city of san jose housing department

Updates on City of San José Services and/or Operations (English | Español | Tiếng Việt | 中文). Departments & Offices Housing-rollover. MUNICIPAL CODE City of SAN JOSÉ, CALIFORNIA Codified through Ordinance No. 30676, adopted October 19, 2021. (Supp. No. 39, Update 2). Main Office Address. 505 West Julian Street San José, CA 95110 (408) 275-8770. TDD: (408) 993-3041. Get Directions and View Map. city of san jose housing department

City of san jose housing department -

SANTA CRUZ – The 831 Water St. project will return to the council floor, yet again.

The Santa Cruz City Council on Tuesday night voted 4-2 to rescind its rejection of the project bid in early October. Councilmembers Justin Cummings and Sandy Brown voted to uphold the project denial. Instead, the duo had suggested the project developer should have to resubmit the application due to a number of changes that were made to the project since its original application date.

Proposed changes even continued to come in after the council had rejected the project application.

“I believe that at this point, the applicant should submit a revised, new application, trigger the new timeline and let us do our job and let the staff do their job in reviewing a complete and an application that is not internally contradictory asking for different things,” Brown said. “It’s a moving target and assessing a moving target like that is very difficult.”

Councilmember Martine Watkins was absent from the vote.

The council had originally denied the application due to a requested concession from the developer, Novin Development, which would place all of the affordable units in one building and the market-rate units in another.

Watkins rebuked the request last month, calling it a form of segregation. However, the council’s decision to rally around the claim violated state legislature passed in 2017.

The California Department of Housing and Community Development notified the city in a letter earlier this month.

Senate Bill 35, California legislation designed to streamline housing projects and mitigate the housing crisis, requires cities to approve or deny projects based on a set of objective standards. Those standards are set by each city, which Santa Cruz has yet to finalize. Therefore, the council had directed city staff to evaluate the project based on the city’s current standards of approval.

City staff had determined the project fit the standards of approval set forth by the city. Yet, the council still chose to reject the project.

HCD also noted a perceived misunderstanding of Assembly Bill 491. The bill, which goes into effect at the start of the new year, addresses matters of segregating housing. However, the bill does not prohibit the consolidation of affordable units. Rather, it states the units can’t be consolidated same floor or same area of a floor, according to HCD.

SB 35 also allows for the consolidation of affordable units if the purpose is to secure grant funding for subsidized housing, Deputy City Manager Lee Butler stated in October. Novin Development discussed its intention to do so during its initial presentation.

The council’s decision to rescind its prior rejection of the application will bring it back to the council to be reassessed under SB 35. The council will then make another decision on the application during its Dec. 14 meeting.

If approved, the project will add 140 housing units to Santa Cruz, 71 of which are slated for affordable housing. The affordable units are deed restricted at 80% of the area median income or lower, but does not specify how many units are designated for very-low-income, the city’s biggest need in its Regional Housing Needs Allocation.

Источник: https://www.santacruzsentinel.com/2021/11/23/santa-cruz-city-council-doubles-back-on-apartment-rejection

Analyst I/II, Housing Department Rent Stabilization Program

Analyst I/II, Housing Department Rent Stabilization Program City of San Jose 121 reviews - San Jose, CA City of San Jose 121 reviews Read what people are saying about working here. The City of San José Housing Department is a leader in the development of affordable housing. Its mission is to strengthen and to revitalize our community through housing and neighborhood investment. The Housing Department has an operating budget of approximately $11.8 million and 77 employees. Positions & Duties The Rent Stabilization Program provides mediation and arbitration services to landlords and tenants in rent-controlled apartments, oversees rent controlled mobile homes and provides information and referrals for non-rent controlled apartment units in San José. Under the direction of a Senior Analyst, the position provides information and assistance to the public and staff on all aspects of the rent control law, regulations, and procedures. This position prepares petitions from the public in preparation for hearings under the Citys rent stabilization and related ordinances and performs other complex tasks required in the administration of housing programs. The incumbent will be expected to make public presentations and must be able to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing, with persons from diverse social, cultural and economic backgrounds. This position shall: * Respond to inquiries from the public regarding Apartment Rent Ordinance, rules, regulations and policies, making referrals to other agencies, as appropriate. * Accept petitions from landlords and tenants in preparation for providing hearing officers with complete information on the rights and responsibilities of the Citys landlords and tenants. Assist the petitioners and respondents in developing all information needed for presentation in hearings without bias toward either party. * Facilitate the resolution of petitions and complaints where possible through voluntary agreements between the parties that are consistent with the Citys housing ordinances and policies * Assist landlords in maintaining compliance with City ordinances for their businesses through enrollment in the Citys rental programs, maintenance of business licenses, and other city and state permit requirements as appropriate. * Analyze rent and other data to ensure compliance with City ordinances. * Advise members of the public on the use of City and external programs for the mediation of disputes. * Confer with department management and others on administrative problems; gathers and analyzes facts about program compliance, processes, procedures and work load; evaluate and prepare recommendations on departmental requests for program changes; provide for and assist in the installation of improved systems or organization; participate in the study of organization and methods as required; and prepare and revise policy and procedures manuals and instructional materials for public and internal use. * Obtain data and other information from operating departments through use of questionnaires, personal visits, and otherwise as indicated; assemble, array, process, and analyze data; prepare studies and reports as indicated; and propose or suggest appropriate action to supervisor. * May supervise and give direction to clerical support staff. * Participate with groups in analyzing and evaluating community conditions and needs; offers guidance and counsel in the establishment of goals and techniques of achievement. * Attend internal and public meetings as required. May be required to present information through speaking in public forums on City housing and other programs. * Negotiate, develop contracts, grants and special funds to meet specific City or department needs; prepare bids and specifications. * Prepare and monitor program budget; prepare revenue estimates; establish fees and charges; prepare and monitor grants, contracts and other financial transactions. * Manage relationships and contracts with contract employees providing mediation and arbitration services for the Rental Rights and Referrals Program. * Utilize automated data processing applications, including spreadsheets and databases to analyze and present information. * Provide translation services, as needed, for Department staff. * Perform related work as required. The ideal candidate will have experience with general management/administrative analytic work and providing information to the public that has involved the interpretation and applications of laws, rules and regulations. Familiarity with rent control and/or issues regarding housing is highly desirable. Fluency in a foreign language, such as Spanish, Vietnamese, Cantonese, Mandarin or Tagalog, is desirable. This recruitment will be used to fill multiple positions in this, or other divisions or departments. If you are interested in employment in this classification, you should apply to ensure you are considered for additional opportunities that may utilize the applicants from this recruitment. Qualifications Minimum Qualifications * Education: A Baccalaureate Degree from an accredited college or university. * Experience: Analyst I: None. Analyst II: Two years of increasingly responsible professional staff analytic or administrative experience at the level of Analyst I with the City of San José. * Employment Eligibility: Federal law requires all employees to provide verification of their eligibility to work in this country. Please be informed that the City of San José will not prepare or file a labor condition application with the Department of Labor. Competencies The ideal candidate will possess the following competencies, as demonstrated in past and current employment history. Desirable competencies for this position include: Job Expertise - Demonstrates knowledge of and experience with applicable professional/technical principles and practices, Citywide and departmental procedures/policies and federal and state rules and regulations. More specifically: * Experience in general management/administrative analytic work and providing information to the public. * Familiarity with rent control and/or issues regarding housing. * Ability to understand, interpret, and communicate complex regulations and legal documents. Analytical Thinking - Approaching a problem or situation by using a logical, systematic, sequential approach. Communication Skills Effectively conveys information and expresses thoughts and facts clearly, orally and in writing; demonstrates effective use of listening skills; displays openness to other peoples ideas and thoughts. Customer Service - Demonstrates the ability to anticipate customers' needs and deliver services effectively and efficiently using professional demeanor. Decision Making - Identifies and understands issues, problems, and opportunities; uses effective approaches for choosing a course of action or developing appropriate solutions. Facilitation Exhibits behaviors and techniques that enhance the quality of group processes. Supervision Sets effective long and short-term goals based on a good understanding of management practices; establishes realistic priorities within available resources; provides motivational support; empowers others; assigns decision-making and work functions to others in an appropriate manner to maximize organizational and individual effectiveness. Teamwork & Interpersonal Skills Develops effective relationships with co-workers and supervisors by helping others accomplish tasks and using collaboration and conflict resolution skills. Selection Process The selection process will consist of an evaluation of the applicants training and experience based on the application and responses to the Job Specific Questions. Only candidates whose backgrounds best match the position with be invited to proceed in the selection process. Additional phases of the selection process will consist of one or more interviews and a language proficiency exam. You will be prompted to answer the following job-specific questions during the online application process: * Please describe your experience in general management/administrative analytic work and providing information to the public that has involved the interpretation and applications of laws, rules, and regulations. * Please describe your work experience with rent control and/or issues regarding housing, including where you obtained your experience and duration in which you performed these duties. * Describe an example of a successful project you participated in. What made the team successful and what was your role in the team? You must answer all job-specific questions in order to be considered for this vacancy or your application will be deemed incomplete and withheld from further consideration. If you have questions about the duties of these positions, the selection or hiring processes, please contact Hsin-Ping Lee at [email protected] Additional Information The application deadline is 11:59 PM on the final filing date. Please allow adequate time to complete the application and submit before the deadline or the system may not save your application. If your online application was successfully submitted, you will receive an automatic confirmation email to the email address you provided. IF YOU DO NOT RECEIVE THE CONFIRMATION, please email [email protected] and we will research the status of your application. Please contact Human Resources at (408) 535-1285, or [email protected] if you have any questions. Job: General Administration Organization: Housing Schedule: Full-time Employee Status: Regular Job Type: Standard Job Posting: Aug 13, 2018, 9:01:26 PM Minimum Salary: 67,121.60 Maximum Salary: 89,044.80 Bargaining Unit 1: Confidential Employees Organization Closing Date: Sep 7, 2018, 6:59:00 AM City of San Jose - 14 hours ago - save job - original job Apply Now Apply On Company Site Save this job

