbornly refused to appear in Dallas, despite messianic predictions that the late scion of the Kennedy clan would return to the land of the living. But the members of QAnon—the Trump-era political conspiracy-theory-cum-cult—who gathered weeks ago in Dallas to await him did not go home. Many of them stayed at Dealey Plaza, one day making the shape of a giant Q, another day lining up to have Michael Brian Protzman, known as Negative48 on Telegram and other right-wing sites, with a bird on his shoulder, show them a nonexistent Illuminati pyramid on top of the Book Depository. The QAnoners attended a Rolling Stones concert and claimed that a number of dead famous people were in fact alive and there in disguise. And one of their followers reportedly offered them property nearby so that they can stay, permanently.

Protzman, who claims to base his predictions on gematria, a form of Jewish numerology, is not alone in prodding the Dallas QAnoners. Yesterday, a Twitter account named for—or pretending to be—John F. Kennedy Sr. asked for a candlelight vigil on the anniversary of his assassination:

They obliged, gathering at Dealey Plaza last night to sing the 1985 anti-famine anthem “We Are the World”—an incongruous choice of songs, perhaps, but one that certainly highlights the average age of the participants:

It’s a nightmarish fever dream. A hilarious hot mess with hints of cringe. Certainly the sort of thing that observers abroad would look at, laugh at, scratch their heads, and move on with their day.

But we should resist the urge to treat this as a joke, because it’s not. It’s not funny, even though it is weird. It’s a murder in waiting.

Podcast episode cover image

As a historian with a background in religious studies, there are any number of precedents I could point to—although they offer little hope that QAnon might just fade away peacefully. Strangely, what this new iteration of QAnon reminds me of more than anything else is the early phase of the First Crusade, the so-called “People’s Crusade”: weird, uncouth, seemingly funny at times, an incredibly murderous, violent collection of groups with an apocalyptic agenda.

When the First Crusade was summoned by Pope Urban II in November 1095, his intended audience was bishops, abbots, and lay lords—people who could summon and lead organized forces of armed pilgrims to conquer Jerusalem. The power of the message rapidly spread beyond papal edicts and letters, however, being taken up by roving preachers and the laity.

As Jay Rubenstein described it in his 2011 book Armies of Heaven, there developed in Northern Europe “a violent, apocalyptic, somewhat acephalous movement rooted in an expectation of the end times and of an imminent battle with Antichrist.” From there, “other preachers, pilgrims, prophets, zealots, and crackpots delivered sermons infused with their own particular apocalyptic and feral sensibilities.” To spread their message, those varied preachers and crackpots drew on signs that may or may not have existed—there are records in the chronicle of Ekkehard of Aura of “a priest of honorable life named Siggerius [who] witnessed two horsemen charging through the skies and for a long time doing battle against one another,” and another who “saw a sword of wondrous length that a whirlwind seemed to be waving about” that flew into the heavens. He goes on to write about stigmata of crosses stamped on people’s brows, a list of bizarre births, and other signs that led “every creature [to join] his Creator’s army, but the enemy—ever alert while others sleep—lost no time in raising up pseudo-prophets.”

And this bit is where the links between QAnon and the People’s Crusade become clear. It is not that QAnon is alone in its murderous ideology—indeed, most of QAnon’s ideas are recycled from a range of other conspiracies and Christian apocalyptic narrative. Some of its goals and parts of its worldview are the warped and bizarre internet versions of pre-existing ideas, such as anti-government armed militia movements, white supremacist ideas drawn from the Turner Diaries, and of course the Trump plot to overturn the election. QAnon has not only become “a violent, apocalyptic, somewhat acephalous movement rooted in an expectation of the end times”—and even a cursory reading of QAnon sites and reports shows how deeply rooted those ideas are—but has given other zealots and crackpots a forum for disseminating their ideas, with results that range in scope.

Some of the more laughable images from the QAnon presence in Dallas have been of Protzman with a bird on his shoulder, showing the long single file of Q adherents a nonexistent Illuminati (an organization that doesn’t exist) pyramid on the Book Depository. False prophets with bizarre birds are not new. In the People’s Crusade, one of the episodes that monastic chroniclers repeatedly mock were preachers following animals. Albert of Aachen wrote of a “gathering of people on foot, who were stupid and insanely irresponsible,” who claimed “that a certain goose was inspired by the Holy Ghost, and a she-goat filled no less with the same, and they had made these their leaders for this holy journey to Jerusalem.” Ekkehard of Aura wrote it as “the silly tale about the goose who is supposed to have led her mistress and many others of that sort.” It was very easy for Christian monastic authors to make fun of it, safe in their monasteries and not dealing with the consequences. Another version of the tale, though, starts similarly but ends in tragedy. In the chronicle of Solomon bar Simson, a twelfth-century edited collection of Jewish historical accounts, we find that that, “One day a Gentile woman came, bringing a goose which she had raised since it was a newborn. The goose would accompany her wherever she went. The Gentile woman now called out to all the passersby: ‘Look, the goose understands my intention to go straying and desires to accompany me.’” Despite this, groups gathered and used this so-called “wonder” to threaten the Jewish community of Mainz, that the magic goose was a “signal that they should exact vengeance from their enemies.” The crusaders and the townsfolk fought, until a crusader was slain, at which point the group called out, “The Jews have caused this,” and both groups joined forces to attack the Jewish community.

Protzman has some 97,000 followers on Telegram, and while the number of Q types gathered in Dallas has dropped from 350-500 in the first few days to perhaps 75-100 now, more than a week after the original promised deadline for JFK’s reappearance, they are still there with him. Protzman seems to believe that JFK and Jackie Kennedy were the second physical incarnations of Jesus and Mary Magdalene, and direct descendants in a genealogy so bizarre not even Dan Brown would touch it, with JFK Jr. as the Archangel Michael and Donald Trump as the Holy Spirit. And while all of this is outrageous and unhinged, he is apparently pushing anti-Semitic films and ideas—Europa: The Last Battle and Adolf Hitler: The Greatest Story Never Told—and leading his followers into ideologies ever more divorced from reality. QAnon is already based in part on medieval blood libel myths, used by Christians to justify massacres of Jewish communities. Protzman’s group is spreading even more direct versions while waiting for the sign for their own crusade, bolstered by apocalyptic visions, the reemergence of dead celebrities to cheer them on, and inevitably the violence and massacres that must follow to create their Promised Land over the bodies of their enemies.

The longer they stay, though, the worse it gets. According to a new report in Vice, the people remaining with Protzman have handed over money, are having their communications monitored, and, according to family members, are “being forced to drink a hydrogen peroxide solution and take ‘bio pellets’ to ward off COVID-19 and stay healthy.” And the fear now is less that this particular band will turn to external violence—though that should never be underestimated—so much as they will end up a Heaven’s Gate or, worse, a Jonestown. On Saturday in a live chat, a follower suggested that they would have to die in order to “witness the truth.” Some of them may have gone to visit the site of the Mount Carmel compound of the Branch Davidians that afternoon. On Sunday, the Negative48 channel on Telegram was saying,

Tomorrow is a day that we are reversing the curse the CABAL tried to destroy us with and here we are…..turning the tables on them! THE BEST IS YET TO COME!

The Dallas QAnon crowd that follows Protzman may be just a small splinter sect of a large cult—but their activities continue, their followers get more radicalized, and most of a month later, they are still in Dallas.

So as the rest of us prepare to share Thanksgiving meals with family and friends, at home, spare a moment for the families whose loved ones have been subsumed by this cult, creating misery that will end no one knows how.

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Источник: https://www.thebulwark.com/the-twisted-qanon-vigil-awaiting-jfk-jr-s-return/

10 years after plane crash death, a look back at JFK Jr.

John F. Kennedy Jr., the son of President John F. Kennedy, died 10 years ago today when the plane he was piloting crashed near Martha's Vineyard. Kennedy's wife, Carolyn Bessette Kennedy, and Carolyn's sister, Lauren, were also killed in the crash. Click through this gallery for a look back on Kennedy's life.

