home remedies for constipation while pregnant

Never take a laxative or stool softener to treat constipation, though, without first speaking with your health care provider, says Wong. While. Do not use any OTC product or medication during pregnancy without checking with your provider first. While occasional constipation can cause. Uterus expansion, additional pressure on your womb and even prenatal pills contribute to trouble using the bathroom. Eliminating Constipation During Pregnancy.

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Research states that around 11 – 38% of women suffer from constipation and other bowel issues at some point in their pregnancy (1). Constipation becomes more than just a discomfort when you are pregnant. The heavy and bloated feeling combined with the growing belly can be a pain.

If you want to end your bowel discomfort without using medications,  read on. MomJunction gives you a few home remedies to treat constipation during pregnancy. However, do check with your doctor before trying these remedies.

What Causes Pregnancy Constipation?

The increasing level of progesterone hormone in pregnancy slows down the functioning of the gastrointestinal system, resulting in constipation.

Constipation and discomfort are higher in early pregnancy due to the backward tilting of the womb (retroversion) until about 12 weeks and a sudden change of progesterone level in the blood.

During the second and third trimesters, the pressure exerted by the growing womb on your bowels will intensify the problem. Also, consumption of iron and calcium supplements, low-fiber diet, lack of exercise, dehydration, worry, and anxiety might cause or contribute to constipation. The rare and most severe causes include hemorrhoids and anal fissures (2).

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Can Constipation Affect Pregnancy?

Yes, constipation could be very painful and irritating in the long run. It might cause abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, and hemorrhoids (2). To avoid all of these, you should start using remedies for relief, which we discuss in the next section.

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Effective Home Remedies To Treat Constipation When Pregnant

Following are some of the effective home remedies to relieve pregnancy constipation.

1. Lemon

Why it works:

Lemon supports digestion. The citric acid in lemon juice can help to induce bowel contractions and eases the stool passage (3). Since hot beverages can help to relieve constipation too, adding lemon to hot water is even more effective.

[ Read: Symptoms Of Dehydration In Pregnancy ]

How to include:

  • You will need half a lemon, one glass of warm water and honey if required.
  • Squeeze fresh juice of half a lemon in a glass of warm water, and add honey to it for enhanced taste. You may consume it twice a day.

2. Water

Why it works:

On dehydration, your body extracts water from the intestines, thus causing constipation. Drinking enough water will soften the stools, and enables easy bowel movements (4).

How to include:

You may take around eight to ten (8oz.) glasses of water during the day to get the desired amount of fluids.

3. Citrus fruits (Oranges)

Why it works:

Oranges are rich in vitamin C, which is essential for overall good health. They also contain high fiber, lack of which will cause constipation (5).

How to include:

Eat one or two oranges (or any other citrus fruit) every day.

4. Ispaghula husks (Psyllium)

Why it works:

It is an excellent source of dietary fiber and contains mucilage that absorbs fluids and adds bulk to the stools. It, therefore, softens the stools and helps relieve constipation (6). Due to its non-irritant property, the risk of having preterm labor remains unaltered.

How to include:

Ispaghula is available in sachets. Mix the contents of one sachet in a glass of water and drink immediately. Take this solution twice a day.

5. Flaxseeds

Why it works:

They are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids which will retain body fluids. They are full of dietary fiber and also contain mucilage that aids in forming bulk around stools (7).

How to include:

Take around half a tablespoon of victoria f bachelor fake boobs flaxseeds and add in any form to your diet. Increase the intake gradually to two tablespoons.

[ Read: High-Fiber Foods To Keep Constipation At Bay In Pregnancy ]

6. Massage

Why it works:

Abdominal massage helps relieve constipation by relaxing the muscles, removing any discomfort, and stimulating bowel movements. A massage done while sitting, standing, or lying down, for 15 minutes will give you complete relaxation (8).

How to include:

Gently massage the abdomen using the flat part of your finger (instead of fingertips) in a clockwise direction. Start with the right side (the ascending colon), then just under your ribcage (the transverse colon), and then the left side (descending colon) of your abdomen. Always ensure your massage moves in a clockwise direction since that’s the direction of your bowel flow.

7. Reflexology:

Why it works:

It is the application of pressure on the reflex points to stimulate the affected organ. Reflexology relaxes the body and eases the feeling of lethargy due to constipation (9).

How to include:

Ask your partner or someone to massage the upper soles of your feet for relaxation, as it eases digestion. You can also massage the edges of your palm if there is no one to help you. You might also place a water bottle beneath the sole of your feet, and roll it back and forth.

8. Acupressure

Why it works:

Stimulating specific points in the body can activate the organs associated with that point. Applying pressure to the perineum is very useful in treating constipation (10). Perineal massage with appropriate oil is useful for preparation of a normal birth home remedies for constipation while pregnant also to relieve flatus and constipation.

How to include:

Find the correct point of the perineum, located in the middle of the abdomen. It is situated five centimeters below the navel. Press this point gently and increase the pressure gradually for around 30 times every day. However, you should not practice this during the later stages of pregnancy.

9. Eat more fiber:

Why it works:

Fiber adds bulk to the digestive system, and aids in smooth bowel movement. It also supplies vitamins and antioxidants which are necessary for a healthy pregnancy (11).

How to include:

Good choices are legumes, beans, dried fruit (apricots, dates, raisins, figs, prunes), whole grains (oatmeal, quinoa, amaranth), nuts and seeds (almonds, hemp seeds, chia seeds), fruits (avocados, home remedies for constipation while pregnant, berries) and cooked vegetables.

[ Read: Apple Cider Vinegar In Pregnancy ]

10. Consume healthy fats:

Why it works:

Consuming enough healthy fat can improve your bowel movements.

How to include:

You may eat an avocado every day or add other healthy conan the barbarian tv show amazon foods such as nuts to your diet.

11. Yogurt

Why it works:

A rich source of probiotics, it helps with digestion by altering the microorganisms in your gut and increasing bowel movements citizens bank na mobile app to include:

Consume one cup of plain yogurt every day.

12. Apple cider vinegar

Why it works:

It contains pectin and acetic acid, which aid in digestion.  (13).

How to include:

Put one tablespoon of apple cider vinegar in a glass of warm water and add a little honey to it. Mix and consume the solution every morning and night to see improvement.

13. Epsom home remedies for constipation while pregnant it works:

Also called magnesium sulphate, it is highly helpful in relieving sore frontier bill pay login. It’s laxative properties help treat constipation (14).

How to include:

Add one cup of Epsom salt to your bathing water, soak and relax in it for some time. DO NOT ingest it as the laxative effect can be too strong and could induce uterine contractions.

Start using these natural remedies for relief from the unpleasant effects of constipation. If it is irritating and painful, it is time to check with your doctor for alternative healing options. Do not take any over-the-counter medicines without seeking advice from your doctor.

[ Read: Laxatives During Pregnancy ]

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Frequently Asked Questions

1. Is constipation an early sign of pregnancy?

Yes, constipation is one of the early pregnancy signs. It happens mainly due to the progesterone hormone that makes the bowel movements sluggish and relaxed (15).

2. Can I take Dulcolax laxative while pregnant?

There are no adequate studies on the impact of the drug in pregnant women. You should contact your doctor before taking this medication. It is good to avoid medicine that might cause irritation of the womb muscle.

3. Is it safe to take laxatives during pregnancy?

Yes, it safe to take home remedies for constipation while pregnant some forms of laxatives during pregnancy. Options include milk of magnesia and Metamucil. Stronger laxatives are prescribed when these do not work, but they come with risks and shouldn’t be used without your doctor’s consent  (16).

You will be able to protect yourself from constipation by doing regular exercises and consuming plenty of water. To treat special financing best buy issue effectively, you should seek advice from your doctor before using these remedies.

Have you tried any of these remedies for pregnancy constipation? Did they help? Share your experiences in the below comment section.

References:

MomJunction's articles are written after analyzing the research works of expert authors and institutions. Our references consist of resources established by authorities in their respective fields. You can learn more about the authenticity of the information we present in our editorial policy.

