home remedies for poison oak or ivy

Poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac are plants that can cause a skin rash upon contact. How can you care for your child at home? Our providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein. Poison ivy, oak, and sumac are plants that can cause a red, itchy rash called allergic. Poison ivy, oak and sumac are three plants that carry the same poison a medication (epinephrine) to treat severe allergic reactions.

Home remedies for poison oak or ivy -

by Thomas E. Harris, MD
Fellow of the Academy of Wilderness Medicine
Urgent Care Physician at MediServe Walk-In Clinic

Do you think you may have a rash caused by poison ivy? When the skin comes in direct contact with an irritating or allergy-causing substance, contact dermatitis can develop. Exposure to poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac cause more cases of allergic contact dermatitis than all other plant families combined.

Poison ivy and poison oak are both found in the Ozarks; however, poison sumac is not.

People of all ethnicities and skin types are at risk for developing poison ivy dermatitis. The severity of the reaction decreases with age, especially in people who have had mild reactions in the past.

What causes Poison Ivy rashes? 

Poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac plants contain a compound called urushiol, which is a light, colorless oil that is found in the fruit, leaves, stem, roots, and sap of the plant. When urushiol is exposed to air, it turns brown and then black; plant leaves develop small black spots.

There are several ways that you can be exposed to urushiol:

  • By touching the sap or rubbing against the leaves of the toxic plant at any time of year
  • By touching something that has urushiol on it, such as animal fur or garden tools
  • By breathing in smoke when toxic plants are burned
  • Ginkgo fruit and the skin of mangoes also contain urushiol and can produce symptoms similar to poison ivy dermatitis

Poison ivy dermatitis is not contagious and cannot be passed from person to person. However, urushiol can be carried under fingernails and on clothes. If another person comes in contact with the urushiol, he or she can develop poison ivy dermatitis. I’ve seen multiple cases where the spouse picked up the laundry and that contact caused the poison ivy dermatitis.

Poison Ivy Signs and Symptoms

After contact with urushiol, approximately 50 percent of people develop signs and symptoms of poison ivy dermatitis. The symptoms and severity differ from person to person. These symptoms usually develop within four hours to four days after exposure to the urushiol. The symptoms are worse within 1 to 14 days after touching the plant, but they can develop up to 21 days later if one has never been exposed to urushiol before.

The most common signs and symptoms of poison ivy dermatitis:

  • Intense itching
  • Skin swelling
  • Skin redness

After the initial symptoms, allergic individuals develop fluid-filled blisters in a line or streak-like pattern. The blisters can occur at different times in different people; blisters can develop on the arms several days after blisters on the hands developed. This does not mean that the reaction is spreading from one area of the body to the other. The fluid that leaks from blisters does not spread the rash.

Poison ivy is usually diagnosed based upon how the skin looks. Further testing is not usually necessary.

At Home Treatments

Poison ivy dermatitis usually resolves within one to four weeks without treatment. Treatments that may help relieve the itching, soreness, and discomfort caused by poison ivy dermatitis include skin treatments that you can do at home. 

  • Adding oatmeal to a bath may help relieve itching. 
  • Applying cool wet compresses may reduce swelling and relieve itching. 
  • Applying calamine lotion to the rash. 
  • If you develop blisters that begin weeping fluid, astringents containing aluminum acetate Burow’s solution and Domeboro, may help to relieve the rash.
  • Antihistamines do not help to relieve itching caused by poison ivy dermatitis and do not treat the rash. Some antihistamines make you sleepy while others do not. The ones that make you sleepy, eg, diphenhydramine (Benadryl) can help you to ignore the itch while sleeping.

Treatments to avoid: Do not use antihistamine creams or lotions, anesthetic creams containing benzocaine, or antibiotic creams containing neomycin or bacitracin to the skin. These creams or ointments could make the rash worse. Do not use bleach to cleanse rash from poison ivy. These areas are open wounds, and bleach is a harsh substance that can damage the skin and slow the healing process.

When to See the Doctor 

If the Poison Ivy dermatitis and blisters become unbearable or spread to the groin or face, you may consider seeking treatment from a physician. There are several treatments your physician may recommend. 

  • Steroid creams – Steroid creams may be helpful if they are used during the first few days after symptoms develop. Low-potency steroid creams, such as 1% hydrocortisone (available in the United States without a prescription) are not usually helpful. A stronger prescription formula may be helpful if used early.
  • Steroid medications and injections – If you develop severe symptoms or the rash covers a large area (especially on the face or genitals), a doctor may prescribe steroid pills (eg, prednisone) or injections to help relieve itching and swelling. Pills are usually given for 14 to 21 days, with the dosage slowly decreased over time.
  • Antibiotics – Skin infections are a potential complication of poison ivy, especially if you scratch your skin. If you develop a skin infection because of poison ivy dermatitis, you may need antibiotics to treat the infection. Do not use over-the-counter topical antibiotic creams; many bacteria are resistant to them and they are one of the chief causes of allergic contact dermatitis not caused by plants.

Tips for Preventing Poison Ivy 

The best way to prevent poison ivy dermatitis is to identify and avoid the plants that cause it. These plants can irritate the skin year round, even during the winter months, and they can still cause a reaction after dying.

