home remedy for pink eye in humans

Pink eye can often be treated at home, according to the NEI. But you should see a doctor if you have moderate to severe pain in the eye, vision. available over the counter from pharmacies as a treatment for acute bacterial conjunctivitis in adults, the elderly and children aged two years or over. A dog's eye, however, is different from a human's eye because the Not surprisingly, the treatment for canine conjunctivitis will depend. home remedy for pink eye in humans

Home remedy for pink eye in humans -

Pink eye, also known as conjunctivitis, is an infection or inflammation of the conjunctiva, the outermost layer of the eyeball and inside of the eyelids. It is also the most common type of dog eye infection . Dogs usually experience this condition in one eye but may contract it in both.

How Can Pink Eye Be Contracted by Dogs?

Canine conjunctivitis can be caused by many things. One of them is a virus. Like humans, dogs that are experiencing a cold or upper respiratory infection may have drainage from the eyes.

Many veterinary ophthalmologists do not feel that viral conjunctivitis contagious, but is, instead, species-specific.

Another cause of pink eye in dogs is bacteria. The bacteria Streptococcus and Staphylococcus are known culprits. While proven bacterial conjunctivitis in dogs is rare, it is highly contagious.

And, if you’re asking yourself, “can dogs get pink eye from humans?” The answer is yes! Therefore, if any one of your human family members has pink eye, you’ll want to take precautions to prevent the rest of the household from contracting it. This includes sterilization of shared spaces within the home, lots of hand washing, and avoiding contact with the eyes.

If any one of your human or furry family members has pink eye, you’ll want to take precautions to prevent the rest of the household from contracting it

Canine conjunctivitis may also be caused by airborne allergens, like dust, pollen, mold, dander, perfume or cosmetics, and smoke.

There is a possibility, too, for pink eye to be caused by an irritation or injury. Whether your dog is rolling around on the carpet or in the yard, their eyes can get rubbed and scratched. Plus, being on the ground makes it easy for dirt, dust, and other particles to get in their eyes.

Dog diseases like keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS), or dry eye, can also cause conjunctivitis, and may require chronic treatment. Dry eye can result from any condition that impairs your pet’s ability to produce tears.

Symptoms of Pink Eye

So, how can you tell if your canine companion has pink eye? Just look into those puppy dog eyes! If you see any of the following signs, your dog likely has an infection and should be taken to the veterinarian for an examination.

Clinical signs of dog pink eye include:

  • Redness or bloodshot appearance
  • Puffy eyelids
  • Discharge
  • Crustiness
  • Eyelids sticking together
  • Watery eyes
  • Squinting
  • Pawing at eyes

How to treat dog pink eye

How to Treat Pink Eye

If your dog develops conjunctivitis, a visit to your veterinarian will be necessary to diagnose the condition, and determine an appropriate treatment plan. The best treatment for pink eye, as determined by your veterinarian, will depend on its cause.

Bacterial

If your dog has bacterial conjunctivitis, your vet will most likely prescribe antibiotic eye drops or ointment. Administering eye drops or eye ointment can be tough, especially if your dog is squirmy. If possible, have someone assist you with the procedure.

Here’s how to give your dog eye drops or ointment:

  1. Have your assistant hold your dog and speak soothingly to help keep your four-legged pal calm and still. Approaching your dog while they’re lying down might make the process easier.
  2. With washed hands and the medication nearby, wipe your dog’s eyes clean of any discharge.  
  3. Next, get the medication ready in one hand and gently lift your dog’s head upward with the other. Resting the hand with the medication in it on your dog’s forehead is a good idea in case they try to jerk away. Your hand will move with their head, ensuring you still get the medication in the right place.
  4. Squeeze the recommended amount of eye drops or a ribbon of ointment on the conjunctival sac, which is the inner part of the lower eyelid. Administering the medicine in this location will help it disperse easily around the whole eye. Massaging your hand over your dog’s eyelid can also spread the medication.  
  5. After you’re finished, reward your pup with praise and a treat!

Viral

For viral conjunctivitis, which results from the common cold and upper respiratory infection, your veterinarian may prescribe steroid eye drops or artificial tears to help wash out the goop. The prescription, along with the gentle wiping away any discharge or crust, will make your dog more comfortable while they’re getting over their illness.

Use a clean towel soaked in lukewarm water when wiping away build-up. Never scratch at the infected area with your finger or other hard objects, as permanent damage may result. Holding a cold compress on your pup’s eye can help soothe it as well.

If you would like to try treating your dog with a vitamin supplement, or make changes to your dog’s diet, discuss your options with your veterinarian. For tips on how to give your dog a vitamin or pill.

Treating viral conjunctivitis in dogs

Allergies

For a case of allergen-induced pink eye, vets might prescribe an antihistamine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, steroid eye drops, or artificial tears. Cleaning the affected area or applying a cold compress is good for relieving the irritation of allergens too.

Irritation/Injury

If your dog’s eye infection was caused by an injury, debris, or friction during play, try to soothe the area and keep a watch on your pup until the eye heals.

Injuries to the eye sometimes include damage to the cornea. Your veterinarian may need to examine your dog’s eyes to be sure that corneal injury did not occur. If a corneal injury is present, your veterinarian can prescribe appropriate medication, severe cases may even require surgery. Medications used for other forms of conjunctivitis, like steroids, can make corneal injuries worse, sometimes leading to blindness. That is why it is so important to consult your vet.

You want to make sure your dog isn’t pawing, scratching, rubbing their face on the carpet, or doing anything that can damage the eye or surrounding skin. Pink eye, in all forms, is a bothersome condition, and your dog may have a hard time leaving their eye alone. If you notice any damaging behaviors, you might want to ask your vet for a cone.

There are a number of different home remedies on the internet. Some are helpful, and others can cause further harm. Your veterinarian can tell you which ones are safe to use.

How to prevent dog pink eye

How to Prevent Pink Eye

Every pet parents goal is to keep their pal happy and healthy. These tips may help prevent your dog from contracting an eye infection:

  • Bacterial

    Bacterial conjunctivitis can be tough to prevent, since we can’t see the bacteria lurking around our environment. But, keeping your pet’s sleep and play areas sterile can kill the bacteria and thwart further spreading.

  • Viral

    Virus-caused pink eye, like bacterial conjunctivitis, can be pretty tricky to prevent. Sometimes, despite our best efforts to keep our family and selves healthy, we still get sick. However, it never hurts to try giving your dog’s immune system a boost with a vitamin-packed diet and lots of exercise. Here’s a look at more fruits and veggies your canine can have to get their vitamins.

  • Allergies

    If your dog has allergies, keeping your home free of dust, dander, and mold can help prevent a reaction. Be sure not to allow smoke or perfumes near an allergic dog either. Your vet can prescribe medications to stop flare-ups in their tracks as well.

    Though we can’t always keep debris and irritants from getting in our pets’ eyes when they play, making sure the fur around their eyes is well-groomed can help. This will prevent little hairs from poking the inside of their eyes. It will also make it more difficult for dust, dirt, and other aggravating particles to get tangled or matted in the fur and fall into the eyes.

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals® (ASPCA®) provides a variety of dog grooming tips that you may find useful. Also, the treatment of common eye infections, like pink eye, can be covered by a pet health insurance plan. Get your free quote today!

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Источник: https://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/resources/can-dogs-get-pink-eye/

Bacterial Conjunctivitis

What is bacterial conjunctivitis?

Conjunctivitis is the name for inflammation of the conjunctiva; this is the thin layer of tissue on the inside of the eyelids and covers the white part of the eye. Also known as pink eye, conjunctivitis is often caused by bacteria, a virus (see viral conjunctivitis) or allergies (see allergic conjunctivitis). If pink eye is caused by bacteria, it is called bacterial conjunctivitis. Like all types of pink eye, bacterial conjunctivitis is common but not usually serious.

One or both eyes can be affected. The main symptoms of bacterial conjunctivitis include:

  • Pinkness or redness of the eye
  • Burning, itching, a sensation of grittiness, or mild pain or discomfort in the eye
  • Thick, sticky discharge from the eye
  • Swollen and/or reddened eyelids

If you think that you might have pink eye, you can try using the Ada app to find out more about your symptoms.

Many cases of mild bacterial conjunctivitis clear up on their own, within a week or two and without any specific treatment. Cleaning the eyes throughout the day with water and a clean cloth or sterile pad, and using lubricating eye drops, also known as artificial tears, may help to relieve symptoms. However, antibiotic eye drops or ointments may be recommended, particularly for more severe cases of bacterial conjunctivitis.

Generally, people make a complete recovery, and the condition does not cause any complications. However, if bacterial conjunctivitis occurs in newborn babies or people with weakened immune systems, such as those who have HIV or are undergoing treatment for cancer, it can be very serious, and medical advice should be sought without delay.

