downtown san jose park

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San Jose's Christmas in the Park returns for both walkers and cars

We are already seeing many pre-pandemic holiday traditions return this year and San Jose’s annual Christmas in the Park event is one of the activities giving visitors a small taste of normalcy. This year, there are two locations. One for drivers who want to stay away from the crowds, and one for walkers who want to experience the tradition the way it was before the pandemic. According to NBC Bay Area, masks won’t be required for either experience you choose. Last year, the event was closed off to pedestrians making it drive-thru only for the first time in its more than 40-year history.

If you’re looking to do the walk-through event, the tree lighting is Friday at Plaza de Cesar Chavez Park in downtown San Jose. This year, the centerpiece will be a 65-foot Christmas tree that doubles as a tunnel that “you can go inside of during a light show that will go off on the 50-minute mark of every hour,” reports NBC Bay Area. Organizers have also built a special new outdoor area for Santa to keep him socially distanced from the kids. “It's a new outdoor setting, something we’ve never done before,” Christmas In the Park executive director Jason Minsky told NBC Bay Area. 

Christmas in the Park organizers are expecting to see crowds close to pre-pandemic levels at Cesar Chavez Park. There will be hand sanitizing areas all over the park, along with signs urging social distancing mixed in with the over 40 musical and animated exhibits. Organizers describe the experiences as a “winter wonderland of lights, songs, and local entertainment while strolling through an enchanted forest of trees decorated by San José schools, community groups, and businesses.”

Christmas in the Park is also bringing back its drive-thru Christmas experience near Raging Waters at Lake Cunningham Park, which will feature more than 200,000 lights. This year, organizers are calling it “Blinky’s Illuminated Holiday” where you will “follow Blinky the reindeer through the musical journey of his imagination,” according to the website where you buy tickets. The drive-thru event starts on Friday and runs until January 9th but beware of the price. The minimum you will pay is $30 per car.

San Jose

Источник: https://hoodline.com/2021/11/huge-holiday-event-in-san-jose-has-something-for-everyone-this-year/

Join us every Friday from 4pm to 7pm

SoFA Pocket Park x Veggielution

As San José begins the long recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a need to revitalize existing urban greenspaces, and even create new ones, to increase community resilience and promote a stronger local food downtown san jose park. Veggielution will expand our presence in East San José to partner with the San Jose Downtown Association to revitalize an underutilized 7,000 surface parking lot in the South First Area (SoFA) downtown art district. We’ve transformed an interim-use space into an urban demonstration garden, farm stand, dog park, and mobile food vending hub. It features murals painted by local artists, and programs and events designed in collaboration with nearby arts organizations to actively engage local residents, schools, nonprofits, and businesses.

The SoFA Pocket Park will connect residents, visitors & families to…

Food growing & cooking, sustainable gardening (composting, water conservation), local food entrepreneurs & products, Museums and arts organizations, and EACH OTHER!

Источник: https://veggielution.org/sofa-pocket-park

“City View is a new landmark and catalyst for growth, invigorating the heart of downtown San Jose,” boasts the marketing copy on developer Jay Paul Co.’s web page about San Jose’s coming development near Rod Dirodon Station. “Within walking distance to future Bart stations and existing Lightrail as well as San Jose’s ever expanding downtown residential housing opportunities, City View is ideally located in the urban environment forward thinking companies need.”

What it doesn’t boast about, is how much of that “urban environment” will still be dedicated to private automobiles.

“It’s a monumental project for 3 million square feet of office. It has some wonderful bike and pedestrian elements – really really wonderful like a pedestrian paseo and an elevated bike lane,” wrote the Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition’s Shiloh Ballard in an email to Streetsblog. “AND, it has a parking bomb.”

That parking bomb consists of over 6,000 spaces, all a short walk from a redeveloped train station that’s soon to get BART, electrified Caltrain, and High-speed Rail, in addition to VTA, ACE and Amtrak, which already serve the station.

“The issue isn’t parking or not…it’s where the parking will be located (underground and not taking valuable vertical or open space); whether major emphasis is placed on sustainability including abundant chargers and free parking for electrics and creating parking access that avoids negatively impacting bicycles, pedestrians, etc.,” wrote Rod Diridon, politician, transportation advocate, and namesake of San Jose’s station, in an email to Streetsblog. “And especially, how much can be negotiated downward from the City’s standard formulas?”

“This is a mile from Diridon station. We jeopardize our investment in transit if we continue to make it easy to drive,” wrote Ballard. “The parking means they have to have more ingress/egress which they are placing on San Fernando, the city’s best bike boulevard.” She added that downtown san jose park city has a grant to improve San Fernando but that this is at cross purposes. “If San Jose wants to achieve downtown san jose park mode shift goals that are quite aggressive in the general plan, they need to act much differently than this. Accommodating the car at this level, in Downtown and a mile from what will be an incredible transit station is insane.”

She added that this is in sharp contrast downtown san jose park Google which also has development plans for the area, “where they want no parking.”

Streetsblog emailed Jay Paul but did not receive an immediate reply.

The Mayor of San Jose, Sam Liccardo also didn’t get back to Streetsblog by press time, but the San Jose Mercury News quoted him last year saying of the development: “This is no small investment in the future of our city.” Liccardo, meanwhile, is seen as one of the most bike-friendly mayors in the Bay Area.

And “Our ambition is to retrofit a city that has been built for cars into one that is built for people,” he told Streetsblog downtown san jose park in 2012. “The vibrancy that we hope and expect it will bring to our streetscape will start to change perceptions of San Jose throughout the region.”

Another look at the development. Image: Jay Paul

“My understanding it was approved before VMT,” wrote Vignesh Swaminathan, a consultant who helped design San Jose’s bike lanes, also in an email to Streetsblog. Swaminathan is referring to Vehicle Miles Traveled–new state rules that require developments to reduce driving in the community. “It is really affecting the circulation, but they are paying for the biggest protected intersection at Park and Almaden.”

“San Jose talks the talk but when push comes to shove and economic development gold comes to town, they sacrifice their commitment to achieving all the goals in the general plan in favor of one goal – job creation,” said Ballard.

Diridon, meanwhile, wonders how much the COVID-19 work-from-home orders will impact the need for so much parking–or the office space itself–in the long run. That said, “Ideally we might begin to learn from the most beautiful and desirable European cities such a Florence, Rome, Paris, and others where parts of their downtown areas are off limits to most cars,” he concluded. “But that, sadly, may be a way off for us.”

Initial completion of the City View, according to the developer’s website, is 2024.

Update 4:30 p.m. from a spokesperson for the City of San Jose: Currently, the project is proposing 6,230 parking spaces. Given the size of this project (over 3.5 million square feet of office space), this is actually 19 percent below the baseline requirement for parking. In its recent approval of the project, the planning commission recommended that our city council consider ways to further reducing parking at the development.

