miss peregrines home for peculiar children recommendation

Based on Ransom Riggs' dark fantasy novel of the same name, Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children follows teenage Jake (Asa Butterfield). "Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children" has the kind of cover that has you picking up the book hoping for a creepy horror story that will. The name Tim Burton and the title Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children sound almost synonymous, like the director was always meant to.

: Miss peregrines home for peculiar children recommendation

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Miss peregrines home for peculiar children recommendation
Miss peregrines home for peculiar children recommendation

Book Review: Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs is a captivating story about a very odd home for a select group of young children.
When Jake’s grandfather mysteriously dies, he goes off on an adventure to find Miss Peregrine and solve the mysteries of his grandfather’s past life.
The answers to the mysteries are found at this special home. It is a book about adventure, family- both biological and situational, and being frost bank hours corpus christi. This book is definitely one of my favorites. It is an amazingly unique book unlike any I have read before. I enjoyed Ransom Riggs’s writing style and I loved seeing the photographs in between chapters. The photographs helped convey the story realistically. The peculiarities that the children had were also very interesting and unique. For example, one child had bees living inside of him, another was as light as air, and yet another could bring dead things back to life. It is an extremely fun reading experience that keeps you engaged and on your toes at all times. There is mild swearing in this book. I would recommend this book to everyone and would encourage people to read it before seeing the movie. Even better, have a group of friends read this book then watch the movie together so you can discuss and compare the two.

Источник: https://ppld.org/book-reviews/miss-peregrines-home-peculiar-children-1

Toppsta - Childrens Books – Reviews

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is a series of books which tell the tale of young Jacob Portman, a normal boy living in Florida. Or at least, that’s what he thought. When his grandfather, Abraham Portman, is killed in a curious circumstances, Jacob is determined to find out what had happened - something that lead him to the discovery of some very peculiar characters. Together, they defeat the enemy, only to find more coming their way.

On their desperate journey to safety, Jacob and his newfound friends encounter dangerous monsters, both literally and figuratively; tricksome characters who are not what they seem; and continuously save each other from the brink of death. Jacob has made so many life-changing choices in his life, but he is about to make the biggest one yet: does he stay with the only true friends he’s ever had, or go home?

Book 1: Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (2011)
Book 2: Hollow City (2014)
Book 3: Library of Souls (2015)
Book 4: A Map of Days - a NEW trilogy featuring the same characters (2018)
Book 5: The Conference of the Birds (2020)
Book 6: The Desolation of Devil's Acre - final book in the series (2021)

Other titles including Miss Peregrine's Journal for Peculiar Children, and Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children Box Set are also available. 

Источник: https://toppsta.com/books/series/22401/miss-peregrines-peculiar-children

Deep within the heart of every avid reader is a longing for adventure. When we read, we indulge in the adventures the author takes us on. Adventures that are crafted through the narrative of an exhilarating storyline and made alive by our own imaginations. When it comes to Ransom Riggs’ book titled Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, the art of exploring and adventuring is consistently dramatic and thrilling.

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The story revolves around a 16-year-old boy named Jacob Portman, whose curiosity and medically-diagnosed “acute stress reaction” takes him on a journey to a mysterious, remote island just off the coast of Wales after Grandpa Portman’s death.

He follows clues that take him to an abandoned orphanage, known as Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. The crumbling ruins seem empty and desolate, but the moment he steps into it, he confronts an underground world of peculiarity that is still inhabited by the very same children he believes his grandfather grew up with.

He learns that this world is actually a repeated day, a time loop that is controlled to stay unchanged. Over and over again, it’s only ever the 3rd of September, 1940. In the mystery of unanswered questions of the past, Jacob is introduced to the best and worst of a supernatural world that was previously limited to his childhood imagination.

Perhaps he’s not truly having psychotic episodes, as Dr Golan and his parents had led him to believe…

Classified as a young adult fantasy book, Riggs holds nothing back when exploring themes of violence, tragedy, incest and alcoholism. Influenced by books such as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J. K. Rowling miss peregrines home for peculiar children recommendation A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle, Riggs’s debut novel prides its major theme along similar lines as these books; exposing a raw, brutal and intriguing discovery of a secret world.

Throughout the novel, the storyline contains dark tones that are both disconcerting and fascinating as Riggs relentlessly pursues adventure through vivid imagery. The kind of adventure that Riggs takes his readers on begins with the emotive language, while the narrative of the setting instantly puts readers at the scene, right in the middle of the action, starting with the remains of Miss Peregrine’s Home:

What stood before me now was no refuge from monsters but a monster itself, staring down from the perch on the hill with vacant hunger. Trees burst forth from broken windows and skins of scabrous vine gnawed at the walls like antibodies attacking a virus – as if nature itself had waged a war against it – but the house seemed unkillable, resolutely upright despite the miss peregrines home for peculiar children recommendation of its angles and the jagged teeth of sky visible through sections of collapsed roof (Riggs 2013, p. 74).

Ransom-Riggs

Understandably, as a film school graduate, Riggs overtly applies his knowledge of visualisation to language throughout the novel. The details of places, people and monsters of all kinds are explicit and brings together the storyline and readers’ experience. It works well, but also becomes unforgivingly wordy at times. No less is the descriptive clarity of the characters Jacob encounters:

My nightmare. It stopped there, hairless and naked, mottled gray-black skin hanging off its frame in loose folds, its eyes collared in dripping putrefaction, legs bowed and feet clubbed and hands gnarled into useless claws – every part looking withered and wasted like the body of an impossibly old man – save one. Its outsized jaws were its main feature, a bulging enclosure of teeth as tall and sharp as little steak knives that the flesh of its mouth was hopeless to contain, so that its lips were perpetually drawn back in a deranged smile” (Riggs 2013, p. 293).

