characteristics of edmond dantes

Edmond Dantes · 2 Limits · Dan Rockz · Eric Tyrell · Agent Greg · Talkboxx · Aleks Cameron · Aleaxander Belousov · The Whiteliner. approach to describe the characteristic of Edmond Dantes, to find out Edmond Dantes' motivation Character, characterization, human needs, and motivation. Edmond Dantès is the protagonist and title character of Alexandre Dumas, père's novel, The Count of Monte Cristo. Dumas may have gotten the idea for the.

Characteristics of edmond dantes -

                                                 INTRODUCTIONWith the servility of class war, injustice prevails and in hoping for escape we are given the illusion of freedom.  This is the general unfolding of the plots in the following novels I will be analyzing: The Count of Monte Cristo (1844) by the French author Alexandre Dumas, Rita Heyworth and the Shawshank redemption (1982) and The Green Mile (1996) by the American author Stephen King. The themes of class war and injustice follow our protagonists in these three novels, the fact that they are from different time scales proves that these subjects are an everlasting theme; they are a continuous source of corruption and the only way of prevailing is by escaping as the protagonists do (certainly in different ways). The importance of this subject on class war does not subside in the world of fiction; The Count of Monte Cristo, Rita Heyworth and the Shawshank Redemption and The Green Mile give us an account of the injustice we are faced with in our own communities and the racial and/or cultural division that is the root cause of this and non-fictional accounts are found in many works which represent cogent and applicable real world analysis, in particularly works by Noam Chomsky who will be one of my key reliable sources within the subject discussion of class war.

My objective will be to discuss and investigate how our protagonists are affected by the themes of class war, injustice and escape and how they deal with them. Even though at first glance they may appear similar they are very obviously different too in the sense that our protagonist, The Count of Monte Cristo eventually becomes his own oppressor, as well as the abuse of power in Stephen King’s novels, and of course the question of escape itself. Have Edmond Dantes, Andy Dufresne and John Coffey truly escaped? Or have they simply moved on to let another take their place, having no affect on the subject of class war and therefore not resolving the injustice at all. There are many controversial viewpoints on these subjects within the novels as well as out of them from antagonists such as Danglars, Percy Wetmore and Norton. Others such as academic Keith Wren writing on The Count of Monte Cristo allude to Dumas’ suggestion that with the power of the upper-class you almost become evil “the fashionable oriental gloss of his new personality carries with it connotations not just of luxury and exoticism but an underlying acceptance of, and indulgence in cruelty”[1]. This quote is specifically relevant to the behaviours and actions of the antagonists from each novel above which I will be discussing further in this dissertation. A limitation of my research topic of class war, injustice and escape will be the broadness of it and the ability to stay within the research territory I need to. My ultimate focus will reside with prisons and other abuses of authority and issues of discrimination. That being said Alexander Dumas’ The Count of Monte Cristo and Stephen Kings Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption and The Green Mile also contain a myriad of other issues pertaining to class war, injustice and escape. Those issues include first and foremost the people themselves, it is about those who society forgets about and is quickly forgotten and with the issue of people comes of course history, culture and economics. These themes are ingrained in my focus on prisons, authority and discrimination but will also be discussed independently.

The decision for using these three novels arrived predominantly from the fact that they greatly encompass the themes of class war, injustice and escape. But most importantly the connection they make identifies that these themes are everlasting issues which is shown through the time scale of the novels. The Count of Monte Cristo was written in the nineteenth century and The Green Mile and The Shawshank Redemption in the twenty first century and despite centuries apart and certain contextual changes, the general themes and principles remain the same. The natures of the conflict and the landscapes from which they emerge often have stark parallels and important underlying concepts pertaining to exploitation, imprisonment and ultimately freedom.

It is important to keep in mind that despite the relevance of these themes to the contemporary environment the definition of what class would have meant in the nineteenth century is different to the twentieth century. But while different, in the sense that we deal with the ultimate higher classes such as Counts and aristocracy in The Count of Monte Cristo as opposed to, in comparison- mere lawyers and bankers to Stephen King’s novels, they are very much relevant to each other today. Those of a higher social class have an unfair advantage in being able to control the destiny and fates of the lives of other people, for instance Edmond Dantes. A good man who’s near to perfect life was easily shattered by a few jealous friends. He is then thrown into prison Chateau D’if for a crime that he did not commit. It is only then and after his 8 years of torment and self pity, leading him to notions of suicide and spitefulness, that Edmond encounters the priest Abbe Faria who teaches him the fine arts of combat, culture, education and languages. Further to Abbe’s death, Edmond escapes taking with him Abbe’s gift of the treasures of Monte Cristo. It is interesting that only with Abbe’s lessons of class and culture (and of course treasure) that Edmond is able to enact revenge on his wrong doers. And here, is the prime example of how money and social class is needed to be a person of power. And indeed, the wrong power as we see Edmond transcend into a “crocodile”[2]…a man with hardly any feeling and with a heart for revenge.

Andy Dufresne form Stephen King’s Rita Heyworth and the Shawshank Redemption goes through similar motions as Edmond Dantes, he is also innocently accused and unlike Dantes, as a man of means and power on the outside of prison, those qualities lead him to be protected on the inside too (after a while when the guards learn of his qualities anyway). But this shows again the power of class and status and the recurring theme that no matter where you go it cannot be escaped. As with the Count of Monte Cristo, Andy Dufresne uses this to escape his injustice too by conning those who are of a higher power in prison such as the warden and escaping to the calm life of Zihuatanejo.

My main focus on the power and war between classes and the injustice of the power it holds in The Green Mile will be exemplified in the treatment of protagonists such as Paul Edgecomb, the inmates and Percy Wetmore. The sadistic Percy Wetmore and the decent Paul Edgecomb watch over Cold Mountain Penitentiary and its inmates, trying to keep those closest to their death subdued and calm. The psychopathic killers such as Billy the Kid, the unstable Eduard Delacroix and the wrongfully accused, saint-like John Coffey, a victim of the greatest injustice will all soon owe their lives to the penitentiary and will be victims of the Old Sparky. Stephen King gives us a book that is unlike The Shawshank redemption and the Count of Monte Cristo, where we follow our protagonists to their fulfilment and escape; here we follow John Coffey to his death, the perfect idea of escape for him (and one which I will further elaborate on within the discussion of escape) but an injustice rippled through the cursed long life of Paul Edgecomb, the mouse (even) and also fellow co-workers.

Each and every character deals with the themes of class war, injustice and escape as they are all consequences of unjust power. Unjust powers have more of a voice than those who contain power of enlightenment and better judgement, the outcome of this is clear through the protagonists of the novels. The ability to entrap and condemn innocents becomes an easy route for revenge for those with unjust power. Dantes has to inherit these powers from treasures, a mere miracle, to be able to enact the revenge those with established class power have cast upon him and to quench his righteous indignation. These are all clear themes within the Stephen King novels, whether it pertains to Percy Wetmore or Warden Norton. When power, through class is given to those who use it for their own selfish means, to satisfy their urges or insane whims, then injustice will be served and vengeance will be sought whether successfully or not. These elementary truths of human action and reaction are consistently laid bare.

CHAPTER 1

Class War

There is a war that has been going on for centuries and it is a war within the hierarchy of class; Historian Dennis Dworkin explains the concept of the term “class” which can be used to mean numerous things: “we associate it with such things as our career path, the school that we attend, the party that we vote for, the way we speak, the car that we drive, the clothes that we wear, the food that we eat, the music that we listen to, the art that we enjoy and the sports that rivet us. More abstractly, it can entail status or income, education or work, life style or social position, group solidarities or conflicts and status hierarchy.”1 These concepts relate greatly to my chosen novels as it is these distinguishing ideas of class war that assemble between the characters and their society. A few clarifications of class must be made and one of which is the distinction of class through different time periods. In the nineteenth century France, the middle class would be better well known as the Bourgeoisie. As owners of growing businesses, most of them were heavily drawn to the aristocratic lifestyle and the image that they presented and to indicate the wealth of their family, the Bourgeoisie did such things as growing the number of servant’s inn their household. They held jobs such as bankers, doctors, dentists, industrial entrepreneurs, architects, engineers, managers of private and public institutions and accountants. These all certainly relate to all three texts from different times, for example in The Shawshank Redemption, Andy Dufresne was a part of the middle class, ‘a rich banker’. In The Green Mile, Percy Wetmore relies on his connections as the governor’s nephew to stand for his social class just as the ‘friends’ of Edmond Dantes do in The Count of Monte Cristo. In summation, social inequality through class is explained by Raymond Williams; “The essential history of the introduction of class, as a word which would supersede older names for social division, relates to the increasing consciousness that social position is made rather than merely inherited… individual mobility could be seen as movement from one estate, degree, order or rank to another. What was changing consciousness was not only increased individual mobility…but the new sense of society or a particular social system which actually created social division…” the division between slaves and masters, rich and poor is a societal structure that causes nothing but unfairness and injustice as the novels represent.

The Count of Monte Cristo

Not forgetting that this is also a historical novel, Dumas does not appoint political allegiances haphazardly. He uses their political interests as vigorous insights into the conscious of the characters, with elements drawn from consistent historical events and class and politics plays an important role in it, especially within certain characters such as: Bonaparte and Bonaparte’s party including Morrel and Noirtier, the judicious and aristocratic royalist’s and the oppressive Villefort and Morcerf family. Danglars who became associated with the desensitising age of the Industrial revolution, thus turning to the narcissism of being a capitalist opportunist and of course Dantes who cultivates the idea of social rights and equality. Through politics, class becomes imperative to evaluating the circumstances that evolve in this novel. Dantes is only thus able to destroy those of social importance with class, power and money when he has the circumstances of social importance himself.

What is money and therefore class if it is not an obsession with power? It is a structure of the capitalist society which teaches us that power is good and what we should strive for, Michel Foucault puts it quite rightly:  “If one understands by democracy the effective exercise of power by a population which is neither divided nor hierarchically ordered in classes, it is quite clear that we are very far from democracy. It is only too clear that we are living under a regime of a dictatorship of class, of a power of class which imposes itself by violence, even when the instruments of this violence are institutional and constitutional; and to that degree, there isn’t any question of democracy for us.”[3] Indeed in the count of Monte Cristo we are presented with the corruption and sham of democracy, the revelation of the corruption within those of power and higher social class, whom the citizens of France depend upon and aspire to be like, such as the lawyer and prosecutor Gerard de Villefort. Not only is he one of the most thoroughly corrupt characters in The Count of Monte Cristo but he also mixes around in circles of his social class who are much the same as him. Indeed we see the fluctuations of Edmonds personality through his new identity and of course class influences this character tremendously and Dantes receives an all consuming sense of dark power. Byron, Manfred and Werner suggest that not just his “dark and melancholy eye” [4] but even darker and more melancholy secrets, nameless suffering alludes with a dismissive view of humanity “Oh man- race of crocodiles”.[5]

The Count of Monte Cristo is partly a story of two friends from different social classes; Edmond Dantes begins as an illiterate working class sailor previously to having been granted the succession of Captain to the Leclere. He and his family had been under the wing of the Mondego household, having Count Mondego the father of Fernand Mondego give him opportunities such as being a sailor on a ship with his son; which is essentially what causes Fernand’s jealousy as he watches this poor boy become a better man and more of a hero than himself “But how could a poor Catalan fisher-boy, without education or resources, make a fortune?”[6] . The role of wealth is ultimately most imperative to the succession of social class, Dantes, under the title of Count of Monte Cristo, is only accepted and praised in the upper class hierarchy when his vast amount of wealth is put on display. He is of course aware of this which is why he decides to make his grand entrance into his enemies’ life through a party of grandeur and sophistication. In this sense his enemies are undermined by their own personal dispositions and their class and status become vehicles through which they can be accessed and ultimately destroyed.

It is right to conclude that without power, wealth and class Edmond Dantes would never have gotten justice in such particular fashion, and while Dumas suggests that he should have left it to God, even if some may agree, it is folly to deny that these elements are imperative in helping to construct a desired ending, if not entirely for the protagonist then certainly for the reader. Power, wealth and class within the characters of The Count of Monte Cristo indeed present corruption and selfishness and Dumas suggests an untrustworthy system, an entirely wrong system at that. There is a political message that seeps through this novel presenting a desire for change in this society that presses so much attention and reliance on a rich minority who caress themselves in their own indulgence. Alexandre Dumas holds strong views within the social order and I believe he demonstrates this using the Count of Monte Cristo, before his death he wrote: “I am thankful to God that he has allowed me to live this long, because, dying as I am, I still have the strength left in me to denounce to the world the cruel treatment, which the people of the civilized world would blush to inflict upon their worst enemies”[7]  he suggests his pain that comes from the “war between people” which is so vividly presented in The Count of Monte Cristo though countless depictions of class struggle and war.