Filed Under: Bicycling, San Jose, Silicon Valley, Transit, Promoted

Источник: https://sf.streetsblog.org/2020/06/04/6000-spot-parking-bomb-coming-to-downtown-san-jose/

Welcome to 750 Ridder Park Drive

The Mercury News is one of California’s oldest continuously published daily newspaper, as well as Santa Clara County’s oldest operating commercial business, beginning its life as the San Jose Weekly Visitor in 1851. When State lawmakers abandoned San Jose for Vallejo as California’s capital in 1851, its two pioneer papers in San Jose — the Argus and the State Journal — went broke. Led by John C. Emerson, three businessmen bought their equipment and opened the San Jose Weekly Visitor. Ten years later, it became the Mercury, named for the nearby Downtown san jose park Almaden mercury mines, and the messenger of Roman mythology.

After several locations in downtown San Jose, the paper moved in 1967 to 750 Ridder Park Drive, just off the Nimitz Freeway (I-880), where it remained until the paper’s owner sold the property to Super Micro Computer, Inc. The 300 editorial, advertising and administration employees have once again returned to downtown, while the printing and production of 10 daily newspapers are now mostly done in Concord and Hayward.

This history, sponsored by Super Micro Computer, Inc., and created by History San José using artifacts and archival material from its collection, as well as interviews from the Mercury News, documents the 312,000-square foot production facility at Ridder Park Drive, and the paper’s history, as well as those reporters and production workers who saw the paper transition from printing presses to digital content.

History of 750 Ridder Park Drive

Moses Schallenberger

Long before 750 Ridder Park Drive was developed for the Mercury News headquarters, it was farmland belonging to Moses Schallenberger, one of the early pioneers of Santa Clara County. Schallenberg, born in Stark County, Ohio in 1826, made his journey overland in 1844 with the John Townsend family, who had taken him in after his parents’ death.

After working in Monterey in mercantile trades, and a short stint in the mines on the Yuba River, Schallenberger came to San Jose in 1850 to manage Dr. Townsend’s estate after his death. He married Fannie Everitt in 1854, a native of Alabama, and they moved to their homestead on the Coyote River two miles north of San Jose. According to Pen Pictures from the ‘Garden of the World,’ the Schallenbergers’ house was constructed at a cost of $13,000. The farm consisted of 115 acres of fertile land devoted to production of fruit and vegetables. Credited as an early orchardist in the Valley, Schallenberger devoted roughly ten acres to orchards by 1858.

Valley Growth Leads to Circulation Boom

Santa Clara Valley was a booming agricultural center for more than a century. Between 1950 and 1965, however, the Valley underwent a dramatic change. Driven by A. P. “Dutch” Hamann, San Jose’s city manager, and his campaign to bring the post-World War II boom to Santa Clara County, and particularly San Jose, the area was refashioned into a manufacturing and technology hub surrounded by suburbia. The San Jose Mercury and San Jose News (they would merge in 1983) was an influential advocate of the area’s sudden growth in population, as well as its beneficiary. As San Jose jumped in population from 95,000 in 1950 to 330,000 in 1965, the newspapers’ publisher, Joe Ridder, happily announced “We’re bursting at the seams here.”

Ridder was determined to move the newspapers out of their crowded location downtown — a former grocery store at 211 West Santa Clara Street — and selected 36 acres of the former Schallenberger farm, four miles north of downtown on the other side of what was then Highway 17. The new office building and production plant more than doubled the space of their downtown building. The Mercury News’ state-of-the art, air-conditioned new home was billed at the time as the world’s largest one-story newspaper plant. The 312,000 square foot main building held more than 1,000 employees, as well as Linotypes and typewriters.

The move of the newspaper (part of San Jose’s seeming limitless appetite for incorporation of far flung orchards) was not welcomed by all. It contributed — or at least reflected — the imminent demise of San Jose’s downtown area, already suffering as it competed for shoppers and other business with the growing number of suburban shopping centers. It also separated reporters and editors from the heart of the city. “One of the things the Mercury News lost when it moved in 1967 from its battered downtown building to its moat-enclosed palace off Nimitz Freeway was its endless stream of walk-in people,” wrote political reporter Harry Farrell in his 1983 book San Jose and Other Famous Places. In addition to city officials and the hubbub of local politics, Farrell missed the “tramps, loudmouthed lawyers, showbiz characters, muscle-bound jocks, panhandlers, fancy ladies, pugnacious politicians, evangelists, growers of 40-pound squashes, visionaries, inventors, cross-country joggers and bikers.”

The Architecture

The Modernist building was designed in 1965 by Warren B. Heid. After graduating with a degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1950, Heid began his career with the prestigious San Jose firm of Binder and Curtis, where he worked on Fire Station 1 in San Jose. By 1959, Heid had established his own firm in Saratoga. His portfolio includes the First National Bank and St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Saratoga, the First Valley National Bank in San Jose, and the City of Saratoga Council Chambers building. His design for the Mercury News plant was listed in the Top Ten National Industrial Plants of 1968 by Factory Magazine.

The Mercury News building reflected the trend throughout California for Modernist style in commercial architecture, with prefabricated concrete panels and a flat roof. Yet, while the structure was not particularly innovative, its design included downtown san jose park unique elements: an elaborate “loggia” or elliptical entrance and a massive bronze sculpture, hanging from the loggia ceiling.

The site was made up of a large production and office building, with ample parking and several small buildings, set back behind an extensive lawn. A concrete walkway, lined by trees led to the entrance, or loggia. Wide quartz steps led up to the raised 60 feet wide and 24 feet deep loggia. Metal railings and 28 columns, some 25 feet tall, lined the perimeter of the loggia. An illuminated pool to the east and west of the loggia also had fountains. The pool wrapped around the western corner of the building and ran the length of the majority of the western elevation.

After groundbreaking in September 1965, the final permit application (filed in July 1966) included an estimated construction value of $3.4 million. The building was dedicated in two days of ceremonies, April 8-9, 1967. Over the ensuing two decades, alterations have increased the size of the building from 185,000 square dollar general corporate headquarters phone number (with roughly 30,000 square feet devoted to mezzanine space) to some 312,000 square feet. This has included additions for production and printing, as well as loading docks. The last addition was completed in 1989.

Contractor Carl N. Swenson

General contractor Carl N. Swenson completed the construction of the initial building as well as many of the additions and upgrades. Swenson arrived in the United States from Sweden in 1902 to work on construction of railroads in the Midwest. By 1911, he moved to California and began constructing homes, civic buildings and farm structures. By 1928, he had completed the eleven-story Medico-Dental building in San Jose.

When it closed in 1986, the Carl N. Swenson Company was called one of Santa Clara County’s oldest, largest and most powerful construction companies. According to the San Jose Mercury News, “probably every resident in the San Jose area has at one time or another been in a building that Swenson and his company constructed.” He remained president of the company until 1956 when his son Clifford took over. Swenson died in 1974. His grandson Barry established Barry Swenson Builder around 1984, which still operates today.