1. Magan Trottier et al.; Treating constipation during pregnancy; Can Fam Physician (2012)
2. Juan C Vazquez; Constipation, haemorrhoids, and heartburn in pregnancy; BMJ Clin Evid (2010)
3. Christopher Teller; Powerful Constipation Natural Remedies
4. Constipation; IUPUI
5. Sáenz C et al.; [Orange renew renters insurance usaa residues as dietary fiber source for foods]; Arch Latinoam Nutr (2007)
6. Mehmood MH et al.; Pharmacological basis for the medicinal use of psyllium husk (Ispaghula) in constipation and diarrhea.; Dig Dis Sci (2011)
7. Hanif Palla A &, Gilani AH; Dual effectiveness of Flaxseed in constipation and diarrhea: Possible mechanism; J Ethnopharmacol (2015)
8. 5 Unexpectedly Wonderful Benefits of Prenatal Massage; Avenue Five Institute Pacific College of Oriental Medicine (2015)
9. M Dolatian et al.; The Effect of Reflexology on Pain Intensity and Duration of Labor on Primiparas; Iran Red Crescent Med J (2011)
10. Ryan Abbott et al.; Effect of Perineal Self-Acupressure on Constipation: A Randomized Controlled Trial; J Gen Intern Med (2015)
11. Sun Hwan Bae; Diets for Constipation; Pediatr Gastroenterol Hepatol Nutr (2014)
12. Prof. Kerryn Phelps et al.; The Mystery Gut
13. Mojgan Mirghafourvand et al.; The Effect of Probiotic Yogurt on Constipation in Pregnant Women: A Randomized How much down payment for mortgage Clinical Trial; Iran Red Crescent Med J (2016)
14. Britt Brandon; Apple Cider Vinegar For Health: 100 Amazing and Unexpected Uses for Apple Cider Vinegar; page 27
15. Izzo AA et al.; The osmotic and intrinsic mechanisms of the pharmacological laxative action of oral high doses of magnesium sulphate. Importance of the release of digestive polypeptides and nitric oxide.; Magnes Res (1996)
16. Management of common symptoms of pregnancy; Antenatal Care: Routine Care for the Healthy Pregnant Woman
17. Tina Sara Verghese et al.; Constipation in pregnancy; Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (2015)

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Dr Sachchidananda Maiti is a practising Consultant Gynaecologist & Obstetrician in Manchester, UK both in the National Health Service (NHS) and in private care at Pall Mall Medical. He has had decades of clinical experience in the UK and abroad. He specializes in managing high risk early pregnancy complications and a variety of gynaecological conditions using ultrasound scan, colposcopy, laparoscope. more

Rebecca is a pregnancy writer and editor with a passion for delivering research-based and engaging content in areas of fertility, pregnancy, birth, and post-pregnancy. She has been into health and wellness writing since 2010. She received her graduate degree in Biotechnology and Genetics from Loyola Academy, Osmania University and obtained a certification in ‘Nutrition and Lifestyle in Pregnancy’ from Ludwig. more

Источник: https://www.momjunction.com/articles/remedies-to-treat-constipation-during-pregnancy_00336613/

Constipation in Pregnancy: 5 Common Causes and the Best Home Remedies

Constipation in Pregnancy: Causes and the Best Home Remedies

Feeling less f 22 thrust regular during your pregnancy? Constipation during pregnancy is uncomfortable, to say the least. Here’s more about what causes it, and what you can do about it to find relief.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

  • Constipation while pregnant is common and usually not something to be concerned about.
  • There are several different causes of constipation, but some diet and lifestyle changes are the simplest ways to manage these infrequent bowel movements.
  • It’s best to keep your doctor or midwife in the know if you’re experiencing any side effects while pregnant, including constipation.

Are you experiencing constipation in your pregnancy? Perhaps you’ve dealt with constipation at other times in your life, but it’s the first time you’re facing symptoms while expecting. It can already feel difficult to navigate the changes in your body as your baby grows, and constipation is certainly no exception. Many women suffer from constipation symptoms (so at least you’re in good company,) and luckily, there are several ways to manage this discomfort. With these tips, you’ll be smooth sailing in no time.

What causes constipation in pregnancy?

Constipation can cause infrequent, hard or dry bowel movements, pain in first community mortgage careers abdomen, bloating and more—one of the less glamorous aspects of pregnancy. Mild constipation is generally defined as three or fewer bowel movements a week. It’s a condition nearly half of all pregnant women experience, which means you’re not alone.

While it may feel like an extremely personal topic, there’s absolutely no shame in expressing any discomfort you might be feeling and the urge to get it under control. In fact, there are several reasons why you might be experiencing constipation. Understanding the causes can help you take action to get home remedies for constipation while pregnant BM’s under control.

5 common constipation causes

  1. Increased home remedies for constipation while pregnant As your hormones change in your pregnancy, so do other bodily functions. Increases in progesterone throughout your pregnancy may relax your intestinal muscles. As a result, this change causes your bowel movements to become less frequent. Increased progesterone is natural and nothing to be worried about.
  2. Anxiety: Changes in your stress levels can also be a culprit for irregularity. As your hormones continue to fluctuate, so can your mood. Symptoms of anxiety (which occur in 52% of pregnant women) can affect your bowel movements, so working on reducing stress and anxiety can help get things moving.
  3. Lack of exercise: You may be surprised to learn that a lack of physical exercise can also affect your bowel movements. The truth is, if your body gets moving on the outside, the inside will follow! Even if you’re experiencing fatigue, it’s best to maintain a healthy activity level, not only to get things in motion.
  4. Some medications: Finally, any additional medication you’re taking can affect regularity. If your physician has prescribed anti-nausea medication or iron tablets, it’s very possible they could be playing a part.
  5. Weakened pelvic muscles: Problems with pelvic muscles (the vagina or rectum) or organs (bladder or uterus) can also cause constipation. This happens if your body is unable to properly relax or contract to eliminate stool effectively.

What are some pregnancy constipation remedies? Do prenatal vitamins help with constipation?

  • Omega-3 DHA:Begin with a prenatal vitamin that has DHA (a fatty acid essential for brain development during pregnancy) along with other nutrients.Enfamom Prenatal Vitamins contain Omega-3 DHA, which can help soften stool. If you don’t want to take a prenatal vitamin, consider finding other ways to incorporate DHA into your diet. Some dietary sources of DHA include fatty fish, such as salmon, sardines, or mackerel. Plant-based sources of DHA are less common but can be found in some edible seaweeds and algae (such as nori, seaweed or spirulina).
  • Hydrate:Drinking plenty of water can help eliminate waste more consistently. Be sure to aim for 10-12 cups of liquid a day, but keep an eye on ingesting too much sugar. Sweating or living in a hotter or humid climate means that you’ll have to be extra diligent with watching hydration levels, so drink up!​
    • If you’re not a fan of plain old aqua, consider adding lemon or lime, going for fizzy water, or turning to low-sugar bevvies to jazz up your hydration game.
    • Another way to boost bowel movements is opting for warm beverages. Any hot beverage (even hot water) can help stimulate a bowel movement, as warm liquid helps increase blood flow and gastrointestinal activity. Time to bust out the herbal tea!
  • Consume fiber: There are two types of dietary fiber: soluble and insoluble. Most Americans only get an average of 10 grams of fiber a day, but it’s recommended to consume 25 to 30 grams per day. Fiber helps move stool along the digestive tract. The best sources come from natural, whole foods, such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, seeds, beans and legumes. Both soluble and insoluble fiber only come from plant-based foods—there is no fiber in meat or dairy.