Rita Heyworth and the Shawshank Redemption

In Rita Heyworth and the Shawshank Redemption Andy Dufresne is confronted with the war between classes even within structured walls such as prison. There are many different hierarchal levels, such as Red who is essentially the respectable business man “who can get you things…a regular Neiman-Marcus”[8], those protected by the guards and wardens such as Andy Dufresne for his knowledge and of course the guards and wardens themselves whom it looks like the law does not apply to. They are able to get away with numerous things such as murder and corruption and so called ‘justice’ which they preach but will be overlooked for them. This is where class really does become important because a certain class of people, like the Warden, get special treatment according to their importance within the established hierarchy. Moreover, Andy Dufresne himself is clearly a well educated and useful individual, due to his banking background, and this status translates in prison to his utilitarian value to those in power. He does things that are thought as ‘terrible’ inside the prison just as he does outside; “What I’m doing here isn’t all that different to what I was doing outside. I’ll hand you a pretty cynical axiom: the amount of expert financial help an individual or company needs rises in direct proportion to how many people that person or business is screwing…the people who run this place are stupid, brutal monsters for the most part. The people who run the straight world are brutal and monstrous, but they happen not to be quite as stupid, because the standard of competence out there is a little higher. Not much, but a little”[9]. Considering this, he exploits those in the higher paid jobs, those with power and class as nothing more than criminals themselves.

The first description of Andy Dufresne in the novel is a great statement in labelling him as someone from middle to upper class background. All the associations of class (and that of the upper class when it comes to Andy Dufresne) have been prescribed by Red’s opening description of Andy Dufresne “When Andy came to Shawshank in 1948, he was thirty years old. He was a short neat little man with sandy hair and small, clever hands. He wore gold rimmed spectacles. His fingernails were always clipped and they were always clean. That’s a funny thing to remember about a man, I suppose, but it seems to sum Andy up for me. He always looked as if he should have been wearing a tie. On the outside he had been a vice-president in the trust department of a large Portland bank.”[10]  As we see, from the beginning we have a certain image of Andy even through aesthetics as almost being “better” than everyone else. Of course this is made through the case that he is so different from all the other inmates, even Red who seems like a good person, he was poor and ultimately a cold blooded killer, like most of those in the Shawshank, and this distinction is quite interesting as indeed, his social stance from the outside protects him inside the walls of prison too. Knowledge is clearly power as we saw in The Count of Monte Cristo; it is a survival technique as through this knowledge that he has had in banking and business, he becomes successful and protected inside the prison too. He is instantly characterised by these labels of class from the way he looks to his job and by our associations and expectations, it is safe to assume that he is indeed from an upper/middle class background. This is what makes him loom in the midst of the ragged outcast, not only to Red or the inmates of course but to the media. His class status makes his crime much more high profile and a target for tabloid journalism as the newspapers had already started hinted at scandals in the case for Andy Dufresne. Furthermore and similarly, in the other novels, we see the effects of social class upon the guards and wardens who persist in abusing their power. Warden Norton for instance who gains acceptance from society outside prison (those who are supposedly better than those who are put away as criminals) for his “Inside-out” regime which is essentially nothing but slave labour. However society evaluates him highly, of a higher social class therefore he must be good, being a godly man and in charge of a huge prison, they support his ideas and encourage it. It is interesting however that only when society finds out that he is a money launderer, a con artist, do they take real action against him, no one questions the murder of young Tommy, or slave labour, but when peoples own pockets are affected and the wardens actions extend into meaningful places, that is when it becomes investigated and the unjust façade comes crashing down. All in all the subtext here says a lot about society and its priorities, which are in many ways, almost criminal; they care more about capital than certain isolated classes of non-people.

The Green Mile

Class war is extremely dominant in The Green Mile which we see mostly with the relationship between Percy Wetmore with his ‘connections’ and the rest of the characters. The reason for Percy’s ability to stay or to be on the Green Mile is because of his connection with the mayor, without such nepotism he would not be so beyond reproach and be able to get away with such things as his attitude and the clearly unfair treatment of inmates such as Eduard “Del” Delacroix.

Percy Wetmore’s social class is a rather large part of the novel as it is the main reason for a lot of the terrible things that go on in The Green Mile. His social class prevents the death row supervisor, Paul Edgecomb from taking actions to prevent disasters that he knew were soon going to happen.  All supervisors are aware that he is a bad, sadistic man, even the inmate’s comment on this frequently, but they are unable to do anything because of his social connections as the nephew of the mayor’s wife. Due to this, Percy Wetmore gets away with abusing the inmates, breaking Delacroix’s hand and when Paul tried to complain to Warden Moores, he tells him to “stick with it”[11]. His crimes are well protected, in this quote we see how connected as anyone else would surely have been fired for such undesirable actions but not Percy; “I had a call from state capital this morning… it was quite an angry call…Paul, the governor is so married he’s almost not there…and his wife has a brother who has one child. That child is Percy Wetmore. Percy called his dad last night, and Percy’s dad called Percy’s aunt. Do I have to trace the rest of this out for you?”[12].  Percy Wetmore’s class, itself here in part a product of unashamed nepotism, creates for him an undeserving career path and this, as the author demonstrates becomes the most dangerous of things. Specifically, people like Percy, who could reasonably have been sent to a place for the criminally insane, is instead an incredibly immoral and irresponsible person looking after some of the most helpless and alone. This tragedy is chilling and is a realisation of the possible ramifications of class connectedness and the corresponding unbalance regarding primarily power but more broadly human interactions in general.

These benefits of higher class connections reflects on the lower class, those who are helpless, those that have no connections to help them even fight their cause such as the inmates, especially the innocent ones. Due to his colour, John Coffey is instantly a disposable outcast. Racism is certainly a factor of John Coffey’s death, while the law states that we are innocent until proven guilty, Coffey does not get this treatment, the way he looks instantly gets him a sentence to an execution. All in all, the entire novel deals with the difficulties of power between characters. Furthermore, we see the social acceptance of men who call themselves “enlightened”, men of power and control who are extremely racist such as Hammersmith, Coffey’s lawyer. He states, “I’m as enlightened as the next man, Mr Edgecombe, went to college in Bowling Green, took history as well as journalism, some philosophy too. I like to think of myself as enlightened…I’d not bring back slavery…I think we have to be humane and generous in our efforts to solve the race problems. But we have to remember that your negro will bite if he gets the chance, just like a mongrel…”[13]. When we give the fate of men to such men as that, who are considered intelligent, then there is never going to be hope concerning social equality. Such tainted judgement will always stand in the way of progress and as long as we have social hierarchy at this level, progress shall be ever far away.

                                                      CHAPTER 2

Injustice

Most people will be adamant in proclaiming that they do not agree with injustice, that they will fight for the rights of people if they deserve it, despite this, we live in an unjust world where unjustified acts are continuously in action. Daniel Dorling provides a brilliant example of the reason for injustice especially relevant in the novels: “In the world’s richest countries injustice is caused less and less by having too few resources to share around fairly and it is increasingly being maintained by widespread adherence to beliefs that actually propagate it…Changing what is understood by injustice today means telling some people, usually those of power, that what they consider to be fair is in fact in many ways unjust”[14]. This is surely the reason for most injustice in the world, that is, the inability to have the courage to really speak, and act, for the principles we give such reverence to, even if it contravenes established hierarchy or convention. In the novels by Stephen King and Alexandre Dumas, this inability to be selfless at such critical times helps the cause of the protagonist’s initial damnation. “Our justice system makes two promises to its citizens: a fundamentally fair trial and an accurate result. If either of those two promises is not met, the criminal justice system itself falls into disrepute” [15] Considering this, all the following novels fall into the injustice of the system and its inherent weaknesses.

The Count of Monte Cristo

Edmond is a victim of injustice not just because of the penal system but also due to his disloyal friends, which is what essentially drives him insane, and the question arises as to why his so called friends would betray him in such a way? Through the insane jealousy of the rich Fernand Mondego seeing Edmond Dantes become so successful on his own without the aid of money but on kindness, compassion and loyalty  he and Danglars, another jealous shipmate, condemn him to a sentence in prison for treason. Moral injustice is certainly a factor in The Count of Monte Cristo and as we see those who he thought closest to him, after all else, betray his trust at such great lengths for their own satisfaction. Although the source of their anger and jealousy differ, their consumption of hatred for Edmond Dantes is raised by a number of things; his best friend Fernand Mondego is overcome with jealousy with Dantes relationship with Mercedies. He is also in love with her but the fact that no matter what happens to Dantes, she will have always chosen him first does not cross Fernands mind. He is obsessed with the possession of her and as I mentioned in class war, Edmond’s social class being below his increases his jealousy as it seems that he cannot handle the fact that Dantes, unlike him, has progressed further, he is in love and to be married and also he seems to be on the way to catching up to his rank from being a poor sailor to captain. Similarly to Danglars who also detests Dantes as Morrel promotes Edmond to Captain instead of him. And so Danglars also feels robbed of what h believes to be his rightful position. Along with Caderousse, the men devise a plan to ruin Edmond Dantes, and so they do quite successfully by sending an anonymous letter to the public prosecutor Gerard De Villefort about the letter Edomond is indeed carrying but does not know the dangers or contents of. His ‘friends’ moral blindness causes this injustice to be committed. With only their happiness and satisfaction in the horizon, they see no consequence of their injustice “We will leave Danglars struggling with the demon of hatred, and endeavouring to insinuate in the ear of the ship owner some evil suspicions against his comrade”[16].While Mondego and Danglars did not essentially mean to condemn Dantes to his death, that fact that he was did not bother them too much, however, maybe the bigger core of injustice was not committed by those traitors but the ultimate traitor, Gerard de Villefort, who imprisons Dantes knowing of his innocence.

Villefort, being a prosecutor, represents the judiciary system; his character is Dumas way of wanting the audience to think hard about the justice and their sense of judgement in the novel.  “The expectation’s society has for law enforcement officers are to protect and serve every individual, family, and home-business owner within a community equally. In addition society expects law enforcement officers to be non bias, non-prejudice, and non-discriminatory when dealing with the many individual ethnic groups and religious-cultural beliefs”[17] These qualities are what Dantes believed the justice system portrayed and exemplified. Much to his dismay, he finds out the truth, how corrupt the justice system is and how with power, justice can be bent and shaped to suit the prosecutors. Vilefort’s inability to judge others and not be compromised by his own feelings influences his self serving stance to ‘protect and serve’ thus leading him to condemn an innocent man. After he is sent to prison, where the warden, a man of authority, once again abuses his power and enforces the injustice already caused by beating Dantes every year from the day he arrives. Through this he loses his faith and hope, this injustice is too much for him to contemplate and the only thing that is eventually left in his heart is the wish of vengeance…

His life indeed changes through the injustice of those he thought he could trust, however through meeting Abbe Faria,(a priest who has been digging to escape the Chateau Di’f but got his baring wrong and dug into Edmond Dante’s cell), he is given the opportunity for things he would never have received elsewhere, an education, swordsmanship, money, power and ultimately vengeance and justice. While Abbe Provides him with materials and intellectual wealth, however the justice that Dantes envisages is of the old testament la loi du talion, ‘an eye for an eye’. Abbe explains to Dantes:“All the good which, with 13/14 mill francs a man could do in these days to his friends; and then dates reflects on how much ill in these times a man with millions could do to his enemies”[18] (p133)Through the help of Abbe Fariah, Edmond makes sense of the reasons for his injustice in prison and plots to avenge his enemies. A debatable issue is in fact whether revenge is justice at all. Is it ok for him to commit so many more crimes and murders to justify his own injustice? Noam Chomsky states that “The roots of the revenge killing are deep…the desire for vengeance displaced concern for law or security”[19] this is extremely relevant to Edmond’s actions, and while his anger is understandable, it is not commendable. He ultimately develops the characteristics akin to the very type of person he is so set on exacting revenge upon and as societal justice has obviously failed its citizen, Dantes being a victim at the utmost of this failure takes justice into his own hands and commits to vengeance. The justice system has let traitors to go about their horrendous crimes unhindered however, coming to the realisation that his condemnation was no mere misjudgement by the prosecutor Villefort, he knows that even if their crimes were revealed, their punishment would still be unjust. His enemies have caused him years of severe distress to the point of suicide and all they would suffer for that would be a few seconds of pain followed by the glory of death.

As a self named man of providence, Dantes sets out to punish those whom he believes need punishment by destroying their lives just as they have done  and destroying those most dear to them. He carries our divine justice where the justice system has failed to.  Yet to do this, Dantes quickly learns of the butterfly effect[20] and how his actions of revenge and thus destruction are not secular to those who “deserve it” but it goes on to cause havoc to the innocent too. By taking on such a divine, godly role of being a controller of life and death, he lacks the omniscience and omnipotence of God and thus his actions are so overshadowed with the dark shadow of vengeance that the idea of him pertaining to justice becomes unjust. Thus Dumas final message of the idea of justice in this epic novel of crime and punishment is sanctified by the idea of letting God control who receives justice, to leave it in god terms and not take it onto your own hand like Dantes does. As we see that even before Dantes enacts his vengeance upon his enemies, their lives seem to have been already going downhill. Such as the Morcef family whose life has taken a own turn of gambling, corruption, bankruptcy, infidelity and death as well as the traitor Caderousse who in Edmonds days in prison has fallen into poverty.