Evolving Business

During the nearly fifty years that the Mercury News operated at the Ridder Park Drive site, the newspaper business went through many changes across the country. Soon after moving, the newspaper switched from the “hot lead” of Linotype machines to computer-generated “cold type,” which is photographically transferred to printing plates. From circulation of a purely paper edition, it moved to digital production as well as digital content, and the online advertising to support it. The business has also undergone significant changes in ownership, intent, and financial organization. As a result, the newspapers’ owners have re-evaluated space needs and property investment.

In October, 2014, Digital First Media, current owner of the San Jose Mercury and its parent, the Bay Area News Group, sold the Ridder Park Drive campus to Super Micro Computer, Inc., as part of the company’s plan to reduce “legacy infrastructure cost” across its newspaper holdings. “Our current campus is simply too large and too expensive to operate for our current business operation,” said publisher Mac Tully.

“We do not define ourselves by the building we work in,” Tully added, “but by the community we serve and that is not changing and will not change.”

Mac Tully

The paper finalized a new lease at 4 North 2nd Street, marking its return to a revitalized downtown.

Pages: 12345

Источник: https://historysanjose.org/exhibits-activities/online-exhibits/750-ridder-park-drive-documenting-the-former-headquarters-of-the-mercury-news/

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The Bigger Picture: Seven Ideas for Downtown San José Report Cover

SPUR’s Bigger Picture series proposes ideas for key locations in San Francisco, San José and Oakland, the Bay Area’s three largest cities. Each exploration represents an opportunity to tackle major regional challenges through local planning processes. And, conversely, each suggests how big investments in infrastructure can — if planned carefully — bring about positive transformation for the immediate neighborhood. 

We partnered with AECOM to identify locations that have important implications for the region. The ideas we explore are not prescriptions but possibilities — offering one vision of what a more sustainable, equitable and prosperous future might look like. 

Our first report in the series looks at the western side of downtown San José, where a major rail station expansion, a park re-envisioning process and a record number of proposed developments are signaling big changes for the neighborhood. We explore possibilities like redesigning elevated State Route 87 as a boulevard and turning SAP Arena into an entertainment center.


This publication is a component of the SPUR Regional Strategy, a vision for the future of the San Francisco Bay Area.

Источник: https://www.spur.org/publications/spur-report/2021-02-19/bigger-picture-seven-ideas-downtown-san-jose

“City View is a new landmark and catalyst for growth, invigorating the heart of downtown San Jose,” boasts the marketing copy on developer Jay Paul Co.’s web page about San Jose’s coming development near Rod Dirodon Station. “Within walking distance to future Bart stations and existing Lightrail as well as San Jose’s ever expanding downtown residential housing opportunities, City View is ideally located in the urban environment forward thinking companies need.”

What it doesn’t boast about, is how much of that “urban environment” will still be dedicated to private automobiles.

“It’s a monumental project for 3 million square feet of office. It has some wonderful bike and pedestrian elements – really really wonderful like a pedestrian paseo and an elevated bike lane,” wrote the Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition’s Shiloh Ballard in an email to Streetsblog. “AND, it has a parking bomb.”

That parking bomb consists of over 6,000 spaces, all a short walk from a redeveloped train station that’s soon to get BART, electrified Caltrain, and High-speed Rail, in addition to VTA, ACE and Amtrak, which already serve the station.

“The issue isn’t parking or not…it’s where the parking will be located (underground and not taking valuable vertical or open space); whether major emphasis is placed on sustainability including abundant chargers and free parking for electrics and creating parking access that avoids negatively impacting bicycles, pedestrians, etc.,” wrote Rod Diridon, politician, transportation advocate, and namesake of San Jose’s station, in an email to Streetsblog. “And especially, how much can be negotiated downward from the City’s standard formulas?”

“This is a mile from Diridon station. We jeopardize our investment in transit if we continue to make it easy to drive,” wrote Ballard. “The parking means they have to have more ingress/egress which they are placing on San Fernando, the city’s best bike boulevard.” She added that the city has a grant to improve San Fernando but that this is at cross purposes. “If San Jose wants to achieve its mode shift goals that are quite aggressive in the general plan, they need to act much differently than this. Accommodating the car at this level, in Downtown and a mile from what will be an incredible transit station is insane.”

She added that this is in sharp contrast with Google which also has development plans for the area, “where they want no parking.”

Streetsblog emailed Jay Paul but did not receive an immediate reply.

The Mayor of San Jose, Sam Liccardo also didn’t get back to Streetsblog by press time, but the San Jose Mercury News quoted him last year saying of the development: “This is no small investment in the future of our city.” Liccardo, meanwhile, is seen as one of the most bike-friendly mayors in the Bay Area.

And “Our ambition is to retrofit a city that has been built for cars into one that is built for people,” he told Streetsblog back in 2012. “The vibrancy that we hope and expect it will bring to our streetscape will start to change perceptions of San Jose throughout the region.”

Another look at the development. Image: Jay Paul

“My understanding it was approved before VMT,” wrote Vignesh Swaminathan, a consultant who helped design San Jose’s bike lanes, also in an email to Streetsblog. Swaminathan is referring to Vehicle Miles Traveled–new state rules that require developments to reduce driving in the community. “It is really affecting the circulation, but they are paying for the biggest protected intersection at Park and Almaden.”

“San Jose talks the talk but when push comes to shove and economic development gold comes to town, they sacrifice their commitment to achieving all the goals in the general plan in favor of one goal – job creation,” said Ballard.

Diridon, meanwhile, wonders how much the COVID-19 work-from-home orders will impact the need for so much parking–or the office space itself–in the long run. That said, “Ideally we might begin to learn from the most beautiful and desirable European cities such a Florence, Rome, Paris, and others where parts of their downtown areas are off limits to most cars,” he concluded. “But that, sadly, may be a way off for us.”

Initial completion of the City View, according to the developer’s website, is 2024.

Update 4:30 p.m. from a spokesperson for the City of San Jose: Currently, the project is proposing 6,230 parking spaces. Given the size of this project (over 3.5 million square feet of office space), this is actually 19 percent below the baseline requirement for parking. In its recent approval of the project, the planning commission recommended that our city council consider ways to further reducing parking at the development.

Filed Under: Bicycling, San Jose, Silicon Valley, Transit, Promoted

Источник: https://sf.streetsblog.org/2020/06/04/6000-spot-parking-bomb-coming-to-downtown-san-jose/

Welcome to 750 Ridder Park Drive

The Mercury News is one of California’s oldest continuously published daily newspaper, as well as Santa Clara County’s oldest operating commercial business, beginning its life as the San Jose Weekly Visitor in 1851. When State lawmakers abandoned San Jose for Vallejo as California’s capital in 1851, its two pioneer papers in San Jose — the Argus and the State Journal — went broke. Led by John C. Emerson, three businessmen bought their equipment and opened the San Jose Weekly Visitor. Ten years later, it became the Mercury, named for the nearby New Almaden mercury mines, and the messenger of Roman mythology.