In addition, anyone experiencing severe symptoms should see a doctor immediately. These include:

  • Intense pain in the eye
  • Extreme redness in the eye
  • Inability to open the eye
  • Severe sensitivity to light
  • Blurred vision that persists after wiping away discharge

Furthermore, if symptoms are mild but do not go away, medical advice should also be sought.

Bacterial conjunctivitis can affect people of any age, but it is more common in children than adults. It is very contagious, which means that it can be spread easily from person to person. For this reason, it is important for people who have bacterial conjunctivitis to take steps to avoid passing it on to others, such as practicing good hygiene.

Symptoms of bacterial conjunctivitis

Bacterial conjunctivitis often begins in one eye and then spreads to the other. Symptoms may include:

  • Pinkness or redness in the eye
  • Burning, itching, a sensation of grittiness, or mild pain or discomfort in the eye
  • Increased watering of the eye
  • Thick, sticky, often yellowish discharge from the eye; this can form a “crust” at night, making the eyes feel as if they are glued shut in the morning
  • Swollen eyelids
  • Slight sensitivity to bright light
  • Swelling of the lymph nodes in front of the ears

Bacterial conjunctivitis usually only causes mild symptoms and does not affect a person’s vision, other than causing slight blurriness when discharge has built up on and around the eye. Depending on the type of bacteria causing the infection, there may be additional symptoms. If you are worried that you may have pink eye, you can try using the Ada app to find out more about your symptoms.

If symptoms are severe or vision is impaired, it is important to contact a doctor without delay. It is also extremely important to see a doctor if any signs of bacterial conjunctivitis are present in a newborn baby.

Causes of bacterial conjunctivitis

The most common causes of bacterial conjunctivitis are the following types of bacteria:

  • Staphylococcus aureus
  • Staphylococcus epidermidis
  • Streptococcus pneumonia
  • Haemophilus influenzae; this is not the same as the flu, which is caused by a virus

Less commonly, the infection can be the result of the following sexually transmitted infections (STIs):

Bacterial conjunctivitis caused by chlamydia or gonorrhea is more serious and requires treatment by a doctor.

Diagnosis of bacterial conjunctivitis

When symptoms are mild, a diagnosis of bacterial conjunctivitis can often be made without seeing a doctor, and the condition can be treated at home. However, if there is any uncertainty or concern over the condition, or the symptoms are severe, seeing a doctor is very important.

A doctor will take the person’s medical history and ask whether anyone they know might have had an eye infection recently. They will examine the eyes and assess the signs and symptoms present, taking care to rule out acute viral conjunctivitis, allergic conjunctivitis and other more serious eye conditions, such as uveitis.

In most cases, it will not be necessary to order laboratory tests to confirm the diagnosis. However, in cases that are severe or do not respond to treatment, as well as in the case of infants, the doctor may take a small swab from the eyelid and test it to determine the cause of the infection and ensure that the treatment approach is correct.

Treatment for bacterial conjunctivitis

Mild cases of bacterial conjunctivitis often clear up within 1-2 weeks without special medical treatment.

The following home remedies and over-the-counter treatments may help to relieve the discomfort caused by conjunctivitis:

  • Gently cleaning discharge from the eye with a clean cloth, sterile pad or cotton wool soaked in water
  • Applying lubricating eye drops, called artificial tears, which are available without a prescription, to the eye; care must be taken not to use the drops in the other eye, if only one eye is infected
  • Applying a cold or warm compress, a clean cloth that has been soaked in water, to the eye
  • Avoiding the use of contact lenses until the infection has cleared

Antibiotics for bacterial conjunctivitis

Antibiotic eye drops or eye ointment may help to clear up the infection more quickly. However, they are not always needed, and many cases of mild bacterial conjunctivitis will resolve on their own, without antibiotic treatment.

Topical antibiotics are typically recommended for more severe or persistent cases of bacterial conjunctivitis, with eye drops usually preferred over ointments for ease of use.

Less commonly, where the cause of bacterial conjunctivitis is chlamydia or gonorrhea, a course of oral or injected antibiotics may be necessary.

Complications of bacterial conjunctivitis

Most cases of mild bacterial conjunctivitis clear up completely, without causing any complications. However, in a small number of severe cases, the infection can cause serious complications, including:

  • Ulcers on the cornea of the eye
  • Damage to vision
  • Otitis media, an ear infection

If a person experiences any severe symptoms, or is concerned about an eye infection, it is recommended that they see a doctor without delay.

Bacterial conjunctivitis in newborns

Infants can be affected by various types of conjunctivitis, including bacterial conjunctivitis. Pink eye in newborns is called neonatal conjunctivitis or ophthalmia neonatorum. Babies with bacterial conjunctivitis typically develop puffy, red eyelids and discharge from the eyes within 1-14 days of birth.

A baby’s eyes may become infected with bacteria from the mother during the childbirth process, including the common varieties listed above, as well as, less commonly, chlamydia and gonorrhea.

Bacterial conjunctivitis in babies can be very serious and requires urgent medical attention. It is treated with antibiotics and may require referral to a specialist.

Conjunctivitis in babies is sometimes mistaken for sticky eyes caused by a blocked tear duct. However, a blocked tear duct will not cause redness or swelling.

Prevention of bacterial conjunctivitis

While it may not always be possible to prevent bacterial conjunctivitis, taking the following steps can help to reduce the likelihood of an infection:

  • Avoiding contact with people who have pink eye
  • Maintaining good hygiene, such as washing your hands often with soap and water, or using hand sanitizer
  • Avoiding touching your eyes when your hands are not clean

If you have bacterial conjunctivitis, the following actions can help avoid spreading the infection to others:

  • Maintaining good hygiene, such as washing your hands often with soap and water, or using hand sanitizer, especially after treating the eyes
  • Cleaning your spectacles
  • Avoiding touching the eyes other than when treating them, as this can spread the bacteria
  • Washing pillowcases and towels often and avoiding sharing them with others
  • Avoiding sharing makeup and eye drops
  • When necessary, staying off school or work until symptoms of bacterial conjunctivitis have cleared; this is generally when the eyes are no longer red and irritated
  • Avoiding the use of swimming pools

In addition, contact lenses should not be worn until symptoms have cleared, and a new pair used when the infection has gone away. Some makeup may also need to be discarded and replaced to prevent reinfection.

Bacterial conjunctivitis FAQs

Q: Viral vs. bacterial conjunctivitis – what is the difference?
A: While both types of conjunctivitis are highly contagious, the causes, some of the symptoms and the treatments are different. Viral conjunctivitis is caused by a virus, often from the group of viruses that cause the common cold, results in a watery discharge from the eye, and has no specific treatment. Bacterial conjunctivitis is caused by bacteria, often types of staphylococcus or streptococcus, is spread through poor hygiene or contact with other people or insects, results in a thick, sticky discharge from the eye, and may – in some cases – require antibiotic eye drops. If you think that you may have a type of pink eye, you can try using the Ada app to find out more about your symptoms.

Q: My child has bacterial conjunctivitis. Is it necessary to keep them home from school?
A: It depends on the region and institution. Some experts feel that a child should not be required to stay at home with bacterial conjunctivitis, unless an outbreak of multiple cases has occurred. However, a particular daycare center or school may have their own policy and ask that a child with bacterial conjunctivitis be kept at home until their symptoms have cleared up, to reduce the likelihood of infecting other children.

Other names for bacterial conjunctivitis

  • Bacterial eye infection
  • Pink eye, or pinkeye
Источник: https://ada.com/conditions/bacterial-conjunctivitis/

Canine Conjunctivitis: How to Recognize and Treat Pink Eye in Dogs

Pink eye, also known as conjunctivitis, presents similarly in dogs as it does in people. Characterized by red or pink irritated eyes and often accompanied by discharge, this common eye infection is not a pleasant experience for dogs or owners but is luckily treatable in most circumstances.

Conjunctivitis in dogs can have many different causes, many of which require specific treatments, so it's a good idea to see your veterinarian if you begin to notice symptoms of pink eye in your pooch. Because of this, it is helpful to know the basics of the disease so you can keep an eye out (literally) for anything concerning.

How Do Dogs Get Pink Eye?

Nikki Graham, DVM from Nottingham Animal Hospital in Hamilton, N.J., explains that pink eye is usually either allergic or bacterial in dogs. She says, "They can get it from inhalant allergies, such as pollen or grass, or from a secondary bacterial infection from a topical irritant, like smoke, sand, or wind from hanging their heads out the car window." 

Graham goes on to explain that other causes of conjunctivitis in dogs can include factors such as entropion, or rolled in eyelids, or keratoconjunctivitis sicca, also known as dry eye, in which dogs don't produce enough tears. Pink eye can be a condition on its own, or it can be a symptom of a different eye disease. 