  • Know what poison ivy looks like and avoid it. “Leaves of three, let them be” is a phrase often used to identify plants that cause poison ivy dermatitis. Generally, poison ivy and poison oak have three leaflets per leaf with flowering branches on a single stem. The Arkansas Native Plant Society has a nice article on identification.
  • Wear protective clothing, including long sleeves and pants, when working in areas where toxic plants may be found. Keep in mind that the resin and oils from the toxic plants can be carried on clothing, pets, and under fingernails. 
  • Wear heavy-duty vinyl gloves when doing yard work or gardening. The oils from toxic plants can seep through latex or rubber gloves.
  • After coming in contact with poison ivy, remove any contaminated clothing and gently wash (do not scrub or rub) your skin and under your fingernails with mild soap and water as soon as possible. Washing within 10 minutes after exposure can reduce the likelihood and severity of symptoms; washing the skin after 30 minutes of exposure typically will not help.
  • Creams and ointments that create a barrier between the skin and the urushiol oil may be somewhat effective for people who are frequently exposed to poison ivy. Bentoquatam (Ivy Block) is one type of barrier cream that may prevent poison ivy dermatitis. It must be reapplied every four hours and it leaves a clay residue on the skin.
  • Avoid burning poisonous vegetation, which can disperse the plant particles in the smoke, irritate the skin, and cause poison ivy dermatitis.

Источник: https://www.mana.md/poison-ivy-101/

Poison ivy, oak, and sumac: How to treat the rash

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Источник: https://www.aad.org/public/everyday-care/itchy-skin/poison-ivy/treat-rash

When Might Poison Ivy Warrant an Office Visit?

To the untrained eye, poison ivy looks like a normal, harmless plant. But every year, millions of Americans experience just how unpleasant it can be.

Poison ivy contains an oil called urushiol which causes a delayed allergic reaction in most people. After coming in contact with the plant, it could take up to five days for the resulting skin rash to fully emerge. Then, depending on its severity, it could take an additional three weeks for the symptoms to subside.

Brenda McSherry, FNP

Brenda McSherry, a family nurse practitioner with Mizzou Quick Care, said several at-home remedies could help calm the itching, burning, blistering and oozing that accompanies a poison ivy rash.

“Try taking a baking soda, oatmeal or Domeboro solution bath,” she said. “Applying aloe vera gel or hydrocortisone cream helps cool and soothe the skin. Oral antihistamines like Benadryl can also provide temporary relief from the itching, as can intermittent use of cold packs — 10 minutes on, 10 minutes off.”

McSherry said people with severe cases of poison ivy often do not realize a trip to Mizzou Quick Care could help expedite the healing process.

“Mizzou Quick Care can be especially helpful if the rash is widespread or affecting the eyes or genital areas,” she said. “We can prescribe strong topical steroid creams or oral steroid medications to help heal the rash, and we can suggest several other treatments based upon your unique case.”

Источник: https://www.muhealth.org/our-stories/when-might-poison-ivy-warrant-office-visit

How to Treat Poison Ivy, Oak, and Sumac and When to Go to a Doctor

Did you know that around 85 percent of people are allergic to poison ivy, oak, or sumac? Also, fifty million people in the United States have an allergic reaction to one of the three each year. 

The rash you get from these plants is termed allergic reaction dermatitis. If you want to know how to treat any of these and when it’s time to go to a doctor, keep reading and find out what you need to know. 

What’s the Cause of Poison Ivy, Oak, and Sumac Rashes?

These rashes are caused by something called urushiol, pronounced (yoo-Roo-shee-ol). Urushiol is in the sap of the plants and it spreads very easily.

It’s colorless, odorless, and very sticky. It causes redness, itching, swelling, and blistering if untreated. 

You’ll typically need a couple of weeks to heal from the rash as long as you don’t let it get infected.

What’s the Best Treatment?

The best poison ivy treatment is prevention. If you aren’t able to prevent it, however, and find yourself swelling, itching, and more, then you should treat it right away.

The good thing is you don’t need to go to the doctor immediately, but you may need to eventually if it gets worse or you’re unable to treat it on your own.

Over the Counter Treatments

Over the counter options can help treat poison oak, ivy, or sumac rashes if you know what to get. If your rash is oozing, then you should apply aluminum acetate, aluminum sulfate, or calcium acetate.

You can find any of these at your local drugstore or pharmacy. The options come in either a lotion or a cream and will stop the oozing fairly fast. 

If your rash is very itchy, then you should apply colloidal oatmeal, baking soda, or calamine lotion. You can also try an over the counter steroid cream, but they might not be strong enough.

If it’s not strong enough, you’ll need to see a doctor and get a prescription steroid cream which is much stronger and should do the trick.

Before going to bed, you can take an antihistamine as well. It won’t stop the itching, but it will help you relax and sleep while you’re dealing with a poison sumac rash.

You should also take a cool bath with an oatmeal-based bath product. Make sure to soak for at least half an hour to soothe your skin. 

What Not to Do

It’s just as important to know what not to do as it is to know what treatments to use. Don’t scratch your blisters! Your hands most likely have bacteria on them and that can lead to an infection. 

You shouldn’t put antibiotic creams with bacitracin or neomycin on your rash either.

Another thing to avoid is putting antihistamine lotions or creams on it. Lastly, don’t put anesthetic creams with benzocaine on your rash either.