After several locations in downtown San Jose, the paper moved in 1967 to 750 Ridder Park Drive, just off the Nimitz Freeway (I-880), where it remained until the paper’s owner sold the property to Super Micro Computer, Inc. The 300 editorial, advertising and administration employees have once again returned to downtown, while the printing and production of 10 daily newspapers are now mostly done in Concord and Hayward.

This history, sponsored by Super Micro Computer, Inc., and created by History San José using artifacts and archival material from its collection, as well as interviews from the Mercury News, documents the 312,000-square foot production facility at Ridder Park Drive, and the paper’s history, as well as those reporters and production workers who saw the paper transition from printing presses to digital content.

History of 750 Ridder Park Drive

Moses Schallenberger

Long before 750 Ridder Park Drive was developed for the Mercury News headquarters, it was farmland belonging to Moses Schallenberger, one of the early pioneers of Santa Clara County. Schallenberg, born in Stark County, Ohio in 1826, made his journey overland in 1844 with the John Townsend family, who had taken him in after his parents’ death.

After working in Monterey in mercantile trades, and a short stint in the mines on the Yuba River, Schallenberger came to San Jose in 1850 to manage Dr. Townsend’s estate after his death. He married Fannie Everitt in 1854, a native of Alabama, and they moved to their homestead on the Coyote River two miles north of San Jose. According to Pen Pictures from the ‘Garden of the World,’ the Schallenbergers’ house was constructed at a cost of $13,000. The farm consisted of 115 acres of fertile land devoted to production of fruit and vegetables. Credited as an early orchardist in the Valley, Schallenberger devoted roughly ten acres to orchards by 1858.

Valley Growth Leads to Circulation Boom

Santa Clara Valley was a booming agricultural center for more than a century. Between 1950 and 1965, however, the Valley underwent a dramatic change. Driven by A. P. “Dutch” Hamann, San Jose’s city manager, and his campaign to bring the post-World War II boom to Santa Clara County, and particularly San Jose, the area was refashioned into a manufacturing and technology hub surrounded by suburbia. The San Jose Mercury and San Jose News (they would merge in 1983) was an influential advocate of the area’s sudden growth in population, as well as its beneficiary. As San Jose jumped in population from 95,000 in 1950 to 330,000 in 1965, the newspapers’ publisher, Joe Ridder, happily announced “We’re bursting at the seams here.”

Ridder was determined to move the newspapers out of their crowded location downtown — a former grocery store at 211 West Santa Clara Street — and selected 36 acres of the former Schallenberger farm, four miles north of downtown on the other side of what was then Highway 17. The new office building and production plant more than doubled the space of their downtown building. The Mercury News’ state-of-the art, air-conditioned new home was billed at the time as the world’s largest one-story newspaper plant. The 312,000 square foot main building held more than 1,000 employees, as well as Linotypes and typewriters.

The move of the newspaper (part of San Jose’s seeming limitless appetite for incorporation of far flung orchards) was not welcomed by all. It contributed — or at least reflected — the imminent demise of San Jose’s downtown area, already suffering as it competed for shoppers and other business with the growing number of suburban shopping centers. It also separated reporters and editors from the heart of the city. “One of the things the Mercury News lost when it moved in 1967 from its battered downtown building to its moat-enclosed palace off Nimitz Freeway was its endless stream of walk-in people,” wrote political reporter Harry Farrell in his 1983 book San Jose and Other Famous Places. In addition to city officials and the hubbub of local politics, Farrell missed the “tramps, loudmouthed lawyers, showbiz characters, muscle-bound jocks, panhandlers, fancy ladies, pugnacious politicians, evangelists, growers of 40-pound squashes, visionaries, inventors, cross-country joggers and bikers.”

The Architecture

The Modernist building was designed in 1965 by Warren B. Heid. After graduating with a degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1950, Heid began his career with the prestigious San Jose firm of Binder and Curtis, where he worked on Fire Station 1 in San Jose. By 1959, Heid had established his own firm in Saratoga. His portfolio includes the First National Bank and St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Saratoga, the First Valley National Bank in San Jose, and the City of Saratoga Council Chambers building. His design for the Mercury News plant was listed in the Top Ten National Industrial Plants of 1968 by Factory Magazine.

The Mercury News building reflected the trend throughout California for Modernist style in commercial architecture, with prefabricated concrete panels and a flat roof. Yet, while the structure was not particularly innovative, its design included two unique elements: an elaborate “loggia” or elliptical entrance and a massive bronze sculpture, hanging from the loggia ceiling.

The site was made up of a large production and office building, with ample parking and several small buildings, set back behind an extensive lawn. A concrete walkway, lined by trees led to the entrance, or loggia. Wide quartz steps led up to the raised 60 feet wide and 24 feet deep loggia. Metal railings and 28 columns, some 25 feet tall, lined the perimeter of the loggia. An illuminated pool to the east and west of the loggia also had fountains. The pool wrapped around the western corner of the building and ran the length of the majority of the western elevation.

After groundbreaking in September 1965, the final permit application (filed in July 1966) included an estimated construction value of $3.4 million. The building was dedicated in two days of ceremonies, April 8-9, 1967. Over the ensuing two decades, alterations have increased the size of the building from 185,000 square feet (with roughly 30,000 square feet devoted to mezzanine space) to some 312,000 square feet. This has included additions for production and printing, as well as loading docks. The last addition was completed in 1989.

Contractor Carl N. Swenson

General contractor Carl N. Swenson completed the construction of the initial building as well as many of the additions and upgrades. Swenson arrived in the United States from Sweden in 1902 to work on construction of railroads in the Midwest. By 1911, he moved to California and began constructing homes, civic buildings and farm structures. By 1928, he had completed the eleven-story Medico-Dental building in San Jose.

When it closed in 1986, the Carl N. Swenson Company was called one of Santa Clara County’s oldest, largest and most powerful construction companies. According to the San Jose Mercury News, “probably every resident in the San Jose area has at one time or another been in a building that Swenson and his company constructed.” He remained president of the company until 1956 when his son Clifford took over. Swenson died in 1974. His grandson Barry established Barry Swenson Builder around 1984, which still operates today.

Evolving Business

During the nearly fifty years that the Mercury News operated at the Ridder Park Drive site, the newspaper business went through many changes across the country. Soon after moving, the newspaper switched from the “hot lead” of Linotype machines to computer-generated “cold type,” which is photographically transferred to printing plates. From circulation of a purely paper edition, it moved to digital production as well as digital content, and the online advertising to support it. The business has also undergone significant changes in ownership, intent, and financial organization. As a result, the newspapers’ owners have re-evaluated space needs and property investment.