Rita Heyworth and the Shawshank Redemption

Andy Dufresne is put in prison on false accusation, maybe his status in class makes him prone to a heavier sentence (even though there was far too much proof for his case anyway) however this was a great injustice as he was a victim of circumstance, of being at the wrong place at the wrong time. As well as his sentence being a great injustice, it can be forgiven due to such heavy evidence, what is really the greatest injustice and an unforgivable one was the authorities abuse of power over his life. When the warden found out about the possibility of Dufresnes freedom, he was quick to abolish it. This injustice of the misuse of power may be the greatest of them all. Yes he did receive a great injustice by being sentenced to life in prison for a crime he did not commit, but it is debatable if the injustice can be blamed on the judiciary as the evidence against him was great and his alibi weak, considering this they cannot be wholly blamed, similarly to Andy Dufresne’s case, the real injustice is committed by the guards and warden. They completely abuse their power and use Dufresne for their own selfish gains.

The powerful protect their interests to the extent that it is profitable to them. The sadistic Hadley in The Shawshank Redemption does not hesitate to throw Dufresne off the roof for his intrusion of his conversation but when he finds out that it would profit him a great deal he not only provides him with his request for his services, which was a crate of beer for his “co-workers”[21]  the word soon spreads around and Andy Dufresne officially becomes protected “If Andy Dufresne came to either of them or any of the other screws that formed a part of their coterie, and showed so much as a single drop of blood in his underpants, every sister in Shawshank would go to bed that night with a headache.”[22] Soon the Warden Samuel Norton takes a real hold of him and this is where injustice truly comes to light. Norton embodies the system of injustice; he is hypocritical and contradictory in his own regulations in the penitentiary system. He appoints himself a “man of god”[23] but shows himself to be anything but, by abusing power in such an incredibly unjust way “The man was the foulest hypocrite that I ever saw in a high position…when Andy talked about them, an expression of amused, disgusted wonder would come over his face, as if he was telling me about some ugly, predatory species of bug that was, by its very ugliest and greed, somehow more comic than terrible”[24]. Adopting Andy as his personal banker, he became his “right hand…his silent partner”[25] and business boomed for him.  Through his abuse of power, he composed the “inside-out” programme that enabled him to slave labour but through society’s perception of prisoners as less than people, they do not care and turn a blind side to the abuse and excessive cruelty that Norton induces on the inmates. Norton is deluded religious man who justifies his self-interested crimes and exploitations at the expense of others in the name of the bible and God “HIS JUDGEMENT COMETH AND THAT RIGHT EARLY”[26]. With Andy however, he carries on being a successful criminal but when Andy comes to him, when finding new evidence that could break his case and set him free, Norton’s selfish interests get the better of him and he abolishes that chance immediately. Tommy Williams tells Andy about Elwood Blatch and his stories, one of which was the killing of Quentin a pro golf player and his mistress- the man and woman Andy is committed for killing, with this information he quickly tells Norton and Norton, not wanting to lose his most important asset, commits the biggest injustice of them all and kills the only witness, Tommy, that would give Andy a chance of freedom.

The penitentiary is a system which allegedly corrects its criminals to law-abiding citizens, ironically the Shawshank Redemption is a nest for greed, bribery, corruption, money-laundering and all in all further injustice and exploitation.  Exploitation of the system for one’s own gain is natural, from Red who can lauder anything into prison “There’s a guy like me in every state and federal prison in America, I guess- I’m the guy who can get it for you”[27], once again even more ironic is that what Red does is nothing criminal worthy, what the wardens, the ‘authority’ does is by far worse, they are slave owners- profiting from forced prison labour. A survival technique in prison would of course be to befriend the most powerful, which is what Andy Dufresne does with the Warden- helping him launder money (which obviously prevents Warden from ever helping him with Tommy’s window of freedom in case Andy would reveal his corrupt secrets).  One of the greatest quotes from the novel must be from Andy Dufresne “I had to come to prison to be a crook”[28], this clearly shows the irony of prison and more importantly the social flaws of prison and the injustice it entails upon its inmates.

The Green Mile

The glaring flaws in capital punishment stares at us through the innocence and divinity of John Coffey, similarly to Andy Dufresne, he was a victim of circumstance but unlike Dufresne, his case haunts the reader as well as the protagonists in the novel.  However, not only was the circumstance of being in the wrong place at the wrong time his downfall, the fact that he was a black man in the mid twentieth century Louisiana did not help his case. We eventually find out that the reason for having those girls in his lap was in fact a vain attempt to heal them, to bring them back to life after their brutal rape and murder by William ‘Wild Bill’ Wharton. Rather than pitying himself for the wrongful arrest and he wrong idea people have of him, John Coffey finds that the injustice does not lie there but it lies on the world; on the people, their hatred for each other is the real tragedy “I’m tired of people being ugly to each other. It feels like pieces of glass in my head. I’m tired of all the times I’ve wanted to help and couldn’t. I’m tired of being in the dark.”[29] Empathic and sensitive to the thoughts and feelings of those around him, he is predominantly affected by the thoughts of his prosecutors: his own lawyer, the parents of the victims, and all of those who know about his case and not him, this injustice of wrongful judgement also hurts him most as it reflects on society and how irrational and unjust it can be.

The relationship between John Coffey and Paul Edgecomb opens a great development in the themes of injustice and justice in The Green Mile. Paul Edgecomb is a good man, and he is faced with an incredibly difficult position when it comes to justice. He does find out about Coffeys innocence yet his position for what is right morally and granting what a person wants and what is expected tares him.  Over time, Edgecomb comes to realise Coffeys divine powers of healing, which he uses to cure Paul Edgecomb of his urinary infection, he revives Mr Jingles when Percy Wetmore stamps and crushes him and cures Hal’s wife Melinda of her deadly brain tumour.  Despite all this, the proof that Coffey is obviously innocent, they carry on the injustice in putting him on “Old Sparky”.

Justice is often discarded for the sake of satisfying the majority and those desperate for a conviction. The parents of the two dead girls and the people of the village have decided he was the killer, and they expect a death which they feel will help them justify the death of their daughter. The fact that he is black however encourages the hate in them, it is no coincidence that more black men were sentenced to death then white, and Coffey, an innocent mans execution suggests at the many innocent black men who did not get a trial and could have indeed been innocent themselves; “John Coffey was black like most of the men who came to stay a while in E Block before dying”[30]. Again going back to racism, this quote certainly does tell the reader something about the society then. Racism was obviously still a strong social construct at the time line of this novel in the 1940’s, we see this even through Coffey’s lawyers extremely racist views; “in that way also Sir Galahad was like your southern negro, who will not do those things for himself”[31]. It is this kind of attitude that distresses Coffey to the point  of wishing death, he is not only innocent of a crime, he is innocent of heart and this is what ultimately makes him the sympathetic character he is “He kill them with they love…that’s how it is every day…all over the world”[32].

The death row is an incredibly important issue pertaining injustice; it is still a legal sentence in 32 states in America[33] , supposedly the world’s most ‘advance’ country. Noam Chomsky states “The death penalty can be tolerated only by extreme statist reactionaries who demand a state that is so powerful that it has the right to kill”[34], indeed this advancement has left them in a primitive time adhering to principles ‘Oculum pro oculo’ Eye for an eye,  surely the system should not have to lower themselves to the same crime as the criminal the justify what they have done, contemplating this, we cannot have a “justice” system when there is no justice or logic in the death penalty.  We see these contemplations through the inmates in The Green Mile, John Coffey is an obvious example of injustice but so are the other inmates like Eduard Delacroix You a good man, Boss Howell…you too Boss Edgecombe…I wish I coulda met you some place else”[35] and Arlen Bitterbuck. It is circumstance that leads people to unjust behaviours and to fix this, we cannot kill and expect everyone else to then fixed, but we must focus on the problems before the Window Breaks[36]. Of course there are always mixed feelings towards the death penalty, especially for those who cannot think rationally about the case such as victims family, their justice is different from real justice, passion and rage gets in the way of rationality similarly to the passion and rage that may have led the prisoners themselves to commit the crime they are sentenced for.

                                                    CHAPTER 3

Escape

When an injustice has been committed upon us, our humanly reaction would be to hope for and to physically escape the torment of a wrongful blame. Escape is the ultimate power and revenge move by the protagonists in The Count of Monte Cristo, Rita Heyworth and the Shawshank Redemption and The Green Mile; they overthrow the system and finally get what they want in their own different ways.

THE Count of Monte Cristo

Edmond Dantes is given the opportunity  to escape his wrongful imprisonment with the help of his friend and ally Abbe Faria, the Italian priest who was also imprisoned in the Chateau d’if and who himself had the original plan of escaping by tunnelling through prison and to his freedom.  His calculations of tunnelling out of prison however are off and instead tunnels through to Edmond’s cell. They befriend each other and Abbe Faria teaches Edmond languages, sciences, literature, culture and combat skills, and near his death which is ultimately Edmonds door to freedom, the priest also tells Edmond where the Monte Cristo treasure is. When Abbe Faria dies, Edmond takes his place in his death sack, tricking the guards into thinking it is him and throwing Edmond instead into the sea. Now the sea becomes a fantastic motif of escape. It acts as a sort of reverse baptism as all his innocence gets washed away; he is no longer the illiterate, honest and inculpable person he was before he was sentenced, those qualities are certainly all dead. Through his escape and as he is raised from the waters he emerges to be a hateful and bitter man set on vengeance. Through the ‘cleansing’ of the sea his transformation becomes complete, even as the smuggling ship saves him, he emerges with a new name The Maltese, and so he begins his repayments. The metaphor of the sea and escape follows him throughout the novel; he calls himself a man a citizen of no land and is a skilled sailor and it is when travelling at sea that he opportunity of escape and solitude really is given to him repeatedly.

From his first entrance into prison, Edmond Dantes had (involuntarily) gained a new identity as prisoner no.34.  His individuality had already begun to erode but through Abbe Faria’s teaching, his new identity provided him with a means of escape after his initial escape of the prison that he would not have been able to hold otherwise. He develops many new identities and masks in his plan of escaping his past: Sinbad the Sailor, Abbe Busoni, the Chief Clerk of Thomason and French, Lord Wilmore, Maltese Zaccone and the Count of Monte Cristo. His identity as the Count of Monte Cristo gives him the ultimate escape that fools his previous friends and even enemies. Nobody expected him, a merchant sailor who has essentially been executed for treason to become a man of such means and intellect as the Count, his transformation indeed worked well as an escape from his former self. When he introduces himself to his enemies once again under the identity of the Count, we notice the number of distractions he uses such as his humongous house, his furniture, the dinner, the exotic fish he brings out at dinner in the water tanks, the telegraph ploy and etc. Clearly these are all distractions from keeping those against him from knowing his true identity, while he is clearly escaping from his former self however he carries on bringing himself lower spiritually and mentally as his self ridden interest in vengeance eliminates his chances of happiness and it is only when this realisation kicks in towards the end that he elopes from this life that he has concocted with the young Haydee.

Rita Heyworth and the Shawshank Redemption

There is a lot of moments of escapism told by Red on Andy Defresne prior to the actual escape which acts as a foreshadowing of the events that will be happening in the future: “He had told Andy that Andy walked around the exercise yard as if he were at a cocktail party. That is’nt the way I would have put it, but I know what he meant. It goes back to what I said about Andy wearing his freedom like an invisibility coat, about how he never really developed a prison mentality. His eyes never got that dull look…Andy walked with his shoulders squared and his step was always light, as if he was heading home to a good home-cooked meal and a good woman instead of to a tasteless mess of soggy vegetables…”[37]This mental diversion indicates the sense of freedom he cannot let go off, he has a guilt free spirit that can only be shown as such from a free man which he has never ceased to believe and which ultimately he gains physically once more. However, those guilty men such as Red and his friends indulge in escapism once in a while “it lasted twenty minutes, that beer-break, and for those twenty minutes we felt like free men. We could have been drinking beer and tarring the roof of one of our own houses.”[38] It seems to be the only hope of escape for men who are in such entrapment.

Abundant with corruption and further injustice, this exploitative and hypocritical system which only drains life out of its inmates instead of rehabilitating them makes Andy’s escape from it  embedded with further justification for the reader and the characters, especially Red who admires him greatly at this point. Finally, as Andy Tunnels through the wall of Shawshank, he tunnels through a metaphorical break through the corruption of the penal system, leaving behind him his own corrupt ways he mentions earlier (saying that what he does inside isn’t so different as what he did outside) even before entering prison; “Andy Dufresne who had waded in shit and came out clean on the other side”[39]. Through Andy’s symbolic escape through the wall inspires Red to find the freedom he has wanted for so long the escape allowed him to face his fears and through this he is finally let go into the real world where he partly misses prison, until he reunites with Andy on the remote island where he truly joins in escaping to.

The Green Mile

Escape in the Green Mile is very different to the previous novels; John Coffey’s desperation of escape is through death. “I know you been worryin, but you ought to quit on it now. Because I want to go, boss…I’m rightly tired of the pain I hear and feel, boss. I’m tierd of bein on the road, lonely as a robin in the rain. Not never havin no buddy to go on with or tell me where we’s comin or goin to or why. I’m tierd of people bein ugly to each other. It feels like pieces og glass in my head. I’m tierd of all the times I’ve wanted to help and couldn’t . I’m tired of bein in the dark. Mostly it’s the pain. There’s too much. If I could end it, I would. But I can’t.”[40] This heart wrenching quote by John Coffey tries to comfort the cowardice of Paul Edgecombe who gives himself and his status too much honour to really do much about Coffeys innocence. This is partly a cry for escape with death but it is also a cry for help and friendship. He says those things because he does not have anyone and the guards do not offer a hand of friendship to him, instead they partly take solace in his wants even though they are wants of a child which Edgecomb frequently touches upon, informing us of his childish nature.  Despite this, Stephen King understands the difficulties on being a real hero, he knows that saving Coffey may mean a loss of his job in the great depression and losing his family too, therefore the only real escape Coffey could go through would be death, that way, the pain would suffice, he wouldn’t have to hear and feel other’s pain as well as his own anymore.