Источник: https://www.wayup.com/i-Legal-Services-j-City-San-Jose-767228997067553/

Mabuhay Court Apartments consists of 96 affordable studio, one-, and two-bedroom apartments in San Jose.

BRIDGE worked with the City of San Jose to build this innovative mixed-use development on what had been a city corporation yard and the site of an outdated community center. The resulting development combines senior housing with a new community center in the city’s downtown. In addition to creating the senior housing, BRIDGE served as master developer for the 16,000-square-foot senior community center. The center, which was funded by the city, is connected to the housing, providing residents easy access to the center’s many programs and services. Shopping is close by, and public bus lines stop at the door for longer trips, making this property ideally located for Seniors. Mabuhay was given a Builder’s Choice Award by Builder magazine.

Architect: David Baker Architects
General Contractor: L & D Construction
Financial Partners: San Jose Redevelopment Agency, San Jose Department of Housing, National Equity Fund, Citibank, Bank of America, Federal Home Loan Bank/World Savings, U.S. Department of Housing and Community Development, BRIDGE Housing Corporation, California Equity Fund

Living at Mabuhay Court Apartments

To find out if this property is currently accepting applications, please contact the Mabuhay Court Senior Apartments Management office at 408-885-0448. Income, age, and other restrictions apply. Small pets are welcome.

Mabuhay Court Apartments is located at 270 E. Empire Street in San Jose. Click here for a map.

For general information about living at a BRIDGE property, click here.

Источник: https://bridgehousing.com/properties/mabuhay-court/

San Jose Spotlight: San Jose Expands Investigation Of Labor Violations At Emergency Housing Sites

San Jose is expanding its investigation of illegal labor practices, including wage theft, at emergency housing projects handled by Habitat for Humanity, but there's no set date for when workers will get paid.

The city's Public Works Department is demanding $319,631.46 in restitution for workers from Veev Build, a subcontractor, for various alleged labor violations reported by San Jose Spotlight at the Monterey/Bernal Emergency Housing Project earlier this year. The amount due is nearly six times what the city initially demanded from Veev in its first notice of violation in April.

The city increased the restitution after Veev turned over additional information revealing more violations, including failing to pay workers for all hours and misclassifying workers, according to a city memo.

San Jose is also reviewing two other emergency housing projects -- Evans Lane and Rue Ferrar i-- after discovering potential underpayments of workers. City documents published earlier this month indicate subcontractor Suarez & Munoz Construction is potentially on the hook for more than $100,000 in restitution and more than $23,000 in penalties.

Ongoing investigations

The city has not yet assigned penalties for Veev and it's unclear when workers from the Monterey/Bernal project will be paid. Public Works Director Matt Cano told San Jose Spotlight he couldn't answer this question because the investigation is still pending.

"Due to the complexities of this investigation it has not yet been completed," Cano wrote in a memo to lawmakers. "However, staff is actively engaged with the contractor to ensure that all workers are paid the proper wages as expeditiously as possible."

Workers waiting for their due wages are frustrated by the delay. Francisco Lara, a plumber at the Monterey/Bernal project, told San Jose Spotlight he worked 12-hour days at the site and cut his arm on a pipe, requiring 12 stitches. According to city records, Lara worked at least one week that wasn't reported on Veev's certified payroll.

"It's stressful," Lara said. "I've got to pretty much struggle for things that I worked hard for and never got."

Molly L. Kaban, an attorney for Veev, said the company discovered errors in the city's calculation of restitution after reviewing its records with help from an external consultant. She did not immediately provide any examples. Veev said it's working with the city to answer questions.

"We believe that once the review process is completed the notice will be revised or revoked entirely," Veev said. "If anything is owed at the completion of the process, of course Veev will abide by any obligation."

Habitat for Humanity East Bay/Silicon Valley is working to rectify the issues and has a compliance consultant working with the company's subcontractors, spokesperson Patti Wang told San Jose Spotlight.

Missing payroll

Habitat for Humanity was assigned a public works project worth approximately $6 million to build emergency interim housing for homeless people during the COVID-19 pandemic. Mayor Sam Liccardo and Gov. Gavin Newsom used the Monterey/Bernal site as a backdrop for a televised press conference in October 2020, boasting that units were built quickly and cheaply.

Earlier this year, San Jose Spotlight reported on rampant wage theft and hazardous work conditions at the site. Numerous workers were not paid money owed under a citywide union contract, and one subcontractor hired non-union labor for less than what prevailing wage laws allow.