In October, 2014, Digital First Media, current owner of the San Jose Mercury and its parent, the Bay Area News Group, sold the Ridder Park Drive campus to Super Micro Computer, Inc., as part of the company’s plan to reduce “legacy infrastructure cost” across its newspaper holdings. “Our current campus is simply too large and too expensive to operate for our current business operation,” said publisher Mac Tully.

“We do not define ourselves by the building we work in,” Tully added, “but by the community we serve and that is not changing and will not change.”

Mac Tully

The paper finalized a new lease at 4 North 2nd Street, marking its return to a revitalized downtown.

Pages: 12345

Источник: https://historysanjose.org/exhibits-activities/online-exhibits/750-ridder-park-drive-documenting-the-former-headquarters-of-the-mercury-news/

San Jose's Christmas in the Park returns for both walkers and cars

We are already seeing many pre-pandemic holiday traditions return this year and San Jose’s annual Christmas in the Park event is one of the activities giving visitors a small taste of normalcy. This year, there are two locations. One for drivers who want to stay away from the crowds, and one for walkers who want to experience the tradition the way it was before the pandemic. According to NBC Bay Area, masks won’t be required for either experience you choose. Last year, the event was closed off to pedestrians making it drive-thru only for the first time in its more than 40-year history.

If you’re looking to do the walk-through event, the tree lighting is Friday at Plaza de Cesar Chavez Park in downtown San Jose. This year, the centerpiece will be a 65-foot Christmas tree that doubles as a tunnel that “you can go inside of during a light show that will go off on the 50-minute mark of every hour,” reports NBC Bay Area. Organizers have also built a special new outdoor area for Santa to keep him socially distanced from the kids. “It's a new outdoor setting, something we’ve never done before,” Christmas In the Park executive director Jason Minsky told NBC Bay Area. 

Christmas in the Park organizers are expecting to see crowds close to pre-pandemic levels at Cesar Chavez Park. There will be hand sanitizing areas all over the park, along with signs urging social distancing mixed in with the over 40 musical and animated exhibits. Organizers describe the experiences as a “winter wonderland of lights, songs, and local entertainment while strolling through an enchanted forest of trees decorated by San José schools, community groups, and businesses.”

Christmas in the Park is also bringing back its drive-thru Christmas experience near Raging Waters at Lake Cunningham Park, which will feature more than 200,000 lights. This year, organizers are calling it “Blinky’s Illuminated Holiday” where you will “follow Blinky the reindeer through the musical journey of his imagination,” according to the website where you buy tickets. The drive-thru event starts on Friday and runs until January 9th but beware of the price. The minimum you will pay is $30 per car.

San Jose

Источник: https://hoodline.com/2021/11/huge-holiday-event-in-san-jose-has-something-for-everyone-this-year/

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Join us every Friday from 4pm to 7pm

SoFA Pocket Park x Veggielution

As San José begins the long recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a need to revitalize existing urban greenspaces, and even create new ones, to increase community resilience and promote a stronger local food system. Veggielution will expand our presence in East San José to partner with the San Jose Downtown Association to revitalize an underutilized 7,000 surface parking lot in the South First Area (SoFA) downtown art district. We’ve transformed an interim-use space into an urban demonstration garden, farm stand, dog park, and mobile food vending hub. It features murals painted by local artists, and programs and events designed in collaboration with nearby arts organizations to actively engage local residents, schools, nonprofits, and businesses.

The SoFA Pocket Park will connect residents, visitors & families to…

Food growing & cooking, sustainable gardening (composting, water conservation), local food entrepreneurs & products, Museums and arts organizations, and EACH OTHER!

Источник: https://veggielution.org/sofa-pocket-park
Things To Do In San Jose
Things To Do In San Jose
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things to do in San Jose, CA
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fun things to do in San Jose, CA

San Jose is the largest city in Northern California both by population and by area.

Located on the southern shore of San Francisco Bay, there is no shortage of fun things to do in San Jose.

Surrounded by the beauty of Wine Country, San Jose is at the center of Silicon Valley.

Considered by many to be the true birthplace of modern technology, Silicon Valley is home to Apple Computer, PayPal, eBay, IBM, Adobe Systems, Samsung, Hewlett Packard, Cisco Systems, and Western Digital to name a few.

The Silicon Valley area has the third highest GDP per capita in the world, preceded only by Zurich, Switzerland and Oslo, Norway.

San Jose, California is ranked the fourth most affluent city in the United States.

Whether it is for a week, a weekend or longer, there are plenty of fun things to do, things to see, and places to visit in San Jose.

We take the guesswork out of how to plan a trip by presenting you with the top places to visit when you’re in San Jose, California.

There are a number of attractions to see, fun to be had, places to go, and stuff to do that could make your trip to San Jose, California one to remember.

Out of the numerous potential places to visit in San Jose, California, we have narrowed down the absolute best of the parks, attractions, and historical landmarks located there.

This guide should help you answer the question of what to do in San Jose.

Fun Things To Do In San Jose

1. Winchester Mystery House

Winchester Mystery House

JHVEPhoto / Shutterstock

San Jose’s Winchester Mystery House was built in 1884 by Sarah Winchester, the widow of the Winchester Rifle magnate William Winchester.

Originally, it reached seven stories in height; however, the 1906 San Francisco earthquake did some damage. The house now stands at four stories.

During a total of the home’s 38 years of construction, Sarah’s belief that the house was haunted by those who had been killed by a Winchester rifle led her to have her house built without the direction of an architect.

As such, there are numerous peculiarities in the construction such as stairways and doors leading nowhere.

The house has 40 bedrooms, but only one working bathroom. She believed that these steps she was taking during construction served to confuse the spirits.

The house now serves as a popular San Jose’s tourist attraction.

On the premises of the Winchester compound sits the American Fire Arms Museum.

Learn the history of the Winchester rifle through exhibits and displays of the rifles throughout history.

Address: 525 S Winchester Blvd, San Jose, CA 95128, USA

2. Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum

Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum

Mariusz S. Jurgielewicz / Shutterstock

San Jose’s Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum is a magnificent museum that is constructed in the architectural style favored by the ancient Egyptians to give you an immersion in their culture.

It also houses the largest collection of ancient Egyptian artifacts in the western United States.

There is also a planetarium on the premises that has shows on the weekends.

You shouldn’t visit San Jose without spending some time in Ancient Egypt.

Address: 1660 Park Ave, San Jose, CA 95191, USA

3. San Jose Museum of Art

San Jose Museum of Art

Uladzik Kryhin / Shutterstock

The San Jose Museum of Art has an impressive permanent collection of works from West Coast artists of the 20th and 21st centuries.

There is a historic wing that was originally built in 1892 for the San Jose Post Office which was used for until 1937.