In addition to physical irritants in the eye, abnormal eyelids or eyelashes, dry eye, and allergies, other possible causes of conjunctivitis in dogs include certain parasites, tumors, and trauma. In most cases, the cause of pink eye will determine the treatment, so it's important to consult your veterinarian before attempting to treat your dog's pink eye on your own. 

RELATED: Cherry Eye: What It Is & When to Seek Help for Your Dog

Symptoms of Dog Pink Eye

Staying on the lookout for common conjunctivitis symptoms means that you may catch cases early, potentially leading to easier treatment and overall better health outcomes for your dog. 

These symptoms are very similar to the symptoms we associate with pink eye in humans, including:

  • Redness
  • Discharge that can appear clear or a mucous texture
  • Inflammation
  • Swelling around the eyes

If you notice your dog rubbing or pawing at their eyes, or squinting or blinking more than usual, this can also be a sign that they are experiencing irritation that might not yet be visible to you.

These symptoms can appear in both eyes or in just one, and are sometimes accompanied by other symptoms, such as nasal discharge, coughing, or sneezing.

Is Conjunctivitis Contagious in Dogs?

Pink eye is notoriously contagious in humans, but luckily, Graham says most cases in dogs are not contagious to people or other dogs. 

However, as always, it's best to consult your veterinarian about your dog's specific case to determine how careful you should be until their conjunctivitis clears up.

Graham adds that this is not usually the case for conjunctivitis in cats, which she says is "usually caused by a virus (herpesvirus) or other infectious agent that can be contagious between cats and can occasionally be spread to humans."

human holding dog's face while putting eyedrops in the dog's eye
Credit: skynesher / Getty

Dog Conjunctivitis Treatments and Home Remedies

"Eye conditions can get better quickly," Graham explains, "but they can also progress to more serious conditions if left untreated or treated incorrectly." Because of this, it's important that you don't attempt to treat an undiagnosed eye condition by yourself, as medication for one condition may worsen another.

Your vet will likely perform a variety of diagnostic tests to determine and develop the treatment plan that is best for your dog. Eye drops are one of the most common treatments for pink eye in both dogs and humans, but the specific drops may differ depending on your dog's case. Your vet can determine what eye drops are best for your dog and show you how to safely apply them.

Certain causes of pink eye may require other treatments, such as medications or surgical procedures. While it might be tempting to try home remedies to treat your dog's conjunctivitis at home, this is not a good idea, and it is absolutely worth it to take your dog to a veterinarian to get a diagnosis first.

How to Prevent Pink Eye in Dogs

While some causes of pink eye in dogs are nearly impossible to prevent, such as dry eye or entropion, many conjunctivitis cases can be prevented. According to Graham, one of the easiest actions you can take to reduce the chances of your dog developing pink eye is to avoid letting your dog hang their head out of a moving car's window. Not only can your dog's eyes be struck by flying debris, but even the wind itself can irritate your dog's eyes.

Ensuring your dog is up-to-date on vaccinations can also help reduce the likelihood of viral causes of conjunctivitis. It is also a good idea to supervise your dog while they play to discourage play that might result in eye injuries. However, in terms of preventing pink eye, the absolute best thing you can do for your dog is to take them to the vet as soon as you notice eye symptoms or discomfort. Catching conjunctivitis early can greatly reduce the severity of the condition, making it much easier to treat.

Источник: https://www.dailypaws.com/dogs-puppies/health-care/dog-conditions/dog-pink-eye-conjunctivitis

Can you “cure” pink eye naturally?

HomeConditionsEye Conditions, A-ZConjunctivitis (Pink eye) Pink eye natural remedies

There are several types of pink eye (conjunctivitis), including allergic, bacterial and viral conjunctivitis, which all share two similar main symptoms: irritation and red eyes. 

Each type of pink eye should be treated appropriately and safely, whether using medically prescribed, at-home or natural remedies.

If you’re leaning toward natural remedies for pink eye, be warned that many have not been clinically approved, or approved by the FDA, even if many people swear by them. Before you begin any sort of treatment, consult an eye doctor.

Some important initial steps to take before beginning any treatment plan include the following:

SEE RELATED: Pink eye (conjunctivitis) treatment

Natural remedies for pink eye

Use the following natural remedies for pink eye with caution, and always talk to an eye doctor before starting any treatment for a chronic infection on your own.

Essential oils

Using essential oils for pink eye is possible, but only if the oils are diffused with water vapor first. If essential oil is applied directly in or around the eyes, it can cause irritation and burning, something you’re likely already experiencing as a result of your pink eye.

To use essential oils for conjunctivitis, place the oil in a humidifier and let your eyes take in the vapor or steam. The most commonly used essential oils for eye infections include:

  • Peppermint oil

  • Tea tree oil

  • Lavender oil

  • Eucalyptus oil

  • Myrrh oil

Coconut oil

Coconut oil, though not an essential oil, has also been used as a pink eye ointment to relieve symptoms such as dryness and inflammation. Coconut oil has not been clinically proven for this use, however, so it’s important to be careful and attentive when applying it.

If you do decide to try coconut oil as a treatment for pink eye, do not apply any closer than an inch or two from the eyes.

Apple cider vinegar

Apple cider vinegar (ACV) has many health benefits, including lowering cholesterol and boosting skin health. Many take ACV as a daily supplement for these, among other benefits. 

Can you use apple cider vinegar for pink eye? Though it is widely discussed on the internet, applying ACV in or near your eyes, even if it has been diluted, is not a proven or safe remedy for conjunctivitis. If used improperly, it can cause even more irritation to eyes and lead to more problems. 

Before considering exposing your eyes to ACV, consult an eye doctor for a medical opinion.

Turmeric 

Turmeric has been used for centuries as an anti-inflammatory treatment for many parts of the body. Turmeric should be taken orally and never applied as a topical remedy for eyes.

Turmeric is often used as a powder, although it can also be found in pills and capsules, as an extract or in its original root form, which is used in cooking. Turmeric teas and milks are also popular ways to consume the plant.

Homeopathic remedies for conjunctivitis

There have been few studies on the effectiveness of homeopathic remedies for conjunctivitis, and the body chemistry of each individual can influence how well homeopathic remedies work in general.

That said, some homeopathic specialists may recommend the following when treating pink eye:

  • Belladonna

  • Euphrasia

  • Argentum nitricum

  • Sulphur

  • Pulsatilla

Each homeopathic remedy depends on the type of pink eye you are experiencing, as well as the symptoms and any additional sensitivities you may have. Consult an eye doctor before beginning a homeopathic treatment.

Herbal remedies for pink eye

Herbal remedies should also be used with caution when it comes to treating pink eye. Herbs may interact with other herbs or medicine already being taken for pink eye, as well as medications for unrelated conditions, which can heighten side effects or do more harm than good.

A professional herbalist may recommend one of the following herbal remedies for pink eye to help soothe irritation and/or fight the infection:

  • Chamomile 

  • Marigold

  • Plantain

  • Eyebright

  • Fennel seed

An herbal eyewash may also be recommended to help fight the infection. Should you choose to go the herbal route, consult an eye care specialist and make sure to follow the provided instructions closely.

Green tea for pink eye

The polyphenols found in green tea can reduce inflammation and work as an antiviral treatment for pink eye, when used correctly. 

How do you use green tea for pink eye? Steep two bags of green tea for about 10 minutes, squeeze out excess liquid and place the bags in the refrigerator for 20 minutes. Then, close your eyes and place the bags over your lids, letting them sit and work their “magic” for up to 30 minutes.

Warning: Tea bags should always be cooled before coming into contact with the eyes.

Natural supplements for pink eye prevention

Some vitamins and supplements have been said to help prevent viral conjunctivitis. By enriching your diet with certain nutrients, you can protect your eye health, which in turn can help prevent infections. 

Vitamins and supplements recommended for preventing pink eye include:

  • Zinc supplements

  • Vitamin A

  • Vitamin B

  • Vitamin C

  • Vitamin K

  • Probiotics

Though these supplements may help prevent pink eye, they will not help “cure” an existing infection. It shouldn’t hurt to incorporate them into your current treatment, however, as long as they’re used as recommended.

Additional considerations for conjunctivitis

Other remedies to consider include cold or warm compresses and over-the-counter lubricating eye drops (artificial tears) to relieve pink eye symptoms. You should also get plenty of rest and hydration. 

If your conjunctivitis persists for an extended period of time or becomes chronic, consult an eye doctor for the next appropriate steps to fight the infection. You will likely need to move to prescription conjunctivitis treatments.

You can also take active steps to avoid coming down with pink eye in the first place, such as washing your hands often and not touching your eyes.

To manage overall eye health, stay up to date with routine eye exams, and don’t hesitate to schedule an additional exam if you begin experiencing problems with your vision.