More than that, Riggs includes haunting vintage photographs along the pages of the novel that illustrate the nature and personalities of the characters in the novel to an even deeper extent. Some of which are incredibly hard to take a second look at due to their frightening sense of strangeness. Riggs, a devoted photograph-collector mentioned in an interview (published at the end of the ebook version) that these were just a few of the hundred thousand photographs that he decided to work with when writing the novel. It began as a hobby but it eventually birthed the story of which Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children is centred on.

It was just a casual hobby, nothing serious, but I noticed that among the photos I found, the strangest and most intriguing ones were always of children. I began to wonder who some of these strange-looking children had been – what their stories were – but the photos were old and anonymous and there was no way to know. So I thought: If I can’t know their real stories, I’ll make them up” (Riggs 2013, p. 362).

miss-peregrine

The story would feel incomplete without these strange photographs. This visual dimension adds a very specific understanding to the development of characters and the way they are perceived. Without warning, the turn of the page brought me to these photographs and each time, it was an incredibly unpleasant shock. The strangeness of these photographs never seemed to wear off. Separate from the story however, these photographs are standalone artworks.

Another interesting dimension to Riggs’s novel is the way he marries reality and fantasy. A big part of what makes up the foundation of the storyline is the work of Ralph Waldo Emerson, an American poet who lived during the 1800s. This is particularly evident during Jacob’s 16th birthday, when he receives ‘The Selected Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson’ as a present from his deceased grandfather. Emerson’s works are simplified in order to gain understanding of a supernatural world that is personally interpreted by Riggs:

Emerson often speaks about the possibility of fantastic things that exist just out of view, and many of his most famous quotes seem to refer directly to the peculiar children. “The power which resides in him is new in nature,” he writes in Self Reliance (1841), “and none but he knows what that is which he can do, nor does he know until he has tried” (Riggs 2013, p. 366).

ransom_riggs2

While these elements work in favour of Riggs’ novel, what is troubling is the part of the plot that explores a love interest portrayed between Jacob and a peculiar child. It becomes a notion of incest and is arguably unnecessary. The idea of it didn’t seem to be a well-suited pair of a peculiar characters and a controversial topic of discussion. This could have been cut without affecting the other favourable elements of the novel.

All in all, this book is for anyone who is willing to embark on an unpredictable reading adventure. It will feel like stepping through a secret door, knowing that there might be danger on the other side, but wanting to do it anyway out of great curiosity and enthusiasm for the anticipated. It will bring you on an journey that persuades you, to no end, to find out is going to happen next. While I do recommend giving this book a read, it should be a warning that the photographs do not sympathise with those who are easily frightened visually. Through the eyes of young Jacob Portman, you will experience one of the most exciting, yet also alarming childhoods that anyone has ever lived and perhaps, learn some lessons along the way:

I used to dream about escaping my ordinary life, but my life was never ordinary. I had simply failed to notice how extraordinary it was” (Riggs 2013, p. 356).

Источник: https://writersedit.com/fiction-writing/book-reviews/miss-peregrines-home-peculiar-children-review/

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children works best when it serves as a vehicle for Tim Burton’s imagination, exploring a world where tall tales seem to be real and monsters manifest themselves literally, where trauma and loss are explained through escape into fantasy, and where shadows distort and bend into uncanny shapes as if to suggest that there is so much more to this world than it might first appear. This is all stock Burton imagery, but the director approaches it with an endearing energy.

Unfortunately, there is more to Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. The film is not content to play as broad Burton fantasy of childhood mythmaking and coming of age. Despite an opening act that hints miss peregrines home for peculiar children recommendation something of a young adult follow-up to Big Fish, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children inevitably gets bogged down in the finer trappings of its young adult source material. Exposition is ladled on, rival orders are established, sequels are set up, familiar plot beats are not so much hit as hammered.

Movie night.

Movie night.

In its opening twenty minutes or so, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children shows a lot of promise. Jake is teenager growing in Florida, when his grandfather dies under semi-mysterious circumstances. Jake thinks he sees a grotesque monster at the scene, but his psychiatrist helpfully explains that such imagery is just a way for the mind to process trauma. It is a fantasy, constructed to help Jake deal with the senseless ameris bank amphitheatre schedule of an elderly relative who was suffering with dementia.

In these early scenes, Burton offers an endearing glimpse of Jake’s childhood. His father is a nature writer, planning a book about the birds of the world. His mundane interests reflect a mundane man, somebody with no real interest in his son’s life. Instead, Jake gravitates to his grandfather. His grandfather fled Poland before the Second World War, apparently because he began seeing “monsters.” Wilson county bank and trust smithville tn he enchants Jake miss peregrines home for peculiar children recommendation stories of globe-trotting adventures, it becomes clear that Jake’s grandfather is also treating the fantastic as a refuge from a cruel and mundane world.

Not somebody you want to cross(bow).

Not somebody you want to cross(bow)…

These are easily the best sequences in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, the ones most firmly anchored in Burton’s aesthetic. The casting helps a great deal. Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children has a spectacular cast of actors who are largely neglected or ignored; Alison Janney as a psychiatrist, Chris O’Dowd as Jake’s father, Kim Dickens as Jake’s mother, Rupert Everett as a rival ornithologist. The only member of the main cast who actually makes a solid impression is Terrance Stamp as Jake’s elderly uncle.

In a better world, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children would focus on Terrence Stamp as a survivor of the Second World War who needs to believe in the fantastic to give his life a sense of meaning. Stamp plays the elderly man as a tragic figure, one who clearly believes that his grandson is meant for brilliant things but is instead destined to suffocated by the drab everyday world around him. There is a wistfulness to the performance and character that suggests that Burton would empathise; the old man feels like the window to the story.