Veev has argued that it's not responsible for misclassifying workers because the workers were supposed to record the correct classification for themselves. The city rejected this argument in its October memo, stating California Labor Code dictates contractors and subcontractors must keep accurate payroll records, and misclassification by a worker doesn't let an employer off the hook.

The city also dinged Veev for allegedly failing to report on its certified payroll records five employees hired through a staffing company, Aerotek Temp Agency. San Jose claims Veev also failed to provide certified payroll records for the last 72 days of work.

"As a result, (the Office of Equal Opportunity) is unable to determine whether Veev owes additional restitution to workers," the memo said.

There is a pending lawsuit in Santa Clara County against Veev brought by two carpenters who claim the company failed to pay them all wages or provide meal breaks at the proper times while they were employed at the housing project.

South Bay Piping Industry Compliance Director Mauricio Velarde says he contacted the city about potential wage violations and safety problems at the Monterey/Bernal site months ago.

"I had been informing them of violations in the summer of 2020, which they ignored," he said, adding he believes Cano downplayed the severity of violations.

Copyright © 2021 Bay City News, Inc. All rights reserved. Republication, rebroadcast or redistribution without the express written consent of Bay City News, Inc. is prohibited. Bay City News is a 24/7 news service covering the greater Bay Area.

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Источник: https://www.sfgate.com/news/bayarea/article/San-Jose-Spotlight-San-Jose-Expands-16654985.php

Valtierra v. Housing Authority of City of San Jose, 313 F. Supp. 1 (N.D. Cal. 1970)

313 F. Supp. 1 (1970)

Anita VALTIERRA et al., Plaintiffs,
v.
The HOUSING AUTHORITY OF the CITY OF SAN JOSE et al., Defendants.
Gussie HAYES et al., Plaintiffs,
v.
HOUSING AUTHORITY OF SAN MATEO, Defendant.

Nos. 52076, C-69-1-RFP.

United States District Court, N. D. California.

March 23, 1970.

Probable Jurisdiction Noted June 8, 29, 1970.

*2 Don B. Kates, Jr., Brian Paddock, Diane V. Delevett, Peter D. Coppelman, Gilroy, Cal., Legal Aid Society of Santa Clara County, San Jose, Cal., National Housing Law Project, Earl Warren Legal Center, Berkeley, Cal., Legal Aid Society of S.M.C., Redwood City, Cal., Legal Aid Society of S.M.C., Menlo Park, Cal., for plaintiffs.

City Atty., Robert S. Sturges, San Jose, Cal., U. S. Atty., for defendants.

Before HAMLIN, Circuit Judge, and PECKHAM and LEVIN, District Judges.

Probable Jurisdiction Noted June 8, 29, 1970. See 90 S. Ct. 1873, 2247.

PECKHAM, District Judge.

This matter comes before this Court on plaintiffs' motions for summary judgment, their applications for an injunction, and defendants' motions to dismiss. Plaintiffs ask that we declare Article XXXIV of the California State Constitution[1] to be unconstitutional and request that we forbid defendants from relying upon it as a reason for not requesting federal assistance with which to finance low-income housing. We hold Article XXXIV to be unconstitutional. See Hunter v. Erickson, 393 U.S. 385, 89 S. Ct. 557, 21 L. Ed. 2d 616 (1969).

Title 42 U.S.C. § 1983 creates a cause of action for the deprivation, under color of state law, of any right, privilege or immunity guaranteed by the United States Constitution. In this case, the non-federal defendants are acting under color of Article XXXIV in not requesting federal assistance. Equal protection cases brought to remedy discrimination against the poor (e. g., Rinaldi v. Yeager, 384 U.S. 305, 86 S. Ct. 1497, 16 L. Ed. 2d 577 (1966); Harper v. Virginia State Board of Elections, 383 U.S. 663, 86 S. Ct. 1079, 16 L. Ed. 2d 169 (1966); Shapiro v. Thompson, 394 U.S. 618, 89 S. Ct. 1322, 22 L. Ed. 2d 600 (1969)), have long been entertained under § 1983. Jurisdiction to hear this case is conferred upon this Court by 28 U.S.C. § 1343(3), (4).

This case is required to be heard by a three-judge court by 28 U.S.C. §§ 2281, 2284, as plaintiffs seek an injunction enjoining defendant local officials *3 from enforcing a state constitutional provision (see A.F.L. v. Watson, 327 U.S. 582, 66 S. Ct. 761, 90 L. Ed. 873 (1946)) on the ground of its repugnance to the Equal Protection Clause.

Two cases are consolidated for consideration. The first is Valtierra v. Housing Authority of San Jose No. 52076. The parties plaintiff are "persons of low income," who have been determined to be eligible for public housing, and who have been placed on the appropriate waiting lists. They are unable to occupy public housing because at present none is available. The second case, Gussie Hayes et al. v. Housing Authority of San Mateo, No. C-69-1-RFP, is consolidated with the first because of the identity of the legal issue, and is brought by similarly situated poor persons, predominately Negro, on the waiting list for public housing in San Mateo County.

Plaintiffs have demonstrated that Article XXXIV has impeded the financing of new housing, only 52% of the referenda submitted to the voters have been approved, even though they cannot of course demonstrate that any particular named plaintiff would be able to occupy new housing if such housing were built. In Santa Clara County, the voters defeated the referendum seeking permission to obtain housing funds in 1968, and in San Mateo County two similar referenda were defeated in 1966. Housing Director Wemen, in San Mateo County, feels it would be fruitless to attempt another referendum at present. [Affidavit J to Hayes complaint.] Plaintiffs' position is that but for the existence of Article XXXIV, local housing authorities would be able to apply for federal assistance if they chose; they further submit that there is evidence that in fact they would so choose. [See Valtierra complaint p. 8].

There are three groups of defendants in the Valtierra case: the Housing Authority of the City of San Jose, a public entity, and its members in their official capacity; the City Council of San Jose, a public entity, and its members, in their official capacity; and the Department of Housing and Urban Development and its Secretary, George Romney. All three groups have filed responsive pleadings. There is only one defendant in the Hayes case, the Housing Authority of San Mateo County. The Court notes that this defendant has not made an appearance in the case, but rather has chosen to stand mute.

The federal defendants, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and its Secretary, George Romney, move for dismissal on the ground that, as to them, the Valtierra complaint does not state a claim upon which relief can be granted. Fed.R.Civ. P. Rule 12(b) (6). The complaint does not seek any relief against the federal defendants; their joinder is not necessary in order to grant the relief that is requested. Therefore this Court ORDERS that their motion for dismissal be granted. Accordingly, the federal defendants are dismissed from this lawsuit. The Hayes case does not involve any federal defendants.

The two non-federal defendants in the Valtierra case, viz., the Housing Authority of San Jose, and the City Council of San Jose, raise several pleas in abatement which do not preclude this Court from reaching the merits of plaintiffs' constitutional claim. First, defendants contend that because California could decline to participate in the program established by the Housing Act of 1937, that California can participate on any condition. This is not the case. Certainly a condition that no Negro could occupy such low-income housing would be unconstitutional. Second, they assert that referenda are not subject to constitutional scrutiny. This is not the law. Hunter v. Erickson, supra. Third, defendants erroneously believe plaintiffs are asking this Court to compel the Housing Authorities to seek federal funding. However, plaintiffs only seek an injunction forbidding the named local officers from relying on Article XXXIV as a reason for not requesting such funds. There may be any number of reasons, quite apart from Article XXXIV *4 why the Housing Authorities might not wish to seek federal funds at any given point in time.