This curse of life has been left to Paul Edgecombe however, he does not have the choice of escape yet, he must wait no matter how much he wants it, watching those suffer and die around him and like Coffey, being able to do nothing about it. Escape is a symbol of freedom, for Coffey freedom was death and it becomes so for Paul Edgecomb too as he watches the decay of people around him. Ironically too, most of the things that Coffey may have suffered, passed on to him, like a part of his immortality but also the pains that he may have felt from the horrible jesting of Percy, reincarnated into Brad Dolan the carer in his care home; a malicious man, similarly to Percy who abuses his power and harasses those who cannot fight back.

CONCLUSION

Class War, injustice and escape convolute with each other in ways that are evident. After all, any class war is an injustice- a system which divides its people in terms of money and hierarchy is a system in which we need to escape from as Andy Dufresne clearly realises. Not only does he understand that the corruption in prison is wrong but he comes to terms that indeed his job on the outside was also just as corrupt and wrong.  John Coffey of course also feels this, he feels the hatred and conflict people of different hierarchical states have with each other, it is an injustice and once again he begs to escape it. Finally Edmond Dantes, who rather than taking his opportunity to escape delves more deeply into it, finding the utter corruption and injustice that comes with money and status which Dumas illustrates once again is a fault of society. A fantastic quote to speaking of the struggles of such societies explored by the novelists is brought to light by Foucault: “The fight against class justice, against its injustice, is always part of the social struggle…but if justice is at stake in a struggle, then it is an instrument of power; it is not in the hope that finally one day, in this or other society, people will be rewarded according to their merits, or punished according to faults, Rather than thinking of the social struggle in terms of “justice” one has to emphasize justice in terms of the social struggle”[41]. He talks about the relationship between the social class and justice, more accurately the injustice that they receive, and indeed we are faced with these unjust penalties in every novel in this essay. As I had previously mentioned, and as I believe Foucault’s quote relates too, it is the Broken Window Theory that we must focus on, to fix problems before the disasters, to put barriers and preventions between the need to commit crimes. A Rousseauistic view on the state of being is imperative in Alexandre Dumas novel, as Faria states; “from an artificial civilisation have originated wants, vices, and false tastes, which occasionally become so powerful as to stifle within us all good feelings”[42] indeed our human nature does not rely on the dependence of a hierarchical structure, it threatens our survival and freedom and as Jean-Jacques Rouseau suggested; it is a degenerate phase of society. And so by working together, as “authors of the law” we should enabled ourselves to stand united because when we see an injustice we can prevent it as the world together is too big to be ignored and suppressed if everybody stood up and truly protected those in need of protecting. Any social class that receive unjust behaviour is indeed unjust lawfully but also humanly as I believe it is against our human nature to let the innocent fall and the corrupt rise. It is unjustifiable for this to happen and the only way this can be fixed, as John Coffey says is to love each other.

Bibliography

Chomsky, Noam, Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass media, Bodley Head, 2008

Chomsky, Noam, Foucault, Michel, Human nature: Justice vs. Power, 1971

Chomsky, Noam, Manufacturing Consent: Noam Chomsky and the Media: the companion Book to the award-winning film by Peter Wintonick and Mark Achbar, Edited by Mark Achbar, 1994

Dworkin, Dennis, Class Struggles, Pearson Longman, 2007

Dorling, Daniel, Injustice, Why Social Inequality Persists, The Policy Press, 2011

Dumas, Alexandre, The Count of Monte Cristo, Wordsworth Classics, 2002

George L. Kelling and Catherine M. Coles, Fixing broken Windows, Touchstone, 1996

King, Stephen, The Green Mile, Orion, 1996

King, Stephen, The Shawshank redemption, Warner Books, 1982

Limbaugh, Steven, What Society Expects of its Criminal Justice System, University of Phoenix, Aug 1, 2010

Milner, Andrew, Class, SAGE, 1999

Robert, Murphy, Chaos Theory, second edition, Ludwig, 2002

Slaughter, Cliff, Marxism, Ideology and Literature, The Macmillan Press, 1980

Stoddard, Lothrop, Social Classes in Post-War Europe, London Charles Scribner’s Son, 1925

Simpson, Ian Maryland becomes latest U.S. state to abolish death penalty” Yahoo! News. [13/03/13]

Woodiwiss, Anthony, Human Rights, Routledge, 2005

Wren, Keith, Introduction and notes to The Count of Monte Cristo, University of Kent, 2002

[1] Keith Wren, Introduction and notes to The Count of Monte Cristo, University of Kent, 2002 p10

[2] Alexandre Dumas, The Count of Monte Cristo, Wordsworth Classics, 2002, p282

[3] Noam Chomsky, Manufacturing Consent: Noam Chomsky and the Media: the companion Book to the award-winning film by Peter Wintonick and Mark Achbar, Edited by Mark Achbar, 1994 p32

[4] Alexandre Dumas, The Count of Monte Cristo, Wordsworth Classics, 2002, p552

[5] Alexandre Dumas, The Count of Monte Cristo, Wordsworth Classics, 2002, p282

[6] Alexandre Dumas, The Count of Monte Cristo, Wordsworth Classics, 2002, p188

[7] John G.Gallaher, General Alexandre Dumas: Soldier of the French Revolution, Southern Illinoise University, 1997, p132

[8] Stephen King, The Shawshank redemption, Warner Books, 1982, pp11-13

[9] Stephen King, The Shawshank redemption, Warner Books, 1982, p53

[10] Stephen King, The Shawshank redemption, Warner Books, 1982, p14

[11] Stephen King, The Green Mile, Orion, 1996, p45

[12] Stephen King, The Green Mile, Orion, 1996, p44

[13] Stephen King, The Green Mile, Orion, 1996, p176

[14] Daniel Dorling, Injustice, Why Social Inequality Persists, The Policy Press, 2011, p1

[15] Pascal Calogero, former Chief Justice, Louisiana Supreme Court (2012)

[16] Alexandre Dumas, The Count of Monte Cristo, Wordsworth Classics, 2002, p9

[17] Steven Limbaugh, What Society Expects of its Criminal Justice System, University of Phoenix, Aug 1, 2010

[18] Dumas, Alexandre, The Count of Monte Cristo, Wordsworth Classics, 2002, p133

[19] Chomsky, Noam, The Revenge Killing of Osama Bin Laden, In These Times, May 31, 2011

[20] In Chaos theory, the butterfly effect is the sensitive dependency on initial conditions in which a small change can result in large changes at a later state. Murphy robert, Chaos Theory, second edition, Ludwig, 2002

[21] Stephen King, The Shawshank redemption, Warner Books, 1982, p45

[22] Stephen King, The Shawshank redemption, Warner Books, 1982, p48

[23] Stephen King, The Shawshank redemption, Warner Books, 1982, p57

[24] Stephen King, The Shawshank redemption, Warner Books, 1982, p57

[25] Stephen King, The Shawshank redemption, Warner Books, 1982, p58

[26] Stephen King, The Shawshank redemption, Warner Books, 1982, p71

[27] Stephen King, The Shawshank redemption, Warner Books, 1982, p11

[28] Stephen King, The Shawshank redemption, Warner Books, 1982, p53

[29] Stephen King, The Green Mile, Orion, 1996, p414

[30] Stephen King, The Green Mile, Orion, 1996, p9

[31] Stephen King, The Green Mile, Orion, 1996, p174

[32] Stephen King, The Green Mile, Orion, 1996, p416

[33] Ian Simpson, Maryland becomes latest U.S. state to abolish death penalty” Yahoo! News. [13/03/13]

[34] Noam Chomsky, Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass media, Bodley Head, 2008

[35] Stephen King, The Green Mile, Orion, 1996, p236

[36] The criminological broken window theory which focuses on stopping crimes before they are committed by maintaining an environment suited for its citizens which prevents them from the need of crime. George L. Kelling and Catherine M. Coles, Fixing broken Windows, Touchstone, 1996

[37] Stephen King, The Shawshank redemption, Warner, p75

[38] Stephen King, The Shawshank redemption, Warner, p47

[39] Stephen King, The Shawshank redemption, Warner, p94

[40] Stephen King, The Green Mile, Orion, 1996, p414

[41] Noam Chomsky/Michel Foucault, Human nature: Justice vs. Power, 1971

[42] Dumas, Alexandre, The Count of Monte Cristo, Wordsworth Classics, 2002, p112

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Источник: https://muchadoaboutliterature.wordpress.com/class-war-injustice-and-escape/

The Newnan Times-Herald

“Revenge does more damage to the avenger than to the avenged.”

One of the best pieces of literary genius tells the story of betrayal, survival, faith, revenge and God. “The Count of Monte Cristo,” written in 1844 by Alexandre Dumas, brings to light a disturbing story with a powerful message.

But, the true message is not what the book is known for. This story is not about justified
revenge. It is quite the opposite.

During the exile of Napoleon Bonaparte, two best friends from different social classes in French society were inseparable. Edmond Dantes was a sailor from a poor family. Fernando Mondego was a wealthy young man from an upper-class family. They were closer than brothers.

There was only one problem. While Fernando had the money and wealth, he allowed his
unfettered desire for his best friend’s girlfriend, Mercedes, to destroy himself from within.
Meanwhile, Edmond was promoted to be the chief sailor among the crew after one hectic trip to France. The decision of his promotion elicited disgust from Fernando and other crew members.

Edmond had also been given a letter from the banished Bonaparte. When Fernando received the letter, his jealousy, lust and ambition were unleashed. Fernando conspired with the local prosecutor Villifort, the crew members, and others to betray Edmond. Not only did Fernando and his co-conspirators conspire to have him arrested and convicted of treason, they ensured that he would be sentenced to 15 years imprisonment at the prison where no one escapes; Chateau d’If.

After time passed – with her love now imprisoned as an enemy of the state, the devastated
Mercedes finally lost hope and gave in to Fernando’s relentless marriage proposals.

During his years of solitary confinement, coupled with his knowledge that he had been betrayed by those he loved, Edmond lost faith in God and every principle he ever stood for. He was just waiting to die. However, he befriended a fellow inmate/priest who was also sentenced based on false testimony.

The priest educated Edmond, taught him the ways of the sword and gentleman, how to suppress emotions, and provided him with expert knowledge in military strategy. However, the priest would have no effect on Edmond’s plans to unleash Hell along with the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse upon his betrayers.

Edmond finally escaped, retrieved the now dead priest’s vast fortune, and became a new man in every way. Edmond became the count of Monte Cristo.

With money, confidence and a polished demeanor, he travelled to Paris with only one purpose – revenge. His newly built image drew his enemies closer to him than ever. None of them even recognized him. Since each of them had prospered by deceiving others, taking advantage of men who freely gave money to others in need, and were devoid of conscience and moral fabric, the count easily, one by one, exacted his revenge by ruining each man in a different way.

He would always reveal himself to a shocked enemy just before they were about to be taken to jail, kill themselves or realize they were doomed.

Thus, the commonly held belief is that “The Count of Monte Cristo” is a story about the justified use of revenge to “make things right.”

Yet, nothing could be further from the truth.

Edmond does not ride into the sunset a happy man with a sense of justice. His thirst for revenge had only been partly satisfied. He realized that there was no amount of pain he can inflict on deserving liars and treacherous men that will ever fill that deep void in the center of his heart.

Though Edmond managed to escape from prison after 14 years, he may as well have remained there for an extra 10 years. His unquenchable thirst for revenge was just as confining – mentally, emotionally, spiritually and morally – as his jail cell ever was. Revenge kept him from beginning anew.

Edmond’s ability to see his plan through might be called a triumph of the human spirit, but it was also a triumph of the darkness within him.
“The Count of Monte Cristo” sends the biblically sound message that when we experience
betrayal, lies, challenges to integrity or any of the thousands of possible unprovoked  attacks on our character, we are expected to forgive each of the wrongdoers, be grateful for what we have and remove ourselves from the situation.

Yes, much easier said than done.

During my career and life, I have witnessed countless examples of evil deeds. But, I have yet to see God ignore these misdeeds either inside or outside of the courtroom.

By leaving injustice in God’s hands and working on the tough duty to forgive, then peace, honor and integrity for the falsely accused criminal defendant, former business associate, former family member, spouse or former friend naturally occurs.

Consider the true lesson from “The Count of Monte Cristo.” I promise to you that I will do so.

Jason Swindle is a criminal-defense attorney and college professor in Carrollton.

Источник: https://times-herald.com/news/2019/06/lessons-from-count-of-monte-cristo

Edmond Dantès

Protagonist of Alexandre Dumas's 1844 novel The Count of Monte Cristo

This article is about the fictional character. For the screenwriter credited as Edmond Dantès, see John Hughes (filmmaker).