Kennedy walked with his mother, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, at Brown University in 1983 after receiving his Bachelor of Arts degree.
John F. Kennedy Jr., the son of President John F. Kennedy, died 10 years ago today when the plane he was piloting crashed near Martha's Vineyard. Kennedy's wife, Carolyn Bessette Kennedy, and Carolyn's sister, Lauren, were also killed in the crash. Click through this gallery for a look back on Kennedy's life. Kennedy walked with his mother, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, at Brown University in 1983 after receiving his Bachelor of Arts degree.
Источник: http://archive.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/gallery/071609_jfkjr/

John F. Kennedy Jr. and Carolyn Bissette leaving the White House Correspondents’ Dinner in Washington, D.C., May 1, 1999. Photo: MANNY CENETA/AFP/Getty Images

Nearly 20 years after John F. Kennedy Jr. and his wife Carolyn Bessette died in a plane crash, TLC is planning on releasing a movie about their private wedding ceremony, reports Deadline. After regularly denying to reporters that they were engaged, the two wed on September 21, 1996, at Brack Chapel on Cumberland Island, Georgia. The intimate ceremony was reportedly attended by close friends and family members. TLC’s two-hour movie, currently titled JFK Jr. & Carolyn Bessette: A Camelot Wedding, features never-before-seen footage from the rehearsal dinner, wedding, and reception. Considering the efforts JFK Jr. and Bessette underwent to keep the media away from their ceremony, this might be another movie the Kennedys won’t like.

Sources

Deadline

TLC Planning a Movie About John F. Kennedy Jr.’s Wedding

Things you buy through our links may earn New York a commission.

Источник: https://www.vulture.com/2018/04/tlc-planning-a-movie-about-john-f-kennedy-jr-s-wedding.html

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10 years after plane crash death, a look back at JFK Jr.

John F. Kennedy Jr., the son of President John F. Kennedy, died 10 years ago today when the plane he was piloting crashed near Martha's Vineyard. Kennedy's wife, Carolyn Bessette Kennedy, and Carolyn's sister, Lauren, were also killed in the crash. Click through this gallery for a look back on Kennedy's life.

Kennedy walked with his mother, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, at Brown University in 1983 after receiving his Bachelor of Arts degree.
John F. Kennedy Jr., the son of President John F. Kennedy, died 10 years ago today when the plane he was piloting crashed near Martha's Vineyard. Kennedy's wife, Carolyn Bessette Kennedy, and Carolyn's sister, Lauren, were also killed in the crash. Click through this gallery for a look back on Kennedy's life. Kennedy walked with his mother, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, at Brown University in 1983 after receiving his Bachelor of Arts degree.
Источник: http://archive.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/gallery/071609_jfkjr/

Former ‘RHONY’ star Carole Radziwill reflects on relationship with John F. Kennedy Jr.

Former “Real Housewives of New York City” star Carole Radziwill marked the 20th anniversary of John F. Kennedy Jr. and Carolyn Bessette’s deaths by giving a glimpse into the couple’s lives before their untimely passing in a 1999 plane crash.

Radziwill, who was married to JFK Jr.’s cousin, Anthony Radziwill, said on A&E’s “Biography: JFK Jr. — The Final Year” Tuesday that Kennedy was “complicated.”

“Based on his upbringing, what he went through, John is very stoic, so when it came to Anthony’s illness, he had blinders on,” she said in the episode, according to E! News. “He would not really acknowledge that Anthony was going to die from the cancer. He blocked it out for a long time.”

Anthony and John were first cousins — their mothers, Jacqueline Kennedy and Lee Radziwill, were sisters — and the pair shared a special bond, according to Carole.

“They trusted each other, they confided in each other, they teased each other, but they loved each other,” she said. “The kind of love that doesn’t have to express itself all the time, you just knew it.”

Ahead of the “Biography” episode, the former reality star and journalist penned an essay for The Daily Mail about the times she shared with her late husband, Kennedy, and Bessette before they all died within a span of three weeks.

“We spent ten years together, the last five of them in and out of hospitals, and in again,” Carole wrote, making note of Anthony’s cancer diagnosis. “Carolyn made every day of those five years about living, not dying. She made what might have otherwise been a hopelessly grim existence, fun.”

She continued, “These were family, my friends, the people closest to me. But they also meant something to the country, and the world. John balanced the weight and hopes of a new century’s dreams.”

To further commemorate Bessette, Carole shared a photo on Instagram with the caption, “I was going through old photos and came upon this beautiful soul. Best friend. Best smile. Best girl.”

Источник: https://pagesix.com/2019/07/17/former-rhony-star-carole-radziwill-reflects-on-relationship-with-john-f-kennedy-jr/

Only photographer to attend JFK Jr.'s wedding 25 years ago shares intimate memories

John F. Kennedy Jr. grew up in a blazing spotlight and was widely regarded as American royalty. He was one of the most photographed men of his generation and one of the country’s most eligible bachelors.

But few people got a glimpse of him the moment he let go of that bachelor status.

On Sept. 21, 1996, he wed Carolyn Bessette in a secret ceremony witnessed by just 35 guests. Now, 25 years later, the only professional photographer invited to the nuptials is sharing his memories.

Denis Reggie, the brother of Sen. Ted Kennedy's wife, attended the small ceremony that took place on Georgia’s Cumberland Island, held in a tiny church with holes in the floor and no electricity, and he captured unforgettable images from the special day.

“The elegance and less being more and not making it a grand occasion but a warm and loving, memorable weekend — I thought that they pulled it off magnificently,” Reggie told TODAY in a segment aired Thursday.

He recalled snapping the most famous photo of the happy couple just moments after they said, “I do.”

“They came out of the chapel and John reached, as a prince would, for the hand of his bride and brought it to his lips and kissed her hand,” Reggie explained. “I thought there was a magic there. You can see in her face, in Carolyn's face, surprise and elation and love and romance and all those wonderful things."

Some of the only other peeks at the wedding that the public has seen came from the groom's longtime friend Billy Noonan, who in 2019 released footage he took with a handheld video camera for the TLC special "JFK Jr. & Carolyn's Wedding: The Lost Tapes.”

In that special, the son of former President John F. Kennedy thanked the guests for helping him and his bride keep the wedding a secret.

"Carolyn and I owe all of you a great debt of gratitude," the lawyer and journalist said on one of Noonan's tapes. "I realize that we imposed certain conditions upon this event."

While they were able to keep the wedding private, a shocked public delighted in Reggie’s photos afterwards and fell in love with JFK Jr. and Bessette’s story.

Related

As Vanity Fair correspondent Rachel Burchfield told TODAY, “That night, for that one bright shining moment, it was Camelot, in their own way, their own version of Camelot. And it was beautiful.”

Kennedy was 35 and Bessette was 30 when they wed. In 1999, just two months before what would have been their third wedding anniversary, the couple died when their plane crashed off Martha's Vineyard.

Ree Hines

Ree Hines is a freelance writer and editor who covers pop culture, lifestyle stories and trending news. She’s also a soul-music loving, coffee-obsessed member of both Team Cat and Team Dog. Ree lives in Tampa, Florida, and is a regular contributor to TODAY.com.

Источник: https://www.today.com/popculture/photographer-jfk-jr-s-wedding-shares-memories-25-years-later-t231986

Inside QAnon’s JFK Jr conspiracy

Conspiracy theorist group QAnon hit a bizarre milestone on Tuesday, when its supporters gathered for what they believed would be the return of the late JFK junior – who, they postured, would be running on an imagined 2024 ticket with former President Donald Trump.

John Fitzgerald Kennedy Junior’s plane was pulled out of the Atlantic Ocean more than 22 years ago in a crash that killed him, his wife Carolyn and his sister-in-law, Lauren Bessette.

For some QAnon true believers, however, the son of the 35th president of the United States not only survived the tragedy but is poised to make a dramatic return to public life.

A bizarre theory has emerged suggesting that the accident was just a ruse to fake his death and that he will re-emerge – perhaps as early as next month – to join a reinstated President Donald Trump as his VP.