When to Go to a Doctor

If you notice puss on your rash or yellow scabs, it’s time to see your doctor. Also, it’s time to pay them a visit if your temperature rises above 100 degrees Fahrenheit. If itching keeps getting worse and you can’t sleep, call your doctor to get some help.

If it’s been over three weeks and the rash isn’t getting any better, this is a sign that something is wrong. If the rash spreads to your mouth, eyes, or genitals, you need to make an appointment ASAP to prevent it from getting worse.

Treating Your Rash

Now you’ve got some great tips for treating a rash caused by poison ivy, oak, or sumac. Remember that prevention is best, but if you do get a rash, use these easy treatment methods as soon as possible. 

Are you dealing with a bad rash that you just can’t shake? If so, we want to hear from you. Click here to contact us for more help.

Related

Источник: https://urgentcaresouthaven.com/how-to-treat-poison-ivy-oak-and-sumac-and-when-to-go-to-a-doctor/

Poison Ivy, Oak, or Sumac: Tips for Washing

Topic Overview

If you have contact with poison ivy, oak, or sumac, immediately wash areas of the skin that may have touched the plant. Sometimes the resulting rash (contact dermatitis) can be completely avoided by washing the affected areas with plenty of water and soap (such as dishwashing soap) or rubbing alcohol. Rinse often, so that the soap or rubbing alcohol doesn't dry on the skin and make the rash worse. Use creek or stream water if you are outdoors.

  • Do not scrub hard when you wash, so you don't irritate the skin. Also, be careful to clean under the fingernails, where the oil can collect and spread easily.
  • Special products, such as Tecnu and Zanfel, are available to remove urushiol from your skin. A hand cleaner, such as Goop, also may help.
  • If your pet was in a area where poison ivy, oak, or sumac grows, you may want to wash your pet with water and a mild soap to make sure the oil doesn't spread. For example, you could get the oil on your hands by petting a dog that has urushiol oil on its fur.

Urushiol can remain active on clothing and other items for many months, especially in dry climates. If these items are not cleaned properly, handling them can spread the urushiol to the skin and possibly cause a rash.

  • Wash all clothing, shoes, and other items that had contact with the plant or with a person who touched the plant.
  • Clean surfaces such as camping gear, gardening tools, and sporting equipment.
  • Wear vinyl or cotton gloves when handling or washing items that have touched poison ivy. Thin rubber (latex) gloves offer no protection, because urushiol can penetrate rubber.

Credits

Current as of: July 2, 2020

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review: William H. Blahd Jr. MD, FACEP - Emergency Medicine
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine
Martin J. Gabica MD - Family Medicine
Martin J. Gabica MD - Family Medicine

Источник: https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/hw75002

Poison ivy

Allergenic plant of Asia and North America

For other uses, see Poison ivy (disambiguation).

Poison ivy fall colouration

Poison ivy is an allergenic plant in the genus Toxicodendron native to Asia and North America. It is well known for causing urushiol-induced contact dermatitis, an itchy, irritating, and sometimes painful rash, in most people who touch it. The rash is caused by urushiol, a clear liquid compound in the plant's sap. The plant is variable in its appearance and habit, and despite its common name, it is not a true ivy (Hedera), but rather a member of the cashew and pistachio family (Anacardiaceae). T. radicans is commonly eaten by many animals, and the seeds are consumed by birds, but poison ivy is most often thought of as an unwelcome weed. Poison ivy was formerly treated as a single species, Toxicodendron radicans, but is now generally treated as a complex of three separate species: Toxicodendron radicans (eastern poison ivy), Toxicodendron rydbergii (western poison ivy) and Toxicodendron orientale (Asian poison ivy).

Description[edit]

Poison ivy is a highly variable plant that can grow as a small plant, a shrub, or a climbing vine.[1] It is commonly characterized by clusters of leaves, each containing three leaflets,[1] hence the common expression "leaves of three, let it be".[2] These leaves can vary between an elliptic to egg shape and will have either smooth, lobed, or toothed margins. Additionally, the leaf clusters are alternate on the stem. Clusters of small, greenish flowers bloom from May to July and produce white berries in the fall a few millimeters in diameter.[3]

  • T. radicans vine with typical reddish "hairs": Like the leaves, the vines are poisonous to humans.

  • Leaves may be smooth or notched on the same plant.

Taxonomy[edit]

Three species of poison ivy are now generally recognised, which are sometimes considered subspecies of Toxicodendron radicans:[4][5][6]

Health effects[edit]

A video describing the effects of poison ivy on the body

Main article: Urushiol-induced contact dermatitis

Urushiol-induced contact dermatitis is the allergic reaction caused by poison ivy. In extreme cases, a reaction can progress to anaphylaxis. Around 15 to 25 percent of people have no allergic reaction to urushiol, but most people have a greater reaction with repeated or more concentrated exposure.[7][8] Typically, the rash from the urushiol oil lasts about five to twelve days, but in extreme cases it can last a month or more.[9]

Over 350,000 people are affected by urushiol annually in the United States.[10]

The pentadecyl catechols of the oleoresin within the sap of poison ivy and related plants causes the allergic reaction; the plants produce a mixture of pentadecylcatechols, which collectively is called urushiol. After injury, the sap leaks to the surface of the plant where the urushiol becomes a blackish lacquer after contact with oxygen.[11][12]