Edmond Dantès (pronounced [ɛd.mɔ̃ dɑ̃.tɛs]) is a title character and the protagonist of Alexandre Dumas's 1844 adventure novelThe Count of Monte Cristo. Within the story's narrative, Dantès is an intelligent, honest and loving man who turns bitter and vengeful after he is framed for a crime he did not commit. When Dantès finds himself free and enormously wealthy, he takes it upon himself to reward those who have helped him in his plight and punish those responsible for his years of suffering. He is known by the aliases The Count of Monte Cristo (French: le Comte de Monte-Cristo), Sinbad the Sailor (Sinbad le Marin), Abbé Busoni and Lord Wilmore.

History[edit]

Dantès, first mate[edit]

When the reader is first introduced to Edmond Dantès, he arrives in Marseille as first mate aboard the merchant ship Le Pharaon (The Pharaoh). At only 19 years old, the young Dantès seems destined for success. Although the trip was successful, the former Captain, Leclère, has fallen ill and died. Dantès relays these events to his patron, M. Morrel, who tells Dantès that he will try to have him named captain. Dantès rushes off to see his father and then his beloved, the young Catalan woman Mercédès, and the two agree to be married immediately.

The engagement and the arrest[edit]

The marriage never occurs, however. On the very night of their nuptial feast, Dantès is arrested as a suspected Bonapartist, a helper to Napoléon, and taken to see the public prosecutor, Gérard de Villefort. Edmond had been anonymously and falsely denounced by Danglars, Edmond's shipmate over whom he was promoted, and Fernand Mondego, a rival suitor for Mercédès' hand. Prosecutor De Villefort concludes that Edmond is innocent, and assures him that he will be released. He then asks for a piece of evidence cited in a letter denouncing Edmond to the authorities. The letter claims that on Edmond's last voyage, he made a stopover at the island of Elba, and received a letter from the deposed Emperor Napoléon. Edmond hands over the letter, which he received in the name of Captain Leclère, and of which the contents are unknown to Edmond. De Villefort throws the letter on the fire for the letter is addressed to his father. Once again he promises Edmond's speedy release. De Villefort has renounced his father, a staunch Bonapartist, and destroyed the letter to protect himself, not Edmond; to further protect his name, de Villefort sentences Edmond to imprisonment in the dreaded Chateau d'If, an island fortress from which no prisoner had ever escaped, and to which the most dangerous political prisoners are sent.

Despair and near-suicide[edit]

After six long years in solitary confinement in the dungeons of the Chateau, Edmond decides to commit suicide by starving himself. Fearing he will be forced to eat, he throws out his food in secrecy. After nearly six months, he hears scratching against the wall of his cell. Curiosity about the source of the noise inspires him to begin eating again. He taps on his wall several times, and when the scratching stops, he concludes that it is a prisoner trying to escape. He then uses the saucepan on which his food is served to begin digging where he heard the scratching before in hopes that it was another prisoner digging his way to freedom. Dantès eventually breaks through enough of the wall that he is able to exchange a brief greeting with an old Italian abbé named Faria, sometimes called the "Mad Priest", who had indeed been attempting to dig to freedom.

Edmond and the Abbé[edit]

The two prisoners become very close, with the learned priest teaching Dantès all he knows about reading, mathematics, science, languages, philosophy, history, sword fighting, and economics. Together, they determine who betrayed Edmond, and although Faria disapproves, Edmond plans vengeance against his betrayers. The two spend years digging a tunnel to freedom, but Faria dies before they can escape. With his dying words, he bequeaths to Edmond a secret treasure, hidden on the island of Monte Cristo. That night, Edmond exchanges himself for his mentor in the priest's bodybag, and escapes from the prison. The jailers, rather than burying prisoners, toss them over the fortress' wall into the sea, weighted with an iron ball chained around the legs. Using a knife made from a sharpened crucifix, Edmond frees himself and reaches the surface. Edmond swims to a small island nearby to seek refuge from the storm for the night. The next day, he swims out to sea as a smuggling ship passes by and is rescued under the pretense of being a shipwreck victim. Edmond soon suggests a stopover and trading of goods at the small island of Monte Cristo, during which he confirms that Faria's treasure exists. On this and subsequent visits, Edmond becomes wealthy.

Loyalty and betrayal[edit]

Upon returning to Marseille, Edmond learns that his father had died of hunger and that Mercédès had married Fernand 18 months after he was supposedly executed for treason. His old neighbour Gaspard Caderousse is still alive, and—under the guise of the Abbé Busoni—Edmond visits him to learn more. Caderousse tells him that Morrel had tried to obtain a fair trial for Edmond, and how Mercédès pleaded for his release. He also learns that those who had remained loyal to him had suffered greatly, while those who had betrayed him had prospered. Edmond thanks Caderousse for the information, paying him with a large diamond that he said had come into Edmond's possession while in prison. Realizing that only Morrel had remained loyal, Edmond creates three disguises — an Englishman named Lord Wilmore, a clerk from the banking firm Thomson and French, and Sinbad the Sailor — and uses them to save Morrel from bankruptcy and suicide. Edmond then goes into hiding, spending nine years reforming himself as the Count of Monte Cristo.

Paris and the Count[edit]

Edmond emerges into Parisian society as the mysterious and sophisticated Count of Monte Cristo. Having purchased the deed to the island from whence he obtained his treasure, Edmond is able to place himself in the upper strata of Parisian society and assume the role of one of the most influential men in all of France. As such, he is introduced to several other powerful men, most notably Danglars, who is now a wealthy banker; Mondego, who is now Count de Morcerf and a military hero; and M. Villefort, who is now the procureur du roi, one of the most powerful advocates in the country. Furthermore, Mondego has married Mercédès, and the two have a son named Albert. Having established himself in Parisian society, and having distanced himself from Edmond Dantès, the Count is able to formulate his plans of revenge against the men who betrayed him. By the end of the novel, Edmond had exacted his revenge on all of the men who would have seen him rot in prison. He exposes Villefort and Mondego for their part in the conspiracy, ruining their respective reputations and bringing the police down upon them; Villefort goes insane, and Mondego commits suicide. Danglars is, for a time, captured by the Italian bandit Luigi Vampa, made to understand Edmond's suffering, and stripped of all of his wealth. Edmond, at the end of the novel, departs with Haydée (previously enslaved by Mondego and liberated by Edmond), leaving with words of immortal wisdom: "to wait and hope".

Portrayal in adaptations[edit]

James O'Neill, father of playwright Eugene, performed the title role over 6,000 times during his career. Edmond Dantès has been portrayed on film many times by actors such as George Dolenz, Robert Donat, Jean Marais, Louis Jourdan, Gérard Depardieu, Richard Chamberlain, and, most recently, Jim Caviezel. Dantès has also been portrayed on stage, including in a musical adaptation of the novel.

In the Japanese animated television series Gankutsuou: The Count of Monte Cristo, he is voiced by Jōji Nakata in the Japanese version and by Jamieson Price in the English dub.

There are also at least three adaptations into television soap operas, the last of which being the 2006 Mexican series Montecristo.

In 2011, ABC debuted the television drama Revenge, billed as a loose adaptation of Dumas' The Count of Monte Cristo. In it, the character of Dantès is envisioned as a female protagonist by the name of Emily Thorne (portrayed by actress Emily VanCamp).[1]

He is portrayed as an Avenger-class Servant in the popular mobile game, Fate/Grand Order, where his character is designed for the game by Rui Komatsuzaki and voiced by Nobunaga Shimazaki.

Craig Horner portrays the Count of Monte Cristo in the second episode of the sixth season of Once Upon a Time. In the series, Edmond seeks revenge on Baron Danglars for burning down his village and murdering his fiancée. Edmond manages to kill him at a party. Aftwerwards, he is approached by the Evil Queen Regina who was impressed with his vengeance and hires Edmond to kill Snow White and Prince Charming. Edmond poses as a victim of the Queen and becomes Snow and Charming's wine steward, but he is hesitant to kill them after he discovers they are nice people. Edmond nonetheless prepares to poison the royal couple. As Rumplestiltskin needs them alive for his own purposes, he poisons Snow and Charming's handmaiden Charlotte, whom Edmond has fallen in love with, with poison from the Agrabahn Vipers. This forces Edmond to take Charlotte to the Land of Untold Stories where their story "cannot play out". Years later, the Evil Queen has redeemed but because of Dr. Jekyll's serum, Regina and the Queen are two separate people. Edmond is among the inhabitants of the Land of Untold Stories that are emigrated to Storybrooke with Charlotte dying from the poison. The Evil Queen takes Edmond's heart to try to force him to kill Snow and Charming. This left Regina with no choice but to kill Edmond by throwing her sword into his back.

Referenced in other films[edit]

Edmond Dantès was referenced in the final scenes of V for Vendetta (2005); protagonist Evey Hammond describes terroristV as Edmond Dantès after he martyrs himself to bring down the tyrannical Norsefire government. Earlier in the movie, V and Evey watch the 1934 film adaptation of The Count of Monte Cristo, which V states is his favourite movie.

Writer/director John Hughes used Edmond Dantès as his pseudonym late in his career.[2]

Sources[edit]

The story of Dantès' imprisonment in the Château d'If was likely inspired by the imprisonment of Gen. Thomas-Alexandre Dumas (Alexandre Dumas, père's own father) in a dungeon fortress in Taranto, Italy, in 1799–1801.[3]

References[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmond_Dant%C3%A8s

Count monte cristo is the main character. Acting characters. Jail break

Where he met with Napoleon Bonaparte and Marshal Bertrand (later said that with Murat), who instructs him to deliver the letter to Paris. By this Edmond fulfills the last will of the captain of the "Pharaoh", who died shortly before.

Upon arrival in Marseille, the owner of the ship Morrel wants to appoint Dantes captain, and Edmond himself is going to marry a Catalan Mercedes from a nearby fishing village.

However, the accountant Danglars claims to be the captain, and her cousin Fernand also wants to marry Mercedes. Both of them and Dantes' neighbor, the envious tailor Cadrusse, met in a tavern, where Danglars had a plan to inform Edmond that he was a Bonapartist agent. He writes an anonymous letter to the prosecutor, but Caderousse is against libel. Therefore, Danglars pretends to throw out a denunciation, but gives a sign to Fernand to deliver the letter to the prosecutor. Fernand vividly plays his part in the conspiracy.

Edmond Dantes, after several years in prison, decides to commit suicide and begins to throw food out the window. And when he is almost dying, he suddenly hears that someone is digging near his cell. Dantes begins to dig towards him and meets Abbot Faria, an Italian learned monk who is considered crazy because he claims the existence of a certain treasure.

Jail break

Edmond Dantes and Abbot Faria prepare to escape together. But before escaping, Faria has a seizure with partial paralysis. Dantes remains with the abbot. Every day they communicate, the abbot teaches him the sciences and foreign languages... In addition, Faria reveals to him the secret of the treasure on the island of Montecristo.

After another seizure, the abbot dies. The guard of the castle sews the deceased into a bag, going to bury in the evening. Dantes carries the corpse to his cell, and he sews himself into a bag. As a dead man, he is thrown into the sea, where he swims to a neighboring island. In the morning he is picked up by local smugglers. Dantes made friends with new comrades, and the captain appreciated him as a skillful sailor.

The island of Montecristo is uninhabited and is used by smugglers as a transit point. Dantes by cunning, pretending to be sick, manages to stay on the island, where he finds a treasure.

Return

Dantes, having become rich, did not forget those who did him good.

He told his fellow smugglers that he had received an inheritance and generously rewarded everyone. He gave the sailor Jacopo, who saved him, a large boat, the inhabitants of the village where Mercedes lived - a fishing boat.

Under the guise of Count Monte Cristo, Dantes enters high society. In addition, he at times reincarnates as Lord Wilmore, Abbot Busoni. For sailors, he is "Sindbad the Sailor".

The count does not kill like an ordinary murderer, he acts with cunning: as a result, Fernand commits suicide, Villefort loses his entire family and goes mad, and Danglars with the remnants of wealth are robbed by robbers and taken prisoner. The Count of Monte Cristo did not want the death of an innocent child (Villefort's son), so he stops taking revenge and releases Danglars ruined, but alive.

At the end of the novel, the Count and Haide sail away by ship, and on the island of Montecristo with his underground palace they leave Morrel's son with his beloved, Valentina de Villefort, daughter of the Comte de Villefort.

Heroes of the novel

In the novel a large number of heroes, the main ones are described below.