READ NEXT:Home remedies for pink eye

Page published in August 2020

Page updated in October 2021

Источник: https://www.allaboutvision.com/treatments-and-surgery/natural-remedies-pink-eye/

Natural Remedy for Pink Eye in Dogs

Eye problems are often obvious to owners because dogs will rub at their eyes, rub their faces on the ground, wink, and even hold one or both eyes shut, but many owners don't know what they can safely do to help at home. Some products can cause serious, if not permanent, damage to an eye or interact with your dog's other medications so it is important to know how pink eye can be managed with home remedies and when to call your veterinarian.

What is Pink Eye in Dogs?

Pink eye is the common name for conjunctivitis and can occur in dogs when the fleshy, pink part surrounding an eye, called the conjunctive, becomes inflamed.

Pink eye can occur due to another eye problem or by itself due to a viral infection, bacterial infection, or allergies. Depending on the reason for the inflammation, pink eye may need medications from a veterinarian but there are a few safe and effective home remedies that may also help.

Antibiotics, steroids, anti-inflammatories, and antihistamines are different medications that may be needed to treat pink eye in addition to the following home remedies if it does not improve.

Источник: https://www.thesprucepets.com/natural-remedy-for-dog-pink-eye-5089183

Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis): Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Pink eye, also known as conjunctivitis, develops when the blood vessels in the transparent membrane, or conjunctiva, that line the eyelid and the white part of the eyeball get inflamed. The inflammation causes blood vessels to become more visible and gives the whites of the eyes a distinct pink or red tint, which is where the condition gets its name.

Causes

Pink eye is one of the most common ailments to affect both children and adults, according to the National Eye Institute (NEI). There are four main factors that can cause pink eye: an allergic reaction, a foreign substance in the eye, a viral infection or a bacterial infection.  

When it is caused by a bacterial or viral infection, pink eye can be very contagious.

"It is spread when a person touches his or her own eye and then touches the eye of another person; or it is spread to the individual by touching the infection in one's own nose or sinus," said Dr. Jill Swartz, practicing physician at GoHealth Urgent Care. 

Viral conjunctivitis is the most common form of pink eye and it is most commonly caused by a cold virus, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology. It can also be caused by the herpes simplex virus.

Bacterial conjunctivitis is caused by a bacterial infection of the eye. This bacteria is sometimes the same that causes strep throat.

On the other hand, allergic and foreign-substance-caused conjunctivitis aren't contagious. Allergic conjunctivitis is caused by allergens such as pollen, pet dander, dust mites or mold. On the other hand, irritant-caused pink eye can result from a foreign object in the eye, contact with chemicals, fumes, cosmetics or from wearing contact lenses for too long or without cleaning them properly.

Newborns can also get a form of pink eye known as "neonatal conjunctivitis," from an infection, irritation or blocked tear duct, according to the NEI.

Symptoms

Symptoms can occur in one or both eyes, according to the Mayo Clinic. 

Pink eye is usually very easy to detect. When the membrane becomes inflamed, it produces mucus and tears to protect the eye.

"It usually starts in a single eye with goopy, thick crusted discharge — you wake up and the eye feels sealed like glue," said Cindy Weston, an assistant professor at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Nursing.

The other most obvious symptom is reddened whites of the eye. Inflammation or swelling from pink eye makes blood vessels more visible, causing the redness. 

Pink eye can also cause itchy and watery eyes, a grainy feeling in the eye, swelling of the eyelids, cloudy vision, a burning sensation and light sensitivity. Sometimes the lymph node in front of the ear can enlarge or become tender or contact lenses may not stay in place or feel uncomfortable because of bumps that may form under the eyelids, according to the NEI.

The symptoms can vary depending on the cause. Viral conjunctivitis usually comes on quickly and can be associated with "cold" pink-eye-symptoms like runny nose, cough, sore throat, fever, congestion, said Weston.  

Bacterial conjunctivitis is often marked by thick, yellow-green discharge and can also exhibit cold-like symptoms. It can also sometimes accompany an ear infection, according to the NEI.

Allergic conjunctivitis usually affects both eyes. The eyes will often feel watery, itchy and scratchy. The discharge is clear and may be accompanied by other allergy symptoms including itchy nose, sneezing and clear nasal drainage.  

Treatment

Pink eye can often be treated at home, according to the NEI. But you should see a doctor if you have moderate to severe pain in the eye, vision problems that don't improve when the discharge is wiped from the eyes and extreme redness in the eyes. If you have a weakened immune system or think you have viral pink eye and the symptoms worsen or don't get any better with time, it's also important to see a doctor, according to the NEI.

Newborns with symptoms of conjunctivitis should see a healthcare provider right away, according to the CDC.

Virus conjunctivitis infections are typically mild and will resolve on its own within a week or two, according to the NEI. Mild bacteria-caused pink eye most often also resolves on its own, but antibiotic ointments or eye drops can hasten the process.

For allergic and irritant-caused pink eye, the inflammation will go away on its own once the allergen or irritant is eliminated or greatly reduced.

There are several at-home treatments that can provide some relief. Swartz suggested that it's best to wipe away the discharge with a warm cloth several times a day. 

A cold compress can also be used to sooth allergic conjunctivitis and a warm compress can be used to sooth viral or bacterial pink eye. Eye drops may also help alleviate dryness and help with swelling. Allergic conjunctivitis can be treated with an over-the-counter antihistamine. 

Contact lens wearers with pink eye should stop wearing their contact lenses until their eyes heal. They should also throw away any used contacts.

Pink eye google let me search that for you usually contagious until the tearing, discharge and matting of the eyes goes away. This can last up to two weeks.

Prevention

Pink eye can be highly contagious, especially in children, so it is important to take steps to prevent infection. Dr. John Soud, owner and co-founder of Velocity Care Urgent Treatment Centers, provided these tips for preventing the spread of pink eye:

  • Never touch your eyes or the area around your eyes without washing your hands first.
  • Be sure to discard old cosmetics and anything that comes in contact with your eyes during an infection.
  • Never share makeup products.

Weston added that surfaces should be wiped down with disinfectant, and towels should be laundered after use to help prevent the spread of infection.

Additional resources

This article is for informational purposes only and is not meant to offer medical advice. This article was updated on Oct. 9, 2018, by Live Science Staff Writer, Yasemin Saplakoglu.

Alina Bradford is a contributing writer for Live Science. Over the past 16 years, Alina has covered everything from Ebola to androids while writing health, science and tech articles for major publications. She has multiple health, safety and lifesaving certifications from Oklahoma State University. Alina's goal in life is to try as many experiences as possible. To date, she has been a volunteer firefighter, a dispatcher, substitute teacher, artist, janitor, children's book author, pizza maker, event coordinator and much more.
Источник: https://www.livescience.com/54869-pink-eye-symptoms-treatment.html

Bacterial Conjunctivitis

What is bacterial conjunctivitis?

Conjunctivitis is the name for inflammation of the conjunctiva; this is the thin layer of tissue on the inside of the eyelids and covers the white part of the eye. Also known as pink eye, conjunctivitis is often caused by bacteria, a virus (see viral conjunctivitis) or allergies (see allergic conjunctivitis). If pink eye is caused by bacteria, it is called bacterial realty auction near me. Like all types of pink eye, bacterial conjunctivitis is common but not usually serious.

One home remedy for pink eye in humans both eyes can be affected. The main symptoms of bacterial conjunctivitis include:

  • Pinkness or redness of the eye
  • Burning, itching, a sensation of grittiness, or mild pain or discomfort in the eye
  • Thick, sticky discharge from the eye
  • Swollen and/or reddened eyelids

If you think that you might have pink eye, you can try using the Ada app to find out more about your symptoms.

Many cases of mild bacterial conjunctivitis clear up on their own, within a week or two and without any specific treatment. Cleaning the eyes throughout the day with water and a clean cloth or sterile pad, and using lubricating eye drops, also known as artificial tears, may help to relieve symptoms. However, antibiotic eye drops or ointments may be recommended, particularly for more severe cases of bacterial conjunctivitis.

Generally, people make a complete recovery, and the condition does not cause any complications. However, if bacterial conjunctivitis occurs in newborn babies or people with weakened immune systems, such as those apply for amazon credit card canada have HIV or are undergoing treatment for cancer, it can be very serious, and medical advice should be sought without delay.

In addition, anyone experiencing severe symptoms should see a doctor immediately. These include:

  • Intense pain in the eye
  • Extreme redness in the eye
  • Inability to open the eye
  • Severe sensitivity to light
  • Blurred vision that persists after wiping away discharge

Furthermore, if symptoms are mild but do not go away, medical advice should also be sought.

Bacterial conjunctivitis can affect people of any age, but it is more common in children than adults. It is very contagious, which means that it can be spread easily from person to person. For this reason, it is important for people who have bacterial conjunctivitis to take steps to avoid passing it on to others, such as practicing good hygiene.