Urushiol binds to the skin on contact where it causes severe itching that develops into reddish inflammation or uncoloured bumps, and then blistering. These lesions may be treated with Calamine lotion, Burow's solution compresses, dedicated commercial poison ivy itch creams, or baths to relieve discomfort,[13] though recent studies have shown some traditional medicines to be ineffective.[14][15]Over-the-counter products to ease itching—or simply oatmeal baths and baking soda—are now recommended by dermatologists for the treatment of poison ivy.[16]

A plant-based remedy cited to counter urushiol-induced contact dermatitis is jewelweed, though jewelweed extracts had no positive effect in clinical studies.[17][18][19][20] Others argue that prevention of lesions is easy if one practices effective washing, using plain soap, scrubbing with a washcloth, and rinsing three times within 2–8 hours of exposure.[21]

The oozing fluids released by scratching blisters do not spread the poison. The fluid in the blisters is produced by the body and it is not urushiol itself.[22] The appearance of a spreading rash indicates that some areas received more of the poison and reacted sooner than other areas or that contamination is still occurring from contact with objects to which the original poison was spread. Those affected can unknowingly spread the urushiol inside the house, on phones, door knobs, couches, counters, desks, and so on, thus in fact repeatedly coming into contact with poison ivy and extending the length of time of the rash. If this has happened, wipe down the surfaces with bleach or a commercial urushiol removal agent. The blisters and oozing result from blood vessels that develop gaps and leak fluid through the skin; if the skin is cooled, the vessels constrict and leak less.[23] If plant material with urushiol is burned and the smoke then inhaled, this rash will appear on the lining of the lungs, causing extreme pain and possibly fatal respiratory difficulty.[22] If poison ivy is eaten, the mucus lining of the mouth and digestive tract can be damaged.[24] An urushiol rash usually develops within a week of exposure and can last 1–4 weeks, depending on severity and treatment. In rare cases, urushiol reactions may require hospitalization.[22]

Urushiol oil can remain active for several years, so handling dead leaves or vines can cause a reaction. In addition, oil transferred from the plant to other objects (such as pet fur) can cause the rash if it comes into contact with the skin.[25][22] Clothing, tools, and other objects that have been exposed to oil should be washed to prevent further reactions.[26]

People who are sensitive to urushiol can also experience a similar rash from mangoes. Mangoes are in the same family (Anacardiaceae) as poison ivy; the sap of the mango tree and skin of mangoes has a chemical compound similar to urushiol.[27] A related allergenic compound is present in the raw shells of cashews.[28] Similar reactions have been reported occasionally from contact with the related Fragrant Sumac (Rhus aromatica) and Japanese lacquer tree. These other plants are also in the family Anacardiaceae.

Treatment[edit]

Main article: Urushiol-induced contact dermatitis § Treatments

Immediate washing with soap and cold water or rubbing alcohol may help prevent a reaction.[29] During a reaction, Calamine lotion or diphenhydramine may help mitigate symptoms. Corticosteroids, either applied to the skin or taken by mouth, may be appropriate in extreme cases. An astringent containing aluminum acetate (such as Burow's solution) may also provide relief and soothe the uncomfortable symptoms of the rash.[30]