From 1937 to 1969, the building was used as the City of San Jose Public Library.

It was acquired by the Fine Arts Gallery Association and the new wing of the museum opened in 1991.

This is one of the only museums to focus on West Coast artists.

Address: 110 S Market St, San Jose, CA 95113, USA

4. Cathedral Basilica of St. Joseph

Interior of Cathedral Basilica of St. Joseph Church

yhelfman / Shutterstock

Cathedral Basilica of St. Joseph was originally a small adobe church built for the benefit of the settlers as opposed to the native Indians.

Construction began in 1803 in the town originally called El Pueblo de San Jose de Guadalupe.

Earthquakes in 1818 and 1822 damaged the original structure beyond repair, and a second adobe church was built to replace it beginning in 1835.

The second church was also damaged by a major earthquake in the 1868 Hayward Earthquake.

The third church was built in 1869 only to be destroyed by a fire in 1875.

A fourth temporary structure was built a few blocks away.

The fifth and final building is the magnificent Basilica that stands today.

Construction began in 1876 and the church was finally granted Basilica status by the Vatican in 1997.

The stained glass windows alone make this one of the most beautiful places in California.

Address: 80 S Market St, San Jose, CA 95113, USA

5. Tech Museum of Innovation

Tech Museum of Innovation

Mariusz S. Jurgielewicz / Shutterstock

The Tech Museum of Innovation is great for the entire family.

It is meant to give the visitor a taste of computing technology being brought to life within the walls of the various Silicon Valley companies.

It is also meant to inspire future generations to meet and exceed today’s technology.

This museum used to be housed in a garage before relocating to it’s current 132,000 square foot home due to its popularity.

The interactive nature of the museum makes this attraction one of the top places to visit while you’re in San Jose.

While you are there, make sure you pop into the IMAX theater to watch their current offering.

The view-screen is eight stories high for a truly unique experience, and one of your best activities in San Jose, California.

Address: 201 S Market St, San Jose, CA 95113, USA

Planning to visit other areas of California? Be sure to check out our lists of things to do in Orange County & things to do in San Diego!

6. Alum Rock Park

Alum Rock Park in San Jose

aido / Shutterstock

Alum Rock Park is the oldest municipal park in California. It has 13 miles of biking and walking trails of varying difficulty.

From 1891 to 1901, access to the park came in the form of a Narrow Gauge Railroad that originated in downtown San Jose.

The park boasts scenic views of Silicon Valley, a visitor’s center, a small museum, and picnic and play areas.

Parking access is free and is the perfect destination for a relaxing family day with plenty of stuff to do.

Address: 15350 Penitencia Creek Rd, San Jose, CA 95127, USA

7. Children’s Discovery Museum

Children's Discovery Museum, San Jose

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The Children’s Discovery Museum is one of the top ten children’s museums in the United States.

Since it’s doors opened in 1990, it has provided interactive educational entertainment to over 6 million visitors.

It is one of the most popular places to go in San Jose, California.

The museum’s unique BioSITE program provides action-science education focused on environmental responsibility.

The museum’s Discovery Youth program provides fifth through twelfth graders a sampling of technology from the neighboring Silicon Valley.

The museum was primarily funded by the generous donations of Steve Wozniak, co-founder of Apple Computer.

Address: 180 Woz Way, San Jose, CA 95110, USA

8. Kelley Park

walled section of Kelley Park in San Jose

Mariusz S. Jurgielewicz / Shutterstock

You can spend an entire day at Kelley Park. With 156 acres of stuff to do, you can enjoy gardens, the park’s trails, the zoo, and museums.

Kelley Park is the home of the Happy Hollow Park and Zoo, Japanese Friendship Garden, San Jose History Park, Viet Museum, and Portuguese Historical Museum among other historical societies.

Planning a road trip around California? You’re going to love our lists detailing out the best things to do in Santa Barbara & the top things to do in Monterey!

Happy Hollow Park and Zoo

Entrance to Happy Hollow Park and Zoo

Uladzik Kryhin / Shutterstock

Happy Hollow Park and Zoo sits on 16 acres within Kelley Park, and encompasses a zoo and amusement park providing your family with plenty of things to see.

The amusement park attractions are geared towards younger children and toddlers, and the puppet theater is a unique addition.

A petting zoo and education center round out the offerings.

The Happy Hollow Zoo is a fully accredited member of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and holds a special place in the heart of California.

Japanese Friendship Garden

Japanese Friendship Garden in Kelley Park

Mariusz S. Jurgielewicz / Shutterstock

The Japanese Friendship Garden is spread out over six acres, and is symbolic of the friendship between San Jose and its sister city of Okayama, Japan.

The gardens include three ponds fully stocked with koi, a traditional tea house, cherry trees, and a Pagoda.

This peaceful retreat is hidden behind walls on the Kelley Park property and is intended to be a mirror image of the famous Korakuen Gardens in Okayama, Japan.

History Park

The San Jose History Park is a park within a park. San Jose history is depicted throughout this indoor/outdoor museum via the replica buildings of old San Jose.

Included are:

  • replica firehouse
  • blacksmith shed
  • migrant cabins
  • Santa Ana One Room School House
  • replica homes of early Santa Clara Valley Settlers
  • post office
  • the Viet Museum
  • the Portuguese Historical Museum
  • Pelham Collection of Early Electronics
  • Hellenic Heritage museum
  • and other historical buildings

For a true taste of San Jose history and one of the best things to do in San Jose, make a visit to Kelley Park.

Address: 1300 Senter Rd, San Jose, CA 95112, USA

Planning a road trip around California? Be sure to check out our list of things to do in Sacramento! & things to do in Los Angeles!

9. San Jose Heritage Rose Garden

No trip to San Jose would be complete without a visit to the San Jose Heritage Rose Garden.

A Heritage Rose is one that has been bred for many years, sometimes centuries.

At the San Jose Heritage Rose Garden, you will encounter over 3,600 different rose bushes representing more than 2,700 different varieties.

While most of these varieties originated in Europe, there are many here that were discovered in the gardens of older homes, old cemeteries, and some actually discovered alongside a dirt road.

The San Jose Heritage Rose Garden is maintained by a loyal army of volunteers with all gardening materials financed by the City of San Jose.

Public admission to the garden is free, but donations are always welcome, and if you want to volunteer, they can always use the help.

Address: 438 Coleman Ave, San Jose, CA 95110, USA

10. San Jose Flea Market

San Jose flea market

Erendira Elizabeth / Shutterstock

The San Jose Flea Market has been a local hotspot for the past 59 years.

It has a number of restaurants and alleys and aisles of everything you could possibly imagine. From jewelry to stereo equipment to books.

There are pony rides, a carousel, and a small Ferris wheel to keep the kids busy while you wander around and view the substantial offerings.

There is something for the entire family, complete with free live music on the weekends. Admission is free with paid parking.