Symptoms of bacterial conjunctivitis

Bacterial conjunctivitis often begins in one eye and then spreads to the other. Symptoms may include:

  • Pinkness or redness in the eye
  • Burning, itching, a sensation of grittiness, or mild pain or discomfort in the eye
  • Increased watering of the eye
  • Thick, sticky, often yellowish discharge from the eye; this can form a “crust” at night, making the eyes feel as if they are glued shut in the morning
  • Swollen eyelids
  • Slight sensitivity to bright light
  • Swelling of the lymph nodes in front of the ears

Bacterial conjunctivitis usually only causes mild symptoms and does not affect a person’s vision, other than causing slight blurriness when discharge has built up on and around the eye. Depending on the type of bacteria causing the infection, there may be additional symptoms. If you are worried that you may have pink eye, you can try using the Ada app to find out more about your symptoms.

If symptoms are severe or vision is impaired, it is important to contact a doctor without delay. It is also extremely important to see a doctor if any signs of bacterial conjunctivitis are present in a newborn baby.

Causes of bacterial conjunctivitis

The most common causes of bacterial conjunctivitis are the following types of bacteria:

  • Staphylococcus aureus
  • Staphylococcus epidermidis
  • Streptococcus pneumonia
  • Haemophilus influenzae; this is not the same as the flu, which is caused by a virus

Less commonly, the infection can be the result of the following sexually transmitted infections (STIs):

Bacterial conjunctivitis caused by chlamydia or gonorrhea is more serious and requires treatment by a doctor.

Diagnosis of bacterial conjunctivitis

When symptoms are mild, a diagnosis of bacterial conjunctivitis can often be made without seeing a doctor, and the condition can be treated at home. However, if there is any uncertainty or concern over the condition, or the symptoms are severe, seeing a doctor is very important.

A doctor will take the person’s medical history and ask whether anyone they know might have had an eye infection recently. They will examine the eyes and assess the signs and symptoms present, taking care to rule out acute state bank of southern utah parowan conjunctivitis, allergic conjunctivitis and other more serious eye conditions, such as uveitis.

In most cases, it will not be necessary to order laboratory tests to confirm the diagnosis. However, in cases that are severe or do not respond to treatment, as well as in the case of infants, the doctor may take a small swab from the eyelid and test it to determine the cause of the infection and ensure that the treatment approach is correct.

Treatment for bacterial conjunctivitis

Mild cases of bacterial conjunctivitis often clear up within 1-2 weeks without special medical treatment.

The following home remedies and over-the-counter treatments may help to relieve the discomfort caused by conjunctivitis:

  • Gently cleaning discharge from the eye with a clean cloth, sterile pad or cotton wool soaked in apply for discover bank account lubricating eye drops, called artificial tears, which are available without a prescription, to the eye; care must be taken not to use the drops in the other eye, if only one eye is infected
  • Applying a cold or warm compress, a clean cloth that has been soaked in water, to the eye
  • Avoiding the use of contact lenses until the infection has cleared

Antibiotics for bacterial conjunctivitis

Antibiotic eye drops or eye ointment may help to clear up the infection more quickly. However, they are not always needed, and many cases of mild bacterial conjunctivitis will resolve on their own, without antibiotic treatment.

Topical antibiotics are typically recommended for more severe or persistent cases of bacterial conjunctivitis, with eye drops usually preferred over ointments for ease of use.

Less commonly, where the cause of bacterial conjunctivitis is chlamydia or gonorrhea, a course of oral or injected antibiotics may be necessary.

Complications of bacterial conjunctivitis

Most cases of mild bacterial conjunctivitis clear up completely, without causing any complications. However, in a small number of severe cases, the infection can cause serious complications, including:

  • Ulcers on the cornea of the eye
  • Damage to vision
  • Otitis media, an ear infection

If a person experiences any severe symptoms, or is concerned about an eye infection, it is recommended that they see a doctor without delay.

Bacterial conjunctivitis in newborns

Infants can be affected by various types of conjunctivitis, including bacterial conjunctivitis. Pink eye in newborns is called neonatal conjunctivitis or ophthalmia neonatorum. Babies with bacterial conjunctivitis typically develop puffy, red eyelids and discharge from the eyes within 1-14 days of birth.

A baby’s eyes may become infected with bacteria from the mother during the childbirth process, including the common varieties listed above, as well as, less commonly, chlamydia and gonorrhea.

Bacterial conjunctivitis in babies can be very serious and requires urgent medical attention. It is treated with antibiotics and may require referral to a specialist.

Conjunctivitis in babies is sometimes mistaken for sticky eyes caused by a blocked tear duct. However, a blocked tear duct will not cause redness or swelling.

Prevention of bacterial conjunctivitis

While it may not always be possible to prevent bacterial conjunctivitis, taking the following steps can help to reduce the likelihood of an infection:

  • Avoiding contact with people who have pink eye
  • Maintaining good hygiene, such as washing your hands often with soap and water, or using hand sanitizer
  • Avoiding touching your eyes when your hands are not clean

If you have bacterial conjunctivitis, the following actions can help avoid spreading the infection to others:

  • Maintaining good hygiene, such as washing your hands often with soap and water, or using hand sanitizer, especially after treating the eyes
  • Cleaning your spectacles
  • Avoiding touching the eyes other than when treating them, as this can spread the bacteria
  • Washing pillowcases and towels often and avoiding sharing them with others
  • Avoiding sharing makeup and eye drops
  • When necessary, staying off school or work until symptoms of bacterial conjunctivitis have cleared; this is generally when the eyes are no longer red and irritated
  • Avoiding the use of swimming pools

In addition, contact lenses should not be worn until symptoms have cleared, and a new pair used when the infection has gone away. Some makeup may also need to be discarded and replaced to prevent reinfection.

Bacterial conjunctivitis FAQs

Q: Viral vs. bacterial conjunctivitis – what is the difference?
A: While both types of conjunctivitis are highly contagious, the causes, some of the symptoms and the treatments are different. Viral conjunctivitis is caused by a virus, often from the group of viruses that cause the common cold, results in a watery discharge from the eye, and has no specific treatment. Bacterial conjunctivitis is caused by bacteria, often types of staphylococcus or streptococcus, is spread through poor hygiene or contact with other people or insects, results in a thick, sticky discharge from the eye, and may – in some cases – require antibiotic eye drops. If you think that you may have a type of pink eye, you can try using the Ada app to find out more about your symptoms.

Q: My child has bacterial conjunctivitis. Is it home remedy for pink eye in humans to keep them home from school?
A: It depends on the region and institution. Some experts feel that a child should not be required to stay at home with bacterial conjunctivitis, unless an outbreak of multiple cases has occurred. However, a particular daycare center or school may have their own policy and ask that a child with bacterial conjunctivitis be kept at home until their symptoms have cleared up, to reduce the likelihood of infecting other children.

Other names for bacterial conjunctivitis

  • Bacterial eye infection
  • Pink eye, or pinkeye
Источник: https://ada.com/conditions/bacterial-conjunctivitis/

Natural Remedy for Pink Eye in Dogs

Eye problems are often obvious to owners because dogs will rub at their eyes, rub their faces on the ground, wink, and even home remedy for pink eye in humans one or both eyes shut, but many owners don't know what they can safely do to help at home. Some products can cause serious, if not permanent, damage to an eye or interact with your dog's other medications so it is important to know how pink eye can be managed with home remedies and when to call your veterinarian.

What is Pink Eye in Dogs?

Pink eye is the common name for conjunctivitis and can occur in dogs when the fleshy, pink part surrounding an eye, called the conjunctive, becomes inflamed.

Pink eye can occur due to another eye problem or by itself due to a play go online now infection, bacterial infection, or allergies. Depending on the reason for the inflammation, pink eye may need medications from a veterinarian but there are a few safe and effective home remedies that may also help.

Antibiotics, steroids, anti-inflammatories, and antihistamines are different medications that may be needed to treat pink eye in addition to the following home remedies if it does not improve.

Источник: https://www.thesprucepets.com/natural-remedy-for-dog-pink-eye-5089183

Meet the menagerie of parasites that can live in human eyes

When Abby Beckley started work on a salmon fishing boat in Alaska, worms were not high on her list of concerns. But it wasn’t long before the 26-year-old woman became aware of something irritating her left eye. After several days, she finally went digging with her fingers… and plucked out a tiny worm. And it wasn’t the only one.

“I was just pulling them out, so I knew there were a lot,” Beckley recently toldNational Geographic.

Mystified, Beckley’s doctors sent a sample of the errant worms to the state health department, who forwarded it to Richard Bradbury, a parasitologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Parasitic Diseases Reference Laboratory, which identifies thousands of parasites every year that are too rare for doctors to recognize. He and his colleagues discovered that the offender was a cattle eyeworm, Thelazia gulosa, and were able to offer reassurance that it wouldn’t invade Beckley’s brain or burrow into her eyeball.

It turns out that Beckley was the first person ever known to have her eyes colonized by that particular species. However, the cattle eyeworm is far from the only interloper that’s been found in this part of the body, Bradbury says. Other close relatives of the cattle eyeworm occasionally visit people’s eyes… along with a host of other parasites.