<p>The crowds gathered at Dealey Plaza in Dallas, Texas, on Tuesday </p>

And those devotees gathered on Tuesday for what they expected would be a dramatic revelation at the AT&T Discovery Plaza in Dallas – but was in fact more of a damp squib. When JFK junior unsurprisingly failed to make an appearance, people in the crowd suggested he would in fact make an appearance at a Rolling Stones concert later that day.

Of course, he also failed to attend that event.

But that hasn’t stopped people from speculating that the deceased Kennedy is still alive.

A viral video has even shown a middle-aged man that some QAnon devotees claim is JFK Jr himself.

The theory is strange even by the standards of QAnon – which claims Democrats and Hollywood celebrities are involved in a secret cannibalistic cult which Donald Trump is secretly battling, a theory expounded in cryptic internet messages by a mysterious prophet-like figure known as Q. And while only a fraction appear to believe the JFK Jr angle, experts say it is still damaging to their relationships and their grasp on reality.

QAnon supporters gather in hope JFK Jnr. returns from dead

Will Sommer, author of the upcoming book Trust the Plan: The Rise of QAnon and the Conspiracy That Reshaped America and a longtime observer of the conspiracy theory, estimates that about 20 per cent of Q followers believe in JFK Jr’s re-emergence, but that those who do, “100 per cent believe”.

“QAnon itself is obviously pretty dangerous. It’s hard to say whether the people who believe the JFK Jr [conspiracy] are more dangerous than the QAnon people who don’t,” he told The Independent.

“Part of the problem, just like with any QAnon belief, is that it’s so bizarre that it alienates people from their friends and family.”

But how did “John John” – poignantly pictured saluting his assassinated father’s coffin at the age of three – come to be drawn into such an outlandish fantasy?

<p>A memorial to John F Kennedy Jr following his death featuring a metal sculpture recalling his salute, aged three, to his father’s funeral cortege in 1963</p>

The story goes that after faking his death, Kennedy returned two decades later to help Mr Trump drain the swamp. First he supposedly appeared as Q himself (or close to Q) with the “Q drops” of cryptic information. Then, he was to have revealed himself in 2019, to replace Mike Pence on the president’s 2020 re-election ticket, or maybe the 2021 “reinstatement” (supposedly scheduled for 13 August – although there is no mechanism for reinstating a former president), or maybe the 2024 campaign.

The timeline has kept shifting with each passing milestone.

In the meantime, the lore goes, Kennedy has been in hiding, disguised as a middle-aged, fedora-wearing financial services manager from Pittsburgh named Vincent Fusca.

JFK Jr began trending on Twitter after the comedy duo The Good Liars spotted Mr Fusca at the CPAC conservative conference in July in a video that went viral with 14,000 likes and 2,000 retweets.

“Are you JFK Jr? Yes or No? How did you survive the plane crash? Or was it faked? Wink twice if you’re JFK Jr,” the pair asked him.

Their target, apparently no longer 6ft 1in tall, and wearing a pro-Trump shirt saying “ We want you back, Sir, we miss you Mr President”, responded: “I don’t know who you are man – oh, he’s filming, we got to get going.”

Mr Fusca did not immediately respond to The Independent’s request for an interview. But it’s unclear which is the real Vincent Fusca as several Twitter accounts invoke the name of the man some believe to be a reincarnated JFK Jr.

One Twitter account @vincent_fusca with 134,000 followers, tweeted in the early hours of 7 January – the day after a pro-Trump mob stormed the Capitol to try to prevent Joe Biden’s victory being certified – a mysterious poem featuring lines like “ Surrounded by Truth you see them attack / Do they Eternally want freedom intact? … Soon you’ll be shown the republic where we emancipate at.”

Another account, @Vincent__Fusca, describes himself as a loving husband, father, patriot and Trump supporter with an undying love for the US.

Yet another is called “VINCENT FUSCA HAS OFFICIALLY RETURNED“. He hasn’t fully tweeted since Joe Biden won the election in November, but preaches his own resurrection: “My return was slated for 7/4/20- The date has moved up; VINCE FUSCA IS BACK- JFK JR IS RISEN!”

The theory appears to have emerged from an April 2018 Q drop resurfacing a pre-Q era theory in which JFK Jr’s 1999 plane crash was orchestrated by the Clintons, supposedly to prevent him running for the New York Senate seat later won by Hillary Clinton.

Fact-checkers from Snopes had tackled this older strain of the conspiracy when it spread during the 2016 election, pointing to a New York Daily News article in an effort to debunk it.

Daily News journalist Joel Siegel wrote four days after Kennedy’s death that two friends confirmed the “best-kept” secrets in politics, that he had been seeking the seat.

“The idea became moot once First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton signalled her interest in running, but the two friends said they expected the son of the slain President eventually would have jumped into politics as a candidate,” the story said.

“The second friend called Kennedy’s interest ‘pretty serious,’ adding: ‘I think he was intrigued by the idea … Would he have decided in the end to go for it? I don’t know. But he was clearly thinking about it. He talked to a few people about it. Then the Hillary thing ended it pretty quickly.”

Writing for The Daily Beast, Mr Sommer has been following the evolution of that shifting pre-Q conspiracy, into a Q-conspiracy, since it emerged on 4- and 8Chan messaging boards around October 2017.

<p>John F Kennedy Jr with President Bill Clinton at the White House in 1998</p>

The summer of that year, a new poster going simply by “R”, later dubbed Ranon, connected the existing conspiracy that Kennedy faked his death by saying he did it to become Q so that he could help his friend, Donald Trump, become president.

The supposed evidence: Mr Trump met Russian President Vladimir Putin in Helsinki on 16 July, the 19th anniversary of Kennedy’s fatal plane crash.

Mr Sommer says that for many QAnon believers, this theory is a step too far.

“There is this funny dynamic in QAnon both with JFK Jr and other stuff where they say, ‘Oh I believe that world elites drink children’s blood and all this kind of stuff, but ‘WOAH JFK Jr, that’s the crazy one’.

“I think it’s just so farcical on its face that they’re kind of embarrassed by it, if someone comes out and says I think world elites sometimes abuse their power to abuse children - that doesn’t sound that crazy. If someone were to come out and say, ‘I think JFK Jr was still alive’ - so yeah they find it embarrassing.”

Rolling Stone writer EJ Dickson continued pulling the thread and found the idea gained popularity after George W Bush campaign staffer turned investigative journalist Liz Crokin, formerly of The Chicago Tribune and National Inquirer, began tweeting and talking about the theory in 2018.

“Right after I shared this on Twitter there was a hit piece written about me and I’m thinking, that’s really crazy, that is so bizarre, I just tweeted a theory that wasn’t even my own, and said this is interesting and next thing there’s a hit piece about me, calling me names … so that made me think, there’s something to this,” she said in a YouTube interview.

“The way that Q talks about JFK Sr in the posts, it is with such love and passion, it makes me think that it is someone that is close to him. To me, if If JFK Jr faked his death and was alive, it would make sense that he was Q.”

More evidence came in the form of an (unverified) quote from Kennedy published in his George magazine just one month before his death.

He said: “If my dear friend Donald Trump ever decided to sacrifice his fabulous billionaire lifestyle to become president he would be an unstoppable force for ultimate justice that Democrats and Republicans alike would celebrate”.

The two were friends, and the photo of them together used in the post was real, from a New York Knicks game in March 1999, three months before the June 1999 issue the quote claimed to be from. The closest quote fact-checkers from the Poynter Institute’s PolitiFact found was from a story in The New York Post in November 2016 from Michael Berman, co-founder of George magazine, when Mr Trump and Kennedy schmoozed at Mar-a-Lago.

“As frequently happened to Kennedy at his events, talk soon turned to whether he could envision himself running for president. Trying to deflect the presidential chatter, Kennedy noted that the Trump estate was far more glamorous than a Kennedy family compound a few miles away. ‘I think you should be asking those questions of Donald,’ Kennedy said, according to Berman. ‘He’d clearly have the most extravagant winter White House.’”