Time's up.

Time’s up.

Sadly, the character is cast aside far too quickly so that Jake might be motivated to action. With the death of his grandfather, Jake sets off on a mission to investigate one of his grandfather’s tall tales, the secret society living on a dreary island off the Welsh Miss peregrines home for peculiar children recommendation. From this point onwards, everything becomes a bit more conventional, as Burton is essentially tasked with constructing a version of the X-Men that hinges more on magic than atomic era anxieties. The parallels speak for themselves; the special school, the mutant children, even the girl who can kill with a touch.

There are miss peregrines home for peculiar children recommendation number of interesting visuals to be found in the remaining two acts of the film. There is something quite endearing about Jake’s encounter with two would-be rappers on a remote Welsh island, and some of the children are suitably creepy. A set of twins dress in homage to The Orphanage, while another makes rejects from Toy Story fight for his own amusement. However, there is not enough wonder to sustain the miss peregrines home for peculiar children recommendation, and not nearly enough to drown out the more paint-by-numbers aspects of the plot.

Let it bee.

Let it bee…

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children quickly degenerates into a mess of young adult clichés. Jake inevitably becomes a leader of this community when it is thrown into crisis. There is a heavy (and frankly unnecessary) emphasis on “time loops.” There is a villain with an over-elaborate (and over-explained) motivation for doing very basic things. The film compensates for its predictability with knowing irony, but that only serves to deflate the sense of wonder that should be driving the plot.

It feels very much like Burton is disinterested in this aspect of the film, and even the presence of a zippy high-energy Eva Green cannot elicit much energy. In fact, the most unsettling aspects of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children lie unexamined, with Jake stumbling upon a secret society that conspires to keep teenagers young forever and trap them living “the perfect day” over and over again. This sounds very much like a nightmare, more like the world against which Burton rebelled in Edward Scissorhands than the wondrous world promised.

Not quite a breath of fresh air.

Not quite a breath of fresh air.

Indeed, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children often feels like a half-hearted riff on superhero franchises, populated by sets of dysfunctional characters with magical abilities that clash against opponents with rival powers at the climax. If that is the case, the idea of trapping these teenagers in a particular moment could be read as clever criticism of the way that comic book narratives trap characters like Spider-Man or the X-Men in a state of perpetual young adulthood without the option to move along.

However, Burton has already delivered his version of a superhero blockbuster, and seems to have no interest in revisiting the genre any time soon. The result is a film that instantly looses any sense of momentum once it decides that its version of wonder and adventure looks suspiciously like another massive motion picture franchise. Ironically for a film featuring a heroine who can generate incredible amounts of oxygen, it looks like Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children just sucks the air out of Tim Burton’s sales.

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Filed under: Non-Review Reviews | Tagged: eva green, film, Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, Movie, non-review review, review, tim burton |

Источник: https://them0vieblog.com/2016/09/28/non-review-review-miss-peregrines-home-for-peculiar-children/

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (Miss Peregrine, #1)Jacob grew up hearing his grandfather Abe’s “fairy stories” and seeing old pictures of peculiar looking children levitating, holding fire, and appearing to be invisible. Abe claimed he knew these children and that they lived in the orphanage where Abe was sent as a teenager at the beginning of WWII. But Jacob soon comes to an age where he realizes that grandfather’s stories were just that, stories. That is until his grandfather’s horrific death. Grandfather’s cryptic last words mixed with the monster Jacob is sure he sees in the woods near Grandfather’s body changes everything. Jacob sets off on a journey to the Welsh island Grandfather talked about to find the mysterious Miss Peregrine and her “home for peculiar children”. What Jacob finds on the island could either disappoint him or confirm that Abe’s stories were true all along.

Why I picked up the book: We chose it for our October “Never Too Old” book club as it seemed a good fit for Halloween. I had heard great things about it. I’m loving it and don’t want to put it down.

Why I finished it: I love the photos and what they add to the story. I want to know what happens next.

I’d give it to: fans of Neil Gaiman. Parts remind me a bit of I Am Number Four by Pittacus Lore and Slice of Cherry by Dia Reeves.

My rating: 4 of 5 stars (I Really Liked It!)

Want to read it? Click here to place the book on hold!

Review by Jenn, YA Librarian (View all my Goodreads reviews)

 

If you love old, antique photographs, check out the author’s non-fiction collection Talking pictures : images and messages rescued from the past.

Want to read it? Click here to place the book on hold!

 

 

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Источник: https://www.natronacountylibrary.org/book-review-miss-peregrines-home-for-peculiar-children-by-ransom-riggs/

Tim Burton's 'Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children' Needs More Peculiarity [Review]

On paper, Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children sounds like a perfect combination of talent, material, and timing. It's essentially an X-Men movie, in keeping with the current craze for superhero films, but one with a fanciful gothic vibe. It is directed by the master of fanciful gothic vibes, Tim Burton — who knows a thing or two about superheroes and big-budget blockbusters already. It's led by the living Tim Burton drawings Eva Green and Asa Butterfield. Oh, and it's based on a bestselling novel by Ransom Riggs.

In short, it has all the makings of a big hit that brings some much-needed quirkiness back to the multiplex. So why, then, does it all feel so. uninspired? So familiar? So not-very-peculiar? 

Miss Peregrine

Miss Peregrine opens in sleepy suburban Florida, where teenage Jake Portman (Asa Butterfield) lives a life so unremarkable he might as well not exist at all. His parents (Chris O'Dowd and Kim Dickens) barely seem to notice him; the popular kids at school certainly don't. His closest friend might be his paternal grandfather Abraham (Terence Stamp), but sadly he is killed off by a Slenderman-like creature within the minutes of our meeting him.