Some of these pests are a nuisance. They might irritate your eye or block your vision from their perch within your eyeball, but won’t do lasting harm. Others can cause more serious problems and even blindness.

On the whole, eye parasites are pretty rare; there was so little information about the cattle eyeworm that Bradbury had to find its description in a scientific paper written in German from 1928. Still, scientists have been able to come up with a few different reasons why parasites might be wriggling across the surface of your eye, or within the globe of your eyeball itself. Here’s what you might want to know in case one of these creatures takes up residence in your peepers.

What’s so great about my eyeball, anyway?

Usually when a parasite takes a shine to a particular part of the body, it’s the gut or the skin around the feet, home remedy for pink eye in humans are a popular entry point. It’s quite unusual to find a parasite whose natural habitat is the eye. Thelazia, the group of worms Beckley’s visitors belonged to, are an impressive exception.

a worm on a finger

The worms are spread by face flies, which eat the tears and other secretions in cows’ eyes; Beckley likely picked up the worms before she ever reached Alaska, when she lived on a ranch with a cow in Oregon, says Bradbury, who reported the incident in February in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. As the face flies feed, they regurgitate the worm’s larvae onto the surface of the eye, where they eventually grow to adulthood and breed. As they crawl around, the worms irritate the eye, causing it to start making tears. This draws more face flies, which get infected by the larvae while they feed.

Generally, if one of these flies lands on our face we brush it home remedy for pink eye in humans before it has a chance to infect us, which is why it’s usually animals that get infected with Thelazia worms. However, there have now been 11 recorded cases in the United States where these worms have invaded people, and cattle eyeworm will likely find its way into another person in the next few years, Bradbury says. But this is unlikely to become a common threat, or something the general public needs to be concerned about.

There is another kind of parasite that makes a beeline for the eyes, although fortunately it does not infect humans. The eye fluke preys upon freshwater fish like trout; as larvae, they seek out and invade the fish’s skin, then migrate to the lens of the eye where they can grow. To complete its life cycle, however, the parasite needs to end up inside a bird—which is why it sabotages the hapless fish’s ability to avoid predators. The parasite controls the fish’s behavior so it swims in ways that make it easier for birds to spot.

For the worms, it makes sense to seek refuge within the eyeball while waiting for their fish host to be gobbled up. That’s because the eye tissues are so delicate that when it does get inflamed, the animal risks blindness. So the body’s immune response to invaders is dampened in the eye.

Most of the time, though, the eye isn’t a parasite’s intended target.

Then what’s it doing there?

Sometimes, a parasite doesn’t get into our eyes under its own steam but because we’ve unwittingly implanted it. Acanthamoeba, a spiny-looking amoeba that lives in water, doesn’t usually harm humans when we come into contact with it. But on rare occasions, when people store their contact lenses in dirty solution or tap water, the amoeba will make itself at home on the sullied surface. When people put in their contacts, the amoeba will then become trapped how to get a credit card at 16 the lens and the eye. “It creates a situation where the Acanthamoeba on that lens may not be able to get washed away by your tears,” Bradbury says.

Acanthamoeba

The amoeba makes the best of this situation by burrowing into the cornea and eating the keratin protein in the eye. This infection is swift, painful, and liable to lead to blindness in the eye if not detected and treated quickly. “With Acanthamoeba it’s a race against time to get the treatment before someone loses their vision,” Bradbury says.

Other times, a parasite gets planted in our eyes because of a case of mistaken identity. The sheep bot fly normally deposits its young inside the nose of sheep. “But when it comes to a human it occasionally gets confused and it shoots the tiny, tiny first stages of the maggot into the eye,” Bradbury says. If they aren’t removed, the maggots will then grow in the eyes, causing conjunctivitis, until they eventually fall out and form a chrysalis so they can develop into grownup flies. Very rarely, the maggots will burrow into the eyeball itself and cause a serious condition called optic atrophy.

But it’s more common for a parasite to wind up in your eye because it got lost on its journey through your body.

botfly maggot

So most of them aren’t trying to feast on my eyeball?

It’s far more likely that a larva will wander into your eye by accident, Bradbury says. This can happen when a parasite like home remedy for pink eye in humans roundworm or rat lungworm that usually infects other animals ends up inside a human and gets disoriented in the unfamiliar landscape.

There are also parasites specialized to grow within people that occasionally take a detour to our eyes. The African eye worm, Loa loa, gets into our bodies when we’re bitten by infected mango flies in tropical parts of Africa. The adults randomly travel around the body, creating moving bumps under the skin and occasionally crawling over the surface of the eye. African eye worms can grow up to 7 centimeters long, making them probably the biggest parasite to visit our eyes. But, while alarming, these worms typically cause very little damage to the eye.

Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for the nematode Onchocerca volvulus, which causes an illness known as river blindness, or onchocerciasis. The worms are transmitted by a kind of blackfly that breeds along moving water in parts of West Africa, Central and South America, and Yemen. A couple adult worms might not cause any noticeable symptoms. But if you are bitten over and over, you can end up with hundreds of thousands of their offspring moving through your skin in hopes of infecting the next fly to bite you, says Paul Cantey, a medical officer for onchocerciasis and scabies at the World Health Organization.

As with most eye parasites, the bulk of the damage is not caused by the worm itself but by our own immune system. When the larvae die, their corpses release bacteria that create proteins that trigger our body’s inflammatory response. This can cause a number of skin problems, including intensely itchy spots and a loss of elastic tissue that leaves the skin fragile and prematurely wrinkled.

a larva

Meanwhile, if the larvae crawl onto the surface of your eye and die, your corneas can become inflamed. If left untreated, the cornea will eventually scar and cloud over, leading to vision loss and finally blindness. The worms can also blind people when they get inside the eye itself and die in the optic nerve.

The more larvae you have in your body, the greater first security federal savings bank likelihood that some will unwittingly head to the eyes. “Migrating into the eye is not going to have any evolutionary benefit because you’re not going to get picked up by flies there,” Cantey says.

Then there’s no real reason for most of these things to be in my eye, right?

Most parasites don’t have designs on your eyeball. However, certain pests might find the eye to be an especially friendly habitat when they do wind up there, says Shan McBurney-Lin, a medical student at the Duke University School of Medicine, in Durham, North Carolina.

She and her colleagues recently reported a brand new species of nematode found nestled in the eyeballs of three people in the tropical southwestern Pacific island of Saipan, causing mischief that included blurred vision and light sensitivity. “The physician who was seeing them could see the worm wiggling around,” McBurney-Lin says. He referred them to a surgeon in Hawaii who extracted the worms. After that, their vision mostly returned to normal.

an eyeball with a worm inside

Meanwhile, the scientists examined the worm, and discovered that it didn’t quite match any known parasites. They suspect that it entered through the foot and then migrated into the eye by traveling through the bloodstream or along the optic nerve.

It’s not clear at this point whether the mystery worm (which hasn’t yet received a proper scientific name) found itself in the eyes by accident or actually prefers this part of the body, McBurney-Lin says. Once in the eyes, though, it might have been able to grow larger than it could have had it wound up elsewhere in the body. This is partly because the immune response is diminished in the eye, making it more vulnerable to invaders. “It can get away with a lot more in the eyes,” McBurney-Lin says. The eye also might be an inviting place to settle because it’s roomier than other organs like the liver or spleen.

“Think of it as kind of like the bladder, where you have a hollowed out space; that’s how it is in the globe of your eye,” McBurney-Lin says. “Yeah, there is fluid in there, but that is much easier for a worm to traverse than solid organ.”

Just how worried should I be about getting an eye parasite?

That depends on where you are.

An estimated 198 million people live in areas where infected blackflies may transmit river blindness, Cantey says. At one time, there were villages in sub-Saharan Africa where 30 to 40 percent of the residents had lost their sight and people were forced to abandon millions of acres of arable land. “Decades ago we would have thought the elimination of onchocerciasis was not possible,” Cantey says. However, a drug called ivermectin introduced in 1987 and donated by the pharmaceutical company Merck & Co., Inc., can treat the disease and has even halted its transmission in four countries.

Most of the other wandering parasites aren’t frequent visitors to the human eye. In the United States, Acanthamoeba infects roughly 1 to 2 people per million in a typical year, while Thelazia worms get into somebody’s eyes on the order of once every decade or two, Bradbury says.

the loa loa parasite

And if you do suspect you have a parasite in the squishy recesses of your eye, there are ways to get it out. Depending on the type of parasite, your doctor might remove it surgically or give you medication to kill the invaders and calm your body’s inflammation. As to whether it’s ever a good idea to excavate the worm yourself…

“Oh god, no, don’t do that,” McBurney-Lin says. “That would cause blindness. Just go to your nearest ophthalmologist.”