We find plaintiffs' Supremacy Clause argument to be unpersuasive and therefore do not decide the case on that ground. Plaintiffs' Privileges and Immunities argument is not reached as this court decides the case on Equal Protection grounds.

 
PLAINTIFFS' EQUAL PROTECTION ARGUMENT

The starting point for this argument is the now well-established standard that classifications based on race are "constitutionally suspect," Bolling v. Sharpe, 347 U.S. 497, 499, 74 S. Ct. 693, 98 L. Ed. 884 (1954), and those based on property "traditionally disfavored," Harper v. Virginia State Board of Elections, 383 U.S. 663, 668, 86 S. Ct. 1079, 16 L. Ed. 2d 169 (1966). Both bear a far heavier burden of justification than other classifications. See, McLaughlin v. Florida, 379 U.S. 184, 194, 85 S. Ct. 283, 13 L. Ed. 2d 222 (1964).

The gravamen of plaintiffs' Equal Protection claim is that the express discrimination in Article XXXIV, as it applies only to "low-income persons", brings it squarely within the ban of a long line of Supreme Court decisions forbidding the unequal imposition of burdens upon groups that are not rationally differentiable in the light of any legitimate State legislative objective. E. g., Skinner v. Oklahoma, 316 U.S. 535, 62 S. Ct. 1110, 86 L. Ed. 1655 (1942); Carrington v. Rash, 380 U.S. 89, 85 S. Ct. 775, 13 L. Ed. 2d 675 (1965); Baxstrom v. Herold, 383 U.S. 107, 86 S. Ct. 760, 15 L. Ed. 2d 620 (1966); and Rinaldi v. Yeager, 384 U.S. 305, 86 S. Ct. 1497, 16 L. Ed. 2d 577 (1966). As characterized by the Court in McLaughlin v. Florida, 379 U.S. at 191, 85 S.Ct. at 288:

 
Judicial inquiry under the Equal Protection Clause, * * * does not end with a showing of equal application among the members of the class defined by the legislation. The courts must reach and determine the question * * * whether there is an arbitrary or invidious discrimination between those classes covered * * * and those excluded.

It is no longer a permissible legislative objective to contain or exclude persons simply because they are poor. Edwards v. Calif., 314 U.S. 160, 62 S. Ct. 164, 86 L. Ed. 119 (1941); Shapiro v. Thompson, 394 U.S. 618, 89 S. Ct. 1322, 22 L. Ed. 2d 600 (1969). Cf., Griffin v. Illinois, 351 U.S. 12, 16-17, 76 S. Ct. 585, 100 L. Ed. 891 (1956).

In addition to asserting that Article XXXIV denies equal protection of the laws to persons who are poor, the Hayes plaintiffs assert that it also denies equal protection to those who are Negro. Although Article XXXIV does not specifically require a referendum for low-income projects which will be predominantly occupied by Negroes or other minority groups, the equal protection clause is violated if a "special burden" is placed on those groups by the operation of the challenged provision, if "the reality is that the law's impact falls on the minority." Hunter v. Erickson, supra, 393 U.S. at 391, 89 S. Ct. at 560.

Thus, last term, the Supreme Court in Hunter v. Erickson, supra, applied to the housing area the constitutional requirement for equal protection. In that case, the Supreme Court invalidated an amendment to the City Charter of Akron, Ohio, which required a referendum before anti-discrimination legislation could be enacted. The Court held this to be impermissible, stating that it violated the Equal Protection Clause for at least three reasons:

First, only laws designed to end housing discrimination were required to run the gauntlet of a referendum, and the state cannot make it more difficult to enact legislation on behalf of one group than on behalf of others. The Hunter court speaking through Mr. Justice White states, 393 U.S. at 390-391, 89 S.Ct. at 560:

 
It is true that the section [requiring a referendum before action may be taken] *5 draws no distinction among racial and religious groups. Negroes and whites, Jews and Catholics are all subject to the same requirements if there is housing discrimination against them which they wish to end. But § 137 [requiring the referendum] nevertheless disadvantages those who would benefit from laws barring racial * * * discrimination as against those who would bar other discriminations or who would otherwise regulate the real estate market in their favor. The automatic referendum system does not reach housing discrimination on sexual or political grounds, or against those with children or dogs, nor does it affect tenants seeking more heat or better maintenance from landlords, nor those seeking rent control, urban renewal, public housing, or new building codes.

Second, the law's impact falls on minorities, resulting in an impermissible burden which constitutes a substantial and invidious denial of equal protection.

 
"Moreover, although the law on its face treats Negro and white, Jew and gentile in an identical manner, the reality is that the law's impact falls on the minority. The majority needs no protection against discrimination and if it did, a referendum might be bothersome but no more than that. Like the law requiring specification of candidates' race on the ballot [citation omitted], § 137 places special burdens on racial minorities within the governmental process. This is no more permissible than denying them the vote, on an equal basis with others. [citations omitted] 393 U.S. at 391, 89 S. Ct. at 560."

Lastly, the Court noted, 393 U.S. at 392, 89 S.Ct. at 561:

 
* * * [I]nsisting that a State may distribute legislative power as it desires and that the people may retain for themselves the power over certain subjects may generally be true, but these principles furnish no justification for a legislative structure which otherwise would violate the Fourteenth Amendment. Nor does the implementation of this change through popular referendum immunize it. [Citations omitted.] The sovereignty of the people is itself subject to * * * constitutional limitations * * *.

Here, as in the Hunter case, the "special burden" of a referendum is not ordinarily required; here, as in the Hunter case, the impact of the law falls upon minorities.[2] The vice in this case is that Article XXXIV makes it more difficult for state agencies acting on behalf of the poor and the minorities to get federal assistance for housing than for state agencies acting on behalf of other groups to receive financial federal assistance. In California, state agencies may seek federal financial aid, without the burden of first submitting the proposal to a referendum, for all projects except low-income housing. Some common examples, inter alia, are: highways, urban renewal, hospitals, colleges and universities, secondary schools, law enforcement assistance, and model cities. Further, even though federal assistance for state housing agencies is a privilege which California need not seek at all, the requirements of equal protection must still be met. United States v. Chicago, M., St. P. & P. RR., 282 U.S. 311, *6 328-329, 51 S. Ct. 159, 75 L. Ed. 359 (1931); Sherbert v. Verner, 374 U.S. 398, 404 (1963); Shapiro v. Thompson, supra.

Defendants argue that Article XXXIV does not violate the Equal Protection Clause because it was not the product of unconstitutional motivations. However, although proof of bad motive may help to prove discrimination, lack of bad motive has never been held to cure an otherwise discriminatory scheme. Certainly Hunter does not demand a demonstration of improper motivation.

Accordingly, plaintiffs' motions for summary judgment, declaring Article XXXIV to be unconstitutional, and their applications for an injunction are granted.

It is so ordered.

NOTES

[1] XXXIV PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECT LAW

§ 1. Approval of electors; definitions

Section 1. No low rent housing project shall hereafter be developed, constructed, or acquired in any manner by any state public body until, a majority of the qualified electors of the city, town or county, as the case may be, in which it is proposed to develop, construct, or acquire the same, voting upon such issue, approve such project by voting in favor thereof at an election to be held for that purpose, or at any general or special election.