As Jake struggles to come to terms with Abraham's death — and the uneasy feeling that something isn't quite right about it — he heads to Wales to first tech federal credit union houston out the orphanage where Abraham grew up. He soon learns, though, that it's no ordinary children's home. It's a haven for "peculiar" kids with superpowers, hidden inside a time loop set to September 3, 1943 and overseen by the unflappable Miss Peregrine (Eva Green). Imagine if Mary Poppins took over Xavier's School for Gifted Youngsters and furnished it with wares found by searching for "steampunk" on Etsy, and you've more or less got the idea.

But wait, there's more: Miss Peregrine and her children are in danger thanks to the evil Mr. Barron (Samuel L. Jackson), who commands a team of wights (evil peculiars, basically) and hollowgasts (those Slenderman-like monsters) and believes these peculiars are their key to immortality. And wouldn't you know it, it turns out Jake has a miss peregrines home for peculiar children recommendation of his own that might make him the peculiars' last, best hope for survival.

Miss Peregrine

If you're still a bit confused about all of that, not to worry. Miss Peregrine spends most of its running time explaining itself. These minutes are used up introducing the various peculiars and their powers in great detail; recounting the history of Mr. Barron and his allies; half-heartedly dropping hints about Abraham's past; and establishing the rules that guide this universe. It's not until about an hour into the film that a character even gets around to explaining to Jake how, exactly, he fits into all of miss peregrines home for peculiar children recommendation. (Seriously, an hour. I checked my watch.) Even once we get to the third act, this film is still explaining things. The villain's climactic monologue boils down to a recap of all of his actions so far.

While Miss Peregrine gets caught up in all of this world-building and mythology-spinning, though, it fails to explore some of the most obvious and interesting questions raised by the premise. It's confirmed that Miss Peregrine's children have lived for decades, but never age thanks to the time loop. What's the psychological toll, then, of 70-plus years' worth of memories on a person forever destined to look 16 years old or even 5 years old? Where did all of these peculiar children come from, and what happened to their families? For that matter, are Jake's parents concerned that their kid has basically disappeared?

Nor does miss peregrines home for peculiar children recommendation Peregrine really bother to flesh out any of its peculiar children. Each miss peregrines home for peculiar children recommendation defined by his or her power, and beyond that the characterizations don't get much deeper than "nice" or "not as nice" or "likes fashion." Not even Jake gets much depth. By the end of the movie, I still couldn't have told you a single personality trait he possessed.

MISS PEREGRINE'S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN

Perhaps the film's indifference its own lead character explains the flatness of Butterfield's performance. He's wholly unconvincing here, which is all the more disappointing since he's proved such a compelling presence in films like Hugo and Ender's Game. He struggles with his American accent, never more obviously than in scenes with Chris O'Dowd whose American accent is even worse. I found myself wishing Burton had just taken pity on his stars and let them keep their natural accents, especially as there is no narrative reason the characters need to be American.

Elsewhere, the cast is stacked with fine actors who have nothing to do. Kim Dickens, Judi Dench, Allison Janney, and Rupert Everett take turns dropping by the set to pick up their paychecks; Terence Stamp works only a little bit harder for his. Eva Green and Samuel L. Jackson are the only grown-up actors who get any real meat to chew on. Thank goodness, then, that both are blessed with the ability to make a meal out of even the paltriest portions.

Green has frequently emerged as the best part of some rather bad movies (e.g., Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, 300: Rise of an Empire, Burton's Dark Shadows) and she fills that role again here. Her Miss Peregrine is endlessly watchable, even when she's doing little more than standing around and watching. Jackson, meanwhile, goes gleefully over the top. He's saddled with dialogue as clunky online banking for huntington bank awkward as anyone else's, but he delivers his lines with such relish he almost makes it work. One of the few times Miss Peregrine really seems to come alive is during a scene in which the two characters confront each other.

MISS PEREGRINE'S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN - Tim Burton

The other times Miss Peregrine really sparks are when Burton gets to return to the misshapen and macabre quirkiness that has powered his biggest hits. A scene involving grotesque inanimate objects come to life looks like something out of his '80s output. And a big third-act setpiece, involving giant candy-covered skeletons lumbering around a carnival, is delightfully bizarre. (It's certainly a nice change of pace from the "portal over New York City" climax we've seen in what feels like every other movie this year.) Both scenes bring to mind the rough-edged practical effects of Burton's older films, and both serve as reminders that when Burton is on top of his game, he serves up dark whimsy better than almost anyone.

For the most part, though, Miss Peregrine looks and feels exactly like the slick, CG-heavy modern blockbuster that it is, less Batman Returns or Beetlejuice than Alice in Wonderland (but less coherent and less interesting). Despite its stated obsession with all things "peculiar," there's little about this movie that is actually surprising. It comes across like a movie going through the motions of setting up a franchise, not a movie eager to bring you on a wild adventure in a whole new world. Which is a shame, because the best parts of Miss Peregrine suggest the better movie we could have had. I'm not usually one for nostalgia, but I left the theater thinking, If only Burton had been able to direct this 25 years ago.

/Film rating: 5 out of 10

Источник: https://www.slashfilm.com/546830/miss-peregrines-home-for-peculiar-children-review/
miss peregrines home for peculiar children recommendation

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Miss peregrines home for peculiar children recommendation -

Toppsta - Childrens Books – Reviews

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is a series of books which tell the tale of young Jacob Portman, a normal boy living in Florida. Or at least, that’s what he thought. When his grandfather, Abraham Portman, is killed in a curious circumstances, Jacob is determined to find out what had happened - something that lead him to the discovery of some very peculiar characters. Together, they defeat the enemy, only to find more coming their way.