Kennedy crashed the Piper Saratoga plane he was flying – with his wife and sister-in-law as passengers – into the Atlantic near Martha’s Vineyard on 16 July, 1999. Their bodies were found five days later. The latest tragedy to befall a family apparently haunted by misfortune made headlines around the world.

For his supposed return at a 4th of July rally in 2019, some supporters carried JFK Jr facemasks.

Others carried Trump JFK Jr 2020 flags or wore his likeness on their shirts, shouting “He’s alive”. Mr Sommer says supporters cheer and interact with Mr Fusca when they see him and ask him if he is really JFK Jr.

“His whole deal is that he’s very cryptic about it. He obviously knows what’s going on but he doesn’t comment on it,” Mr Sommer says.

“He talks about Q and stuff like that. But when I’m like, I want to talk about how people think you’re JFK Jr, he doesn’t do that.”

Spotting Mr Fusca in the background of MAGA rallies and GOP events has become a popular sport for some QAnon followers.

He was seen at Mr Trump’s Ohio rally on 26 June this year, according to Patriot Takes, and before that was seen at CPAC in July. He was also seen at CPAC two years ago in this Reddit post, “JFK Jr spotted at CPAC…. Hillary’s arrest must be imminent”.

At February’s CPAC, he could be seen behind former housing secretary Ben Carson, giving a double-thumbs up, as if to say, “trust the plan”.

Источник: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/jfk-jr-qanon-back-dead-dallas-b1964092.html

John F. Kennedy Jr.

American magazine publisher and lawyer, son of President John F. Kennedy

"John-John" and "John Kennedy Jr." redirect here. For people named John John, see John John. For other people named John Kennedy Jr., see John Kennedy (disambiguation).

John Fitzgerald Kennedy Jr. (November 25, 1960 – July 16, 1999), often referred to as John-John or JFK Jr., was an American lawyer, journalist, and magazine publisher. He was a son of the 35th U.S. president John F. Kennedy and First LadyJacqueline Kennedy, and a younger brother of Caroline Kennedy. Three days before his third birthday, his father was assassinated.

From his childhood years at the White House, Kennedy was heavily covered by media, and later became a popular social figure in Manhattan. Trained as a lawyer, he worked as a New York City assistant district attorney for almost four years. In 1995, Kennedy launched George magazine, using his political and celebrity status to publicize it. He died in a plane crash in 1999 at the age of 38.

Early life[edit]

John Fitzgerald Kennedy Jr. was born at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital on November 25, 1960, two weeks after his father, Massachusetts senator John F. Kennedy, was elected president. His father took office exactly eight weeks after John Jr. was born. His parents had a stillborn daughter named Arabella four years before John Jr.'s birth. John Jr. had an older sister, Caroline, and a younger brother, Patrick, who died two days after his premature birth in 1963. His putative nickname, "John-John", came from a reporter who misheard JFK calling him "John" twice in quick succession; the name was not used by his family.[1]

John Jr. lived in the White House during the first three years of his life and remained in the public spotlight as a young adult. His father was assassinated on November 22, 1963, and the state funeral was held three days later on John Jr.'s third birthday. At his mother's prompting, John Jr. saluted the flag-draped casket as it was carried out from St. Matthew's Cathedral.[2] NBC News vice-president Julian Goodman called the video of the salute "the most impressive...shot in the history of television," which was set up by NBC Director Charles Jones, who was working for the press pool.[3]Lyndon B. Johnson wrote his first letter as president to John Jr. and told him that he "can always be proud" of his father.[4]Stan Stearns, who took an iconic photograph of the salute, served as chief White House photographer during the Johnson administration. Over the years, Stearns showed Johnson the image as it was a symbol of what Johnson said in his letter to John Jr. The family continued with their plans for a birthday party to demonstrate that the Kennedys would go on despite the death of the president.[5]

After President Kennedy was assassinated in 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy moved her family, after a brief residency in the Georgetown area of Washington, to a luxury apartment on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City, where Kennedy Jr. grew up. In 1967, his mother took him and Caroline on a six-week "sentimental journey" to Ireland, where they met PresidentÉamon de Valera and visited the Kennedy ancestral home in Dunganstown.[6]

Mother's remarriage[edit]

After JFK's brother Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated in 1968, Jackie took Caroline and John Jr. out of the United States, saying: "If they're killing Kennedys, then my children are targets ... I want to get out of this country."[7] The same year, she married Greek shipping tycoon Aristotle Onassis, and the family went to live on his private island of Skorpios. Kennedy is said to have considered his stepfather "a joke".[8] When Onassis died in 1975, he left Kennedy $25,000, though Jacqueline was able to renegotiate the will and acquired $20 million for herself and her children.[citation needed]

In 1971, Kennedy returned to the White House with his mother and sister for the first time since the assassination. President Richard Nixon's daughters gave Kennedy a tour that included his old bedroom, and Nixon showed him the Resolute desk under which his father had let him play.[9]

Education[edit]

Kennedy's ninth grade photo in the 1975 Collegiate School yearbook

Kennedy attended private schools in Manhattan, starting at Saint David's School and moving to Collegiate School, which he attended from third through tenth grade.[6] He completed his education at Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. After graduating, he accompanied his mother on a trip to Africa. He rescued his group while on a pioneering course, which had gotten lost for two days without food or water.[10]

In 1976, Kennedy and his cousin visited an earthquake disaster zone at Rabinal in Guatemala, helping with heavy building work and distributing food. The local priest said that they "ate what the people of Rabinal ate and dressed in Guatemalan clothes and slept in tents like most of the earthquake victims," adding that the two "did more for their country's image" in Guatemala "than a roomful of ambassadors."[11] On his sixteenth birthday, Kennedy's Secret Service protection ended[12] and he spent the summer of 1978 working as a wrangler in Wyoming.[13] In 1979, the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston was dedicated, and Kennedy made his first major speech, reciting Stephen Spender's poem "I Think Continually of Those Who Were Truly Great."[14]

Kennedy attended Brown University, where he majored in American studies.[15] There, he co-founded a student discussion group that focused on contemporary issues such as apartheid in South Africa, gun control, and civil rights. Visiting South Africa during a summer break, he was appalled by apartheid, and arranged for U.N. ambassador Andrew Young to speak about the topic at Brown.[16] By his junior year at Brown, he had moved off campus to live with several other students in a shared house,[17] and spent time at Xenon, a club owned by Howard Stein. Kennedy was initiated into Phi Psi, a local social fraternity that had been the Rhode Island Alpha Chapter of national Phi Kappa Psi fraternity until 1978.[18]

In January 1983, Kennedy's Massachusetts driver's license was suspended after he received more than three speeding summonses in a twelve-month period, and failed to appear at a hearing.[19][20] The family's lawyer explained he most likely "became immersed in exams and just forgot the date of the hearing."[21] He graduated that same year with a bachelor's degree in American studies, and then took a break, traveling to India and spending some time at the University of Delhi where he did his post graduation work and he met Mother Teresa. He also worked with some of the Kennedy special interest projects, including the East Harlem School at Exodus House and Reaching Up.[citation needed]

Career[edit]

After the 1984 Democratic Convention in San Francisco, Kennedy returned to New York and earned $20,000 a year in a position at the Office of Business Development, where his boss reflected that he worked "in the same crummy cubbyhole as everybody else. I heaped on the work and was always pleased."[22] From 1984 to 1986, he worked for the New York City Office of Business Development and served as deputy director of the 42nd Street Development Corporation in 1986,[23] conducting negotiations with developers and city agencies. In 1988, he became a summer associate at Manatt, Phelps, Rothenberg & Phillips, a Los Angeles law firm with strong connections to the Democratic Party. There, Kennedy worked for Charlie Manatt, his uncle Ted Kennedy's law school roommate.[22]

From 1989, Kennedy headed Reaching Up, a nonprofit group which provided educational and other opportunities for workers who helped people with disabilities. William Ebenstein, executive director of Reaching Up, said, "He was always concerned with the working poor, and his family always had an interest in helping them."