For the purposes of this article the term "low rent housing project" shall mean any development composed of urban or rural dwellings, apartments or other living accommodations for persons of low income, financed in whole or in part by the Federal Government or a state public body or to which the Federal Government or a state public body extends assistance by supplying all or part of the labor, by guaranteeing the payment of liens, or otherwise. For the purposes of this article only there shall be excluded from the term "low rent housing project" any such project where there shall be in existence on the effective date hereof, a contract for financial assistance between any state public body and the Federal Government in respect to such project.

For the purposes of this article only "persons of low income" shall mean persons or families who lack the amount of income which is necessary (as determined by the state public body developing, constructing, or acquiring the housing project) to enable them, without financial assistance, to live in decent, safe and sanitary dwellings, without overcrowding.

[2] That minority groups comprise "the poor" is increasingly clear. In his affidavit, Mr. Franklin Lockfeld, Senior Planner for the Santa Clara County Planning Department stated: "The low-income areas are closely related to the areas of concentration of minority residents and high income areas are closely related to the nearly all white sections of the community. * * * In 1960, only 5% of the units occupied by white-non-Mexican-Americans were in delapidated or deteriorated condition, while 23% of the units occupied by Mexican-Americans and 20% of the units occupied by non-whites were in delapidated or deteriorated condition. Minorities were thus over represented in the less than standard housing by greater than four to one, and occupied nearly one-third of the deteriorating and delapidated housing in the County in 1960."

Источник: https://law.justia.com/cases/federal/district-courts/FSupp/313/1/1969112/

San Jose expands investigation of labor violations at emergency housing sites

San Jose is expanding its investigation of illegal labor practices, including wage theft, at emergency housing projects handled by Habitat for Humanity, but there’s no set date for when workers will get paid.

The city’s Public Works Department is demanding $319,631.46 in restitution for workers from Veev Build, a subcontractor, for various alleged labor violations reported by San Jose Spotlight at the Monterey/Bernal Emergency Housing Project earlier this year. The amount due is nearly six times what the city initially demanded from Veev in its first notice of violation in April.

The city increased the restitution after Veev turned over additional information revealing more violations, including failing to pay workers for all hours and misclassifying workers, according to a city memo.

San Jose is also reviewing two other emergency housing projects — Evans Lane and Rue Ferrari– after discovering potential underpayments of workers. City documents published earlier this month indicate subcontractor Suarez & Munoz Construction is potentially on the hook for more than $100,000 in restitution and more than $23,000 in penalties.

Ongoing investigations

The city has not yet assigned penalties for Veev and it’s unclear when workers from the Monterey/Bernal project will be paid. Public Works Director Matt Cano told San Jose Spotlight he couldn’t answer this question because the investigation is still pending.

Cano wrote in a memo to lawmakers:

“Due to the complexities of this investigation it has not yet been completed. However, staff is actively engaged with the contractor to ensure that all workers are paid the proper wages as expeditiously as possible.”

Workers waiting for their due wages are frustrated by the delay. Francisco Lara, a plumber at the Monterey/Bernal project, told San Jose Spotlight he worked 12-hour days at the site and cut his arm on a pipe, requiring 12 stitches. According to city records, Lara worked at least one week that wasn’t reported on Veev’s certified payroll.

Lara said:

“It’s stressful. … I’ve got to pretty much struggle for things that I worked hard for and never got.”

Molly L. Kaban, an attorney for Veev, said the company discovered errors in the city’s calculation of restitution after reviewing its records with help from an external consultant. She did not immediately provide any examples. Veev said it’s working with the city to answer questions.

Veev said:

“We believe that once the review process is completed the notice will be revised or revoked entirely. If anything is owed at the completion of the process, of course Veev will abide by any obligation.”

Habitat for Humanity East Bay/Silicon Valley is working to rectify the issues and has a compliance consultant working with the company’s subcontractors, spokesperson Patti Wang told San Jose Spotlight.

Missing payroll

Habitat for Humanity was assigned a public works project worth approximately $6 million to build emergency interim housing for homeless people during the Covid-19 pandemic. Mayor Sam Liccardo and Gov. Gavin Newsom used the Monterey/Bernal site as a backdrop for a televised press conference in October 2020, boasting that units were built quickly and cheaply.

Earlier this year, San Jose Spotlight reported on rampant wage theft and hazardous work conditions at the site. Numerous workers were not paid money owed under a citywide union contract, and one subcontractor hired non-union labor for less than what prevailing wage laws allow.

Veev has argued that it’s not responsible for misclassifying workers because the workers were supposed to record the correct classification for themselves. The city rejected this argument in its October memo, stating California Labor Code dictates contractors and subcontractors must keep accurate payroll records, and misclassification by a worker doesn’t let an employer off the hook.

The city also dinged Veev for allegedly failing to report on its certified payroll records five employees hired through a staffing company, Aerotek Temp Agency. San Jose claims Veev also failed to provide certified payroll records for the last 72 days of work.

The memo said:

“As a result, (the Office of Equal Opportunity) is unable to determine whether Veev owes additional restitution to workers.” 

There is a pending lawsuit in Santa Clara County against Veev brought by two carpenters who claim the company failed to pay them all wages or provide meal breaks at the proper times while they were employed at the housing project.

South Bay Piping Industry Compliance Director Mauricio Velarde says he contacted the city about potential wage violations and safety problems at the Monterey/Bernal site months ago.

Adding he believes Cano downplayed the severity of violations, he said:

“I had been informing them of violations in the summer of 2020, which they ignored.” 


This story was originally published by San Jose Spotlight. 

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Источник: https://sfbayca.com/2021/11/27/san-jose-investigation-emergency-housing-labor-violations/

: City of san jose housing department

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City of San Jose, Housing Department

SANTA CRUZ – The 831 Water St. project will return to city of san jose housing department council floor, yet again.

The Santa Cruz City Council on Tuesday night voted 4-2 to rescind its rejection of the project bid in early October. Councilmembers Justin Cummings and Sandy Brown voted to uphold the project denial. Instead, the duo had suggested the project developer should have to resubmit the application due to a number of changes that were made to the project since its original application date.

Proposed changes even continued to come in after the council had rejected the project application.

“I believe that at this point, the applicant should submit a revised, new application, trigger the new timeline and let us do our job and let the staff do their job in reviewing a complete and an application that is not internally contradictory asking for different things,” Brown said. “It’s a moving target and assessing a moving target like that is very difficult.”

Councilmember Martine Watkins was absent from the vote.

The council had originally denied the application due to a requested concession from the developer, Novin Development, which would place all of the affordable units in one building and the market-rate units in another.

Watkins rebuked the request last month, calling it a form virginia commonwealth bank routing number segregation. However, the council’s decision to rally around the claim violated state legislature passed in 2017.

The California Department of Housing and Community Development notified the city in a letter earlier this month.

Senate Bill 35, California legislation designed to streamline housing projects and mitigate the housing crisis, requires cities to approve or deny projects based on a set of objective standards. Those standards are set by each city, which Santa Cruz has yet to finalize. Therefore, the council had directed city staff to evaluate the project based on the city’s current standards of approval.