    If you’re not sure whether you’re getting enough fiber, try out these tips:
    • Incorporate more fiber into your diet by adding new dishes you may not have tried in the past. These recipes are packed with important nutrients for you and baby during pregnancy.
    • Consider swapping what you already eat for more fiber-rich dupes. Some easy swaps to incorporate more fiber can be switching from white to whole grain breads, white rice to brown rice, swapping sugary cereals at breakfast for heart-healthy oatmeal, and snacking on fruits throughout the day (apples and oranges travel well if you’re constantly on the go!)
    • Start food prepping for the week (or longer). High fiber foods like beans and grains (such a buckwheat, quinoa, barley and millet) can be cooked in larger batches and reheated easily—most grains and beans last 3-4 days in the fridge, and up to 2 months in the freezer.
  • Exercise: Maintaining an exercise regimen keeps your intestines working. Remaining inactive can increase your chances of constipation because your bowels are no longer as stimulated. Another reason is that a lack of exercise can lead to increased home remedies for constipation while pregnant levels and more anxiety in some people. Consider taking walks throughout the day (bonus points if you’re able to get out in nature) or practicing light yoga to keep you moving.

Can constipation hurt the baby during pregnancy?

Luckily, constipation is generally something that only you have to worry about. Your baby will not be affected by irregular bowel movements. It is important for you to keep an eye on constipation, however, as larger stools may lead to rectal fissures or bleeding.

If I’m constipated, when should I contact my doctor?

If you’re experiencing mild constipation, you should mention that in your next visit with your doctor or midwife, and in the meantime, try to incorporate some of the advice above. If you are feeling stressed about constipation, though, you can always give your doctor a heads up sooner for peace of mind (as anxiety can exacerbate the issue, definitely something you’ll want to avoid!)

It’s important to note that some severe bouts of constipation that are accompanied by other issues (such as alternating between constipation and diarrhea, or if you pass blood or mucus) should be flagged asap. If this is the case, you should contact your doctor immediately. These cases are generally rare, and manageable deutsche bank new york aba number help from your healthcare professional.

Managing constipation during pregnancy

With all the above suggestions in mind, finding relief for constipation can be challenging for some, but smooth moves are possible. Make a plan to speak to your doctor to create one that incorporates hydration, light exercise, and the right diet with plenty of fiber. Managing those three factors can significantly improve your bowel movements.

To find out more about prenatal and postnatal care, check out these recommendations on creating a pregnancy fitness plan and incorporating prenatal vitamins into your regimen.

Источник: https://www.enfamil.com/articles/home-remedies-pregnancy-constipation/

Constipation in Pregnancy

Constipation during pregnancy is a common problem and nearly half of all pregnant women get constipated at some point. Constipation occurs when there is abdominal pain or discomfort, difficult and infrequent bowel movements, and the passage of hard stools.

What causes constipation during pregnancy?

In general, worry, anxiety, minimal physical exercise, and a low-fiber diet may cause constipation. Constipation during pregnancy is due to the increase in progesterone hormones that relax the intestinal muscle causing food and waste to move slower through your system.

Sometimes iron tablets may contribute to constipation. Make sure you are drinking plenty of water if you are taking iron supplements. You may need to switch to a different type of iron tablet, but it is important to talk to your health care provider first.

How can I prevent or treat constipation during pregnancy?

Prevention and treatment of constipation involve many of the same steps.

Here are a few things that you can do to help prevent constipation from occurring or treat it if you are already experiencing it:

  • Eat a high fiber diet: Ideally, you will consume 25 to 30 grams per day of dietary fiber from fruits, vegetables, breakfast cereals, whole-grain bread, prunes, and bran. This helps ensure bulkier stools that are easier to poop.
  • Drink a lot of fluids: Drinking plenty of fluids is important, particularly when increasing fiber intake helps ensure softer stools. Drink 10 to 12 cups of fluids each day. It is the combination of a high fiber diet and plenty of liquids that best help you eliminate your waste. Sweat, hot/humid climates, and exercise may increase your need for additional fluids.
  • Exercise routinely: If you are inactive, you have a greater chance of constipation. Walking, swimming and other moderate exercises will help the intestines work by stimulating your bowels. Schedule exercise three times a week for 20-30 minutes each.
  • Over-the-counter remedies: There are over-the-counter products such as Metamucil (Category B) which may help soften your bowel movements and reduce constipation. Always speak to your health care provider before using over-the-counter medications.
  • Reduce or eliminate iron supplements: Iron supplements may contribute to constipation. Good nutrition can often meet your iron needs during pregnancy. Taking smaller doses of iron throughout the day rather than taking it all at once can reduce constipation. Talk to your health care provider about checking your iron levels and recommendations to manage iron intake during pregnancy. Find natural ways to get iron here.

What remedies should not be used for constipation during pregnancy?

Laxative pills are NOT recommended for the treatment of constipation during pregnancy because they might stimulate uterine contractions and cause dehydration. Talk to your doctor about taking an over-the-counter fiber supplement or a laxative or stool softener.

Mineral oils should NOT be used during pregnancy because they reduce nutrient absorption.

Is constipation during pregnancy ever serious?

Usually not, but occasionally constipation during pregnancy can be a symptom of another problem. If you have severe constipation that’s accompanied by abdominal pain, alternates with diarrhea, or you pass capital one 360 savings routing number or blood, call your doctor or midwife immediately.

Also, straining during a bowel movement or passing a hard stool can lead to or worsen hemorrhoids, which are swollen veins in the rectal area. Hemorrhoids can be extremely uncomfortable, though they rarely cause serious problems. In most cases, they go away fairly soon after your baby is born. However, if the pain is severe, or if you have rectal bleeding, call your doctor.

 

Want to Know More?


Compiled using information from the following sources:
Mayo Clinic Guide To A Healthy Pregnancy Harms, Roger W., M.D., et al, Part 3.
William’s Obstetrics Twenty-Second Ed. Cunningham, F. Gary, et al, Ch. 8.

Источник: https://americanpregnancy.org/healthy-pregnancy/pregnancy-health-wellness/constipation-during-pregnancy/

Constipation in pregnancy

Constipation is very common in pregnancy. It means that your bowel motions (poos) are very hard and may be painful to pass. You may also be doing a poo less often than usual.

There are things you can do to help deal with constipation and prevent it.

Symptoms of constipation

Symptoms include:

  • hard stool (poo)
  • less frequent bowel motions (pooing less)
  • pain on passing a bowel motion (when having a poo)
  • passing wind (farting)
  • cramp-like pains in your tummy

Causes of constipation

Constipation can be caused by:

  • not drinking enough water
  • not eating enough fibre
  • pregnancy hormones - these can make your poo move more slowly through your intestine
  • your growing baby and womb putting extra pressure on your intestines
  • taking iron supplements

How to ease constipation

You can ease constipation by:

  • drinking plenty of water - try to have 10 glasses of water a day, about 2.3 litres
  • eating foods that are high in fibre every day - vegetables, wholegrain breads, porridge, fruit, dried fruits, vegetables, beans and lentils
  • staying active - try walking, swimming, pregnancy yoga or pilates
  • going to the toilet when you first feel the urge to have a bowel motion (do a poo) - give yourself plenty of time and take some deep breaths to help relax the pelvic floor

Only take iron supplements if your GP or midwife has said you need them.

Healthy eating during pregnancy

Your position on the toilet

Having a good position on the toilet can help when you are emptying your bowels.

  1. Use a small step or footstool under your feet. This helps you to get into the best position.
  2. Lean forward, as much as your bump allows. Put your elbows bb king lucille vinyl your knees. Try and keep your back straight.
  3. Do not strain, and do not hold your breath. Taking long, slow, deep breaths through your mouth will help your tummy muscles relax.
Correct toilet position for pregnant women with constipation

When to get medical help

Non-urgent advice: Talk to your GP, midwife or obstetrician if:

  • making diet and lifestyle changes does not work
  • you have blood in your stools (poo)
  • you have pains in your tummy
  • you are vomiting

They may home remedies for constipation while pregnant a high fibre drink, or other types of laxative to help you have a bowel motion.

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Источник: https://www2.hse.ie/conditions/constipation-pregnancy/

What Every Pregnant Woman Needs to Know About Anal Health

Are you experiencing pain or discomfort while defecating or when you sit for long periods? You may have hemorrhoids or anal fissures, which can be a concern for pregnant women. Anal health issues during pregnancy are common, as hormonal shifts can increase your risk of developing them. 