  • Edmond Dantes - the main character... A sailor unjustly imprisoned. After escaping, he becomes rich, noble and famous, under the name Count of Monte Cristo.
  • Abbot Faria- Edmond Dantes's comrade in prison, a learned monk who discovered the secret of the treasure on the island of Monte Cristo.
  • Fernand Mondego- a relative of Mercedes who wants to marry her. Later he becomes Lieutenant General, Comte de Morcer and Peer of France.
  • Mercedes- the bride of Edmond Dantes, who later became the wife of Fernand.
    • Albert de Morcer- the son of Fernand and Mercedes.
  • Danglars- an accountant at the "Pharaoh", gave the idea of ​​denunciation of Dantes, later becomes a baron and a wealthy banker.
    • Ermina Danglars- wife of Danglars, former lover of the Crown Attorney de Villefort, who is fond of the stock market game.
    • Eugenie Danglars- the daughter of the spouses Danglars, who dreams of becoming an independent artist.
  • Gerard de Villefort- Assistant Attorney of Marseille, then became the Crown Attorney of Paris.
    • Eloise de Villefort- the second wife of the Crown Attorney, ready to do anything for her son Edward.
    • Noirtier de Villefort- Father of the Crown Prosecutor, a former Girondist and senator of Napoleon, chairman of the Bonapartist club, later a paralytic.
    • Valentina de Villefort(in the original - Valencienne) - Villefort's eldest daughter from his first marriage, a wealthy heiress, actually a nurse with her grandfather, beloved of Maximillian Morrel.
    • Edouard de Villefort- the young son of the Crown Attorney from his second marriage, a spoiled and cruel child.
  • Gaspard Cadrousse- Dantes' neighbor, at first a tailor, and later an innkeeper, became an accomplice in the murder, a fugitive from hard labor.
  • Bertuccio- the business manager of the Count of Monte Cristo, a retired Corsican smuggler, Benedetto's adoptive father.
  • Benedetto- a fugitive from hard labor, illegitimate son of the Crown Attorney and Baroness Danglars
  • Pierre Morrel- Marseilles merchant, owner of the ship "Pharaoh", benefactor of Dantes.
    • Maximilian Morrel- son of Pierre Morrel, officer, protege of the Count of Monte Cristo.
  • Dr. d'Avrigny- family doctor Vilforov, who was the first to suspect the terrible secret of this family.
  • Franz d'Epinay- the groom forced upon Valentina de Villefort, friend of Albert de Morcer, son of Baron d'Epinay, killed in a duel by Noirtier de Villefort.
  • Lucien Debré- Secretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of France, current lover and partner in the exchange game of Baroness Danglars.
  • Beauchamp- journalist, friend of Albert de Morcer.
  • Haide- the slave of the count, the daughter of Ali-Tebelin, the Yanin pasha, devoted to Fernand.
  • Luigi Wampa- a noble shepherd who became the leader of a band of robbers in the vicinity of Rome.
  • Jacopo- a sailor from a smuggler's ship, saved Dantes when he drowned after escaping from the castle of If.

Success of the novel

The success of the novel "Monte Cristo" surpassed all previous works of the writer. It was at that time one of the greatest successes of any novel in France. Based on the novel, they stage performances in theaters. Earnings allow Alexandre Dumas to buy a villa in addition to a house. He calls the luxurious palace Monte Cristo, and he himself begins to lead a life worthy of his hero.

Hero prototype

One of the prototypes of the hero of the novel was a certain Francois Picot, who, according to a denunciation-joke of his acquaintances, ended up in prison, where he spent about 7 years. In prison, he looked after a sick priest, who, before his death, told the secret about a hidden treasure. After his release, François Pico found out the cause of his misadventures and began to take revenge, killing all but one of the informers. The last informant, Antoine Allu, guessed everything and himself killed Francois Picot, after which he fled to England. In 1828, Antoine Allu confessed before his death, and the priest wrote down the story, which soon became public.

Alexandre Dumas became interested in this story, but he did not like the trivial killer. Therefore, the Count of Monte Cristo did not harm anyone with his own hands, but only directed misfortunes to his enemies.

Sloppy plot

As in most of Dumas's works, the text of the novel contains many negligence and inconsistent passages. For example, in the first chapter, Dantes assures Morrel that he has no complaints about Danglars as an accountant, he is ready to continue serving with him. On the other hand, in prison, in a conversation with Faria, Dantes reports that he discovered some kind of fraud in Danglars' accounts. In the same conversation with Faria, Dantes clearly recalls that on the table of the conspirators in the gazebo, he noticed a pen, ink and paper. But if you re-read the scene in the gazebo, it becomes clear that all of the above Danglars demanded after Dantes left.

Another example: in chapter XIII, Albert informs Franz that in college "he was very strong in Greek." And later, visiting the count, he confesses to Monte Cristo that he does not understand a word in Greek. In both cases, there was absolutely no point in Albert lying.

Also in prison, Dantes learns that the abbot's treasure is worth two million scuds, which is equal to seventeen million francs. But at the end of the book, he tells Maximillian about the one hundred millionth fortune. It can be assumed that Dantes increased his capital during this time, but it is very difficult to make from seventeen to one hundred million, even in ten years. And if you take into account the fact that in every country he bought himself a mansion (like in France) and spent about six million a year, such an increase in capital seems impossible. Although the abbot may not have been fully aware of the size of the treasure

Drug motives

"The Count of Monte Cristo" contains information about the effects of hashish - the protagonist of the novel is a connoisseur and lover of this, rare in those years, drug. The text mentions that he uses Egyptian dawamesk and homemade hashish-opium pills mixed in equal parts (as a sleeping pill). The action of Dawamesk is described in detail in Chapter X of Volume II ("Sinbad the Sailor"): here the Count of Monte Cristo treats them to the young Baron Franz d'Epinay, through whom he expects to enter the high society of Paris. After a while Franz feels “That a strange transformation is taking place with him. All the fatigue that had accumulated during the day, all the anxiety caused by the events of the evening, disappeared, as in that first minute of rest, when you are still so awake that you feel the approach of sleep. His body acquired a disembodied lightness, thoughts brightened inexpressibly, feelings were doubly heightened "... Soon he falls into a oneiroid hallucinosis of romantic-erotic content, during which he gradually falls asleep.

The second volume of the novel was written by Alexandre Dumas in 1844. It reflects the author's personal impressions of his visits to the "Club of Assassins", where he had the opportunity to taste dawamesc. According to the testimony of contemporaries, Dumas ate this drug very willingly, and after using it he became extremely talkative. During the existence of the "Club" he wrote many famous works - in particular, all three novels about the Musketeers.

Continuations of the novel

Alexandre Dumas did not write the sequels of the novel, however, many sequels are known, some of which were allegedly found in the writer's archive after his death (or attributed to Dumas-son). But judging by the style of writing and description of events, neither the father nor the son of Dumas could write such works.

Film "Son of Monte Cristo" (1940, USA)

novel en: The Stars "Tennis Balls, written in the year by Stephen Fry, uses motives from the novel The Count of Monte Cristo.

On March 31st, German rock metal band Vanden Plas released the album Christ 0, using a modernized version of the story of the Count of Monte Cristo.

Screen adaptations

Many films have been filmed based on the novel.

  • The Count of Monte Cristo, USA, starring Robert Donath
  • Count of Monte Cristo - France, Italy, starring Jean Mare
  • Count of Monte Cristo - France, Italy, starring Louis Jourdan
  • The Count of Monte Cristo - TV movie, UK-Italy, starring Richard Chamberlain
  • Prisoner of the If Castle -, USSR - France, starring - Victor Avilov, Mikhail Boyarsky.
  • Count of Monte Cristo -, TV series, Germany -France -Italy, starring Gerard Depardieu, Ornella Muti.
  • The Earl of Monte Cristo, USA, UK, Ireland, starring James Caviezel.
  • Favorsky - TV series, Russia, starring Ilya Shakunov, Alexander Lykov, Valery Degtyar, Andrey Zibrov, Nodar Mgaloblishvili, Tara Amirkhanova. (The plot of the novel by Dumas is shifted to modern times- USSR / Russia / Baltic States / Armenia period 1982-1999).
  • "Count Krestovsky" (2005, a television series was shot by Russian filmmakers, where the story of Count Monte Cristo in the USSR of the 1980s was played up)
  • "MonteCristo" -, Argentina, TV series.
  • "MonteCristo" -, Russia, TV series.
  • "Gankutsuou" - "Count of Monte Cristo" (Ruler of the Cave), - - anime film Japan, also uses the motives of the plot of the novel.

Theatrical performances

Links

  • Count of Monte Cristo, parts 1-3 in the library of Maxim Moshkov
  • Count of Monte Cristo, parts 4-6 in the library of Maxim Moshkov
  • Island of Monte Cristo - Everything about the Count of Monte Cristo.
  • Wikisource's Le Comte de Monte-Cristo is the original version of the novel (in French).

Sources of


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Edmond Dantes- the main character, a sailor, unjustly imprisoned. After escaping, he becomes rich, noble and famous under the name of Count of Monte Cristo. Also used names: Abbot Busoni, Lord Wilmore, Maltese Zakkone, Sinbad the Sailor.


Abbot Faria- Edmond Dantes's comrade in prison, a learned monk who revealed to him the secret of the treasure on the island of Monte Cristo.
Fernand Mondego- Cousin Mercedes, a fisherman who wants to marry her. Later he becomes Lieutenant General, Comte de Morcer and Peer of France.

Mercedes Herrera- the bride of Edmond Dantes, who later became the wife of Fernand.

Albert de Morcer- the son of Fernand and Mercedes.

Danglars- an accountant at the "Pharaoh", submitted the idea of ​​denunciation to Dantes, later became a baron and a wealthy banker.


Ermina Danglars- the wife of Danglars, in the past the widow of the Marquis de Nargon and the mistress of the Crown Attorney de Villefort, who is fond of the stock market game. Biological mother of Benedetto.
Eugenie Danglars- the daughter of the spouses Danglars, who dreams of becoming an independent artist.

Gerard de Villefort- Assistant Attorney of Marseille, then became the Crown Attorney of Paris. Biological father of Benedetto.


René de Saint-Meran- the first wife of Villefort, mother of Valentina, daughter of the Marquis and Marquise de Saint-Meran.
Eloise de Villefort- the second wife of the Crown Attorney, ready to do anything for her son Edouard.
Noirtier de Villefort- Father of the Crown Prosecutor, former Jacobin and senator of Napoleon, chairman of the Bonapartist club, later paralyzed. "Despite this, he thinks, he desires, he acts."
Valentina de Villefort- Villefort's eldest daughter from his first marriage, a wealthy heiress, in fact a nurse with her grandfather, the beloved of Maximilian Morrel.
Edouard de Villefort- the young son of the Crown Attorney from his second marriage, a spoiled and cruel child.

Gaspard Cadrousse- Dantes' neighbor, first a tailor, and later an innkeeper. For some time he was a smuggler, later became an accomplice in a murder, a fugitive from hard labor.
Giovanni Bertuccio- the business manager of the Count of Monte Cristo, a retired Corsican smuggler, Benedetto's adoptive father.
Benedetto- a fugitive from hard labor, the illegitimate son of the royal attorney and Baroness Danglars. He was known in Parisian society as Viscount Andrea Cavalcanti.
Pierre Morrel- Marseilles merchant, owner of the ship "Pharaoh", benefactor of Dantes.

Maximilian Morrel- the son of Pierre Morrel, captain of the Spagi, protege of the Count of Monte Cristo.
Julie Morrell (Herbaugh)- the daughter of Pierre Morrel.
Emmanuelle Herbaud- Julie's husband.
Penelon- the old boatswain of the "Pharaoh", helps Dantes when he saves Pierre Morrel from bankruptcy and shame. After serving at sea, he became a gardener for Julie and Emmanuel Herbaud.
Cocles- Pierre Morrel's treasurer, who remained faithful to him to the end. Then he became the gatekeeper for Julie and Emmanuel Herbaud.

Dr. d'Avrigny- family doctor Vilforov, who was the first to suspect the terrible secret of this family.
Franz d'Epinay- the groom, imposed on Valentina de Villefort, friend of Albert de Morcer, son of General de Quesnel (Baron d'Epinay), killed in a duel by Noirtier de Villefort.
Lucien Debré- Secretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of France, the current lover and partner in the exchange game of Baroness Danglars.
Beauchamp- Editor of the newspaper "Impartial Voice", a friend of Albert de Morser.
Raoul de Chateau-Renaud- French aristocrat, baron, friend of the Viscount de Morcer (like the three previous ones).
Haide- the slave of the count, the daughter of Ali-Tebelin, the Yaninsky pasha, betrayed by Fernand.



Luigi Wampa- a young shepherd who became the leader of a band of robbers in the vicinity of Rome. Obliged to the Count of Monte Cristo for life and freedom, in return he vowed never to touch either the Count himself or his friends.
Peppino- a robber from the gang of Luigi Wampa, rescued by the Count of Monte Cristo from the guillotine and later kidnapped Danglars when he fled to Italy.
Jacopo- a Corsican sailor from the tartans of the smugglers of "Young Amelia", who saved Dantes when he was drowning after escaping from the castle-prison of If. Subsequently - the captain of the yacht of the Count.
Batistin- Valet of the Count of Monte Cristo.

Ali- slave, servant of the Count of Monte Cristo, dumb Nubian (with his tongue cut off).

Alexander Dumas wrote the novel in 1845. The work was an overwhelming success with the public. The reason for the creation of the work was the story that the writer heard about a real island where a cache of treasures is hidden. The narrative is divided in six parts... The protagonist of the novel, Count of Monte Cristo, aka Edmun Dantes, suffered undeservedly and wants to restore justice. Let's tell summary.

In contact with

Part I. An insidious plan leads to imprisonment

The events of The Count of Monte Cristo begin in Marseille. A ship enters the harbor, the commander of which was killed during the voyage. A young but promising sailor named Edmond Dantes took command of the ship..

The owner of the ship, Mr. Morrel, from the ship's accountant Danglars, learns about the delay of the ship on the island of Elba.