In 1989, Kennedy earned a J.D. degree from the New York University School of Law.[24] He then failed the New York bar exam twice, before passing on his third try in July 1990.[25] After failing the exam for a second time, Kennedy vowed that he would take it continuously until he was ninety-five years old or passed.[26] If he had failed a third time, he would have been ineligible to serve as a prosecutor in the Manhattan District Attorney's Office, where he worked for the next four years.[27][28] On August 29, 1991, Kennedy won his first case as a prosecutor.[29]

In the summer of 1992, he worked as a journalist and was commissioned by The New York Times to write an article about his kayaking expedition to the Åland Archipelago, where he saved one of his friends from the water when his kayak capsized.[30] He then considered creating a magazine with his friend, public-relations magnate Michael J. Berman—a plan which his mother thought too risky. In his 2000 book The Day John Died, Christopher Andersen wrote that Jacqueline had also worried that her son would die in a plane crash, and asked her longtime companion Maurice Tempelsman "to do whatever it took to keep John from becoming a pilot".[31]

Acting[edit]

Meanwhile, Kennedy had done a bit of acting, which was one of his passions (he had appeared in many plays while at Brown). He expressed interest in acting as a career, but his mother strongly disapproved of it, considering it an unsuitable profession.[32] On August 4, 1985, Kennedy made his New York acting debut in front of an invitation-only audience at the Irish Theater on Manhattan's West Side. Executive director of the Irish Arts Center, Nye Heron, said that Kennedy was "one of the best young actors I've seen in years".[23] Kennedy's director, Robin Saex, stated, "He has an earnestness that just shines through." Kennedy's largest acting role was playing a fictionalized version of himself in the eighth-season episode of the sitcom Murphy Brown, called "Altered States". In this episode, Kennedy visits Brown at her office, in order to promote a magazine he is publishing.

George magazine[edit]

In 1995, Kennedy and Michael Berman founded George, a glossy, politics-as-lifestyle and fashion monthly, with Kennedy controlling 50 percent of the shares.[32] Kennedy officially launched the magazine at a news conference in Manhattan on September 8 and joked that he had not seen so many reporters in one place since he failed his first bar exam.[33]

Each issue of the magazine contained an editor's column and interviews written by Kennedy,[34] who believed they could make politics "accessible by covering it in an entertaining and compelling way" which would allow "popular interest and involvement" to follow.[35] Kennedy did interviews with Louis Farrakhan, Billy Graham, Garth Brooks, and others.[35]

The first issue was criticized for its image of Cindy Crawford posing as George Washington in a powdered wig and ruffled shirt. In defense of the cover, Kennedy stated that "political magazines should look like Mirabella."[36]

In July 1997, Vanity Fair had published a profile of New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani, claiming that the mayor was sleeping with his press secretary (which both parties denied). Although tempted to follow up on this story, Kennedy decided against it.[37] The same month, Kennedy wrote about meeting Mother Teresa, declaring that the "three days I spent in her presence was the strongest evidence this struggling Catholic has ever had that God exists."[34]

The September 1997 issue of George centered on temptation, and featured two of Kennedy's cousins, Michael LeMoyne Kennedy and Joseph P. Kennedy II. Michael had been accused of having an affair with his children's underaged babysitter, while Joe had been accused by his ex-wife of having bullied her. John declared that both his cousins had become "poster boys for bad behavior"—believed to be the first time a member of the Kennedy family had publicly attacked another Kennedy. He said he was trying to show that press coverage of the pair was unfair, due to them being Kennedys.[38] But Joe paraphrased John's father by stating, "Ask not what you can do for your cousin, but what you can do for his magazine."[39]

Decline[edit]

By early 1997, Kennedy and Berman found themselves locked in a power struggle, which led to screaming matches, slammed doors, and even one physical altercation. Eventually Berman sold his share of the company, and Kennedy took on Berman's responsibilities himself. Though the magazine had already begun to decline in popularity before Berman left, his departure was followed by a rapid drop in sales.[40]

David Pecker, CEO of Hachette Filipacchi Magazines who were partners in George, said the decline was because Kennedy refused to "take risks as an editor, despite the fact that he was an extraordinary risk taker in other areas of his life." Pecker said, "He understood that the target audience for George was the eighteen-to-thirty-four-year-old demographic, yet he would routinely turn down interviews that would appeal to this age group, like Princess Diana or John Gotti Jr., to interview subjects like Dan Rostenkowski or Võ Nguyên Giáp."[40] Shortly before his death, Kennedy had been planning a series of online chats with the 2000 presidential candidates. Microsoft was to provide the technology and pay for it while receiving advertising in George.[41] After his death, the magazine was bought out by Hachette,[42] but folded in early 2001.[43]

Later life[edit]

Family activity[edit]

Kennedy addressed the 1988 Democratic National Convention in Atlanta, introducing his uncle, Senator Ted Kennedy. He invoked his father's inaugural address, calling "a generation to public service", and received a two-minute standing ovation.[44] Republican consultant Richard Viguerie said he did not remember a word of the speech, but remembered "a good delivery" and added, "I think it was a plus for the Democrats and the boy. He is strikingly handsome."[45][46]

Kennedy participated in his cousin Patrick J. Kennedy's campaign for a seat in the Rhode Island House of Representatives by visiting the district.[47] He sat outside the polling booth and had his picture taken with "would-be" voters. The polaroid ploy worked so well in the campaign that Patrick J. Kennedy used it again in 1994.

Kennedy also campaigned in Boston for his uncle's re-election to the U.S. Senate against challenger Mitt Romney in 1994. "He always created a stir when he arrived in Massachusetts," remarked Senator Kennedy.[48]

Relationships[edit]

While attending Brown University, Kennedy met Sally Munro, whom he dated for six years, and they visited India in 1983. While he was a student at Brown, he also met socialite Brooke Shields,[49] with whom he was later linked.

Kennedy also dated models Cindy Crawford and Julie Baker, as well as actress Sarah Jessica Parker,[50] who said she enjoyed dating Kennedy but realized he "was a public domain kind of a guy." Parker claimed to have no idea what "real fame" was until dating Kennedy and felt that she should "apologize for dating him" since it became the "defining factor in the person" she was.[51]

Kennedy had known actress Daryl Hannah since their two families had vacationed together in St. Maarten in the early '80s. After meeting again at the wedding of his aunt Lee Radziwill in 1988, they dated for five and a half years, though their relationship was complicated by her feelings for singer Jackson Browne, with whom she had lived for a time.

Also during this time, Kennedy dated Christina Haag. They had known each other as children, and she also attended Brown University.

Marriage[edit]

After his relationship with Daryl Hannah ended, Kennedy cohabitated with Carolyn Bessette, who worked in the fashion industry. They were engaged for a year, though Kennedy consistently denied reports of this. On September 21, 1996, they married in a private ceremony on Cumberland Island, Georgia,[52] where his sister, Caroline, was matron of honor and his cousin Anthony Radziwill was best man.[53]

The next day, Kennedy's cousin Patrick revealed that the pair had married. When they returned to their Manhattan home, a mass of reporters was on the doorstep. One of them asked Kennedy if he had enjoyed his honeymoon, to which he responded: "Very much." He added "Getting married is a big adjustment for us, and for a private citizen like Carolyn even more so. I ask you to give her all the privacy and room you can."[54]

But Carolyn was, in fact, badly disoriented by the constant attention from the paparazzi. The couple was permanently on show, both at fashionable Manhattan events, and on their travels to visit celebrities such as Mariuccia Mandelli and Gianni Versace.[55] She also complained to her friend, journalist Jonathan Soroff, that she could not get a job without being accused of exploiting her fame.[56]

In June 2019, Billy Noonan, a longtime friend of John F. Kennedy Jr., released a video tape of the secret wedding that had taken place on the remote island.[57][58]

Piloting[edit]

Kennedy took flying lessons at the Flight Safety Academy in Vero Beach, Florida.[38] In April 1998, he received his pilot's license, which he had aspired to since he was a child.[33]