Similar allergenic plants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcdeInnes, Robin J. (2012). "Toxicodendron radicans, T. rydbergii". Fire Effects Information System (FEIS). US Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service (USFS), Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory – via https://www.feis-crs.org/feis/.
  2. ^"LEAVES OF THREE, LET IT BE: HOW TO AVOID POISON IVY AND ITS ITCHY RASH". Reconnect with Nature. Forest Preserve District of Will County. Retrieved 19 October 2020.
  3. ^https://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/weedguide/single_weed.php?id=113
  4. ^"Toxicodendron rydbergii". Plants of the World Online. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Retrieved 19 October 2020.
  5. ^"Toxicodendron orientale". Plants of the World Online. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Retrieved 19 October 2020.
  6. ^"Toxicodendron radicans". Plants of the World Online. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Retrieved 19 October 2020.
  7. ^"How Poison Ivy Works". HowStuffWorks. 23 September 2005.
  8. ^Rohde, Michael. "Contact-Poisonous Plants of the World". mic-ro.com.
  9. ^"Poison Ivy, Poison Oak and Poison Sumac FAQs".
  10. ^Chaker, Anne Marie; Athavaley, Anjali (June 22, 2010). "Least-Welcome Sign of Summer". The Wall Street Journal. p. D1.
  11. ^Barceloux, Donald G. (2008). Medical Toxicology of Natural Substances: Foods, Fungi, Medicinal Herbs, Plants, and Venomous Animals. John Wiley and Sons. pp. 681–. ISBN .
  12. ^Rietschel, Robert L.; Fowler, Joseph F.; Fisher, Alexander A. (2008). Fisher's contact dermatitis. PMPH-USA. pp. 408–. ISBN .
  13. ^Wilson, W. H. & Lowdermilk, P. (2006). Maternal Child Nursing Care (3rd edition). St. Louis: Mosby Elsevier.
  14. ^"American Topics. An Outdated Notion, That Calamine Lotion". Archived from the original on 2007-06-19. Retrieved 2007-07-19.
  15. ^Appel, L.M. Ohmart; Sterner, R.F. (1956). "Zinc oxide: A new, pink, refractive microform crystal". AMA Arch Dermatol. 73 (4): 316–324. doi:10.1001/archderm.1956.01550040012003. PMID 13301048.
  16. ^"American Academy of Dermatology – Poison Ivy, Oak & Sumac". Archived from the original on 2009-06-05.
  17. ^Long, D.; Ballentine, N. H.; Marks, J. G. (1997). "Treatment of poison ivy/oak allergic contact dermatitis with an extract of jewelweed". Am. J. Contact. Dermat. 8 (3): 150–3. doi:10.1097/01206501-199709000-00005. PMID 9249283.
  18. ^Gibson, MR; Maher, FT (1950). "Activity of jewelweed and its enzymes in the treatment of Rhus dermatitis". Journal of the American Pharmaceutical Association. 39 (5): 294–6. doi:10.1002/jps.3030390516. PMID 15421925.
  19. ^Guin, J. D.; Reynolds, R. (1980). "Jewelweed treatment of poison ivy dermatitis". Contact Dermatitis. 6 (4): 287–8. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0536.1980.tb04935.x. PMID 6447037. S2CID 46551170.
  20. ^Zink, B. J.; Otten, E. J.; Rosenthal, M.; Singal, B. (1991). "The effect of jewel weed in preventing poison ivy dermatitis". Journal of Wilderness Medicine. 2 (3): 178–182. doi:10.1580/0953-9859-2.3.178.
  21. ^Extreme Deer Habitat (2014-06-22). "How to never have a serious poison ivy rash again". Retrieved 2016-07-26.
  22. ^ abcd"Facts about Poison Ivy: How long does the rash last?, What can you do once the itching starts?, How do you get poison ivy?". poison-ivy.org. 25 February 2015.
  23. ^Editors of Prevention (2010). The Doctors Book of Home Remedies: Quick Fixes, Clever Techniques, and Uncommon Cures to Get You Feeling Better Fast. Rodale. pp. 488–. ISBN .CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  24. ^Lewis, Robert Alan (1998). Lewis' dictionary of toxicology. CRC Press. pp. 901–. ISBN .
  25. ^"Poison Ivy, Oak & Sumac". aad.org. Archived from the original on 2007-07-08.
  26. ^"Poision ivy - oak - sumac". MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia. A.D.A.M., Inc. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  27. ^Tucker, Mark O.; Swan, Chad R. (1998). "The Mango–Poison Ivy Connection". New England Journal of Medicine. 339 (4): 235. doi:10.1056/NEJM199807233390405. PMID 9673302.
  28. ^Rosen, T.; Fordice, D. B. (April 1994). "Cashew Nut Dermatitis". Southern Medical Journal. 87 (4): 543–546. doi:10.1097/00007611-199404000-00026. PMID 8153790.
  29. ^"Misconceptions About Treating Poison Ivy and Oak Rash". teclabsinc.com. Archived from the original on 2014-08-26.
  30. ^Gladman, Aaron C. (June 2006). "Toxicodendron Dermatitis: Poison Ivy, Oak, and Sumac". Wilderness & Environmental Medicine. 17 (2): 120–128. doi:10.1580/PR31-05.1. PMID 16805148.
  31. ^"Botanical Dermatology – ALLERGIC CONTACT DERMATITIS – ANACARDIACEAE AND RELATED FAMILIES". The Internet Dermatology Society, Inc. Retrieved 22 Sep 2014.
Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poison_ivy

Having more time to explore nature is a sweet perk of summer, but dealing with a poison ivy rash that pops up after trekking through greenery isn’t the ideal way to end your outdoor adventures.

Poison ivy is found in most parts of the U.S., except Alaska, Hawaii, and parts of the West Coast, according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It can grow as either a vine or a small shrub that trails along the ground, and it can climb on low plants, trees, and poles. Poison ivy is usually identified by its three shiny leaves that bud from one small stem, the FDA says.

But here’s the tricky part: Poison ivy can change color. Its leaves are reddish in the spring, green in the summer, and yellow, orange, or red in the fall. It can also have greenish-white flowers and whitish-yellow berries.

Getty Images

So, what should you do if you come into contact with this pesky plant? Below, doctors explain the best treatment for a poison ivy rash, how long you can expect it to last, and when it’s time to rope in your doctor for reinforcements.

Why does poison ivy cause a rash?

Poison ivy, oak, and sumac all contain an oil called urushiol that most people are allergic to, according to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). As a result, pretty much everyone who comes into contact with these plants develops a rash anywhere between a few hours to three weeks after exposure (depending on whether or not you have been exposed to it before).

“Poison ivy causes an allergic contact dermatitis, which means that your immune system becomes sensitized to the urushiol and mounts an inflammatory response,” says Joshua Zeichner, M.D., director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. “This translates to a red, itchy rash that may become extensive or even lead to blistering in severe cases.”

What does a poison ivy rash look like?

JodiJacobsonGetty Images

Poison ivy can cause red, itchy, blistery bumps to form on the skin, and they’re not usually in any particular pattern, says Gary Goldenberg, M.D., an assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

The rash tends to mimic the way you came into contact with the poison ivy. For example, if you brushed along the plant, it could leave a rash in a line on your skin. “New blisters may continue to appear for up to two weeks,” Dr. Goldenberg says. “The areas with most exposure appear first and those with least exposure appear later.”

What does a poison ivy rash feel like? Is it contagious?