Hemorrhoids are enlarged veins in the anus and rectum. When hemorrhoids become swollen, they can cause unpleasant symptoms such as pain, irritation, and itching. These enlarged veins can be hidden inside your rectum or found under the skin around your anus.

Anal fissures are small tears in the lining of the anus. Because the anus is thin and sensitive, even a tiny tear can lead to pain, itching, and bleeding.

Although pregnancy increases your risk for these ailments, it doesn’t mean you can’t do anything to combat your symptoms. Below, Betsy Clemens, MD, shares what you need to know about anal health issues during pregnancy. 

Risk factors for hemorrhoids and anal fissures

When you’re pregnant, your progesterone levels increase. As a result, blood volume increases. This may be the reason why many pregnant women have inflamed hemorrhoids.

Sitting down for prolonged periods can lead to the development of hemorrhoids. Pressure from your uterus on your anus and rectum is another contributing factor. 

Anal fissures are usually caused by trauma to the anal canal. This trauma can be due to constipation, IBS, or Crohn’s disease. Because pregnant women are more likely to suffer from constipation, they’re more likely to develop anal fissures. However, these fissures can also appear after childbirth. 

How to lower your risk for hemorrhoids and anal fissures 

Although you can’t control all of the risk factors associated with hemorrhoids and anal fissures, you can employ a few strategies to lower your chances of developing them. You may benefit from:

  • Consuming a diet rich in vegetables and fiber 
  • Drinking at least 10 glasses of water on a daily basis 
  • Avoiding foods that may upset your stomach
  • Taking breaks from sitting down too long 

If you suffer from constipation while you’re pregnant, don’t rely on laxative pills because some can cause uterine contractions and dehydration. 

Getting professional help 

Women often see an improvement in their anal health after giving birth. But this doesn’t mean you should ignore the pain and discomfort while you’re pregnant or delay treatment because you’re embarrassed.

If you notice blood in your stool, or if you experience pain, itchiness, or a burning sensation near your anus, contact Midwest Hemorrhoid Treatment Center in Creve Coeur, Missouri, to schedule an appointment. You may also request a call back via our online form. Our team specializes in anorectal disorders and can help diagnose and treat your symptoms with great care and compassion.

All About IRC for Hemorrhoids
All About IRC for Hemorrhoids

When conservative care fails to improve your internal hemorrhoids, you may want to consider nonsurgical infrared coagulation (IRC). This quick and relatively painless procedure gets rid of hemorrhoids fast. Learn all about it here.

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5 Causes of Anal Itchiness

Anal itchiness is an uncomfortable and embarassing sensation that causes an intense urge to scratch the sensitive area. Knowing the cause of your anal itchiness, however, may help you get relief from your symptoms. Click here to learn more.

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What the Color of Your Stool Says About Your Health

You may not give much thought to the color of your stool, but it can tell you a lot about your health. Before you flush, take a look. Keep reading to learn what the color of your stool says about your health.

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Everything You Should Know About IRC

When at-home care fails to alleviate your hemorrhoid symptoms, you may be wondering what medical treatments can help. Infrared coagulation (IRC) is a nonsurgical, in-office treatment for internal hemorrhoids. Click here to learn all about IRC.

Don’t Ignore These Warning Signs of Anal Fissures

Do you experience severe pain during a bowel movement that lingers for a few minutes or even a few hours? You may have an anal fissure. Don’t ignore the warning signs. Delaying care for an anal fissure may worsen your condition.

What Truck Drivers Should Know About Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids are a common health problem among truck drivers. However, it’s not the long hours on the road that causes the uncomfortable condition. Keep reading to learn what you need to know about truck drivers and hemorrhoids.

Betsy F. Clemens, M.D., Creve Coeur, MO

Phone (appointments): 314-669-2758

Constipation During Pregnancy

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by Amy O’Connor

Medically Reviewedby Lisa Hickman, M.D.

Medical Review Policy

All What to Expect content that addresses health or safety is medically reviewed by a team of vetted health professionals. Our Medical Review Board includes OB/GYNs, pediatricians, infectious disease specialists, doulas, lactation counselors, endocrinologists, fertility specialists and more. 

We believe you should always know the source of the information you're reading. Learn more about our editorial and medical review policies.

 on October 21, 2020

What causes constipation during pregnancy — and what to do when your bowels just can't seem to get a move on.

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Irregular bowel movements that cause a bloated, gassy, clogged-up feeling are a very regular pregnancy complaint. Here's what you can do if you're feeling stopped up.

When does constipation generally start during pregnancy?

Constipation tends to start as early as progesterone levels rise, around the second to third month of pregnancy. It may get worse as pregnancy progresses and your uterus grows.

What causes constipation during pregnancy?

As with many other pregnancy symptoms, pregnancy hormones are the culprit behind constipation. Progesterone causes the muscles in your bowels to relax, allowing food to hang around longer in the digestive tract.

The upside is there's added time for nutrients to be absorbed into your bloodstream and reach your baby. The downside is you end up with a waste-product traffic jam. Your expanding uterus also takes up valuable space normally occupied by your bowel, cramping its usual activity.

What can I do about constipation when I'm pregnant?

You don't have to resign yourself to nine months of discomfort. There are plenty of tactics to combat colon congestion (all the while heading off hemorrhoids, a common side effect of constipation):

  • Fight back with fiber. Fiber-rich foods help you eliminate waste; aim for 25 to 35 grams each day. Check the food labels if you want, but there's no need to do the math. Instead, focus on simply eating plenty of whole grain cereals and breads, legumes (edamame and chickpeas), fresh fruits and veggies (raw or lightly cooked — preferably with skin left on), and dried fruits. Going for the green can also help you go, in both the form of leafy green vegetables and kiwi fruit, which packs a potent laxative effect. Sample from this fiber-rich and tasty menu to get started. Really plugged up? Try adding some bran or psyllium to your diet, starting with a sprinkle and increasing as needed. Be sure to check with your doctor first before you do this, though, and don't go overboard, since these fiber powerhouses can carry away important nutrients before they can be absorbed. (Also be prepared for some flatulence, another common complaint of pregnancy as well as a temporary side effect of upping the fiber in your diet.)
  • Resist refined. Try to avoid refined grains (white bread, white rice, refined cereals and pasta) when you can; they tend to back things up. 
  • Drink up.Downing between eight and 10 8-ounce glasses of fluids (water, vegetable or fruit juice and broth) every day keeps solids moving through your digestive tract and makes your stool soft and easier to pass. You can also turn to warm liquids, including that health spa staple, hot water and lemon, to help stimulate peristalsis (the intestinal contractions that help you go). Prune juice is a good pick for truly tough cases, since it's a mild laxative.
  • Don't max out at mealtime. Big meals can overtax your digestive tract, leading to things getting backed up. Try eating six mini-meals a day rather than three large ones and you might also experience less gas and bloating.
  • Go when you gotta go. Regularly holding it in can weaken the muscles that control your bowels and lead to constipation, so try to go whenever you have to.
  • Consider your supplements and medications. Ironically, many of the supplements and medications that do a pregnant body good (prenatal vitamins, calcium and iron supplements, and antacids) can exacerbate constipation. So check with your practitioner about alternatives (such as slow-release iron supplements) or adjustments in dosages until the situation improves. Also ask your practitioner about taking a magnesium supplement to help fight constipation. Taking it at night may relax achy muscles and help you sleep better, too.
  • Get your fill of probiotics. The probiotic acidophilus, found in yogurts that contain active cultures, stimulate the intestinal bacteria to break down food better to keep things moving. You can also ask your practitioner to recommend a good probiotic supplement in capsules, chewables or powder form that can be added to smoothies.
  • Get a move on. Regular exercise during pregnancy encourages regular bowel movements. Even just a 10-minute walk can get things moving, so make sure you're getting the recommended amount of practitioner-approved exercise.
  • Stay away from stimulant laxatives. Not all laxatives and stool softeners (especially herbal or homemade ones) are safe for use during pregnancy. Talk to your practitioner before taking any constipation medication or remedy.
  • Do your Kegels. Straining when you’re constipated (along with simply being pregnant and giving birth!) can cause your pelvic floor muscles to weaken, but regular Kegels can help keep those muscles stronger. 
  • Talk with your doctor. Let your provider know if at-home measures aren’t getting things moving. She may recommend over-the-counter meds like docusate or polyethylene glycol.