The young man replies that he was following the last order of the ship's captain. Dantes undertakes to fulfill the request of the emperor - to convey the letter to the conspirator, M. Noirtier.

Mr. Morrell officially appoints a promising young man as the new captain of the ship. Dantes goes home to see his old father and beautiful bride Mercedes from the village of Catalana.

At this time, Danglars, jealous of the lucky sailor, together with Cadrusse, who robbed the old man Dantes, conspiring to denigrate an innocent youth. They are joined by Fernand Mondego, who wants to marry Mercedes. Danglars composes a letter without the author, the letter reaches the assistant prosecutor of Marseille, Gerard de Villefort.

Attention! Caderousse is old man Dantes' housemate.

The groom Mercedes is detained right during the celebration and taken to Monsieur Villefort. The seaman confesses to the prosecutor that he did come to the Elbe, but this is not considered a crime. The fatal mistake of Edmun Dantes was the mention of a letter for Mr. Noirtier, who is Gerard's father. An ardent opponent of the emperor's power, the Marseilles prosecutor cannot sacrifice his career. The prosecutor burns the letter, and orders the detainee as a witness to be sent to the castle of If, a political prison in the middle of the sea.

Gerard Villefort visits Paris, where he asks for an audience with the king, informs the monarch of the emperor's plans, which he learned from the letter, for which he receives a promotion.

Five years have passed. Prison gnaws at Dantes, his mind fades, the guy decides to die of hunger. One evening Dantes hears a noise behind the wall. The desperate prisoner guesses that someone is digging. The young man decides to dig towards him and after a few weeks he meets a new friend. This is an abbot from the next cell named Faria. For a long time, friends are preparing an escape, along the way, the abbot teaches Dantes the sciences. Faria is not young, his strength is dying out, he did not live to see the fulfillment of what was planned. Before death the old man talks about wealth buried on the island of Monte Cristo.

Plans are changing dramatically. Edmun overhears the conversation of the jailers about the burial of Faria, drags the body of the dead priest to his cell, and takes his place. Dantes did not take into account only one thing - the dead thrown off a cliff... Unsuspecting jailers throw the body into the water. The former prisoner successfully gets out, swims to the rock sticking out of the sea. Rescuers young man become smugglers.

Part II. Circumstances are in favor of Dantes

Edmun Dantes is on the ship of his rescuers for several months, having won the confidence of the commander. One day a young man gets a chance to get to the very island of Monte Cristo, which was mentioned by the late Abbot Faria.

The sly man fakes his own fall from a height, pretends to be mortally wounded in order to stay on the island. The ship leaves without him.

Edmun Dantes finds a treasure... Soon the smugglers return back, the daredevil announces to them that he is recovering.

In Livorno, Dantes acquires a ship and chooses a course for Marseille. Over the long period of the hero's absence, a lot has changed:

  • the father of the future Count of Monte Cristo died;
  • the fiancee Mercedes married Fernand, who changed his last name to de Morcer and received the rank of general;
  • accountant Danglars became a banker;
  • Villefort was promoted to Crown Attorney;
  • Caderousse was now the owner of the inn.

Edmun visits Caderousse disguised as Abbot Busoni, shows him a diamond, the money from the sale of which must be distributed equally among mutual acquaintances. The unsuspecting innkeeper reveals the secret of a conspiracy against young Dantes.

After visiting Caderousse, Edmun, posing as Lord Wilmore, visits the mayor of Marseille with a request to familiarize himself with his case, as well as to pay off the debts of Mr. Morrel, who has become bankrupt. Morrel wants to die, but a letter signed by Sinbad the Sailor brings the bankrupt owner of the company back to life. The Morrel family will bless the unknown savior.

Parisian nobleman Franz d'Epinay is going to Italy, on the way visiting the legendary island, whose owner calls himself Sinbad the Sailor. Later, in Rome, d'Epinay recognizes the owner of the island, who introduces himself as the name of the count Monte Cristo.

Important! Sinbad the Sailor, Abbot Busoni, Lord Wilmore, Count of Monte Cristo - all these characters are played by the main character of the work.

Viscount Albert de Morcer, son of Fernand and Mercedes, travels with Franz. Albert is kidnapped by bandits, the count rescues a young man. Morser invites the main character to France.

Part III. Hello Paris

The scene is Paris. The Count of Monte Cristo arrives at the time appointed by Albert. The latter introduces him to his comrades, including the young Maximilian Morrel.

The protagonist acquires a house formerly owned by the Marquis de Saint-Meran, father-in-law of the Crown Prosecutor. Count's steward, Bertuccio, reveals the secret of the house.

Brother Bertuccio was killed, and the Crown Attorney refused to assist in the investigation of the crime. Bertuccio vowed to kill Villefort.

A few months later, Bertuccio discovers that he secretly visits the house where his pregnant mistress lives. Bertuccio saw Gerard buried a living baby... The manager gave the child a second life - Bertuccio's daughter-in-law took over the upbringing of the child.

Note! Benedetto (that was the name of the young man saved by Bertuccio) had a bad character and bad manners, which led him to hard labor.

Bertuccio shares another secret - Cadrusse killed the jeweler, to whom he sold the diamond, and shot his wife. The innkeeper was convicted.

Monte Cristo opens unlimited credit from Danglars. Count Ali's servant saves Villefort's wife from an accident, and, thanks to this, deserves the recognition of the whole family.

It is revealed that Valentina, in love with Maximilian Morrel, is another illegitimate child of the Crown Attorney. Valentina's family, with the exception of her grandfather, is eager to marry the girl off to Franz d'Epinay.

With the count, a pupil arrived in France, the charming beauty Haide, perceived by everyone as his mistress. One day Haide sees a man who betrayed her people, and sold it, Gaide. It was Fernand de Morcer.

Part IV. The beginning of revenge

The hero, who became the Count of Monte Cristo, stubbornly prepares the ground for revenge: he invites his offenders to a dinner party, where he publicly announces about the allegedly found corpse of a baby, which makes Villefort and Madame Danglard turn pale - after all, this is theirs common child... Ms. Danglars husband is suffering colossal losses due to false information.

A certain Andrea Cavalcanti arrives in Paris - Benedetto in disguise. The guy wants to have a wedding with Danglars daughter. But his plans are thwarted by Cadrusse, eager for his own benefit. Benedetto is intimidated and pays him money. The escaped convict wants rob the Count of Monte Cristo... In the former home of Saint-Meran, the innkeeper encounters the Abbot Busoni. Under dictation, Caderousse writes an incriminating letter for the banker about his future son-in-law.

Attention! Andrea Cavalcanti and Benedetto are one person.

De Morser throws a ball where the hero, who has changed over the years, meets Mercedes. The woman recognizes her former lover in the form of the Count of Monte Cristo, but does not show it.

Part V. Masks dropped

In the house of de Villefort, a series of deaths occurs. The conclusion is obvious - the killer lives nearby... Events are made public. The now paralyzed old man Noirtier breaks the engagement of his granddaughter Valentina with the young d'Epinay.

Reckoning overtakes Fernand - the newspaper publishes an article describing his dishonorable actions during the service. At meetings in the Chamber, which includes Morser, Haide appears with evidence of the general's crimes.

The offended Albert challenges the culprit of his father's troubles to a duel, and upon learning the truth, asks his forgiveness. Albert and Mercedes leave Paris. Fernand learns the real name of his avenger. The general broke down and shot himself.

Danglars is suffering losses. There remains the hope of arranging the marriage of his daughter with Cavalcanti. When the prenuptial agreement was signed, the protagonist personally handed the letter written by Cadrus to the banker. Danglar's daughter flees, the financier is ruined. Benedetto also runs, he is caught trying to cross the border. At the trial, the illegitimate son of the prosecutor reveals the truth about his relationship with Villefort.

Part VI. Interchange

Valentine is poisoned. It becomes known that the poisoner is Villefort's second wife hoping to get an inheritance. The prosecutor's wife poisons her child, then drinks the poison herself. The man's mind grows cloudy.

All the heroes of the novel get what they deserve. Cadrusse and Fernand are dead, the prosecutor Villefort is insane, Danglars fell to the same robbers who once captured Albert de Morser.

Valentina's fatal illness was played by Noirtier together with the count. Lovers Valentina and Maximilian are reunited, the Count of Monte Cristo floats away, leaving the island and treasures to the young couple.

Dumas' novel The Count of Monte Cristo - plot, content

Output

The author of the novel "The Count of Monte Cristo" makes the reader think about the goals life path... Whatever the circumstances, it is important not to let your inner strength break down, you can see this on the example of the main character.

This article tells about an adventure novel that was created in the years 1844-1845. The topic of our today's story is the characteristics of its heroes and a summary. "The Count of Monte Cristo" is a work by A. Dumas (father). He is a recognized classic of French literature. Many of his works, including "The Count of Monte Cristo", cause the most positive reviews from readers. First, we will acquaint you with a brief summary, and then we will move on to characterizing the heroes of the work of interest to us.

Imagine the protagonist of a novel written by (father). It is Dantes, a Marseilles sailor from the ship "Pharaoh". He went on a regular voyage to Elba, where he met with Marshal Bertrand, who instructed Edmond (this is the name of the protagonist) to deliver the letter to Paris. Dantes also met here with Napoleon Bonaparte. Edmond agreed to deliver the letter, thus fulfilling the last wishes of the captain of the ship "Pharaoh", who had died shortly before. Morrel, the owner of the ship, upon arrival in Marseille, decided to appoint Dantes in charge.

Denunciation of Edmond

Edmond was about to marry Mercedes, a Catholic from a nearby village. With this girl, however, he wants to connect his fate and Fernand, her cousin... Accountant Danglars (Edmond suspects him of deception) begins to fear for his place. Danglars, Fernand and the tailor Cadrousse, Dantes' envious neighbor, meet in the tavern. Danglars has a plan to inform Dantes that he is a supposedly Bonapartist subordinate. For this, he writes an anonymous letter to the prosecutor, but Cadrusse is against this plan. Therefore, Danglar has to pretend that he destroyed the denunciation. He tells Fernand to deliver a letter to the prosecutor, which is what his cousin Mercedes does.

Arrest and imprisonment in the castle

During the wedding with the chosen one, Dantes is arrested. Cadrousse understands everything, but is silent, because he is afraid that they will think that he is involved in a political case. The protagonist is taken to Villefort, the assistant to the Crown Attorney, who tries to conduct the case honestly. He is going to release the innocent, but learns that Dantes had to hand over the letter to his father Noirtier, a Bonapartist. Villefort realizes that if this fact becomes known, his career may come to an end. Therefore, he decides in this situation to sacrifice Edmond. Villefort burns the letter, and Edmond is sent without trial or investigation to the Château d'If, in conclusion. He himself is in a hurry to Paris in order to warn of the impending coup of King Louis XVIII.

Fateful meeting

We continue to describe the summary. "The Count of Monte Cristo" is a work that is very interesting to read. Events keep in suspense until the very end. Alexandre Dumas (father) goes on to say that after a few years in prison, Dantes decides to commit suicide. He starts throwing food out the window. However, a few days later, when he was almost dying, Edmond suddenly heard someone digging the ground near his cell. The main character starts digging a tunnel from his side.

He meets a scientist-clergyman from Italy, Abbot Faria. The abbot is considered crazy, since he constantly talks about the existence of a multimillion-dollar treasure, and only he knows where it is. Faria's personality makes a huge impression on the protagonist. This already elderly person is full of hope and love for life. He works all the time: he writes scientific works, even being imprisoned, makes tools and steadily prepares an escape. Faria, after listening to the story of the protagonist, restores the course of events. He reveals to Dantes the culprits and the reason for his imprisonment. Edmond swears vengeance on his enemies. He asks Faria to become his mentor in life and teacher in the sciences. We will not dwell on this in detail, describing the summary. "The Count of Monte Cristo" is a voluminous work, so we can only tell about the main events.

Edmond learns about the treasure

The Abbot and Edmond prepare together to escape. When everything is ready, Faria suddenly has a seizure. The right side of the abbot's body is paralyzed. The main character refuses to escape alone and decides to stay with Faria. They communicate, the abbot teaches Edmond foreign languages ​​and sciences. In addition, he reveals to the main character the secret of the treasure, which is buried on about. Monte Cristo. Faria learned about him when he served as a librarian for one of the descendants of Cardinal Spada, who hid his wealth from Pope Alexander VI and Caesar Borgia, his son.

Escape of Edmond, meeting with the smugglers

The abbot dies after another seizure. Going to bury the deceased in the evening, the warders sew his body into a sack. Dantes, who has come to say goodbye to the deceased, is illuminated by an idea. Edmond Dantes decides to transfer the body of the abbot to his cell; The main character is thrown into the sea like a dead man. With difficulty Edmond gets out of the bag. He manages to swim to a neighboring island. Thus, the protagonist leaves the castle of If. Local smugglers pick it up in the morning. Dantes meets new comrades. He was appreciated as a skillful sailor by their captain. Dantes, being at large, learns that he spent 14 years in prison.

Edmond finds treasure, gifts to smugglers

No one lives on the island of Monte Cristo. It is used as a staging post by smugglers from a work by Alexandre Dumas ("The Count of Monte Cristo"). Edmond pretends to be sick and with the help of this trick remains on the island, where he finds a buried treasure. Having become rich, the main character did not forget those who were kind to him. He told his fellow smugglers that he had received an inheritance, and he rewarded them all generously.