Address: 1590 Berryessa Rd, San Jose, CA 95133, USA

Going on a road trip around California soon? Be sure to read our awesome lists of things to do in Palm Springs & things to do in Long Beach!

11. New Almaden Quicksilver Mining Museum

New Almaden Quicksilver Mining Museum

Santa Clara County Parks

The Almaden Quicksilver Mine is the oldest and most productive mercury mine in history.

The mining operations of 135 years are chronicled at this museum.

While the mine itself is closed down, there are many historical structures left at the site.

Don’t miss this opportunity to learn about the rich history of mercury mining.

Address: 21350 Almaden Rd, San Jose, CA 95120, USA

12. Japantown

Buddhist Temple in JapanTown

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Japantown, San Jose is one of the last three Japantown cultural communities in the United States.

It is also one of the best, and definitely worth spending a whole day there.

This 125-year-old community offers some of the best authentic Japanese restaurants, theaters, art galleries, and shops in the country.

Immerse yourself in Japanese culture for the day.

Address: Japantown, San Jose, CA 95112, USA

13. Hayes Mansion

Hayes Mansion

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Whether you go just for the beautiful architecture or if you are lucky enough to score a room there, the Hayes Mansion should not be missed.

This historic mansion is actually built in 1906 in the general layout of a Maltese Cross with a long center section that houses a solarium.

The architecture is that of a Mediterranean Villa and is 41,000 sq ft. The property used to boast its own Post Office, Railway station, and power plant.

Today, it is a luxury hotel with over 200 guest rooms.

Address: 200 Edenvale Ave, San Jose, CA 95136, USA

14. Great America Amusement Park

Great America Amusement Park

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San Jose’s Great America Amusement Park was first established in 1976.

Currently under the control of Cedar Fair, the park sits on 100-acres and is considered the premier amusement park for Northern California.

The roller coasters range from the Gold Striker that is considered the new standard when it comes to wooden coasters, to the newest addition, the Rail Blazer which has an innovative design unlike any other coaster in the world.

Thrill rides, family rides, carnival games and Boomerang Bay, a water park, give the family lots to do.

For the littlest visitors, Planet Snoopy offers rides, shows, playgrounds, and a meet and greet with all your favorite Charlie Brown characters.

The park is only open seasonally, so plan accordingly if a Great America day fits into your travel itinerary.

Great America Amusement Park is located adjacent to Levi Stadium, home of the San Francisco 49ers football team.

Address: 4701 Great America Pkwy, Santa Clara, CA 95054, USA

15. Museum of Quilts & Textiles

A loving celebration of the art of quilting and textiles can be found at San Jose’s Museum of Quilts & Textiles.

Exhibitions are both historic and contemporary and are changed every six to twelve weeks.

This San Jose museum celebrates the art of quilting with a collection of over 800 quilts, and celebrates textiles through the various innovative uses of cloth fibers throughout cultures and history.

There is also a research library with more than 500 books on quilting and textiles throughout history.

The first Friday of every month offers free admission from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm giving you the perfect excuse to go spend a fun and educational couple of hours while you’re visiting San Jose.

Address: 520 S 1st St, San Jose, CA 95113, USA

16. Bigfoot Discovery Museum

Bigfoot Discovery Museum

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Located 32 miles southwest of San Jose, the Bigfoot Discovery Museum is a must on your things to see list for believers of all ages.

There have been numerous sightings in the Santa Cruz Mountains over the years, and the Big Foot Research Project wants to hear all about it.

Stories, interviews, photos, and investigations are all kept in this two-room museum near the entrance to the Redwood National Forest.

Admission is free and owner Mike has stories to tell.

Address: 5497 Hwy 9, Felton, CA 95018, USA

17. Mount Hermon Adventures

Mount Hermon Adventures

Taylor Robinson / Shutterstock

For a truly unique outdoor adventure, Mount Hermon Adventures is most definitely one of the fun things to do in San Jose.

Located under the canopy of magnificent and ancient Redwood Trees, they are famous for their aerial courses and zip lining.

The park is well known in the area for team building, and a day spent at Mount Hermon Adventures will prove both fun and educational.

Mount Hermon Adventures is an important part of the Redwood Forest along the Santa Clara coast.

They are just a few miles outside of San Jose and the minimum age to participate is 10-years-old. Their zip line is considered the best in the state.

Address: 17 Conference Dr, Felton, CA 95018, USA

18. Mountain Winery

Formerly known as the Paul Masson Wineries, the Mountain Winery is well known for its wine tasting and for its outdoor theater that hosts numerous concerts throughout the year.

The winery itself is a historical site. They are now best known for their summer concert series.

Enjoy a night out with dinner at a show. Starting with a 3-course gourmet meal at La Cresta Restaurant followed by music provided by both classic bands and modern superstars.

For something different, you can experience the Wine Deck and enjoy wine selections paired with a selection of cheese and charcuterie or upgrade that selection to a seafood feast.

Both the restaurant and the wine deck are only open on concert nights and reservations are recommended. Truly one of the best things to do.

Address: 14831 Pierce Rd, Saratoga, CA 95070, USA

19. Villa Montalvo

Villa Montalvo Art Center

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Also just outside San Jose in the Santa Cruz Mountains lies the Montalvo Arts Center. This cultural center and park surround the mansion, which is a historic landmark.

There are a number of hiking trails as well as a number of gardens filled with elaborate marble statues and several different garden structures.

The mansion itself is primarily used for weddings and other events but the property as a whole is definitely worth the trip and should make its way on to your list of places to visit.

Address: 15400 Montalvo Rd, Saratoga, CA 95071, USA

20. San Jose McEnery Convention Center

Located in the center of downtown, the San Jose McEnery Convention Center sponsors numerous events throughout the year.

From Auto shows to ComiCon, there is always something going on there.

This 550,000 square foot structure has resident art displays outside the entrance on San Carlos Street including the tile mural project and the interactive sculpture called The Idea Tree.

If there doesn’t happen to be a convention or show that piques your interest, a short visit to the mural and Idea Tree should be a part of the trip.

Address: 408 Almaden Blvd, San Jose, CA 95113, USA

21. Los Gatos Creek Trail

Los Gatos Creek Trail

Sundry Photography / Shutterstock

Many visitors believe that no trip is complete without enjoying some of the trails at local parks.

One of the favorite destinations for mountain biking is the Los Gatos Creek Trail.

There is even a trail in the works in downtown San Jose which will take the biking enthusiast directly to the Los Gatos Creek Trail as well as other local trails.

Los Gatos Creek Trail offers 9.7 miles of biking and pedestrian trails for hours of family fun.

22. San Pedro Square Market

San Jose’s San Pedro Square Market has a great selection of restaurants for a long leisurely lunch outdoors or a gourmet dinner.

There is live music 6 nights a week, and most restaurants are open until 9:00 pm.