Can I prevent constipation during pregnancy?

Healthy eating habits and regular exercise encourage a speedy digestive system, which can help prevent constipation during pregnancy.

Continue Reading Below

Consuming lots of fiber-rich foods (fruits, veggies, whole grains, lentils), drinking enough water and staying (or getting) active can all combine to prevent constipation by counteracting the natural digestive slowdown of pregnancy.

When can I expect constipation to end while I'm pregnant?

For some women, constipation lasts throughout pregnancy as progesterone levels peak. However, if you change up your eating and exercise habits, things usually begin moving more smoothly. And you can take steps to combat constipation at any point during your pregnancy.

Weirdest Pregnancy Symptoms

From the What to Expect editorial team and Heidi Murkoff, author of What to Expect When You're Expecting. What to Expect follows strict reporting guidelines and uses only credible sources, such as peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions and highly respected health organizations. Learn how we keep our content accurate and up-to-date by reading our medical review and editorial policy.

  • What to Expect When You're Expecting, 5th edition, Heidi Murkoff.
  • WhatToExpect.com, Your Guide to Pregnancy Hormones, September 2018.
  • WhatToExpect.com, Are You Drinking Enough Water During Pregnancy?, October 2019.
  • American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Problems of the Digestive System, June 2020.
  • Mayo Clinic, Is It Safe to Take Stool Softeners to Treat Pregnancy Constipation?, April 2020.
  • National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, Treating Constipation During Pregnancy, August 2012.
  • Mayo Clinic, Kegel Exercises: A How-To Guide for Women, September 2020.

Trending On What to Expect

  • The COVID-19 Vaccine During Pregnancy
  • Signs of Labor
  • ⚠️ You can't see this cool content because you have ad block enabled.

    Please whitelist our site to get all the best deals and offers from our partners.

  • What It's Like to Get the COVID-19 Vaccine During Pregnancy, According to Moms-to-Be
  • How Many Weeks, Months and Trimesters in a Pregnancy?
  • Sleeping Positions During Pregnancy
Источник: https://www.whattoexpect.com/pregnancy/symptoms-and-solutions/constipation.aspx

Home remedies for constipation while pregnant -

Constipation During Pregnancy

author-image

by Amy O’Connor

Medically Reviewedby Lisa Hickman, M.D.

Medical Review Policy

All What to Expect content that addresses health or safety is medically reviewed by a team of vetted health professionals. Our Medical Review Board includes OB/GYNs, pediatricians, infectious disease specialists, doulas, lactation counselors, endocrinologists, fertility specialists and more. 

We believe you should always know the source of the information you're reading. Learn more about our editorial and medical review policies.

 on October 21, 2020

What causes constipation during pregnancy — and what to do when your bowels just can't seem to get a move on.

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Irregular bowel movements that cause a bloated, gassy, clogged-up feeling are a very regular pregnancy complaint. Here's what you can do if you're feeling stopped up.

When does constipation generally start during pregnancy?

Constipation tends to start as early as progesterone levels rise, around the second to third month of pregnancy. It may get worse as pregnancy progresses and your uterus grows.

What causes constipation during pregnancy?

As with many other pregnancy symptoms, pregnancy hormones are the culprit behind constipation. Progesterone causes the muscles in your bowels to relax, allowing food to hang around longer in the digestive tract.

The upside is there's added time for nutrients to be absorbed into your bloodstream and reach your baby. The downside is you end up with a waste-product traffic jam. Your expanding uterus also takes up valuable space normally occupied by your bowel, cramping its usual activity.

What can I do about constipation when I'm pregnant?

You don't have to resign yourself to nine months of discomfort. There are plenty of tactics to combat colon congestion (all the while heading off hemorrhoids, a common side effect of constipation):

  • Fight back with fiber. Fiber-rich foods help you eliminate waste; aim for 25 to 35 grams each day. Check the food labels if you want, but there's no need to do the math. Instead, focus on simply eating plenty of whole grain cereals and breads, legumes (edamame and chickpeas), fresh fruits and veggies (raw or lightly cooked — preferably with skin left on), and dried fruits. Going for the green can also help you go, in both the form of leafy green vegetables and kiwi fruit, which packs a potent laxative effect. Sample from this fiber-rich and tasty menu to get started. Really plugged up? Try adding some bran or psyllium to your diet, starting with a sprinkle and increasing as needed. Be sure to check with your doctor first before you do this, though, and don't go overboard, since these fiber powerhouses can carry away important nutrients before they can be absorbed. (Also be prepared for some flatulence, another common complaint of pregnancy as well as a temporary side effect of upping the fiber in your diet.)
  • Resist refined. Try to avoid refined grains (white bread, white rice, refined cereals and pasta) when you can; they tend to back things up. 
  • Drink up.Downing between eight and 10 8-ounce glasses of fluids (water, vegetable or fruit juice and broth) every day keeps solids moving through your digestive tract and makes your stool soft and easier to pass. You can also turn to warm liquids, including that health spa staple, hot water and lemon, to help stimulate peristalsis (the intestinal contractions that help you go). Prune juice is a good pick for truly tough cases, since it's a mild laxative.
  • Don't max out at mealtime. Big meals can overtax your digestive tract, leading to things getting backed up. Try eating six mini-meals a day rather than three large ones and you might also experience less gas and bloating.
  • Go when you gotta go. Regularly holding it in can weaken the muscles that control your bowels and lead to constipation, so try to go whenever you have to.
  • Consider your supplements and medications. Ironically, many of the supplements and medications that do a pregnant body good (prenatal vitamins, calcium and iron supplements, and antacids) can exacerbate constipation. So check with your practitioner about alternatives (such as slow-release iron supplements) or adjustments in dosages until the situation improves. Also ask your practitioner about taking a magnesium supplement to help fight constipation. Taking it at night may relax achy muscles and help you sleep better, too.
  • Get your fill of probiotics. The probiotic acidophilus, found in yogurts that contain active cultures, stimulate the intestinal bacteria to break down food better to keep things moving. You can also ask your practitioner to recommend a good probiotic supplement in capsules, chewables or powder form that can be added to smoothies.
  • Get a move on. Regular exercise during pregnancy encourages regular bowel movements. Even just a 10-minute walk can get things moving, so make sure you're getting the recommended amount of practitioner-approved exercise.
  • Stay away from stimulant laxatives. Not all laxatives and stool softeners (especially herbal or homemade ones) are safe for use during pregnancy. Talk to your practitioner before taking any constipation medication or remedy.
  • Do your Kegels. Straining when you’re constipated (along with simply being pregnant and giving birth!) can cause your pelvic floor muscles to weaken, but regular Kegels can help keep those muscles stronger. 
  • Talk with your doctor. Let your provider know if at-home measures aren’t getting things moving. She may recommend over-the-counter meds like docusate or polyethylene glycol.

Can I prevent constipation during pregnancy?

Healthy eating habits and regular exercise encourage a speedy digestive system, which can help prevent constipation during pregnancy.

Continue Reading Below

Consuming lots of fiber-rich foods (fruits, veggies, whole grains, lentils), drinking enough water and staying (or getting) active can all combine to prevent constipation by counteracting the natural digestive slowdown of pregnancy.

When can I expect constipation to end while I'm pregnant?

For some women, constipation lasts throughout pregnancy as progesterone levels peak. However, if you change up your eating and exercise habits, things usually begin moving more smoothly. And you can take steps to combat constipation at any point during your pregnancy.

Weirdest Pregnancy Symptoms

From the What to Expect editorial team and Heidi Murkoff, author of What to Expect When You're Expecting. What to Expect follows strict reporting guidelines and uses only credible sources, such as peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions and highly respected health organizations. Learn how we keep our content accurate and up-to-date by reading our medical review and editorial policy.