It’s mostly very itchy. The AAD says that the itch can be so intense that it can wake you up while you’re sleeping. “Some patients may experience skin burning and pain,” Dr. Goldenberg says.

While severe allergic reactions to poison ivy can happen, they’re “more rare,” adds Purvi Parikh, M.D., an allergist with Allergy & Asthma Network. The following symptoms are a sign of a severe reaction and require immediate medical care:

  • Difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • A rash around one or both eyes, your mouth, or on your genitals
  • Swelling on your face, especially if an eye swells shut
  • Itching that worsens or makes it impossible to sleep
  • Rashes on most of your body
  • A fever

While the rash is not contagious itself, you can still develop a rash if you touch another person’s skin or clothing while the oil from the poison ivy is still on it.

The best treatment for a poison ivy rash

If you know you came into contact with poison ivy, the AAD recommends taking off the clothes you were wearing and thoroughly washing them. Then, rinse your skin with lukewarm, soapy water to wash off the urushiol. If it’s not washed off, the oil can spread from person to person and to other areas of your body that weren’t originally exposed to the plant, Dr. Zeichner says.

After that, there’s only so much you can do to speed up the rash’s healing process. “The rash usually resolves in three to four weeks without treatment,” Dr. Goldenberg says.

However, there are some home remedies that can help make you more comfortable while the poison ivy rash heals:

✔️ Take short oatmeal or baking soda baths. The AAD recommends soaking in a lukewarm bath with a colloidal oatmeal preparation (you can find it at your local drugstore or online) to help with the itch. Adding one cup of baking soda to running water in a bath can also help relieve the need to scratch. This is important, as incessant itching can break the skin and raise your risk of infection.

✔️Use calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream.Calamine lotion can offer itch relief, Dr. Goldenberg says. And, if you have a mild case, applying hydrocortisone cream or lotion can also help.

Allegra Adult 24 Hour Allergy Relief

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✔️Apply cool compresses to the rash. Wet a clean washcloth with cold water, wring it out, and apply it to your skin to help soothe the area.

✔️Take an antihistamine. If you know you were exposed to poison ivy, Dr. Zeichner says you can take an antihistamine “right away” to try to tamp down on your body’s allergic response. Long-acting antihistamines like cetirizine (Zyrtec), levocetirizine (Xyzal), and fexofenadine (Allegra) can be especially helpful, Dr. Parikh adds.

If you’re incredibly itchy, have a huge rash, or just can’t seem to get relief, Dr. Zeichner recommends calling your doctor for help and a proper diagnosis. Again, if you have trouble breathing or experience other signs of an extreme allergic reaction, seek medical care right away.


Support from readers like you helps us do our best work. Go here to subscribe to Prevention and get 12 FREE gifts. And sign up for our FREE newsletter here for daily health, nutrition, and fitness advice.

Korin MillerKorin Miller is a freelance writer specializing in general wellness, sexual health and relationships, and lifestyle trends, with work appearing in Men’s Health, Women’s Health, Self, Glamour, and more.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Источник: https://www.prevention.com/health/a33367617/poison-ivy-rash-treatment/

: Home remedies for poison oak or ivy

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Home remedies for poison oak or ivy

Having more time to explore nature is a sweet perk of summer, but dealing with a poison ivy rash that pops up after trekking through greenery isn’t the ideal way to end your outdoor adventures.

Poison ivy is found in most parts of the U.S., except Alaska, Hawaii, and parts of the West Coast, according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It can grow as either a vine or a small shrub that trails along the ground, and it can climb on low plants, trees, and poles. Poison ivy is usually identified by its three shiny leaves that bud from one small stem, the FDA says.

But here’s the tricky part: Poison ivy can change color. Its leaves are reddish in the spring, green in the summer, and yellow, orange, or red in the fall. It can also have greenish-white flowers and whitish-yellow berries.

Getty Images

So, what should you do if you home remedies for poison oak or ivy into contact with this pesky plant? Below, doctors explain the best treatment for home remedies for poison oak or ivy poison ivy rash, how long you can expect it to last, and when it’s time to rope in your doctor for reinforcements.

Why does poison ivy cause a rash?

Poison ivy, oak, and sumac all contain an oil called urushiol that most people are allergic to, according to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). As a result, pretty much everyone who comes into contact with these plants develops a rash anywhere between a few hours to three weeks after exposure (depending on whether or not you have been exposed to it before).

“Poison ivy causes an allergic contact dermatitis, which means that your immune system becomes sensitized to the urushiol and mounts home remedies for poison oak or ivy inflammatory response,” says Joshua Zeichner, M.D., director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. “This translates to a red, itchy home remedies for poison oak or ivy that may become extensive or even lead to blistering in severe cases.”

What does a poison ivy rash look like?

JodiJacobsonGetty Images

Poison ivy can cause red, itchy, blistery bumps to form on the skin, and they’re not usually in any particular pattern, says Gary Goldenberg, M.D., an assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

The rash tends to mimic the way you came into contact with the poison ivy. For example, if you brushed along the plant, it could leave a rash in a chase check routing number location on your skin. “New blisters may continue to appear for up to two weeks,” Dr. Goldenberg says. “The areas with most exposure appear first and those with least exposure appear later.”

What does a poison ivy rash feel like? Is it contagious?