The death of his cousin Michael in a skiing accident[59] prompted John to take a hiatus from his piloting lessons for three months. His sister Caroline hoped this would be permanent, but when he resumed, she did little to stop him.[60]

Death[edit]

Main article: John F. Kennedy Jr. plane crash

On July 16, 1999, Kennedy departed from Fairfield, New Jersey, at the controls of his Piper Saratoga light aircraft. He was traveling with his wife Carolyn and sister-in-law Lauren Bessette to attend the wedding of his cousin Rory Kennedy at Hyannis Port, Massachusetts, after having picked Lauren up in Martha's Vineyard. He had purchased the plane on April 28, 1999, from Air Bound Aviation.[61] Carolyn and Lauren were passengers sitting in the second row of seats.[62] Kennedy had checked in with the control tower at the Martha's Vineyard Airport, but the plane was reported missing after it failed to arrive on schedule.[63]

Officials were not hopeful about finding survivors after aircraft debris and a black suitcase belonging to Bessette were recovered from the Atlantic Ocean.[64] President Bill Clinton gave his support to the Kennedy family during the search for the three missing passengers.[64]

On July 18, a Coast Guard admiral declared an end to hope that Kennedy, his wife and her sister could be found alive.[65] On July 19, the fragments of Kennedy's plane were found by the ship NOAAS Rude using side-scan sonar. The next day, Navy divers descended into the 62 °F (17 °C) water. The divers found part of the shattered plane strewn over a broad area of seabed 120 feet (37 m) below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean.[66] The search ended in the late afternoon of July 21, when the three bodies were recovered from the ocean floor by Navy divers and taken by motorcade to the county medical examiner's office.[67] The discovery was made from high-resolution images of the ocean bottom.[68] Divers found Carolyn's and Lauren's bodies near the twisted and broken fuselage while Kennedy's body was still strapped into the pilot's seat.[63] Admiral Richard M. Larrabee of the Coast Guard said that all three bodies were "near and under" the fuselage, still strapped in.[69]

On the evening of July 21, the bodies were autopsied at the county medical examiner's office; the findings revealed that the crash victims had died upon impact. At the same time, the Kennedy and Bessette families announced their plans for memorial services.[67] On July 21, the three bodies were taken from Hyannis to Duxbury, Massachusetts, where they were cremated in the Mayflower Cemetery crematorium.[70][71]Ted Kennedy favored a public service for John, while Caroline Kennedy insisted on family privacy.[72] On the morning of July 22, their ashes were scattered at sea from the Navy destroyerUSS Briscoe off the coast of Martha's Vineyard.[73]

A memorial service was held for Kennedy on July 23, 1999, at the Church of St. Thomas More, which was a parish that Kennedy had often attended with his mother and sister. The invitation-only service was attended by hundreds of mourners, including President Bill Clinton, who presented the family with photo albums of John and Carolyn on their visit to the White House from the previous year.[74] Other guests at the church were Ted Kennedy, Arnold Schwarzenegger with Maria Shriver, John Kerry, Lee Radziwill, Maurice Tempelsman and Muhammad Ali.[75]

Kennedy's last will and testament stipulated that his personal belongings, property, and holdings were to be "evenly distributed" among his sister Caroline Kennedy's three children, who were among fourteen beneficiaries in his will.[63]

Legacy[edit]

In 2000, Reaching Up, the organization which Kennedy founded in 1989, joined with The City University of New York to establish the John F. Kennedy Jr. Institute.[76] In 2003, the ARCO Forum at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government was renamed to the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum of Public Affairs. An active participant in Forum events, Kennedy had been a member of the Senior Advisory Committee of Harvard's Institute of Politics for fifteen years. Kennedy's paternal uncle, Ted, said the renaming symbolically linked Kennedy and his father while his sister, Caroline, stated the renaming represented his love of discussing politics.[77]

A drawing of three-year-old JFK Jr. saluting his father's coffin, placed on a memorial wall for him shortly after his death

On the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy Jr.'s father in 2013, the New York Daily News re-ran the famous photograph of the three-year-old John F. Kennedy Jr. saluting his father's coffin during the funeral procession. Photographer Dan Farrell, who took the photo, called it "the saddest thing I've ever seen in my whole life".[78]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^Kennedy Year in ReviewArchived May 13, 2006, at the Wayback MachineCNN.
  2. ^Lucas, Dean (July 22, 2007). "Famous Pictures Magazine – JFK Jr salutes JFK". Famous Pictures Magazine. Retrieved May 21, 2013.
  3. ^NBC Executive Julian Goodman on NBC's coverage of President Kennedy's funeral-EMMYTVLEGENDS on YouTube
  4. ^Miller, Merle (1980). Lyndon: An Oral Biography. New York: Putnam. p. 323.
  5. ^Leamer, p. 1.
  6. ^ abHeymann, pp. 145–146.
  7. ^Seely, Katherine (July 19, 1999). "John F. Kennedy Jr., Heir to a Formidable Dynasty". The New York Times. Retrieved November 8, 2009.
  8. ^Davis, p. 690.
  9. ^Shane, Scott (July 18, 1999). "A life lived in celebrity". Baltimore Sun.
  10. ^Leigh, p. 235.
  11. ^Leigh, pp. 195–196.
  12. ^Leigh, p. 137.
  13. ^Landau, p. 77.
  14. ^Leigh, p. 251.
  15. ^Leigh, pp. 236–237.
  16. ^Landau, p. 78.
  17. ^Landau, p. 82.
  18. ^Robert T. Littell, The Men We Became: My Friendship With John F. Kennedy, Jr. (St. Martin's Press 2004), passim.
  19. ^Gillon, Steven M. (July 7, 2020). America's Reluctant Prince: The Life of John F. Kennedy Jr. Dutton. pp. 148–149. ISBN .
  20. ^Heymann, C. David (July 10, 2007). American Legacy: The Story of John and Caroline Kennedy. Atria Books. p. 218. ISBN .
  21. ^Gillon, Steven M. (July 7, 2020). America's Reluctant Prince: The Life of John F. Kennedy Jr. Dutton. p. 149. ISBN .
  22. ^ abGross, Michael (March 20, 1989). "Favorite Son". New York Magazine.
  23. ^ abBly, p. 279.
  24. ^Heymann, Clemens David (2007). American Legacy: The Story of John & Caroline Kennedy. Simon and Schuster. pp. 323. ISBN .
  25. ^Blow, Richard; Bradley, Richard (2002). American Son: A Portrait of John F. Kennedy, Jr. Macmillan. pp. 17. ISBN .
  26. ^"JOHN KENNEDY JR. FAILS BAR EXAM 2ND TIME; SAYS HE'LL TAKE IT AGAIN". Desert News. May 1, 1990.
  27. ^"John F. Kennedy Jr. Passes Bar Exam". Los Angeles Times. November 4, 1990.
  28. ^Spoto, Donald (2000). Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis: A Life. Macmillan. p. 330. ISBN .
  29. ^Sullivan, Ronald (August 30, 1991). "Prosecutor Kennedy Wins First Trial, Easily". The New York Times.
  30. ^Andersen, Christopher (2014). The Good Son: JFK Jr. and the Mother He Loved. Gallery Books. pp. 266–267. ISBN .
  31. ^"Book: JFK. Jr's Death Foretold". ABC News. July 11, 2000.
  32. ^ abA&E Biography
  33. ^ abLandau, p. 117.
  34. ^ abSumner, David E. (2010). The Magazine Century: American Magazines Since 1900. Peter Lang International Academic Publishers. pp. 201. ISBN .
  35. ^ abLandau, pp. 100–102.
  36. ^Landau, p. 99.
  37. ^Blow, pp. 174–175.
  38. ^ abAndersen, p. 316.
  39. ^Leigh, pp. 322–323.
  40. ^ abHeymann, p. 438.
  41. ^Blow, p. 274.
  42. ^Bercovici, Jeff (2001). "Hachette delivers death ax to George"Archived September 30, 2007, at the Wayback Machine. Media Life Magazine.
  43. ^"Reliable Sources: 'George' Folds"Archived April 18, 2016, at the Wayback Machine. CNN. January 6, 2001.
  44. ^Selye, Katherine Q. (July 19, 1999). "John F. Kennedy Jr., Heir To a Formidable Dynasty". The New York Times.
  45. ^Wadler, Joyce (September 12, 1988). "The Sexiest Kennedy".
  46. ^"John F. Kennedy Jr. introduces his uncle Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.) at the 1988 Democratic Nation" – via www.youtube.com.
  47. ^Bly, p. 297.
  48. ^Kennedy, Edward (July 23, 1999). "The History Place – Great Speeches Collection: Ted Kennedy Speech – Tribute to JFK Junior". www.historyplace.com. Retrieved July 5, 2021.
  49. ^O'Neill, Liisa (May 25, 2009). "Actress and former model Brooke Shields reveals that she didn't lose her virginity until she was 22". New York Daily News.
  50. ^Landau, pp. 94–95.
  51. ^Specter, Michael (September 20, 1992). "FILM; Bimbo? Sarah Jessica Parker Begs to Differ". The New York Times.
  52. ^Landau, Elaine (2000). John F. Kennedy, Jr. Twenty-First Century Books. p. 117. ISBN .
  53. ^Heymann, Clemens David (2007). American Legacy: The Story of John & Caroline Kennedy. Simon and Schuster. pp. 458. ISBN .
  54. ^Heymann, p. 463.
  55. ^Heymann, p. 447.
  56. ^Heymann, pp. 472–473.
  57. ^Hines, Ree (June 26, 2019). "See rare footage from JFK Jr. and Carolyn Bessette's fairy-tale wedding". TODAY.com.
  58. ^Puente, Maria (July 14, 2019). "When JFK Jr. and Carolyn got married: Never before seen tapes on TV for first time". USA Today.
  59. ^Blow, p. 301.
  60. ^Heymann, p. 478-479.
  61. ^Heymann, p. 32.
  62. ^Heymann, p. 36.
  63. ^ abcHeymann, p. 499.
  64. ^ abGrunwald, Michael (July 18, 1999). "JFK Jr. Feared Dead in Plane Crash". The Washington Post.
  65. ^Gellman, Barton (July 19, 1999). "No Hope of Survivors, Admiral Tells Families". The Washington Post.
  66. ^Klein, p. 222.
  67. ^ ab"Crash and Search Time Line". The Washington Post. July 22, 1999. Retrieved November 29, 2012.
  68. ^"Divers Found Bodies". Chicago Tribune. July 22, 1999.
  69. ^Allen, Mike (July 22, 1999). "Bodies From Kennedy Crash Are Found". The New York Times.
  70. ^Maxwell, Paula (July 28, 1999). "Kennedy cremated in Duxbury"(PDF). Duxbury Clipper. Duxbury, MA. Retrieved November 29, 2012.
  71. ^Doing this wrong, but the preceding link is dead. Here's a copy of that report.
  72. ^Landau, p. 20.
  73. ^Gellman, Barton; Ferdinand, Pamela (July 23, 1999). "Kennedy, Bessettes Given Shipboard Rites". The Washington Post. pp. A1. Retrieved May 22, 2008.
  74. ^Landau, p. 23.
  75. ^Kleinfield, N. R. (July 24, 1999). "THE KENNEDY MEMORIAL: THE SERVICE; Doors Closed, Kennedys Offer Their Farewells". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved July 5, 2021.
  76. ^"JFK, JR. INSTITUTE FOR WORKER EDUCATION". Archived from the original on May 22, 2015. Retrieved September 13, 2014.
  77. ^Kicenuik, Kimberly A. (September 22, 2003). "ARCO Forum at IOP Renamed In Honor of John F. Kennedy Jr". The Harvard Crimson.
  78. ^"Daily News' iconic photo of JFK Jr.'s salute to dad's coffin still haunts". New York Daily News. November 17, 2013.