  • What to Expect When You're Expecting, 5th edition, Heidi Murkoff.
  • WhatToExpect.com, Your Guide to Pregnancy Hormones, September 2018.
  • WhatToExpect.com, Are You Drinking Enough Water During Pregnancy?, October 2019.
  • American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Problems of the Digestive System, June 2020.
  • Mayo Clinic, Is It Safe to Take Stool Softeners to Treat Pregnancy Constipation?, April 2020.
  • National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, Treating Constipation During Pregnancy, August 2012.
  • Mayo Clinic, Kegel Exercises: A How-To Guide for Women, September 2020.

Trending On What to Expect

  • The COVID-19 Vaccine During Pregnancy
  • Signs of Labor
  • ⚠️ You can't see this cool content because you have ad block enabled.

    Please whitelist our site to get all the best deals and offers from our partners.

  • What It's Like to Get the COVID-19 Vaccine During Pregnancy, According to Moms-to-Be
  • How Many Weeks, Months and Trimesters in a Pregnancy?
  • Sleeping Positions During Pregnancy
Источник: https://www.whattoexpect.com/pregnancy/symptoms-and-solutions/constipation.aspx

Constipation in pregnancy

Constipation is very common in pregnancy. It means that your bowel motions (poos) are very hard and may be painful to pass. You may also be doing a poo less often than usual.

There are things you can do to help deal with constipation and prevent it.

Symptoms of constipation

Symptoms include:

  • hard stool (poo)
  • less frequent bowel motions (pooing less)
  • pain on passing a bowel motion (when having a poo)
  • passing wind (farting)
  • cramp-like pains in your tummy

Causes of constipation

Constipation can be caused by:

  • not drinking enough water
  • not eating enough fibre
  • pregnancy hormones - these can make your poo move more slowly through your intestine
  • your growing baby and womb putting extra pressure on your intestines
  • taking iron supplements

How to ease constipation

You can ease constipation by:

  • drinking plenty of water - try to have 10 glasses of water a day, about 2.3 litres
  • eating foods that are high in fibre every day - vegetables, wholegrain breads, porridge, fruit, dried fruits, vegetables, beans and lentils
  • staying active - try walking, swimming, pregnancy yoga or pilates
  • going to the toilet when you first feel the urge to have a bowel motion (do a poo) - give yourself plenty of time and take some deep breaths to help relax the pelvic floor

Only take iron supplements if your GP or midwife has said you need them.

Healthy eating during pregnancy

Your position on the toilet

Having a good position on the toilet can help when you are emptying your bowels.

  1. Use a small step or footstool under your feet. This helps you to get into the best position.
  2. Lean forward, as much as your bump allows. Put your elbows on your knees. Try and keep your back straight.
  3. Do not strain, and do not hold your breath. Taking long, slow, deep breaths through your mouth will help your tummy muscles relax.
Correct toilet position for pregnant women with constipation

When to get medical help

Non-urgent advice: Talk to your GP, midwife or obstetrician if:

  • making diet and lifestyle changes does not work
  • you have blood in your stools (poo)
  • you have pains in your tummy
  • you are vomiting

They may prescribe a high fibre drink, or other types of laxative to help you have a bowel motion.

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Источник: https://www2.hse.ie/conditions/constipation-pregnancy/

Having trouble going number two? Chances are, you’re experiencing constipation. Trust us, you know it when you’ve got it. It’s a common pregnancy symptom (sorry), but that doesn’t mean you’re left to suffer. Read on to learn what’s causing your constipation, how to find relief and how to prevent it in the months ahead.

Wondering what it feels like to be constipated while pregnant? You might have that “stopped up” feeling, abdominal discomfort or have feces that are dry or hardened. Going to the bathroom could be difficult or painful. And unfortunately, constipation is super-common in pregnancy. The American Pregnancy Association says approximately half of all women get constipated at some point during their pregnancy.

Causes Of Constipation During Pregnancy

During pregnancy, elevated progesterone levels cause smooth muscle to relax, which slows the passage of food through your intestines. This increases water absorption from the bowel and results in constipation. Your rapidly growing uterus, which compresses your intestines and pushes your stomach upward, also contributes to the problem. Stress, lack of exercise and a low-fiber diet can make you constipated too.

Will Constipation Affect Baby?

It won’t be a problem for baby. For you, the constipation will probably just be a nuisance, but in some cases, it does lead to serious medical problems such as hemorrhoids, rectal bleeding and rectal fissures.

Constipation Relief During Pregnancy

The first step in finding constipation relief is to make sure you’re drinking lots of water (at least eight glasses a day), consuming enough fiber (as in fruits and vegetables) and getting ample activity (try walking 20 to 30 minutes daily). If the constipation persists, Metamucil or a mild stool softener such as Colace can help. If you’re taking iron supplements, these may be contributing to your constipation—talk with your doctor about possible alternatives. In general, mineral oils, oral laxatives, enemas and rectal suppositories should be taken only after talking with your doctor, because they may stimulate labor.

Related Video

Drinking plenty of water and eating those fruits and veggies can help prevent constipation later in pregnancy. Staying active can help prevent constipation too.

What Other Pregnant Women Do When They Have Constipation

“I’ve had some constipation lately, and the only thing that seemed to ease it was Metamucil (recommended by my doctor).”

“I’ve been constipated on and off throughout this pregnancy—it’s one of those symptoms that can be heavily influenced by what you eat. I take Colace to keep things moving when I start to feel a little constipated, but I’ve also been eating apples daily to try to keep things moving naturally (without medication)—it really does help!”

“I had some severe constipation a couple weeks ago, and it is certainly not fun. I suggest getting a bottle of prune juice. Between drinking a glass of prune juice, eating an Activia yogurt and taking one Colace, my constipation has turned around.”

Please note: The Bump and the materials and information it contains are not intended to, and do not constitute, medical or other health advice or diagnosis and should not be used as such. You should always consult with a qualified physician or health professional about your specific circumstances.

Plus, more from The Bump:

Источник: https://www.thebump.com/a/constipation-during-pregnancy

5 Safe Remedies for Constipation in Pregnancy

Infrequent bowel movements. Abdominal pain. The passage of hard stools.

If you’re pregnant, you’ve probably experienced these three familiar signs of constipation. Hormonal changes, pressure on the womb, and the iron in prenatal vitamins are to blame.

Why Am I Constipated?

An increase in the progesterone hormone during pregnancy causes the relaxation of your body’s muscles. That includes your intestines. And slower moving intestines means slower digestion. This can lead to constipation.

Constipation is common during pregnancy. Almost three out of four pregnant women will experience constipation and other bowel issues at some point, according to a study published in .

From over-the-counter pills to natural cures, there are a whole host of remedies available for relieving constipation.

But when pregnancy’s involved, the number of solutions shrinks.

These five remedies are pregnancy-safe.

A diet high in fiber helps prevention constipation. It also supplies pregnant women with vitamins and antioxidants.

Pregnant women should try to consume 25 to 30 grams of dietary fiber each day to stay regular and healthy.

Good choices include fresh fruits, vegetables, beans, peas, lentils, bran cereals, prunes, and whole-grain bread.

Try cutting up some raspberries, apples, bananas, figs, and strawberries for a refreshing fruit salad. Or roast some sweet corn, Brussels sprouts, and carrots for a delightful side dish.

It’s important to stay hydrated during pregnancy. That might mean doubling your water intake.

Pregnant women should drink at least eight 12-ounce glasses of water a day. This will help keep your bowels soft and moving smoothly through your digestive tract.

Try breaking up your daily food intake into five or six smaller meals to help with constipation relief. This will allow the stomach to digest food without having to work overtime, and allow it to transfer food to the intestine and colon smoothly.

Eating large meals can overload your stomach and make it harder for your digestive system to process what you’ve consumed.

Regular physical activity can help reduce constipation. Exercise stimulates your bowels. Pregnant women should try to exercise three times a week for 20 to 30 minutes each.