It’s mostly very itchy. The AAD says that home remedies for poison oak or ivy itch can be so intense that it can wake you up while you’re sleeping. “Some patients may experience skin burning and pain,” Dr. Goldenberg says.

While severe allergic reactions to poison ivy can happen, they’re “more rare,” adds Purvi Parikh, M.D., an allergist with Allergy & Asthma Network. The following symptoms are a sign of a severe reaction and require immediate medical care:

  • Difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • A rash around one or both eyes, your mouth, or on your genitals
  • Swelling on your face, especially if an eye swells shut
  • Itching that worsens or makes it impossible to sleep
  • Rashes on most of your body
  • A fever

While the rash is not contagious itself, you can still develop a rash if you touch another person’s skin or clothing while the oil from the poison ivy is still on it.

The best treatment for a poison ivy rash

If you know you came into contact with poison ivy, the AAD recommends taking off the clothes you were wearing and thoroughly washing home remedies for poison oak or ivy. Then, rinse your skin with lukewarm, soapy water to wash off the urushiol. If it’s not washed off, the oil can spread from person to person and to other areas of your body that weren’t originally exposed to the plant, Dr. Zeichner says.

After that, there’s only so much you can do to speed up the rash’s healing process. “The rash usually resolves in three to four weeks without treatment,” Dr. Goldenberg says.

However, there are some home remedies that can help make you more comfortable while the poison ivy rash heals:

✔️ Take short oatmeal or baking soda baths. The AAD recommends soaking in a lukewarm bath with a colloidal oatmeal preparation (you can find it at your local drugstore or online) to help home remedies for poison oak or ivy the itch. Adding one cup of baking soda to running water in a bath can also help relieve the need to scratch. This is important, as incessant itching can break the skin and raise your risk of infection.

✔️Use calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream.Calamine lotion can offer itch relief, Dr. Goldenberg says. And, if you have a mild case, applying hydrocortisone cream or lotion can also help.

Allegra Adult 24 Hour Allergy Relief

amazon.com

SHOP NOW

✔️Apply cool compresses to the rash. Wet a clean washcloth with cold water, wring it out, and apply it to your skin to help soothe the area.

✔️Take an antihistamine. If you know you were exposed to poison ivy, Dr. Zeichner says you can take an antihistamine “right away” to try to tamp down on your body’s allergic response. Long-acting antihistamines like cetirizine (Zyrtec), levocetirizine (Xyzal), and fexofenadine (Allegra) can be especially helpful, Dr. Parikh adds.

If you’re incredibly itchy, have a huge rash, or just can’t seem to get relief, Dr. Zeichner recommends calling your doctor for help and a proper diagnosis. Again, if you have trouble breathing or experience other signs of an extreme allergic reaction, seek medical care right away.


Support from readers like you helps us do our best work. Go here to subscribe to Prevention and get 12 FREE gifts. And sign up for our FREE newsletter here for daily health, nutrition, and fitness advice.

Korin MillerKorin Miller is a freelance writer specializing in general wellness, sexual health and relationships, and lifestyle trends, with work appearing in Men’s Health, Women’s Health, Self, Glamour, and more.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Источник: https://www.prevention.com/health/a33367617/poison-ivy-rash-treatment/

When Might Poison Ivy Warrant an Office Visit?

To the untrained eye, poison ivy looks like a normal, harmless plant. But every year, millions of Americans experience just how unpleasant it can be.

Poison ivy contains an home remedies for poison oak or ivy called urushiol which causes a delayed allergic reaction in most people. After coming in contact with the plant, it could take up to five days for the resulting skin rash to fully emerge. Then, depending on its severity, it could take an additional three weeks for the symptoms to subside.

Brenda McSherry, FNP

Brenda McSherry, a family nurse practitioner with Mizzou Quick Care, said several at-home remedies could help calm the itching, burning, blistering and oozing that accompanies a poison ivy rash.

“Try taking a baking soda, oatmeal or Domeboro solution bath,” she said. “Applying aloe vera gel or hydrocortisone cream helps cool and soothe the skin. Oral antihistamines like Benadryl can also provide temporary relief from the itching, as can intermittent use of cold packs — 10 minutes on, 10 minutes off.”

McSherry said people with severe cases wells fargo vendor financial services address poison ivy often do not realize a trip to Mizzou Quick Care could help expedite the healing process.

“Mizzou Quick Care can be especially helpful if the rash is widespread or affecting the eyes or genital areas,” she said. “We can prescribe strong topical steroid creams or oral steroid medications to help heal the rash, and we can suggest several other treatments based upon your unique case.”

Источник: https://www.muhealth.org/our-stories/when-might-poison-ivy-warrant-office-visit

Poison ivy, oak, and sumac: How to treat the rash

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Источник: https://www.aad.org/public/everyday-care/itchy-skin/poison-ivy/treat-rash

Poison Ivy, Oak, or Sumac: Tips for Washing

Topic Overview

If you have contact with poison ivy, oak, or sumac, immediately wash areas of the skin that may have touched the plant. Sometimes the resulting rash (contact dermatitis) can be completely avoided by washing the affected areas with plenty of water and soap (such as dishwashing soap) or rubbing alcohol. Rinse often, so that the soap or rubbing alcohol doesn't dry on the skin and make the rash worse. Use creek or stream water if you are outdoors.