On their desperate journey to safety, Jacob and his newfound friends encounter dangerous monsters, both literally and figuratively; tricksome characters who are not what they seem; and continuously save each other from the brink of death. Jacob has made so many life-changing choices in his life, but he is about to make the biggest one yet: does he stay with the only true friends he’s ever had, or go home?

Book 1: Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (2011)
Book 2: Hollow City (2014)
Book 3: Library of Souls (2015)
Book 4: A Map of Days - a NEW trilogy featuring the same characters (2018)
Book 5: The Conference of the Birds (2020)
Book 6: The Desolation of Devil's Acre - final book in the series (2021)

Other titles including Miss Peregrine's Journal for Peculiar Children, and Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children Box Set are also available. 

Источник: https://toppsta.com/books/series/22401/miss-peregrines-peculiar-children

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children book review

Ransom Riggs’ teen bestseller, Miss Peregrines Home for Peculiar Children, tells a suspenseful, mind-altering tale of Jacob Portman, a typical sixteen-year-old boy. Though Jacob seems to be a normal teen at the beginning of the story, the audience learns that Jacob is truly gifted— or peculiar.

The adventure begins when Jacob tells about his past experiences with his grandfather. He explains that his grandfather used to reflect on his childhood, fabricating wild phenomena regarding a mysterious island he inhabited as a child after World War II. He told about children with inhumane qualities, such as a girl who could not succumb to gravity, a girl with two mouths, and a boy who had the ability to bring inanimate objects to life. Jacob’s grandfather even had black and white photos of these children to prove his instincts.

As a boy, Jacob truly believed in this frivolous nonsense. As he matured, however, Jacob became more in touch with reality and realized that there is no way that his grandfather’s myths could be true. His grandfather always had an uncultivated imagination.

Years pass by and Grandpa Portman grows mentally ill. After an extreme action scene in which Jacob sees his grandfather tortured and awaiting death, he listens to his grandfather last few sentences. His grandfather slowly demands that Jacob must “find the bird. In the loop. On the other side of the old man’s grave. September third, 1940. Emerson. The letter. Tell them what happened.” (Riggs, 33).

With absolutely no knowledge of his grandfather’s last few words, Jacob easily agrees, under the intention that his grandfather is severely ill and just spilling out random phrases. Little did Jacob know at the time, these concise statements were of great significance.

The suspense is immediately drawn. As Jacob undergoes serious family-related, mental, and emotional issues, he is severely committed to deciphering his grandfather’s demands.

As the story progresses, choices must be made. Risks must be taken. Jacob takes the journey of his lifetime and sees incredible marvels that one would never even imagine in his wildest dreams. During the entire book, the are several questions that must be answered, such as the curiosity pertaining to whether or not Jacob’s experiences are happening in his own life, or in some kind of chaotic dream-sequence.

Riggs did a stellar job at character development and suspense construction. One of the most unique elements of this fantastic read is the photographs that are included. Instead of requiring the reader to imagine every single mythological element, Riggs provides black and white photographs. The majority of the pictures are of the “peculiar children” mentioned in the title. This component truly makes this wonderful book stand out from most teen-bestsellers.

After reading such a fictional book, the reader is commanded to rethink reality. It is truly mind altering.

Источник: https://eastside-online.org/entertainment/miss-peregrines-home-for-peculiar-children-book-review/

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (Miss Peregrine, #1)Jacob grew up hearing his grandfather Abe’s “fairy stories” and seeing old pictures of peculiar looking children levitating, holding fire, and appearing to be invisible. Abe claimed he knew these children and that they lived in the orphanage where Abe was sent as a teenager at the beginning of WWII. But Jacob soon comes to an age where he realizes that grandfather’s stories were just that, stories. That is until his grandfather’s horrific death. Grandfather’s cryptic last words mixed with the monster Jacob is sure he sees in the woods near Grandfather’s body changes everything. Jacob sets off on a journey to the Welsh island Grandfather talked about to find the mysterious Miss Peregrine and her “home for peculiar children”. What Jacob finds on the island could either disappoint him or confirm that Abe’s stories were true all along.

Why I picked up the book: We chose it for our October “Never Too Old” book club as it seemed a good fit for Halloween. I had heard great things about it. I’m loving it and don’t want to put it down.

Why I finished it: I love the photos and what they add to the story. I want to know what happens next.

I’d give it to: fans of Neil Gaiman. Parts remind me a bit of I Am Number Four by Pittacus Lore and Slice of Cherry by Dia Reeves.

My rating: 4 of 5 stars (I Really Liked It!)

Want to read it? Click here to place the book on hold!

Review by Jenn, YA Librarian (View all my Goodreads reviews)

 

If you love old, antique photographs, check out the author’s non-fiction collection Talking pictures : images and messages rescued from the past.

Want to read it? Click here to place the book on hold!

 

 

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Источник: https://www.natronacountylibrary.org/book-review-miss-peregrines-home-for-peculiar-children-by-ransom-riggs/

Tim Burton's 'Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children' Needs More Peculiarity [Review]

On paper, Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children sounds like a perfect combination of talent, material, and timing. It's essentially an X-Men movie, in keeping with the current craze for superhero films, but one with a fanciful gothic vibe. It is directed by the master of fanciful gothic vibes, Tim Burton — who knows a thing or two about superheroes and big-budget blockbusters already. It's led by the living Tim Burton drawings Eva Green and Asa Butterfield. Oh, and it's based on a bestselling novel by Ransom Riggs.

In short, it has all the makings of a big hit that brings some much-needed quirkiness back to the multiplex. So why, then, does it all feel so... uninspired? So familiar? So not-very-peculiar? 