In rare cases, people have yanked out worms that were dwelling on the surface of their eyes rather than deep inside. However, “You can actually cause some injury to yourself trying to remove something from your eye; better to have a qualified doctor do that,” Bradbury says.

Most of the time, if you follow basic precautions, you are unlikely to encounter an eye parasite. You know the drill: store your contact lenses in proper solution and change it regularly, wash your hands, rinse off fresh vegetables, and cook your meat properly. And if you’re in the tropics—where these pests seem to be more abundant—wear bug spray and protective clothing and don’t walk around barefoot.

“This is a rare occurrence; people don’t need to become paranoid about getting parasites in their eye,” Bradbury says. “For those whom it happens to it’s very disturbing, it may be vision threatening, and it can be very severe, but for most of us if we just go about our normal life and adhere to normal hygienic practices… we should be perfectly fine.”

This article has been corrected to reflect that ivermectin is only recommended to treat river blindness, not prevent it.

Источник: https://www.popsci.com/human-eye-parasites/

Canine Conjunctivitis: How to Recognize and Treat Pink Eye in Dogs

Pink eye, also known as conjunctivitis, presents similarly in dogs as it does in people. Characterized by red or pink irritated eyes and often accompanied by discharge, this common eye infection is not a pleasant experience for dogs or owners but is luckily treatable in most circumstances.

Conjunctivitis in dogs can have many different causes, many of which require specific treatments, so it's a good idea to see your veterinarian if you begin to notice symptoms of pink eye in your pooch. Because of this, it is helpful to know the basics of the disease so you can keep an eye out (literally) for anything concerning.

How Do Dogs Get Pink Eye?

Nikki Graham, DVM from Nottingham Animal Hospital in Hamilton, N.J., explains that pink eye is usually either allergic or bacterial in dogs. She says, "They can get it from inhalant allergies, such as pollen or grass, or from a secondary bacterial infection from a topical irritant, like smoke, sand, or wind from hanging their heads out the car window." 

Graham goes on to explain that other causes of conjunctivitis in dogs can include factors such as entropion, or rolled in eyelids, or keratoconjunctivitis sicca, also known as dry eye, in which dogs don't produce enough tears. Pink eye can be a condition on its own, or it can be a symptom of a different eye disease. 

In addition to physical irritants in the eye, abnormal eyelids or eyelashes, dry eye, and allergies, other possible causes of conjunctivitis in dogs include certain parasites, tumors, and trauma. In most cases, the cause of pink eye will determine the treatment, so it's important to consult your veterinarian before attempting to treat your dog's pink eye on your own. 

RELATED: Cherry Eye: What It Is & When to Seek Help for Your Dog

Symptoms of Dog Pink Eye

Staying on the lookout for common conjunctivitis symptoms means that you may catch cases early, potentially leading to easier treatment and overall better health outcomes for your dog. 

These symptoms are very similar to the symptoms we associate with pink eye in humans, including:

  • Redness
  • Discharge that can appear clear or a mucous texture
  • Inflammation
  • Swelling around the eyes

If you notice your dog rubbing or pawing at their eyes, or squinting or blinking more than usual, this can also be a sign that they are experiencing irritation that might not yet be visible to you.

These symptoms can appear in both eyes or in just one, and are sometimes accompanied by other symptoms, such as nasal discharge, coughing, or sneezing.

Is Conjunctivitis Contagious in Dogs?

Pink eye is notoriously contagious in humans, but luckily, Graham says most cases in dogs are not contagious to people or other dogs. 

However, as always, it's best to consult your veterinarian about your dog's specific case to determine how careful you should be until their conjunctivitis clears up.

Graham adds that this is not usually the case for conjunctivitis in cats, which she says is "usually caused by a virus (herpesvirus) or other infectious agent that can be contagious between cats and can occasionally be spread to humans."

human holding dog's face while putting eyedrops in the dog's eye
Credit: skynesher / Getty

Dog Conjunctivitis Treatments and Home Remedies

"Eye conditions can get better quickly," Graham explains, "but they can also progress to more serious conditions if left untreated or treated incorrectly." Because of this, it's important that you don't attempt to treat an undiagnosed eye condition by yourself, as medication for one condition may worsen another.

Your vet will likely perform a variety of diagnostic tests to determine and develop the treatment plan that is best for your dog. Eye drops are one of the most common treatments for pink eye in both dogs and humans, but the specific drops may differ depending on your dog's case. Your vet can determine what eye drops are best for your dog home remedy for pink eye in humans show you how to safely apply them.

Certain causes of pink eye may require other treatments, such as medications or surgical procedures. While it might be tempting to try home remedies to treat your dog's conjunctivitis at home, this is not a good idea, and it is absolutely worth it to take your dog to a veterinarian to get a diagnosis first.

How to Prevent Pink Eye in Dogs

While some causes of pink eye in dogs are nearly impossible to prevent, such as dry eye or entropion, many conjunctivitis cases can be prevented. According to Graham, one of the easiest actions you can take to reduce the chances of your dog developing pink eye is to avoid letting your dog hang their head out of a moving car's window. Not only can your dog's eyes be struck by flying debris, but even the wind itself can irritate your dog's eyes.

Ensuring your dog is up-to-date on vaccinations can also help reduce the likelihood of viral causes of conjunctivitis. It is also a good idea to supervise your dog while they play to discourage play that might result in eye injuries. However, in terms of preventing pink eye, the absolute best thing you can do for your dog is to take them to the vet as soon as you notice eye symptoms or discomfort. Catching conjunctivitis early can greatly reduce the severity of the condition, making it much easier to treat.

Источник: https://www.dailypaws.com/dogs-puppies/health-care/dog-conditions/dog-pink-eye-conjunctivitis

Is There a Home Remedy for Pink Eye?

Waking up with an irritated eye can quickly ruin your day. Pink eye, also known as conjunctivitis, is a common condition. There are several types of pink eye and different ways to treat each at home—most incidences of pink eye resolve on their own.

However, if at-home treatment doesn’t help resolve symptoms or symptoms worsen, it’s best to seek medical attention right away. People should also be cautious if a child has pink eye symptoms because they can be a sign of a more serious condition.

Pink Eye in Children

Because pink eye is a symptom of measles, a serious and contagious virus with no cure, it’s important to promptly treat children with pink eye to rule out a possible case of measles in an unvaccinated child.

If a child has been vaccinated, pink eye is probably just a regular case of pink eye, and at-home treatment is usually sufficient to treat the condition. People should usaa car insurance near me a close eye on the irritated eye to check for additional or worsening symptoms that might require a doctor’s care.

Pink Eye and Measles

In children with malnutrition, measles can eventually cause blindness. A measles vaccine called the MMR vaccine exists, but no antiviral treatment is available should a person contract the disease. Other symptoms of the measles include:

  • Red blotchy rash
  • High fever
  • Light-sensitivity

Treating Bacterial or Viral Pink Eye

It can be challenging to tell which kind of pink eye you have on your own. However, most mild cases of viral pink eye go away on their own. 

There’s no treatment for viral pink eye, so taking care of the viral infection requires managing symptoms. Healing typically takes about a week or two.

Bacterial pink eye may produce pus or mucus and may require a course of antibiotics, though not always. Antibiotics are useless for viral pink eye.

You can treat symptoms of pink eye at home by:

  • Take over-the-counter (OTC) non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) to help with any pain you’re experiencing. 
  • Use eye drops for lubrication. Artificial tears can help get the gunk out of your eyes and prevent dryness that increases irritation. 
  • Apply a warm compress to your eye (or eyes) for several minutes, repeating a few times a day or as needed to soothe your irritated eyes. Always use a clean washcloth to prevent spreading the infection. If you have pink eye in both eyes, use two separate washcloths.

If you usually wear contact lenses, stop wearing them. When your eyes feel better, wear a new pair to prevent reinfecting your eye(s). Don’t wear makeup while you’re fighting off the infection and throw away makeup that’s been in contact with your eyes (e.g., mascara, eye shadow, eyeliner, etc.) 

Another type of pink eye is sexually transmitted pink eye. It happens in newborns birthed vaginally by mothers with an active sexually transmitted infection (STI) and requires treatment with antibiotics. 

Avoid Ointments and Herbs

Don’t apply anything else to your eyes unless it’s been approved by a doctor. Ointments and herbal concoctions may seem like a good idea, but they can compound the problem and further irritate your eyes.

Allergic Conjunctivitis

ink eye can also be the result of allergies. The key to treating allergic pink eye is to avoid and stop using or exposing yourself to the allergen. This form of pink eye is not contagious, but that doesn’t mean it’s not incredibly annoying and uncomfortable! 

Solutions for treating allergic pink eye include:

  • Use OTC antihistamines to reduce allergy symptoms like itchy, watery eyes. You can take these in pill or drop form. 
  • Use a cool washcloth to reduce eye irritation. Apply for a few minutes.
  • Apply artificial tears to prevent your eyes from drying out too much and causing further irritation. 