  • Do not scrub hard when you wash, so you don't irritate the skin. Also, be careful to clean under the fingernails, where the oil can collect and spread easily.
  • Special products, such as Tecnu and Zanfel, are available to remove urushiol from your skin. A hand cleaner, such home remedies for poison oak or ivy Goop, also may help.
  • If your pet was in a area where poison ivy, oak, or sumac grows, you may want to wash your pet with water and a mild soap to make sure the oil doesn't spread. For example, you could get the oil on your hands by petting a dog that has urushiol oil on its fur.

Urushiol can remain active on clothing and other items for many months, especially in dry climates. If these items are not cleaned properly, handling them can spread the urushiol to the skin and possibly cause a rash.

  • Wash all clothing, shoes, and other items that had contact with the plant or with a person who touched the plant.
  • Clean surfaces such as camping gear, gardening tools, and sporting equipment.
  • Wear vinyl or cotton gloves when handling or washing items that have touched poison ivy. Thin rubber (latex) gloves offer no protection, because urushiol can penetrate rubber.

Credits

Current as of: July 2, 2020

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review: William H. Blahd Jr. MD, FACEP - Emergency Medicine
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine
Martin J. Gabica MD - Family Medicine
Martin J. Gabica MD - Family Medicine

Источник: https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/hw75002

Jewelweed: a natural remedy for poison ivy, stinging nettles

In days of old — you know, back when I was a kid — learning about the magical plant called touch-me-not was something that happened with country kids at an early age. It was just part of my hunting, fishing, camping, and hiking upbringing.

The parent, or maybe an aunt, uncle or grandparent doing the introduction, would home remedies for poison oak or ivy the child to touch one of the plant’s half-inch-long seed pods. The child would hesitantly touch the tiny bean-like pod and it would burst, shooting its seeds in all directions. What usually followed was a curious child eagerly searching for more pods to touch — so much for the plant’s name.

While the plant’s moniker “touch-me-not” comes from its pods that explode when touched, the origin of its other common name, “jewelweed,” is less clear. The name most likely came from the observation that water droplets bead up on the leaves like jewels or from the fact that, if you hold a leaf under water, it looks silvery or jeweled. Yet another source, John Hilty, mentions that the name comes from the fact that “their attractive orange flowers glisten in the sunlight.”

Jewelweed is found all across Canada and in all but a few of the arid western states. It only grows in semi-shaded wet areas, therefore the annual plants sometimes struggle during a drought.

Aside from being a pretty but common wildflower, jewelweed — particularly spotted jewelweed — has an important medical use. Rub up against stinging nettles — jewelweed to the rescue.

Native Americans used its sap to treat various skin rashes. If you crush the hollow stem and rub the sticky, clear sap on your skin, it quickly takes away the itch from poison ivy blisters or the burning sensation caused by stinging nettles.

The sap from jewelweed can also be used to ease the itch caused by athlete’s foot. According to information found on the University of Texas Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center website, “scientific data confirm (jewelweed’s) fungicidal qualities.”

I have used jewelweed sap to treat both poison ivy and stinging nettles. In each case, jewelweed sap provided very quick relief. Corticosteroid creams are sold for the same purpose, but the sap from jewelweed is an excellent natural substitute.

An article in the August 2012 issue of the Journal of Ethnopharmacology supported that a mash made from jewelweed stems and leaves was successful at reducing the rash caused by poison ivy. That study did not address its anti-itch properties.

The scientific name of touch-me-not or spotted jewelweed, Impatiens capensis, provides a hint as to this plant’s domesticated relatives — the ornamental impatiens found at garden centers. Another species of wild jewelweed, the yellow-flowered pale jewelweed (Impatiens pallida), also grows across North America, but is not as common.

Both spotted and pale jewelweed are native plants. By the end of summer, they grow three to five feet tall, often in dense stands. The plants have both opposite and alternate branching and leaves. The plant’s stem is somewhat translucent, hollow and succulent. It is easily crushed. Larger stems are sometimes marked with enlarged bulb-like nodes. Light green or red roots are often visible growing into the ground from the bottom of the stem.

The plant blooms from late July until the first hard frost. They are blooming now. The inch-long cone-shaped flowers of spotted jewelweed are red-orange with darker spots. They sport three showy, pollinator-attracting lips at the entrance to the “cone.” From a side view, the flowers are seen to be hanging balanced from a tiny stem. The flowers of pale jewelweed are the same shape and size, but light yellow in color, with tiny spots.

I have patches of both spotted and pale jewelweed growing near my house, and they are a regular haven for hummingbirds. Because of the depth and angle of the flowers and their nectar-bearing spur, hummingbirds, bees and sometimes swallowtail butterflies are the main pollinators. Most flowers are successfully pollinated and later produce seeds.

All native plants, including jewelweed, are a part of the natural web of life. Aside from the plant’s importance to hummingbirds and bees, white-tailed deer browse on the foliage; mice, ruffed grouse, pheasants and some songbirds eat the seeds. The plant is also a host to several species of moth larvae.

Now would be a perfect time to acquaint yourself with this native medicinal wildflower. The knowledge could come in handy someday. Note: Most people do not have an allergy to touch-me-not, but you might. Be sure to test a small area of skin prior to a large application.

Источник: https://www.outdoornews.com/2018/08/23/jewelweed-a-natural-remedy-for-poison-ivy-stinging-nettles/
home remedies for poison oak or ivy

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