Miss Peregrine

Miss Peregrine opens in sleepy suburban Florida, where teenage Jake Portman (Asa Butterfield) lives a life so unremarkable he might as well not exist at all. His parents (Chris O'Dowd and Kim Dickens) barely seem to notice him; the popular kids at school certainly don't. His closest friend might be his paternal grandfather Abraham (Terence Stamp), but sadly he is killed off by a Slenderman-like creature within the minutes of our meeting him.

As Jake struggles to come to terms with Abraham's death — and the uneasy feeling that something isn't quite right about it — he heads to Wales to seek out the orphanage where Abraham grew up. He soon learns, though, that it's no ordinary children's home. It's a haven for "peculiar" kids with superpowers, hidden inside a time loop set to September 3, 1943 and overseen by the unflappable Miss Peregrine (Eva Green). Imagine if Mary Poppins took over Xavier's School for Gifted Youngsters and furnished it with wares found by searching for "steampunk" on Etsy, and you've more or less got the idea.

But wait, there's more: Miss Peregrine and her children are in danger thanks to the evil Mr. Barron (Samuel L. Jackson), who commands a team of wights (evil peculiars, basically) and hollowgasts (those Slenderman-like monsters) and believes these peculiars are their key to immortality. And wouldn't you know it, it turns out Jake has a secret of his own that might make him the peculiars' last, best hope for survival.

Miss Peregrine

If you're still a bit confused about all of that, not to worry. Miss Peregrine spends most of its running time explaining itself. These minutes are used up introducing the various peculiars and their powers in great detail; recounting the history of Mr. Barron and his allies; half-heartedly dropping hints about Abraham's past; and establishing the rules that guide this universe. It's not until about an hour into the film that a character even gets around to explaining to Jake how, exactly, he fits into all of this. (Seriously, an hour. I checked my watch.) Even once we get to the third act, this film is still explaining things. The villain's climactic monologue boils down to a recap of all of his actions so far.

While Miss Peregrine gets caught up in all of this world-building and mythology-spinning, though, it fails to explore some of the most obvious and interesting questions raised by the premise. It's confirmed that Miss Peregrine's children have lived for decades, but never age thanks to the time loop. What's the psychological toll, then, of 70-plus years' worth of memories on a person forever destined to look 16 years old or even 5 years old? Where did all of these peculiar children come from, and what happened to their families? For that matter, are Jake's parents concerned that their kid has basically disappeared?

Nor does Miss Peregrine really bother to flesh out any of its peculiar children. Each is defined by his or her power, and beyond that the characterizations don't get much deeper than "nice" or "not as nice" or "likes fashion." Not even Jake gets much depth. By the end of the movie, I still couldn't have told you a single personality trait he possessed.

MISS PEREGRINE'S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN

Perhaps the film's indifference its own lead character explains the flatness of Butterfield's performance. He's wholly unconvincing here, which is all the more disappointing since he's proved such a compelling presence in films like Hugo and Ender's Game. He struggles with his American accent, never more obviously than in scenes with Chris O'Dowd whose American accent is even worse. I found myself wishing Burton had just taken pity on his stars and let them keep their natural accents, especially as there is no narrative reason the characters need to be American.

Elsewhere, the cast is stacked with fine actors who have nothing to do. Kim Dickens, Judi Dench, Allison Janney, and Rupert Everett take turns dropping by the set to pick up their paychecks; Terence Stamp works only a little bit harder for his. Eva Green and Samuel L. Jackson are the only grown-up actors who get any real meat to chew on. Thank goodness, then, that both are blessed with the ability to make a meal out of even the paltriest portions.

Green has frequently emerged as the best part of some rather bad movies (e.g., Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, 300: Rise of an Empire, Burton's Dark Shadows) and she fills that role again here. Her Miss Peregrine is endlessly watchable, even when she's doing little more than standing around and watching. Jackson, meanwhile, goes gleefully over the top. He's saddled with dialogue as clunky and awkward as anyone else's, but he delivers his lines with such relish he almost makes it work. One of the few times Miss Peregrine really seems to come alive is during a scene in which the two characters confront each other.

MISS PEREGRINE'S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN - Tim Burton

The other times Miss Peregrine really sparks are when Burton gets to return to the misshapen and macabre quirkiness that has powered his biggest hits. A scene involving grotesque inanimate objects come to life looks like something out of his '80s output. And a big third-act setpiece, involving giant candy-covered skeletons lumbering around a carnival, is delightfully bizarre. (It's certainly a nice change of pace from the "portal over New York City" climax we've seen in what feels like every other movie this year.) Both scenes bring to mind the rough-edged practical effects of Burton's older films, and both serve as reminders that when Burton is on top of his game, he serves up dark whimsy better than almost anyone.

For the most part, though, Miss Peregrine looks and feels exactly like the slick, CG-heavy modern blockbuster that it is, less Batman Returns or Beetlejuice than Alice in Wonderland (but less coherent and less interesting). Despite its stated obsession with all things "peculiar," there's little about this movie that is actually surprising. It comes across like a movie going through the motions of setting up a franchise, not a movie eager to bring you on a wild adventure in a whole new world. Which is a shame, because the best parts of Miss Peregrine suggest the better movie we could have had. I'm not usually one for nostalgia, but I left the theater thinking, If only Burton had been able to direct this 25 years ago.