City staff had determined the project fit the standards of approval set forth by the city. Yet, the council still chose to reject the project.

HCD also noted a perceived misunderstanding of Assembly Bill 491. The bill, which goes into effect at the start of the new year, addresses matters of segregating housing. However, the bill does not prohibit the consolidation of affordable units. Rather, it states the units can’t be consolidated same floor or same area of a floor, according to HCD.

SB 35 also allows for the consolidation of affordable units if i was made for loving you original purpose is to secure grant funding for subsidized housing, Deputy City Manager Lee Butler stated in October. Novin Development discussed its intention to do so during its initial presentation.

The council’s decision to rescind its prior rejection of the application will bring it back to the council to be reassessed under SB 35. The council will then make another decision on the application during its Dec. 14 meeting.

If approved, the project will add 140 housing units to Santa Cruz, 71 of which are slated for affordable housing. The affordable units are deed restricted at 80% of the area median income or lower, but does not specify how many units are designated for very-low-income, the city’s biggest need in its Regional Housing Needs Allocation.

Источник: https://www.santacruzsentinel.com/2021/11/23/santa-cruz-city-council-doubles-back-on-apartment-rejection

San Jose is building hundreds of tiny homes for the homeless to help protect them from the coronavirus

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City of San José Housing Department.
  • San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo announced that the city would spend $17 million on prefabricated tiny homes for the homeless.
  • San Jose has about 6,000 residents without reliable shelter and only 850 shelter beds for them.
  • Experts warned that the coronavirus could hit homeless populations especially hard, as they may be unable to practice social distancing and self-isolate. 
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

San Jose city leaders voted to spend $17 million tiny homes for the homeless, Maggie Angst at Mercury News reported. 

Over half a million people are homeless on any night in the US, and San Jose alone has a homeless population of about 6,000. Right now, the city has 850 beds available in its shelters, enough for fewer than 15% of residents. Since the coronavirus outbreak, San Jose has compensated by leasing motel rooms, setting up temporary trailers, and converting two downtown convention centers into additional shelters. 

San Jose has committed to spending $17 million on the prefab tiny homes despite a projected budget shortfall of $110 million over the next two years. To make up the difference, the city plans to tap into Homeless Housing, Assistance and Prevention (HHAP), a state grant to address homelessness. San Jose originally planned to use the money for a homeless navigation center to help people transition to permanent housing, but the plan fell through as the city couldn't find a place for it. 

Medical experts and homeless advocates have stated unsheltered residents are particularly at risk as social distancing is difficult in shelters, and people who have exposed or diagnosed with COVID-19 lack the ability to isolate themselves. A new study estimates that 3,400 homeless people across the country will die from COVID-19, and more than 21,000 will be hospitalized.

Here's what the tiny home plan looks like. 

The city plans to build 500 new tiny homes within a few weeks rather than months or years, thanks to Governor Gavin Newsom relaxing environmental regulations.

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city of san jose housing department City of San José Housing Department.

"We can't know for sure what's going to happen in the weeks ahead — particularly if there is a second wave of infections — so the need for housing that would be necessary for people who are COVID positive — or exposed or the highly vulnerable who need to self-isolate or quarantine — will be critical" Mayor Sam Liccardo said.

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City of San José Housing Department.

The city council estimates that $17 million will allow it to construct 500 homes, at about $25,000 each.

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AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli

This initiative is aimed at housing people as quickly as possible, and it's a much larger undertaking.

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So far, the city has located four sites that could serve as locations for the homes.

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Photo by Neal Waters/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The homes are specifically intended for people who are diagnosed with COVID-19 or exposed and have no place to self-quarantine.

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City of San José Housing Department.

Liccardo said that he hopes the units could last up to ten or 15 years.

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Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images

California has taken some other public health measures, like deploying mobile hand-washing stations across the state.

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Photo by Neal Waters/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/silicon-valley-city-building-tiny-homes-homeless-coronavirus-2020-4