Works cited[edit]

  • Blow, Richard (2002). American Son: A Portrait of John F. Kennedy, Jr. St. Martin's Paperbacks. ISBN .
  • Bly, Nellie (1996). The Kennedy Men: Three Generations of Sex, Scandal and Secrets. Kensington. ISBN .
  • Davis, John H. (1993). The Kennedys: Dynasty and Disaster. S.P.I. Books. ISBN .
  • Heymann, C. David (2008). American Legacy: The Story of John and Caroline Kennedy. Atria Books. ISBN .
  • Landau, Elaine (2000). John F. Kennedy, Jr. Millbrook Press. ISBN .
  • Leamer, Laurence (2005). Sons of Camelot: The Fate of an American Dynasty. William Morrow Paperbacks. ISBN .

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_F._Kennedy_Jr.

JFK Jr. has stubbornly refused to appear in Dallas, despite messianic predictions that the late scion of the Kennedy clan would return to the land of the living. But the members of QAnon—the Trump-era political conspiracy-theory-cum-cult—who gathered weeks ago in Dallas to await him did not go home. Many of them stayed at Dealey Plaza, one day making the shape of a giant Q, another day lining up to have Michael Brian Protzman, known as Negative48 on Telegram and other right-wing sites, with a bird on his shoulder, show them a nonexistent Illuminati pyramid on top of the Book Depository. The QAnoners attended a Rolling Stones concert and claimed that a number of dead famous people were in fact alive and there in disguise. And one of their followers reportedly offered them property nearby so that they can stay, permanently.

Protzman, who claims to base his predictions on gematria, a form of Jewish numerology, is not alone in prodding the Dallas QAnoners. Yesterday, a Twitter account named for—or pretending to be—John F. Kennedy Sr. asked for a candlelight vigil on the anniversary of his assassination:

They obliged, gathering at Dealey Plaza last night to sing the 1985 anti-famine anthem “We Are the World”—an incongruous choice of songs, perhaps, but one that certainly highlights the average age of the participants:

It’s a nightmarish fever dream. A hilarious hot mess with hints of cringe. Certainly the sort of thing that observers abroad would look at, laugh at, scratch their heads, and move on with their day.

But we should resist the urge to treat this as a joke, because it’s not. It’s not funny, even though it is weird. It’s a murder in waiting.

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As a historian with a background in religious studies, there are any number of precedents I could point to—although they offer little hope that QAnon might just fade away peacefully. Strangely, what this new iteration of QAnon reminds me of more than anything else is the early phase of the First Crusade, the so-called “People’s Crusade”: weird, uncouth, seemingly funny at times, an incredibly murderous, violent collection of groups with an apocalyptic agenda.

When the First Crusade was summoned by Pope Urban II in November 1095, his intended audience was bishops, abbots, and lay lords—people who could summon and lead organized forces of armed pilgrims to conquer Jerusalem. The power of the message rapidly spread beyond papal edicts and letters, however, being taken up by roving preachers and the laity.

As Jay Rubenstein described it in his 2011 book Armies of Heaven, there developed in Northern Europe “a violent, apocalyptic, somewhat acephalous movement rooted in an expectation of the end times and of an imminent battle with Antichrist.” From there, “other preachers, pilgrims, prophets, zealots, and crackpots delivered sermons infused with their own particular apocalyptic and feral sensibilities.” To spread their message, those varied preachers and crackpots drew on signs that may or may not have existed—there are records in the chronicle of Ekkehard of Aura of “a priest of honorable life named Siggerius [who] witnessed two horsemen charging through the skies and for a long time doing battle against one another,” and another who “saw a sword of wondrous length that a whirlwind seemed to be waving about” that flew into the heavens. He goes on to write about stigmata of crosses stamped on people’s brows, a list of bizarre births, and other signs that led “every creature [to join] his Creator’s army, but the enemy—ever alert while others sleep—lost no time in raising up pseudo-prophets.”