The Symptoms and Treatments for Eye Allergies

Pink Eye From Irritants

You can also get pink eye by exposing your eyes to irritants like chemicals or makeup products.

If you’re not sure what could be causing the issue, think about what you’ve recently added to your beauty or skincare routine. Have you tried any new eye creams? Stop using any products you suspect may pima county housing search causing an allergic reaction and throw them out.

When to See a Doctor

 Most of the time, pink eye will resolve on its own. But some symptoms warrant a doctor’s attention. These include:

  • Vision troubles
  • Pain 
  • Sensitivity to light: Especially if you are having trouble with indoor light, this can be a sign of severe bremer mortgage portal damage.
  • Excess mucus or pus production
  • Symptoms that aren’t getting better on their own and may be getting worse
  • Signs of an infection like a fever or body pains

Quick Tip

A warm compress can help loosen the sticky, crusty mess that’s causing your eyelids to stick together. 

Prevent Spreading Pink Eye

Viral and bacterial pink eye are contagious. You can spread the infection from eye to eye or other people. If you have pink eye, it’s important to wash items that have been in close contact with your eyes to prevent the spread of the infection. Home remedy for pink eye in humans may include:

  • Pillowcases
  • Sheets
  • Towels
  • Makeup tools 

It’s important to wash your hands before touching your face and eyes—this rule always applies. You can prevent catching several viruses by washing your hands frequently and before touching your eyes and face. Don’t share the above-listed items with other people, either, since you may spread the infection to someone else.

Home Remedies to Avoid

According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, people with pink eye should avoid eye drops designed to reduce redness since they can cause burning and irritation.

Some people might recommend using breast milk to help with pink eye in children, but this folk wisdom is not supported by research. Putting breast milk into a child's or adult person’s eye can spread bacteria.

There are anecdotal reports that people have found success in using tea bags to cure pink eye. However, there's no solid evidence that they can help treat an infection. There's even the possibility that putting tea bags on or around your eyes could exacerbate the problem and further irritate your eyes.

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  1. American Academy of Ophthalmology. Quick home remedies for pink eye. October 29, 2020.

  2. American Academy of Ophthalmology. Six ways measles can affect the eyes. March 5, 2015.

  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Conjunctivitis (pink eye). January 4, 2019.

  4. Pink eye and your child: Symptoms, treatment & prevention. Children’s Hosptial Los Angeles.

  5. American Academy of Ophthalmology. Quick home remedies for pink eye. October 29, 2020.

  6. Baynham JTL, Moorman MA, Donnellan C, Cevallos V, Us bank official app JD. Antibacterial effect of human milk for common causes of paediatric conjunctivitis. British Journal of Ophthalmology. 2013;97(3):377-379. doi: 10.1136/bjophthalmol-2012-302833

Additional Reading
  • Azari AA, Arabi A. Conjunctivitis: a systematic review. J Ophthalmic Vis Res. 2020;15(3):372-395. doi:10.18502/jovr.v15i3.7456

  • Cleveland Clinic. Pink eye (conjunctivitis). April 10, 2020.

  • National Eye Institute. Treatment for pink eye. June 19, 2019.

Источник: https://www.verywellhealth.com/home-remedy-for-pink-eye-5092903

Can you “cure” pink eye naturally?

HomeConditionsEye Conditions, A-ZConjunctivitis (Pink eye) Pink eye natural remedies

There are several types of pink eye (conjunctivitis), including allergic, bacterial and viral conjunctivitis, which all share two similar main symptoms: irritation and red eyes. 

Each type of pink eye should be treated appropriately and safely, whether using medically prescribed, at-home or natural remedies.

If you’re leaning toward natural remedies for pink eye, be warned that many have not been clinically approved, or approved by the FDA, even if many people swear by them. Before you begin any sort of treatment, consult an eye doctor.

Some important initial steps to take before beginning any treatment plan include the following:

SEE RELATED: Pink eye (conjunctivitis) treatment

Natural remedies for pink eye

Use the following natural remedies for pink eye with caution, and always talk to an eye doctor before starting any treatment for a chronic infection on your own.

Essential oils

Using essential oils for pink eye is possible, but only if the oils are diffused with water vapor first. If essential oil is applied directly in or around the eyes, it can cause irritation and burning, something you’re likely already experiencing as a result of your pink eye.

To use essential oils for conjunctivitis, place the oil in a humidifier and let your eyes take in the vapor or steam. The most commonly used essential oils for eye infections include:

  • Peppermint oil

  • Tea tree oil

  • Lavender oil

  • Eucalyptus oil

  • Myrrh oil

Coconut oil

Coconut oil, though not an essential oil, has also been used as a pink eye ointment to relieve symptoms such as dryness and inflammation. Coconut oil has not been clinically proven for this use, however, so it’s important to be careful and attentive when applying it.

If you do decide to try coconut oil as a treatment for pink eye, do not apply any closer than an inch or two from the eyes.

Apple cider vinegar

Apple cider vinegar (ACV) has many health benefits, including lowering cholesterol and boosting skin health. Many take ACV as a daily supplement for these, among other benefits. 

Can you use apple cider vinegar for pink eye? Though it is widely discussed on the internet, applying ACV in or near your eyes, even if it has been diluted, is not a proven or safe remedy for conjunctivitis. If used improperly, it can cause even more irritation to eyes and lead to more problems. 

Before considering exposing your eyes to ACV, consult an eye doctor for a medical opinion.

Turmeric 

Turmeric has been used for centuries as an anti-inflammatory treatment for many parts of the body. Turmeric should be taken orally and never applied as a topical remedy for eyes.

Turmeric is often used as a powder, although it can also be found in pills and capsules, as an extract or in its original root form, which is used in cooking. Turmeric teas and milks are also popular ways to consume the plant.

Homeopathic remedies for conjunctivitis

There have been few studies on the effectiveness of homeopathic remedies for conjunctivitis, and the body chemistry of each individual can influence how well homeopathic remedies work in general.

That said, some homeopathic specialists may recommend the following when treating pink eye:

  • Belladonna

  • Euphrasia

  • Argentum nitricum

  • Sulphur

  • Pulsatilla

Each homeopathic remedy depends on the type of pink eye you are experiencing, as well as the symptoms and any additional sensitivities you may have. Consult an eye doctor before beginning a homeopathic treatment.

Herbal remedies for pink eye

Herbal remedies should also be used with caution when it comes to treating pink eye. Herbs may interact with other herbs or medicine already being taken for pink eye, as well as medications for unrelated conditions, which can heighten side effects or do more harm than good.

A professional herbalist may recommend one of the following herbal remedies for pink eye to help soothe irritation and/or fight the infection:

  • Chamomile 

  • Marigold

  • Plantain

  • Eyebright

  • Fennel seed

An herbal eyewash may also be recommended to help fight the infection. Should you choose to go the herbal route, consult an eye care specialist and make sure to follow the provided instructions closely.

Green tea for pink eye

The polyphenols found in green tea can reduce inflammation and work as an antiviral treatment for pink eye, when used correctly. 

How do you use green tea for pink eye? Steep two bags of green tea for about 10 minutes, squeeze out excess liquid and place the bags in the refrigerator for 20 minutes. Then, close your eyes and place the bags over your lids, letting them sit and work their “magic” for up to 30 minutes.

Warning: Tea bags should always tmobile bill pay online cooled before coming into contact with the eyes.

Natural supplements for pink eye prevention

Some vitamins and supplements have been said to help prevent viral conjunctivitis. By enriching your diet with certain nutrients, you can protect your eye health, which in turn can help prevent infections. 

Vitamins and supplements recommended for preventing pink eye include:

  • Zinc supplements

  • Vitamin A

  • Vitamin B

  • Vitamin C

  • Vitamin K

  • Probiotics

Though these supplements may help prevent pink eye, they will not help “cure” an existing infection. It shouldn’t hurt to incorporate them into your current treatment, however, as long as they’re used as recommended.

Additional considerations for conjunctivitis

Other remedies to consider include cold or warm compresses and over-the-counter lubricating eye drops (artificial tears) to relieve pink eye symptoms. You should also get plenty of rest and hydration. 

If your conjunctivitis persists for an extended period of time or becomes chronic, consult an eye doctor for the next appropriate steps to fight the infection. You will likely need to move to prescription conjunctivitis treatments.

You can also take active steps to avoid coming down with pink ecb violation amnesty in the first place, such as washing your hands often and not touching your eyes.

To manage overall eye health, stay up to date with routine eye exams, and don’t hesitate to schedule an additional exam if you begin experiencing problems with your vision.

READ NEXT:Home remedies for pink eye

Page published in August 2020

Page updated in October 2021

Источник: https://www.allaboutvision.com/treatments-and-surgery/natural-remedies-pink-eye/

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