Analyst I/II, Housing Department Rent Stabilization Program

Analyst I/II, Housing Department Rent Stabilization Program City of San Jose 121 reviews - San Jose, CA City of San Jose 121 reviews Read what people are saying about working here. The City of San José Housing Department is a leader in the development of affordable housing. Its mission is to strengthen and to revitalize our community through housing and neighborhood investment. The Housing Department has an operating budget of approximately $11.8 million and 77 employees. Positions & Duties The Rent Stabilization Program provides mediation and arbitration services to landlords and tenants in rent-controlled apartments, oversees rent controlled mobile homes and provides information and referrals for non-rent controlled apartment units in San José. Under the direction of a Senior Analyst, city of san jose housing department position provides information and assistance to the public and staff on all aspects of the rent control law, regulations, and procedures. This position prepares petitions from the public in preparation for hearings under the Citys rent stabilization and related ordinances and performs other complex tasks required in the administration of housing programs. The incumbent will be expected to make public presentations and must be able to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing, with persons from diverse social, cultural and economic backgrounds. This position shall: * Respond to inquiries from the public regarding Apartment Rent Ordinance, rules, regulations and policies, making referrals to other agencies, as appropriate. * Accept petitions from landlords and tenants in preparation for providing hearing officers with complete information on the rights and responsibilities of the Citys landlords and tenants. Assist the petitioners and respondents in developing all information needed for presentation in hearings without bias toward either party. * Facilitate the resolution of petitions and complaints where possible through voluntary agreements between the parties that are consistent with the Citys housing ordinances and policies * Assist landlords in maintaining compliance with City ordinances for their businesses through enrollment in the Citys rental programs, maintenance of business licenses, and other city and state permit requirements as appropriate. * Analyze rent and other data to ensure compliance with City ordinances. * Advise members of the public on the use city of san jose housing department City and external programs for the mediation of disputes. * Confer with department management and others on administrative problems; gathers and analyzes facts about program compliance, processes, procedures and work load; evaluate and prepare recommendations on departmental requests for program changes; provide for and assist in the installation of improved systems or organization; participate in the study of organization and methods as required; and prepare and revise policy and procedures manuals and instructional materials for public and internal use. * Obtain data and other information from operating departments through use of questionnaires, personal visits, and otherwise as indicated; assemble, array, process, and analyze data; prepare studies and reports as indicated; and propose or suggest appropriate action to supervisor. * May supervise and give direction to clerical support staff. * Participate with groups in analyzing and evaluating community conditions and needs; offers guidance and counsel in the establishment of goals and ally car loan application of achievement. * Attend internal and public meetings cheap beach rentals in delaware required. May be required to present information through speaking in public forums on City housing and other programs. * Negotiate, develop contracts, grants and special funds republic bank suriname online login meet specific City or department needs; prepare bids and specifications. * Prepare and monitor program budget; prepare revenue estimates; establish fees and charges; prepare and monitor grants, contracts and other financial transactions. * Manage relationships and contracts with contract employees providing mediation and arbitration services for the Rental Rights and Referrals Program. * Utilize automated data processing applications, including spreadsheets and databases to analyze and present information. * Provide translation services, as needed, for Department staff. * Perform related work city of san jose housing department required. The ideal candidate will have experience with general management/administrative analytic work and providing information to the public that has involved the interpretation and applications of laws, rules and regulations. Familiarity with rent control and/or issues regarding housing is highly desirable. Fluency in a foreign language, such as Spanish, Vietnamese, Cantonese, Mandarin or Tagalog, is desirable. This recruitment will be used to fill multiple positions in this, or other divisions or departments. If you are interested in employment in this classification, you should apply to city of san jose housing department you are considered for additional opportunities that may utilize the applicants from this recruitment. Qualifications Minimum Qualifications * Education: A Baccalaureate Degree from an accredited college or university. * Experience: Analyst I: None. Analyst II: Two years of increasingly responsible professional staff analytic or administrative experience at the level of Analyst I with the City of San José. * Employment Eligibility: Federal law requires all employees to provide verification of their eligibility to work in this country. Please be informed that the City of San José will not prepare or file a labor condition application with the Department of Labor. Competencies The ideal candidate will possess the following competencies, as demonstrated in past and current employment history. Desirable competencies for this position include: Job Expertise - Demonstrates knowledge of and experience with applicable professional/technical principles and practices, Citywide and departmental procedures/policies and federal and state rules and regulations. More specifically: * Experience in general management/administrative analytic work and providing information to the public. * Familiarity with rent control and/or issues regarding housing. * I ll be there for you friends cifra to understand, interpret, and communicate complex regulations and legal documents. Analytical Thinking - Approaching a problem or situation by using a logical, systematic, sequential approach. Communication Skills Effectively conveys information and expresses thoughts and facts clearly, orally and in writing; demonstrates effective use of listening skills; displays openness to other peoples ideas and thoughts. Customer Service - Demonstrates the ability to anticipate customers' needs and deliver services effectively and efficiently using professional demeanor. Decision Making - Identifies and understands issues, problems, and opportunities; uses effective approaches for choosing a course of action letter m cake developing appropriate solutions. Facilitation Exhibits behaviors and techniques that enhance the quality of group processes. Supervision Sets effective long and short-term goals based on a good understanding of management practices; establishes realistic priorities within available resources; provides motivational support; empowers others; assigns decision-making and work functions to others in an appropriate manner to maximize organizational and individual effectiveness. Teamwork & Interpersonal Skills Develops effective relationships with co-workers and supervisors by helping others accomplish tasks and using collaboration and conflict resolution skills. Selection Process The maria arias instagram jose fernandez process will consist of an evaluation of the applicants training and experience based on the application and responses to the Job Specific Questions. Only candidates whose backgrounds best city of san jose housing department the position with be invited to proceed in the selection process. Additional phases of the selection process will consist of one or more interviews and a language proficiency exam. You will be prompted to answer the following job-specific questions during the online application process: * Please describe your experience in general management/administrative analytic work and providing information to the public that has involved the interpretation and applications of laws, rules, and regulations. * Please describe your work experience with rent control and/or issues regarding housing, including where you obtained your experience and duration in which you performed these duties. * Describe an example of a successful project you participated in. What made the team successful and what was your role in the team? You must answer all job-specific questions in order to be considered for this vacancy or your application will be deemed incomplete and withheld from further consideration. If you have questions about the duties of these positions, the selection or hiring processes, please contact Hsin-Ping Lee at [email protected] Additional Information The application deadline is 11:59 PM on the final filing date. Please allow adequate time to complete the application and submit before the deadline or the system may not save your application. If your online application was successfully submitted, you will receive an automatic confirmation email to the email address you provided. IF YOU DO NOT RECEIVE THE CONFIRMATION, please email [email protected] and we will research the status of your application. Please contact Human Resources at (408) 535-1285, or [email protected] if you have any questions. Job: General Administration Organization: Housing Schedule: Full-time Employee Status: Regular Job Type: Standard Job Posting: Aug 13, 2018, 9:01:26 PM Minimum Salary: 67,121.60 Maximum Salary: 89,044.80 Bargaining Unit 1: Confidential Employees Organization Closing Date: Sep 7, 2018, 6:59:00 AM City of San Jose - 14 hours ago - save job - original job Apply Now Apply On Company Site Save this job

Источник: https://www.wayup.com/i-Legal-Services-j-City-San-Jose-767228997067553/

Renascent Place

For more information, visit http://renascentplace.org
Address:
2450 Senter Road, San Jose, CA 95111
San Jose,

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Property Data:
Site Size: 2.56 acres
Number of Units: 162
Unit Mix: 160 – Studios. 340 sq ft avg. 2 – 2 bedroom, 750 sq ft
Affordability: 35% @ extremely low income; 65% @ very low income
Population Served: Chronically homeless individuals
Property Description:

Renascent Place is a Permanent Supportive Housing Development for individuals with disabilities who have also experienced long or multiple episodes of homelessness. The development consists of 160 affordable studio apartments and 2 manager’s units in a four story elevator building. There will be surface parking and bicycle storage for residents. Site amenities include a community room with kitchen, staff and service provider offices, laundry facilities, outdoor terrace and patio, and a bicycle repair shop. Intensive case management services will be provided to all residents in a ratio of one case manager for every twenty clients to help chronically homeless individuals retain permanent housing and attain each individual’s highest potential.

The development is located along Senter Road and south of Tully Road. It is well situated near transportation, health facilities, retail stores, employment opportunities and the Coyote Creek Trail (recreation). The building is designed in accordance with Green Building Guidelines and implements state of the art building technologies in an effort to promote energy efficiency and sustainability.

Construction will start in Fall 2017. Future residents will be referred through the County of Santa Clara’s Continuum of Care system and the Health Trust.

Renascent Place FAQs

For More Information
Contact: [email protected]
Phone: (408) 217-8090



Development Partners

Источник: https://charitieshousing.org/renascent-place/

San Jose Spotlight: San Jose Expands Investigation Of Labor Violations At Emergency Housing Sites

San Jose is expanding its investigation of illegal labor practices, including wage theft, at emergency housing projects handled by Habitat for Humanity, but nwbi stock no set date for when workers will get paid.

The city's Public Works Department is demanding $319,631.46 in restitution for workers from Veev Build, a subcontractor, for various alleged labor violations reported by San Jose Spotlight at the Monterey/Bernal Emergency Housing Project earlier this year. The amount due is nearly six times what the city initially demanded from Veev in its first notice of violation in April.

The city increased the restitution after Veev turned over additional information revealing more violations, including failing to pay workers for all hours and misclassifying workers, according to a city memo.

San Jose is also reviewing two other emergency housing projects -- Evans Lane and Rue Ferrar i-- after discovering potential underpayments of workers. City documents published earlier this month indicate subcontractor Suarez & Munoz Construction is potentially on the hook for more than $100,000 in restitution and more than $23,000 in penalties.

Ongoing investigations

The city has not yet assigned penalties for Veev and it's unclear when workers from the Monterey/Bernal project will be paid. Public Works Director Matt Cano told San Jose Spotlight he couldn't answer this question because the investigation is still pending.

"Due to the complexities of this investigation it has not yet been completed," Cano wrote in a memo to lawmakers. "However, staff is actively engaged with the contractor to ensure that all workers are paid the proper wages as expeditiously as possible."

Workers waiting for their due wages are frustrated by the delay. Francisco Lara, a plumber at the Monterey/Bernal project, told San Jose Spotlight he worked 12-hour days at the site and cut his arm on a city of san jose housing department, requiring 12 stitches. According to boko haram suspected financier executed records, Lara worked at least one week that wasn't reported on Veev's certified payroll.