And this bit is where the links between QAnon and the People’s Crusade become clear. It is not that QAnon is alone in its murderous ideology—indeed, most of QAnon’s ideas are recycled from a range of other conspiracies and Christian apocalyptic narrative. Some of its goals and parts of its worldview are the warped and bizarre internet versions of pre-existing ideas, such as anti-government armed militia movements, white supremacist ideas drawn from the Turner Diaries, and of course the Trump plot to overturn the election. QAnon has not only become “a violent, apocalyptic, somewhat acephalous movement rooted in an expectation of the end times”—and even a cursory reading of QAnon sites and reports shows how deeply rooted those ideas are—but has given other zealots and crackpots a forum for disseminating their ideas, with results that range in scope.

Some of the more laughable images from the QAnon presence in Dallas have been of Protzman with a bird on his shoulder, showing the long single file of Q adherents a nonexistent Illuminati (an organization that doesn’t exist) pyramid on the Book Depository. False prophets with bizarre birds are not new. In the People’s Crusade, one of the episodes that monastic chroniclers repeatedly mock were preachers following animals. Albert of Aachen wrote of a “gathering of people on foot, who were stupid and insanely irresponsible,” who claimed “that a certain goose was inspired by the Holy Ghost, and a she-goat filled no less with the same, and they had made these their leaders for this holy journey to Jerusalem.” Ekkehard of Aura wrote it as “the silly tale about the goose who is supposed to have led her mistress and many others of that sort.” It was very easy for Christian monastic authors to make fun of it, safe in their monasteries and not dealing with the consequences. Another version of the tale, though, starts similarly but ends in tragedy. In the chronicle of Solomon bar Simson, a twelfth-century edited collection of Jewish historical accounts, we find that that, “One day a Gentile woman came, bringing a goose which she had raised since it was a newborn. The goose would accompany her wherever she went. The Gentile woman now called out to all the passersby: ‘Look, the goose understands my intention to go straying and desires to accompany me.’” Despite this, groups gathered and used this so-called “wonder” to threaten the Jewish community of Mainz, that the magic goose was a “signal that they should exact vengeance from their enemies.” The crusaders and the townsfolk fought, until a crusader was slain, at which point the group called out, “The Jews have caused this,” and both groups joined forces to attack the Jewish community.

Protzman has some 97,000 followers on Telegram, and while the number of Q types gathered in Dallas has dropped from 350-500 in the first few days to perhaps 75-100 now, more than a week after the original promised deadline for JFK’s reappearance, they are still there with him. Protzman seems to believe that JFK and Jackie Kennedy were the second physical incarnations of Jesus and Mary Magdalene, and direct descendants in a genealogy so bizarre not even Dan Brown would touch it, with JFK Jr. as the Archangel Michael and Donald Trump as the Holy Spirit. And while all of this is outrageous and unhinged, he is apparently pushing anti-Semitic films and ideas—Europa: The Last Battle and Adolf Hitler: The Greatest Story Never Told—and leading his followers into ideologies ever more divorced from reality. QAnon is already based in part on medieval blood libel myths, used by Christians to justify massacres of Jewish communities. Protzman’s group is spreading even more direct versions while waiting for the sign for their own crusade, bolstered by apocalyptic visions, the reemergence of dead celebrities to cheer them on, and inevitably the violence and massacres that must follow to create their Promised Land over the bodies of their enemies.

The longer they stay, though, the worse it gets. According to a new report in Vice, the people remaining with Protzman have handed over money, are having their communications monitored, and, according to family members, are “being forced to drink a hydrogen peroxide solution and take ‘bio pellets’ to ward off COVID-19 and stay healthy.” And the fear now is less that this particular band will turn to external violence—though that should never be underestimated—so much as they will end up a Heaven’s Gate or, worse, a Jonestown. On Saturday in a live chat, a follower suggested that they would have to die in order to “witness the truth.” Some of them may have gone to visit the site of the Mount Carmel compound of the Branch Davidians that afternoon. On Sunday, the Negative48 channel on Telegram was saying,

Tomorrow is a day that we are reversing the curse the CABAL tried to destroy us with and here we are…..turning the tables on them! THE BEST IS YET TO COME!

The Dallas QAnon crowd that follows Protzman may be just a small splinter sect of a large cult—but their activities continue, their followers get more radicalized, and most of a month later, they are still in Dallas.

So as the rest of us prepare to share Thanksgiving meals with family and friends, at home, spare a moment for the families whose loved ones have been subsumed by this cult, creating misery that will end no one knows how.

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Источник: https://www.thebulwark.com/the-twisted-qanon-vigil-awaiting-jfk-jr-s-return/

JFK Jr. would’ve been 60 today — a look back on his life

“John-John” Fitzgerald Kennedy should’ve turned 60 this week.

The handsome son of former President John F. Kennedy died more than two decades ago, but his legacy lives on, with friends and colleagues honoring his would-be birthday by recalling his cut-short life.

“His legacy was really about who he would’ve become,” former Manhattan Assistant District Attorney Brian Steel, who worked with Kennedy, told Today this week. “But I just think America and maybe the world would have been a better place” if he had lived longer.

In his 38 years, JFK Jr. became a trained lawyer, launched a magazine and managed a media spotlight perpetually focused on him since childhood. His life came to an abrupt end when, on July 16, 1999, he died alongside his wife, Carolyn Bessette, and sister-in-law, Lauren Bessette, after the private plane he was piloting plummeted into the Atlantic.

“If John knew he would be gone at 38 years old, I don’t think John would have wanted to be forgotten,” former magazine executive assistant Rosemarie Terenzio told Today.

On what would’ve been his 60th birthday, some highlights from a life curtailed.

john-f-kennedy-jrBettmann Archive
john-f-kennedy-jrBettmann Archive
john-f-kennedy-jrBettmann Archive

JFK Jr. was born Nov. 25, 1960, just two weeks after his father was elected president. The nickname “John-John,” developed after a reporter misheard JFK refer to John, and became a popular diminutive for him in the media — although his family didn’t adopt it.

John Jr. grew up at the White House until his father’s 1963 assassination. On his third birthday, in a moment which was captured in an iconic photograph which would become representative of the decade, he rendered a final salute during his father’s state funeral procession.

john-f-kennedy-jrBettmann Archive
john-f-kennedy-jrBettmann Archive
john-f-kennedy-jrGetty Images

Following Robert F. Kennedy’s 1968 assassination , Jackie Kennedy took John and his older sister Caroline out of the US, fearing for their lives. That same year she married Greek shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis, and the family proceeded to live on his private island, Skorpios.

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john-f-kennedy-jrBettmann Archive
john-f-kennedy-jrGetty Images

JFK Jr. spent most of his elementary, middle and high school years at elite Manhattan private schools. After graduation, he traveled widely and volunteered before attending Brown University, where he continued to be politically involved in helping the causes he was most moved by, including civil rights and gun control.

john-f-kennedy-jrGetty Images
john-f-kennedy-jrLawrence Schwartzwald

In his short adult life, John managed to become a lawyer, worked in the Manhattan District Attorney’s office as a prosecutor, for the New York Times as a journalist, as an actor at Manhattan’s Irish Arts Center and, in 1995, co-founded the political lifestyle magazine George, which folded in 2001.

john-f-kennedy-jrRon Galella Collection via Getty
john-f-kennedy-jrAFP via Getty Images

On July 16, 1999, JFK Jr.’s plane was reported missing while en route to Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts. A search commenced, but within days a Coast Guard admiral admitted to the family that there was no hope of finding John, Carolyn or Lauren alive.

Fragments of the plane were discovered on July 19, and on July 21 all three of the passengers’ bodies were recovered.

Hundreds came to pay their respects at the July 23 funeral at Manhattan’s St. Thomas More Church.

Mourners outside the Church of St. Thomas More after a private memorial mass for  John F. Kennedy Jr., and his wife Carolyn Bessette Kennedy on July 23, 1999 in New York.

In Sen. Edward Kennedy’s eulogy of his nephew at the service, he noted that JFK Jr. had not even lived long enough to comb a gray hair.

“I think that was probably the line that took us all out,” Terenzio told Today. “Now you look back, and you think of what might have been.”

Источник: https://nypost.com/2020/11/25/jfk-jr-wouldve-been-60-today-a-look-back-on-his-life/

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