/Film rating: 5 out of 10

Источник: https://www.slashfilm.com/546830/miss-peregrines-home-for-peculiar-children-review/

Book Review: Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs is a captivating story about a very odd home for a select group of young children.
When Jake’s grandfather mysteriously dies, he goes off on an adventure to find Miss Peregrine and solve the mysteries of his grandfather’s past life.
The answers to the mysteries are found at this special home. It is a book about adventure, family- both biological and situational, and being different. This book is definitely one of my favorites. It is an amazingly unique book unlike any I have read before. I enjoyed Ransom Riggs’s writing style and I loved seeing the photographs in between chapters. The photographs helped convey the story realistically. The peculiarities that the children had were also very interesting and unique. For example, one child had bees living inside of him, another was as light as air, and yet another could bring dead things back to life. It is an extremely fun reading experience that keeps you engaged and on your toes at all times. There is mild swearing in this book. I would recommend this book to everyone and would encourage people to read it before seeing the movie. Even better, have a group of friends read this book then watch the movie together so you can discuss and compare the two.

Источник: https://ppld.org/book-reviews/miss-peregrines-home-peculiar-children-1

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children works best when it serves as a vehicle for Tim Burton’s imagination, exploring a world where tall tales seem to be real and monsters manifest themselves literally, where trauma and loss are explained through escape into fantasy, and where shadows distort and bend into uncanny shapes as if to suggest that there is so much more to this world than it might first appear. This is all stock Burton imagery, but the director approaches it with an endearing energy.

Unfortunately, there is more to Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. The film is not content to play as broad Burton fantasy of childhood mythmaking and coming of age. Despite an opening act that hints at something of a young adult follow-up to Big Fish, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children inevitably gets bogged down in the finer trappings of its young adult source material. Exposition is ladled on, rival orders are established, sequels are set up, familiar plot beats are not so much hit as hammered.

Movie night.

Movie night.

In its opening twenty minutes or so, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children shows a lot of promise. Jake is teenager growing in Florida, when his grandfather dies under semi-mysterious circumstances. Jake thinks he sees a grotesque monster at the scene, but his psychiatrist helpfully explains that such imagery is just a way for the mind to process trauma. It is a fantasy, constructed to help Jake deal with the senseless loss of an elderly relative who was suffering with dementia.

In these early scenes, Burton offers an endearing glimpse of Jake’s childhood. His father is a nature writer, planning a book about the birds of the world. His mundane interests reflect a mundane man, somebody with no real interest in his son’s life. Instead, Jake gravitates to his grandfather. His grandfather fled Poland before the Second World War, apparently because he began seeing “monsters.” As he enchants Jake with stories of globe-trotting adventures, it becomes clear that Jake’s grandfather is also treating the fantastic as a refuge from a cruel and mundane world.

Not somebody you want to cross(bow)...

Not somebody you want to cross(bow)…

These are easily the best sequences in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, the ones most firmly anchored in Burton’s aesthetic. The casting helps a great deal. Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children has a spectacular cast of actors who are largely neglected or ignored; Alison Janney as a psychiatrist, Chris O’Dowd as Jake’s father, Kim Dickens as Jake’s mother, Rupert Everett as a rival ornithologist. The only member of the main cast who actually makes a solid impression is Terrance Stamp as Jake’s elderly uncle.

In a better world, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children would focus on Terrence Stamp as a survivor of the Second World War who needs to believe in the fantastic to give his life a sense of meaning. Stamp plays the elderly man as a tragic figure, one who clearly believes that his grandson is meant for brilliant things but is instead destined to suffocated by the drab everyday world around him. There is a wistfulness to the performance and character that suggests that Burton would empathise; the old man feels like the window to the story.

Time's up.

Time’s up.

Sadly, the character is cast aside far too quickly so that Jake might be motivated to action. With the death of his grandfather, Jake sets off on a mission to investigate one of his grandfather’s tall tales, the secret society living on a dreary island off the Welsh Coast. From this point onwards, everything becomes a bit more conventional, as Burton is essentially tasked with constructing a version of the X-Men that hinges more on magic than atomic era anxieties. The parallels speak for themselves; the special school, the mutant children, even the girl who can kill with a touch.

There are a number of interesting visuals to be found in the remaining two acts of the film. There is something quite endearing about Jake’s encounter with two would-be rappers on a remote Welsh island, and some of the children are suitably creepy. A set of twins dress in homage to The Orphanage, while another makes rejects from Toy Story fight for his own amusement. However, there is not enough wonder to sustain the film, and not nearly enough to drown out the more paint-by-numbers aspects of the plot.

Let it bee...

Let it bee…

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children quickly degenerates into a mess of young adult clichés. Jake inevitably becomes a leader of this community when it is thrown into crisis. There is a heavy (and frankly unnecessary) emphasis on “time loops.” There is a villain with an over-elaborate (and over-explained) motivation for doing very basic things. The film compensates for its predictability with knowing irony, but that only serves to deflate the sense of wonder that should be driving the plot.

It feels very much like Burton is disinterested in this aspect of the film, and even the presence of a zippy high-energy Eva Green cannot elicit much energy. In fact, the most unsettling aspects of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children lie unexamined, with Jake stumbling upon a secret society that conspires to keep teenagers young forever and trap them living “the perfect day” over and over again. This sounds very much like a nightmare, more like the world against which Burton rebelled in Edward Scissorhands than the wondrous world promised.

Not quite a breath of fresh air.

Not quite a breath of fresh air.

Indeed, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children often feels like a half-hearted riff on superhero franchises, populated by sets of dysfunctional characters with magical abilities that clash against opponents with rival powers at the climax. If that is the case, the idea of trapping these teenagers in a particular moment could be read as clever criticism of the way that comic book narratives trap characters like Spider-Man or the X-Men in a state of perpetual young adulthood without the option to move along.

However, Burton has already delivered his version of a superhero blockbuster, and seems to have no interest in revisiting the genre any time soon. The result is a film that instantly looses any sense of momentum once it decides that its version of wonder and adventure looks suspiciously like another massive motion picture franchise. Ironically for a film featuring a heroine who can generate incredible amounts of oxygen, it looks like Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children just sucks the air out of Tim Burton’s sales.