"It's stressful," Lara said. "I've got to pretty much struggle for things that I worked hard for and never got."

Molly L. Kaban, an attorney for Veev, said the company discovered errors in the city's calculation of restitution after reviewing its records with help from an external consultant. She did not immediately provide any examples. Veev said it's working with the city to answer questions.

"We believe that once the review process is completed the notice will be revised or revoked entirely," Veev said. "If anything is owed at the completion of the process, of course Veev will abide by any obligation."

Habitat for Humanity East Bay/Silicon Valley is working to rectify the issues and has a compliance consultant working with the company's subcontractors, spokesperson Suntrust mortgage sign on Wang told San Jose Spotlight.

Missing payroll

Habitat for Humanity was assigned a public works project worth approximately $6 million to build emergency interim housing for homeless people during the COVID-19 pandemic. Mayor Sam Liccardo and Gov. Gavin Newsom used the Monterey/Bernal site as a backdrop for a televised press conference in October 2020, boasting that units were built quickly and cheaply.

Earlier this year, San Jose Spotlight reported on city of san jose housing department wage theft and hazardous work conditions at the site. Numerous workers were not paid money owed under a citywide union contract, and one subcontractor hired non-union labor for less than what prevailing wage laws allow.

Veev has blue moon restaurant edmond ok that it's not responsible for misclassifying workers because the workers were supposed to record the correct classification for themselves. The city rejected this argument in its October memo, stating California Labor Code dictates contractors and subcontractors must keep accurate payroll records, and misclassification by a worker doesn't let an employer off the hook.

The city also dinged Veev for allegedly failing to report on its certified payroll records five employees hired through a staffing company, Aerotek Temp Agency. San Jose claims Veev also failed to provide certified payroll records for the last 72 days of work.

"As a result, (the Office of Equal Opportunity) is unable to determine whether Veev owes additional restitution to workers," the memo said.

There is a pending lawsuit in Santa Clara County against Veev brought by two carpenters who claim the company failed to pay them all wages or provide meal breaks at the proper times while they were employed at the housing project.

South Bay Piping Industry Compliance Director Mauricio Velarde says he contacted the city about potential wage violations and safety problems at the Monterey/Bernal site months ago.

"I had been informing them of violations in the summer of 2020, which they ignored," he said, adding he believes Cano downplayed the severity of violations.

Copyright © 2021 Bay City News, Inc. All rights reserved. Republication, rebroadcast or redistribution without the express written consent of Bay City News, Inc. is prohibited. Bay City News is a 24/7 news service covering the greater Bay Area.

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Источник: https://www.sfgate.com/news/bayarea/article/San-Jose-Spotlight-San-Jose-Expands-16654985.php

City of San Jose Del Monte, Bulacan Official Logo

Republic of the Philippines

City fifth third ach routing number San Jose Del Monte, Bulacan

ARya San Joseño!

DEPARTMENT  OFFICERPOSITION CONTACT NUMBER / Email address Office of the City Mayor

Hon. Arturo B. Robes

Atty. Martin T. Meñez

City Mayor 

Chief of Staff (COS)

 044-3077265 [email protected]Office of the City Administrator Dennis M. Booth, Ph.D.

City Administrator  

044-3077263 [email protected]/ [email protected] 

Office of the Assistant  City Administrator Atty. Rizaldy L. MendozaAsst. City Administrator  044-3077263 [email protected]/ [email protected]City Legal Services  OfficeAtty. Elmer A. GaliciaCity Legal Officer 044-3073200/ 09368176641 [email protected] City Budget OfficeMs. Ana D. Sucgang City Budget Officer044-3078608 [email protected]City Planning and Development Office (CPDO)Ms. Regina S. delos ReyesCPD Coordinator 044-3077261 [email protected]City Accounting OfficeMs. Juliet V. QuimbaOIC- City Accountant 044-3055287/ [email protected] Office of the SP Secretary Mr. Felix P. CadizSP Secretary044-3055285/ City Health Office Roselle T. Tolentino, MD, MPH, OPCOMCity Health Officer 044-3077538City Treasurer’s Office Ms. Liza S. Avanceña City Treasurer 044-3055282 [email protected]City Veterinary Office Arvin H. Agapito, DVMCity Veterinarian096631892/ 09339956566 [email protected]City Environment and Natural Resources City of san jose housing department (CENRO)Engr. Thelma S. BautistaCity Env. & Nat. Res. Officer044-/ [email protected]City Assessor’s Office Ms. Estela L. San FelipeCity Assessor 044-3077339/ [email protected]City Civil Registry Ms. Esther F. AbingCity Civil Registrar044-/ [email protected] City Agriculture Office Ms. Flora G. San Felipe City Agriculturist044-8158689/  [email protected]/ [email protected] City Engineering Office Engr. Rufino A. Gravador Jr. City Engineer044-3071047/ [email protected] General Services Office (GSO)Engr. Juan S. Labilles, Jr.General Services Office 044-8931948/  City Social Welfare and Development Office (CSWDO)Ms. Marlyn A. Cumba, RSWCSWD Officer044-3077227/ [email protected]City Cooperative Office Ms. Leonila C. DazaCity Cooperative Officer 044-815-7588/ [email protected]City Human Resource Management Office (CHRMO)Ms. Wilma Q. Abella HRM Officer044-3068973/ [email protected] City Population Office Ms. Violeta C. CadizCity Population Officer044-/ [email protected] Ospital  ng Lungsod ng San Jose del Monte Erbe M. Bugay, MD, FPCS, MPH, OPCOM  OIC- Chief of Hospital  [email protected] Office of the City Vice Mayor 044-3077157/ [email protected] City College of San Jose del Monte Ms. Guinevere S. FelicianoRegistrar09178322130/ [email protected]
Источник: https://csjdm.gov.ph/government/departments/

Mabuhay Court Apartments consists of 96 affordable studio, one- and two-bedroom apartments in San Jose.

BRIDGE worked with the City of San Jose to build this innovative mixed-use development on what had been a city corporation yard and the site of an outdated community center. The resulting development combines senior housing with a new community center in the city’s downtown. In addition to creating the senior housing, BRIDGE served as master developer for the 16,000-square-foot senior community center. The center, which was funded by the city, is connected to the housing, providing residents easy access to the center’s many programs and services. Shopping is close by, and public are there any wells fargo banks open today lines stop at the door for longer trips, making this property ideally located for Seniors. Mabuhay was given a Builder’s Choice Award by Builder magazine.

Architect: David Baker Architects
General Contractor: L & D Construction
Financial Partners: San Jose Redevelopment Agency, San Jose Department of Housing, National Equity Fund, Citibank, Bank of America, Federal Home Loan Bank/World Savings, U.S. Department of Housing city of san jose housing department Community Development, BRIDGE Housing Corporation, California Equity Fund

Living at Mabuhay Court Apartments

To find out if this property is currently accepting applications, please contact the Mabuhay Court Senior Apartments Management office at 408-885-0448. Income, age, and other restrictions apply. Small pets are welcome.

Mabuhay Court Apartments is located at 270 E. Empire Street in San Jose. Click here for a map.

For general information about living at a BRIDGE property, click here.

Источник: https://bridgehousing.com/properties/mabuhay-court/

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