The options for exercise are endless. Try walking down your favorite hiking path, swimming at your local gym, or practicing prenatal yoga on a relaxing afternoon.

Check with your doctor about what exercises are safe for you and your baby.

If other natural options have failed, doctors will sometimes prescribe stool softeners like Colace on a short-term basis to help pregnant women with constipation. Colace stool softeners are available online. However, long-term use can lead to .

Stool softeners help moisten your bowels so they are easier to pass. They are especially useful for pregnant women taking constipation-causing iron supplements. Doctors will often prescribe softeners along with iron pills. You can find a variety of iron supplements here.

Stool softeners are medications, so it’s best to check with your doctor if they are safe for you.

Takeaway

Constipation relief during pregnancy is common, and it can be remedied.

Just follow the steps above to help ease the discomfort of backed up bowels while you wait for your little one to arrive.

Tips for a Healthy and Happy Pregnancy

Food Fix: What to Eat When Pregnant

Источник: https://www.healthline.com/health/pregnancy/constipation-remedies

Image: Shutterstock

Research states that around 11 – 38% of women suffer from constipation and other bowel issues at some point in their pregnancy (1). Constipation becomes more than just a discomfort when you are pregnant. The heavy and bloated feeling combined with the growing belly can be a pain.

If you want to end your bowel discomfort without using medications,  read on. MomJunction gives you a few home remedies to treat constipation during pregnancy. However, do check with your doctor before trying these remedies.

What Causes Pregnancy Constipation?

The increasing level of progesterone hormone in pregnancy slows down the functioning of the gastrointestinal system, resulting in constipation.

Constipation and discomfort are higher in early pregnancy due to the backward tilting of the womb (retroversion) until about 12 weeks and a sudden change of progesterone level in the blood.

During the second and third trimesters, the pressure exerted by the growing womb on your bowels will intensify the problem. Also, consumption of iron and calcium supplements, low-fiber diet, lack of exercise, dehydration, worry, and anxiety might cause or contribute to constipation. The rare and most severe causes include hemorrhoids and anal fissures (2).

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Can Constipation Affect Pregnancy?

Yes, constipation could be very painful and irritating in the long run. It might cause abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, and hemorrhoids (2). To avoid all of these, you should start using remedies for relief, which we discuss in the next section.

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Effective Home Remedies To Treat Constipation When Pregnant

Following are some of the effective home remedies to relieve pregnancy constipation.

1. Lemon

Why it works:

Lemon supports digestion. The citric acid in lemon juice can help to induce bowel contractions and eases the stool passage (3). Since hot beverages can help to relieve constipation too, adding lemon to hot water is even more effective.

[ Read: Symptoms Of Dehydration In Pregnancy ]

How to include:

  • You will need half a lemon, one glass of warm water and honey if required.
  • Squeeze fresh juice of half a lemon in a glass of warm water, and add honey to it for enhanced taste. You may consume it twice a day.

2. Water

Why it works:

On dehydration, your body extracts water from the intestines, thus causing constipation. Drinking enough water will soften the stools, and enables easy bowel movements (4).

How to include:

You may take around eight to ten (8oz.) glasses of water during the day to get the desired amount of fluids.

3. Citrus fruits (Oranges)

Why it works:

Oranges are rich in vitamin C, which is essential for overall good health. They also contain high fiber, lack of which will cause constipation (5).

How to include:

Eat one or two oranges (or any other citrus fruit) every day.

4. Ispaghula husks (Psyllium)

Why it works:

It is an excellent source of dietary fiber and contains mucilage that absorbs fluids and adds bulk to the stools. It, therefore, softens the stools and helps relieve constipation (6). Due to its non-irritant property, the risk of having preterm labor remains unaltered.

How to include:

Ispaghula is available in sachets. Mix the contents of one sachet in a glass of water and drink immediately. Take this solution twice a day.

5. Flaxseeds

Why it works:

They are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids which will retain body fluids. They are full of dietary fiber and also contain mucilage that aids in forming bulk around stools (7).

How to include:

Take around half a tablespoon of ground flaxseeds and add in any form to your diet. Increase the intake gradually to two tablespoons.

[ Read: High-Fiber Foods To Keep Constipation At Bay In Pregnancy ]

6. Massage

Why it works:

Abdominal massage helps relieve constipation by relaxing the muscles, removing any discomfort, and stimulating bowel movements. A massage done while sitting, standing, or lying down, for 15 minutes will give you complete relaxation (8).

How to include:

Gently massage the abdomen using the flat part of your finger (instead of fingertips) in a clockwise direction. Start with the right side (the ascending colon), then just under your ribcage (the transverse colon), and then the left side (descending colon) of your abdomen. Always ensure your massage moves in a clockwise direction since that’s the direction of your bowel flow.

7. Reflexology:

Why it works:

It is the application of pressure on the reflex points to stimulate the affected organ. Reflexology relaxes the body and eases the feeling of lethargy due to constipation (9).

How to include:

Ask your partner or someone to massage the upper soles of your feet for relaxation, as it eases digestion. You can also massage the edges of your palm if there is no one to help you. You might also place a water bottle beneath the sole of your feet, and roll it back and forth.

8. Acupressure

Why it works:

Stimulating specific points in the body can activate the organs associated with that point. Applying pressure to the perineum is very useful in treating constipation (10). Perineal massage with appropriate oil is useful for preparation of a normal birth and also to relieve flatus and constipation.

How to include:

Find the correct point of the perineum, located in the middle of the abdomen. It is situated five centimeters below the navel. Press this point gently and increase the pressure gradually for around 30 times every day. However, you should not practice this during the later stages of pregnancy.

9. Eat more fiber:

Why it works:

Fiber adds bulk to the digestive system, and aids in smooth bowel movement. It also supplies vitamins and antioxidants which are necessary for a healthy pregnancy (11).

How to include:

Good choices are legumes, beans, dried fruit (apricots, dates, raisins, figs, prunes), whole grains (oatmeal, quinoa, amaranth), nuts and seeds (almonds, hemp seeds, chia seeds), fruits (avocados, pears, berries) and cooked vegetables.

[ Read: Apple Cider Vinegar In Pregnancy ]

10. Consume healthy fats:

Why it works:

Consuming enough healthy fat can improve your bowel movements.

How to include:

You may eat an avocado every day or add other healthy fat foods such as nuts to your diet.

11. Yogurt

Why it works:

A rich source of probiotics, it helps with digestion by altering the microorganisms in your gut and increasing bowel movements (12).

How to include:

Consume one cup of plain yogurt every day.

12. Apple cider vinegar

Why it works:

It contains pectin and acetic acid, which aid in digestion.  (13).

How to include:

Put one tablespoon of apple cider vinegar in a glass of warm water and add a little honey to it. Mix and consume the solution every morning and night to see improvement.

13. Epsom salts

Why it works:

Also called magnesium sulphate, it is highly helpful in relieving sore muscles. It’s laxative properties help treat constipation (14).

How to include:

Add one cup of Epsom salt to your bathing water, soak and relax in it for some time. DO NOT ingest it as the laxative effect can be too strong and could induce uterine contractions.

Start using these natural remedies for relief from the unpleasant effects of constipation. If it is irritating and painful, it is time to check with your doctor for alternative healing options. Do not take any over-the-counter medicines without seeking advice from your doctor.

[ Read: Laxatives During Pregnancy ]

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Frequently Asked Questions

1. Is constipation an early sign of pregnancy?

Yes, constipation is one of the early pregnancy signs. It happens mainly due to the progesterone hormone that makes the bowel movements sluggish and relaxed (15).

2. Can I take Dulcolax laxative while pregnant?

There are no adequate studies on the impact of the drug in pregnant women. You should contact your doctor before taking this medication. It is good to avoid medicine that might cause irritation of the womb muscle.

3. Is it safe to take laxatives during pregnancy?

Yes, it safe to take only some forms of laxatives during pregnancy. Options include milk of magnesia and Metamucil. Stronger laxatives are prescribed when these do not work, but they come with risks and shouldn’t be used without your doctor’s consent  (16).