San Pedro Square is also home to an important piece of San Jose history.

El Pueblo de San Jose de Guadalupe was the first city founded in the Californias in 1777.

The Peralta Adobe House, built in 1797, is the last remaining structure from the original Pueblo.

The Peralta House can be toured by appointment only.

The Fallon House is another historic landmark in San Jose.

Thomas Fallon and his wife Carmel first moved to San Jose in 1855 and built their home shortly thereafter.

Their goal was to build the “grandest home in the county.” The house became the Italia hotel in 1900, and was acquired by the City of San Jose in 1990.

Like the Peralta House, the Fallon House can be toured by appointment only.

With the food, shopping, music, and history, the San Pedro Square Market is one of the best things to do in the downtown area of San Jose.

Address: 87 N San Pedro St, San Jose, CA 95110, USA

23. Santana Row

Santana Row

Sundry Photography / Shutterstock

Santana Row is an exclusive area of West San Jose that is an upscale shopping, dining, and residential area.

This 42-acre area is called the “Village within a City,” and is home to 50 shops, 30 restaurants, and residential areas.

The architecture of the area is influenced by various European neighborhoods nicely complimented by beautifully appointed landscaping.

An important part of Santana Row is Park Valencia where live music and public events take place.

Whether you are after a burger from a chain or a gourmet dinner at one of the concept restaurants, Santana Row should be on your list.

Address: 377 Santana Row, San Jose, CA 95128, USA

24. Overfelt Gardens Park

Chinese Cultural Garden; Overfelt Park

Lowe Llaguno / Shutterstock

Another day of fun things to do in San Jose includes a visit to Overfelt Gardens Park.

This 33-acre park includes trails, a fountain and a fragrance garden populated with various aromatic plants.

Three lakes provide habituate for various birds, reptiles, mammals, fish, and amphibians year around.

The California Wild Area of the park is covered in native wildflowers, brush, trees, and grasses.

In the southeast area of the park is the Chinese Cultural Garden complete with a Statue of Confucius.

Address: 2145 McKee Rd, San Jose, CA 95116, USA

25. Shoreline Lake Park

Shoreline Lake Park

Mariusz S. Jurgielewicz / Shutterstock

Located just off the scenic Skyline Blvd, Shoreline Lake Park should definitely be on your places to visit in San Jose.

Take the family for a day of fun that includes an 18-hole golf course, miles of both paved and unpaved trails, a wildlife refuge, and a fun aquatic center that offers rentals of sailboats, windsurfers, kayaks, canoes, pedal boats, and rowboats.

There is also a wildlife refuge on the site.

Address: 3160 N Shoreline Blvd, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA

26. Skyline Boulevard

Cars driving on Skyline Boulevard

Sundry Photography / Shutterstock

Skyline Boulevard is one of the most scenic drives in Northern California and possibly the entire state.

Also known as State Route 35, this two-lane highway runs along the ridge by the Santa Cruz Mountains from San Francisco south.

It goes through Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, San Jose, and San Mateo. It offers incredible views of the Redwoods, the Pacific Ocean, and San Francisco Bay.

During the winter, snow at the higher elevations draws families out for fun in the snow.

There are numerous protected open space areas that can be accessed along the way. Skyline Boulevard is also a favorite for Mountain Bikers and offers trails of all sizes.

It is truly another one of those free and fun things to do in California.

Planning a road trip around California soon? You need to check out our lists of things to do in Santa Cruz & the best things to do in Santa Monica!

27. Computer History Museum

Computer History Museum

Lynn Yeh / Shutterstock

What would a visit to San Jose and the Silicon Valley region be if there wasn’t a Computer History Museum?

Originally a part of the now defunct Digital Equipment Corporation, the museum moved to the Silicon Valley area in 1996.

This San Jose icon is one of the great places to visit is said to have the largest collection of computer artifacts in the world.

The exhibits and collections are updated regularly as additions such as the IBM exhibit and most recently the donations of source code by Adobe and Microsoft.

The museum is open daily, and there are family tours available every Saturday.

Make sure you check to make sure they are open because private events will close the museum to the public.

Address: 1401 N Shoreline Blvd, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA

28. San Jose City Hall

 San Jose City Hall

KENNY TONG / Shutterstock

The current San Jose City Hall is the sixth building to carry that title throughout history.

It is a masterpiece of postmodern architecture, and definitely should be one of your chosen places to visit while you are in San Jose.

Address: 200 E Santa Clara St, San Jose, CA 95113, USA

29. SAP Center

SAP Center building

Sundry Photography / Shutterstock

Home of the San Jose Sharks NHL Hockey Team, the SAP Center is considered one of the best places to attend an event.

The SAP Center in San Jose is also home to numerous other concerts and events. In 2012 and 2016, the USA Olympic Gymnastics Trials took place there.

There are several Mixed Martial Arts events that take place there regularly. Make sure you check the calendar to see which blockbuster concerts are scheduled there.

There is almost always something happening at the SAP Center, and your trip to San Jose, California could well include one of these events.

Address: 525 W Santa Clara St, San Jose, CA 95113, USA

30. Raging Waters Water Park

Everyone turns into a kid for the day when there is a big beautiful Water Park around.

Raging Waters is the largest water park in Northern California, and offers 23 acres of family fun.

If you visit San Jose, California during the summer, cooling off for the day at Raging Waters should be part of your plans.

Address: 2333 S White Rd, San Jose, CA 95148, USA

Travel Tips

When traveling in the San Jose area, you will be best off with access to a rental car.

While most of the attractions are within the city itself, there are several important attractions that will require you to drive.

While in the area, it would be a shame not to venture out to visit parts of San Francisco, the Redwood Forest, or Yosemite National Park.

San Jose can be a convenient starting point for these excursions.

Several of the things to do in San Jose are reliant on what season you choose to visit.

While the climate is similar to that found in the Mediterranean, if you choose to travel in the Santa Cruz Mountains or into Yosemite, you will most likely run into snow.

If you are flying into the area, one of the travel hacks of note is that you can actually find better deals flying into San Jose Airport than you would flying into either San Francisco or Oakland.

Hotels in this area can get expensive. There are 492 hotels in San Jose and prices can be found for $68 a night if you look carefully.

If you are looking for luxury, there are a number of hotels that can accommodate you in that as well.

Start Planning Your Trip To San Jose

It is said that in order to truly appreciate San Jose, you need to view it as a local would.

As such, many of the top itinerary selections include locations that are important to the history, important to the area and places where the locals like to go.

No matter how short or long of a time spent visiting San Jose, your time will not be wasted.

This historical city offers attractions, education, and fun to children and adults alike.

After learning all about the West Coast, if you choose to make your next vacation destination on the East Coast, you might want to consider Gainesville in Florida.

Источник: https://www.busytourist.com/fun-things-to-do-in-san-jose-california/

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