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Filed under: Non-Review Reviews | Tagged: eva green, film, Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, Movie, non-review review, review, tim burton |

Источник: https://them0vieblog.com/2016/09/28/non-review-review-miss-peregrines-home-for-peculiar-children/

Walking back to the car after a recent screening of “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children,” my movie-savvy, nearly-seven-year-old son took my hand and asked me sweetly: “Mommy, what was that about?”

Um … er … well …

The short answer (which probably wasn’t terribly helpful to him) was: It’s “X-Men” meets “Groundhog Day.” The real answer, which required a lot of stumbling and bumbling and twists and turns, was far more lengthy (and probably not terribly helpful, either). Because even though I’d just seen the exact same movie my son had, I wasn’t sure I completely understood it, either.

The latest adventure from Tim Burton would seem tailor-made for his tastes but it’s a convoluted slog, dense in mythology and explanatory dialogue but woefully lacking in thrills. It’s been a matter of diminishing returns with Burton for the past several years now between “Alice in Wonderland,” “Dark Shadows” and “Big Eyes” (although the animated “Frankenweenie” found the director in peak retro form). “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children” allows him to show only brief glimmers of the gleefully twisted greatness of his early work such as “Pee-wee’s Big Adventure” and “Beetlejuice.” The characters here are supposed to be delightful—or at least interesting—simply because they’re superficially odd, and it just isn’t enough anymore. Too often, it feels like we’ve seen this movie before—and seen it done better.

Although the film (based on the novel by Ransom Riggs) is populated by an assortment of peculiars, as they’re known—kids born with unusual abilities that make it difficult for them to live in the outside world—precious few of them feel like actual human beings whose lonely plight might carry some emotional resonance. There’s Emma (Ella Purnell), the pretty blonde who has to wear lead shoes so she doesn’t fly away. There’s Olive (Lauren McCrostie), the redhead who has to wear gloves so she doesn’t accidentally set things on fire. There’s the girl with a ravenous maw hidden on the back of her head. The invisible boy who likes to play tricks. The girl who can make things grow super fast. The boy who can project images through his eyeball. The creepy, masked twins. They flit in and out, do the thing they do, and ta da! Then they’re gone without leaving much impact.

Their leader is the stylish and formidable Miss Alma LeFay Peregrine, played by Eva Green, who nearly saves the day simply by showing up with that vampy, riveting screen presence of hers. With a shocking swoop of midnight-blue hair and an array of gorgeous gowns from frequent Burton costume designer Colleen Atwood, she has the ability to manipulate time (and turn into a bird, which seems unrelated). But that isn’t enough. She also has to be extra quirky by smoking a pipe.

And the seemingly regular kid who stumbles upon all these freaks and geeks is the incredibly boring Jake, played by “Hugo” star Asa Butterfield. He’s our wide-eyed conduit, so of course he has to function as the straight man in such a wildly fanciful world. But there’s just nothing to him, and the young British actor’s American accent seems to flatten him further.

You may have noticed I haven’t tried to describe the plot yet. Yes, I am procrastinating. 

Shy, teenage Jake lives in a bland tract house in suburban Florida (on the same street as Edward Scissorhands, possibly). He dreams of being an explorer, he says, but he would seem to lack the requisite get-up-and-go. All his life, he’s heard his beloved grandfather (Terence Stamp, who departs far too quickly) tell him outlandish stories about his own youth on an island off the coast of Wales, where he grew up at an orphanage for misfits with magical powers.

After Grandpa dies under mysterious circumstances, Jake convinces his parents (Chris O’Dowd and a frustratingly underused Kim Dickens), with the help of his grief counselor (Allison Janney), that he should visit the island and try to find this mysterious home in hopes of achieving closure. Dad tags along to take photographs of birds and drink beer at the pub full of crotchety locals. (Cinematographer Bruno Delbonnel, whose work includes the Coen brothers’ luscious “Inside Llewyn Davis,” does make the foggy Welsh setting look severe and dramatic.)

When Jake finally does find the stately, gothic home his grandfather had told him about, he discovers it’s in ruins, the result of a bombing decades earlier during World War II. But once he steps inside and begins investigating, the inhabitants dare to pop their heads out and the place comes colorfully to life. Seems they’re stuck in a time loop, doomed to repeat the same day in September 1943 right up until the moment the Nazi bomb fell on them. The time-conscious Miss Peregrine explains that she winds the clock back 24 hours at the end of each night, just before the moment of destruction, allowing everyone to relive that day all over again.

Doesn’t that sound fun? Are you still paying attention?

Anyway, for some reason, all the kids want Jake to stick around, ostensibly because they haven’t seen a fresh face in about 70 years, and his will do. But they’re all in danger, you see, because just as there are good mutants in the “X-Men” world, there are also bad ones. Here, they’re the peculiars who use their powers to take over other time loops, or something. And they way the stay alive is by eating people’s eyeballs, or something. Their leader is the courtly yet menacing Mr. Barron, whom Samuel L. Jackson plays with the kind of scenery chewing he could do in his sleep. But what they want is never clear, so they’re never truly frightening.

The supposedly epic collision between good and evil results in exactly one exciting action set piece. It involves stop-motion animated skeletons battling an army of long-limbed, eye-gouging mercenary giants at a boardwalk amusement park, and it’s the only scene that vividly recalls the kind of artistry and absurd humor that long have been Burton’s trademarks. And the peculiar who makes it all happen has the most useful—and the most ethically intriguing—ability of all. Enoch (Finlay MacMillan) can bring things back to life—a person, a creepy doll—by inserting a beating heart into it. Unfortunately, though, he ends up being just another cog in the particularly dull machinery.

Christy Lemire

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