You will be able to protect yourself from constipation by doing regular exercises and consuming plenty of water. To treat the issue effectively, you should seek advice from your doctor before using these remedies.

Have you tried any of these remedies for pregnancy constipation? Did they help? Share your experiences in the below comment section.

References:

MomJunction's articles are written after analyzing the research works of expert authors and institutions. Our references consist of resources established by authorities in their respective fields. You can learn more about the authenticity of the information we present in our editorial policy.

1. Magan Trottier et al.; Treating constipation during pregnancy; Can Fam Physician (2012)
2. Juan C Vazquez; Constipation, haemorrhoids, and heartburn in pregnancy; BMJ Clin Evid (2010)
3. Christopher Teller; Powerful Constipation Natural Remedies
4. Constipation; IUPUI
5. Sáenz C et al.; [Orange juice residues as dietary fiber source for foods]; Arch Latinoam Nutr (2007)
6. Mehmood MH et al.; Pharmacological basis for the medicinal use of psyllium husk (Ispaghula) in constipation and diarrhea.; Dig Dis Sci (2011)
7. Hanif Palla A &, Gilani AH; Dual effectiveness of Flaxseed in constipation and diarrhea: Possible mechanism; J Ethnopharmacol (2015)
8. 5 Unexpectedly Wonderful Benefits of Prenatal Massage; Avenue Five Institute Pacific College of Oriental Medicine (2015)
9. M Dolatian et al.; The Effect of Reflexology on Pain Intensity and Duration of Labor on Primiparas; Iran Red Crescent Med J (2011)
10. Ryan Abbott et al.; Effect of Perineal Self-Acupressure on Constipation: A Randomized Controlled Trial; J Gen Intern Med (2015)
11. Sun Hwan Bae; Diets for Constipation; Pediatr Gastroenterol Hepatol Nutr (2014)
12. Prof. Kerryn Phelps et al.; The Mystery Gut
13. Mojgan Mirghafourvand et al.; The Effect of Probiotic Yogurt on Constipation in Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial; Iran Red Crescent Med J (2016)
14. Britt Brandon; Apple Cider Vinegar For Health: 100 Amazing and Unexpected Uses for Apple Cider Vinegar; page 27
15. Izzo AA et al.; The osmotic and intrinsic mechanisms of the pharmacological laxative action of oral high doses of magnesium sulphate. Importance of the release of digestive polypeptides and nitric oxide.; Magnes Res (1996)
16. Management of common symptoms of pregnancy; Antenatal Care: Routine Care for the Healthy Pregnant Woman
17. Tina Sara Verghese et al.; Constipation in pregnancy; Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (2015)

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What Is Postpartum Constipation?

What Is Postpartum Constipation?

Constipation is common after giving birth. Characterized by difficult or infrequent bowel movements, many people experience constipation during pregnancy, and it can continue after delivery, or it may occur for the first time after delivery. Generally, constipation is defined as fewer than three bowel movements a week and/or less often than your normal bathroom habits. This condition may persist for a week or longer until your body's elimination system gets back on track.

People who did not have an issue with constipation during their pregnancy might be surprised to develop it after. On the other hand, for someone who has had bowel woes in the past or dealt with them while they were pregnant, constipation may continue or worsen right after giving birth.

Whether the experience is new to you or not, constipation is uncomfortable—especially when your body is still trying to heal from labor and delivery. Postpartum constipation can happen for several reasons. Understanding them can help you find the best treatment and get relief.

What to Expect at the Hospital After Giving Birth

Causes

Constipation is often a normal, yet annoying, discomfort that can be caused by several factors related to what's happening to your body before, during, and after you give birth.

Common causes of constipation after childbirth include:

  • C-section: It can take up to 3 to 4 days for your digestive system to start working normally again following major surgery, including a c-section.
  • Damage to the anal sphincter or pelvic floor muscles: The stretching that occurs during labor and delivery can make it more difficult for your body to efficiently move your bowels
  • Dehydration or lack of fluids: Lack of water in the body (and the stool), which might happen due to not drinking water during labor and/or if you were vomiting or experienced blood loss, slows down the body's elimination process.
  • Hormonal changes: Hormonal changes, which begin while you are pregnant and adjust rapidly right after delivery, can slow bowel function.
  • Iron supplementation: Taking iron, which might be given if you are anemic, also slows the passage of stool.
  • Not eating: In response to not eating (at all or as much) during labor and delivery, the body's normal rhythms become sluggish.
  • Perineal pain: If you have pain in your perineal area, for example, after getting an episiotomy or because of postpartum hemorrhoids or from stretching (or tearing) during childbirth, constipation might not be as much a physical problem as a mental one. If you are afraid of tearing your stitches or having more pain, the fear may cause you to retain stool.
  • Using pain medication or epidural during labor: Medications, particularly systemic narcotics, are known to slow down the digestive tract.

Bowel Movements During Labor

Treatment

Depending on the cause and the steps you take to treat it, constipation is likely to resolve within a few days to a week after giving birth. In most cases, you can successfully treat postpartum constipation at home. The best thing you can do is be proactive about prevention and treatment.

Typically, you'll be given stool softeners after delivery while in the hospital and to take home with you after discharge to prevent and/or treat constipation, particularly if you've had a severe tear (third or fourth degree), if you have hemorrhoids, are taking iron supplements for anemia, or are on narcotic pain medicine. If not, or if constipation is a particular concern for you, talk to your doctor or midwife about taking a stool softener.

A mild laxative or fiber supplement might be necessary if other measures don't work. Reach out to your health provider for personalized recommendations or with any questions you may have.

Your Post-Pregnancy Body

Coping

In addition to medications, there are other at-home remedies that can help you find relief.

  • Drink plenty of water: Aim to drink 8 to 10 glasses a day. Warm liquids such as herbal tea might be helpful as well. The fiber-filled foods you add to your diet will absorb the water you drink. This makes your stools softer and easier to pass.
  • Don't ignore the urge: As much as you might fear more pain, holding on to a bowel movement will only make the stool harder. Try to go (but don't push intensely as that can cause hemorrhoids) when you sense you need to go.
  • Eat well: High fiber foods can be your best defense. Foods such as whole-grain cereals and whole-grain bread, brown rice, beans, and fresh fruits and veggies are excellent fiber-rich foods that get the digestive system moving.
  • Walk: It might seem intimidating—particularly if you are recovering from a c-section—but a little bit of walking (at a slow pace) can help move your bowels. Note that, if you had a c-section, you'll need to get medical clearance from your doctor before resuming any form of exercise.

Constipation and hemorrhoids often go hand-in-hand. If you had a vaginal delivery, you might be more likely to develop hemorrhoids. Straining to pass a bowel movement and having hard stool can make hemorrhoids worse.

Types of Labor and Delivery Complications

When to Call Your Doctor

Postpartum constipation is very common and usually resolves with proper lifestyle coping measures, but sometimes it can be a sign of a bigger problem. There are several "red flag" symptoms that you should be on the lookout for.

Call your doctor if you are constipated and have other concerning symptoms, including:

  • Blood or mucus in your stool
  • Constipation alternating with diarrhea
  • Excessive rectal bleeding
  • Severe, painful bulging in the vagina, vulva, and/or perineum
  • Severe rectal pain
  • Severe stomach pain
  • You do not have a bowel movement by the 3rd day after having your baby

Causes of Postpartum Abdominal Pain

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Family uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. What can help with constipation in pregnancy? October 2020.

  2. Cleveland Clinic. Constipation. Updated November 17, 2019.

  3. Turawa EB, Musekiwa A, Rohwer AC. Interventions for treating postpartum constipation. Cochrane. September 23, 2014.

  4. Trottier M, Erebara A, Bozzo P. Treating constipation during pregnancy. Can Fam Physician. 2012;58(8):836-838. PMID: 22893333

  5. Verghese TS, Futaba K, Latthe P. Constipation in pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol. 2015;17(2):111-115. doi:10.1111/tog.12179

Источник: https://www.verywellfamily.com/constipation-after-birth-284550
home remedies for constipation while pregnant

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