The protagonist begins an investigation

After that, Edmond decides to start his own investigation in order to find out what happened after his arrest with his fiancee, father, friends and enemies. He visits Cadrousse under the guise of a priest who allegedly fulfills the last will of Dantes and bequeaths the diamond to his friends: Mercedes, Danglars, Fernand and Cadrousse. The latter keeps the tavern. At the sight of a diamond, greed seizes him, and he forgets about caution. Caderousse tells Edmond the truth about his arrest and what happened after that. Dantes's father fell into despair and died of hunger, Mercedes was also very grieved.

Morrel tried to fight for Dantes to be released and supported his father. Caderousse also said that Mercedes had married Fernand, and Monsieur Morrel, former owner Edmond is practically broke. Fernand and Danglars are now rich. They belong to the upper world and must be happy. Danglars became a millionaire banker, has the title of baron. Fernand is now General, Peer of France, Comte de Morcer.

Saving Morrel

Edmond returns to Marseille. Here he learns that Morrel is really on the verge of ruin. He only hopes for the return of the "Pharaoh" with cargo, the ship on which Dantes once sailed. However, the news comes that the ship sank in a storm (although the captain and crew miraculously escaped). Dantes finds out about all this when he comes to the armature disguised as Agent Morrel. The main character gives Morrell the last reprieve on behalf of him. It is already coming to an end, and he cannot pay off. Morrel, in order to avoid shame, decides to commit suicide. At the last moment, however, redeemed bills are brought in, and the new "Pharaoh" enters the port. Morrel and his family are saved. Dantes is watching them from afar. Out of gratitude, he closed Morrel's account, and now he wants to take revenge on his enemies.

The mysterious Count of Monte Cristo

9 years have passed. Alexandre Dumas continues to describe further events. The Count of Monte Cristo, eccentric and mysterious, succeeds Edmond Dantes. This is just one of the images that the protagonist created. He is also known to some as Abbot Busoni, Lord Wilmore and others. The Italian smugglers and robbers, whom he was able to unite and subjugate, like many travelers and sailors, know the protagonist under the name of Sinbad the Sailor. Over the past years, he has already managed to visit many parts of the world and significantly expand his education. The Count of Monte Cristo, moreover, learned to skillfully manipulate people. He is the owner of a fast ship. And in the caves on the island of Monte Cristo, he has a hidden underground palace. Here he receives travelers.

Dantes, disguised as a count, is a member of high French society. He intrigues him and delights in his unusual lifestyle and wealth. The main character has a dumb servant Ali, about whom he says that if he disobeys him, he will be killed. The count is in charge of Giovanni Bertuccio, a Corsican smuggler who has his own accounts with Villefort. In the meantime, Villefort had already become the Crown Prosecutor of Paris. The count, in addition, contains Gaide - a slave, whom he treats at first as a daughter. This is the daughter of Pasha Ali-Tebelin, whom Fernand treacherously killed.

Implementation of the plan of revenge

The main character begins to gradually implement his plan of revenge. He believes that the death of enemies is insufficient payment for the suffering caused. The count sees himself as an instrument of Providence, an instrument of justice. He inflicts blows on victims gradually. As a result, Fernand is disgraced, his wife and son left him, and ultimately he commits suicide. Villefort loses his mind and loses his entire family. Danglars goes bankrupt and flees France. The robbers who obey Monte Cristo take him prisoner in Italy. They rob Danglars of the last remnants of his fortune. The count, however, was already tired of revenge. He realized that fair retribution for criminals had done irreparable damage to many innocent people. A heavy burden on the conscience of the protagonist lay the consciousness of this. Therefore, he releases Danglars, even allows him to take 50 thousand francs with him.

Final events

So we come to the end, describing a summary. "The Count of Monte Cristo" ends with the hero, who realized that he did not love Gaide with his father's love, and sailed away with her on the ship. He leaves the island of Monte Cristo with all its riches as a gift to Maximilian, the son of Morrel, and also to Valentina de Villefort, his beloved, the daughter of the prosecutor.

Count of Monte Cristo (Edmond Dantes)

Monte Cristo (aka E. Dantes) is the protagonist of the work written by A. Dumas (father). The history of its real prototype was gleaned by the author from the archives of the Paris police. A victim of a prank, the shoemaker was imprisoned in a castle. Here he courted a prisoner, a prelate, who bequeathed him a large fortune. The shoemaker, finding himself free, took revenge on his enemies, but he himself died at the hands of the last of the survivors. The name Monte Cristo was inspired by the name of a small island located near the Elbe.

It should be noted that by the end of the work, when the guilty are mercilessly punished, neither Monte Cristo himself nor the reader experiences the necessary satisfaction (except, perhaps, for the youngest reader, for whom this image is intended). The main character of the novel is so strongly transformed that he acts unrecognized among people who knew him before. The motive of inner transformation is the structuring motive of his character. One can only speak of an implicit, dotted "shining" through the image of the calculating and cold avenger of Monte Cristo of Edmond's direct disinterestedness. He can be combined typologically with such characters as Joseph the Beautiful and Odysseus, who, after many years, were met by loved ones and were not recognized by them. Mercedes, unlike Penelope, could not wait for her lover, she decided that he was dead. And unlike Jacob, the old father did not endure separation from his son. The hero of Dumas is reborn, not maturing. Edmond's credulity and simplicity are transformed into romantic mystery, demonism. In addition, the way of his being is changing: Edmond lives a natural life, and the Count of Monte Cristo, whose character description is given in some detail in the novel, controls the lives of other people without having his own.

Danglars

This is an accountant who served on "Pharaoh". This person is envious. It was he who initiated the denunciation of Dantes. We can say that Baron Danglars is the most fallen hero of all in the novel, but he did not feel any remorse. He managed to leave Marseilles. Danglars was engaged in supplies for the French army during spanish war and got rich on it. The hero's only love was money. That is why Monte Cristo exploited this weakness as revenge. The robber Luigi Wampa, a friend of the count, kidnapped Danglars at his request and began to starve him, offering the hero to buy food for millions. When Danglars had no money left at all, the count decided to let him go. Thus, this character was the first of those who were spared by the main character. However, he was the last one who deserved to be forgiven by the Count of Monte Cristo. The book, which was written by Alexandre Dumas, makes you wonder about the reasons for this.

Gaspard Cadrousse

Who was the neighbor of the protagonist and his father. Gaspard is one of the participants in the denunciation of Dantes. But it can be justified by the fact that he was drunk and therefore did not take seriously the writing of the denunciation, believing that it was a joke. Later, the hero became the owner of the inn. Greed forced him to kill a man and become a criminal. Edmond several times, in different guises, gave Caderousse a chance to improve. In fact, he did not even take revenge on him, but only gave him the right to choose, which was a test for him. The Count of Monte Cristo, as revenge, presented Cadrousse with a choice - to leave the criminal past or to continue the wicked path. He could not refuse the profit and decided to rob the count, but fell from Benedetto, his "friend", with whom he committed the robbery.

Gerard de Villefort

This hero of the work is an assistant to the Crown Attorney. He put Edmond in prison only because he had a letter from Napoleon, which was addressed to Villefort's father. He then rose to the position of Crown Attorney. The past of this hero was not impeccable, which the Count of Monte Cristo took advantage of for revenge. Gerard had love affair with Madame Danglars. An unwanted child was born from her. Villefort buried it in the garden of a house located in Auteuillet. Monte Cristo first bought this house. Then, inviting the light of Paris, he showed the audience a reenactment of the night when the child was buried alive. Benedetto with his help became a defendant, and it turned out that he is the son of Villefort. Gerard's wife turned out to be a poisoner. All this led to the fact that Villefort went mad.

Fernand Mondego

This hero is a fisherman, Mercedes' cousin. He was in love with her, so he decided to betray Edmond. After that, Fernand was recruited. He managed to rise to the rank of general, and also receive the title of count. When Greece revolted against Turkey, Fernand betrayed Ali-Tibelin, Ioannina's pasha. Monte Cristo's revenge was sophisticated. He announced the circumstances under which Ali-Tibelin died. This led to the contempt of Albert and Mercedes. Fernand's story ended with a shot in the temple.

Abbot Faria

The novel "The Count of Monte Cristo" introduces us to another interesting character. This is an Italian priest who became Edmond's second father. He was his cellmate at the Chateau d'If. Faria is the sage who taught Dantes everything. Everyone believed that he was crazy, because he offered treasures for his freedom. And only Edmond learned that these treasures actually existed.

Pierre Morrel

Undoubtedly, Morrel is a positive hero in the work "The Count of Monte Cristo". Pierre (that was his name) - best friend Edmona, owner of the ship "Pharaoh". Dumas ("The Count of Monte Cristo") portrayed him as the noblest man. When Dantes was arrested, he went to Villefort several times in order to ask for him. When Morrel did not have the money to pay off his debts, he was ready to wash away the shame with his blood. However, Dantes saved him. Pierre was sure that he should thank Edmond for saving his honor, although he appeared to him under the guise of an agent of a banking house.

So, you met the main characters of the novel. The Count of Monte Cristo is a book worth reading. It will be especially interesting for young readers. Many of them are simply delighted with the work of Alexandre Dumas - "The Count of Monte Cristo". This novel is known all over the world for a reason.

We have described only briefly the work "The Count of Monte Cristo". Parts that are not so important for the development of the plot have been omitted by us. However, this retelling gives an idea of ​​the main events of the novel.

The gloomy prisoner of the If castle is recognized as a real symbol just retribution... The fate of Edmond Dantes, which he described in detail, is known to residents of all countries. The brave sailor paid with happiness and freedom just for building own life honestly and with dignity. Well, the desire to punish the scoundrels who robbed a young man of his family, career and youth can be called more than justified.

History of creation

Biography of Edmond Dantes is full of incredible events, so it is doubly surprising that the character of Alexandre Dumas has a prototype. The story that the writer told in the novel "The Count of Monte Cristo", Dumas heard during boat trip on Mediterranean Sea.

Noticing the island of Montecristo from the side of the ship, the man inquired about the legends associated with this peculiar place. The sailors told the writer a fascinating tale that interested Dumas. Returning home, the writer sat down to work, and in 1844 the novel was published.

The prototype of the unusual hero was the shoemaker Francois Picot, who was born in the town of Nîmes. In 1807, the man was accused of espionage on the basis of an anonymous note. François spent 7 years in prison, during which he met an Italian priest. After his escape, Pico found the savings of a new friend, returned to his homeland and killed everyone who was involved in the anonymous letter. True, unlike the hero of Dumas, François killed the fourth conspirator, about whom the shoemaker was not aware.

"Count of Monte Cristo"


Edmond Dantes was born into a poor family living on the outskirts of Marseille. The boy's mother died long ago, and the father was involved in raising the hero. Already at the age of 18, Edmond mastered the profession of a sailor and made a career on the three-masted ship "Pharaoh".

“He was a young man of eighteen or twenty years old, tall, slender, with beautiful black eyes and jet-black hair; his whole appearance breathed with that calmness and determination, which are characteristic of people who from childhood are accustomed to struggle with danger. "

The young man was away from home for a long time, so the elder Dantes was assisted by the sailor's bride Mercedes, a girl who lived in a neighboring village. During the next voyage, the captain of the Pharaoh died suddenly, and Edmond was offered the position of ship manager.

Such a happy and successful fate caused discontent and envy among the local population. Wanting to harm Dantes, three friends of the sailor send an anonymous denunciation to the prosecutor, accusing the man of commitment.


Alas, who does not know about the tricks of his enemies, Dantes honestly admits during interrogation that he recently met with a dubious person. Such a statement became fatal - the prosecutor, involved in no less dirty affairs, decides to make a scapegoat out of Edmond. Dantes is sentenced to life imprisonment in one of the most guarded and inaccessible prisons in France - the Château d'If.

The first five years of imprisonment become hell for Edmond. A man who understands that he is not guilty of anything even tries to commit suicide. The hero stops eating, throws the meager food out the window. From sad thoughts and suicide attempts, Dantes is distracted by strange sounds behind the wall. A man who has not spoken to a living person for many months understands that he is not alone and that there is a companion in misfortune nearby.


The hero and the stranger behind the wall break through an underground passage. So Edmond ends up in the next cell, where Abbot Faria languishes. The men decide to escape from the hated prison, breaking their way through the earthen walls. Shortly before the end of the tunnel, Dantes' friend dies. Before his death, the abbot reveals a secret to Edmond - gold is buried on the island of Monte Cristo, which was hidden 300 years ago.

Grieving about the death of a friend, Dantes realizes that the death of Faria is a chance to escape from prison faster than the hero planned. The man drags the deceased into his own cell, while he hides in a body bag. The next morning, the guards throw out the hiding Dantes into the sea.


Having hardly got out of the bag, the man meets among the waves of the sea smugglers who take the former prisoner of the If castle to the island of Monte Cristo. There, following the abbot's prompts, Edmond finds gold. Well now main task for the hero becomes vengeance on those who deprived him of happy life and sent him to prison for 14 years.

Hiding his true identity under the name of Abbot Busoni, Dantes visits the first conspirator, a former tailor and current owner of the Cadrousse inn. From a greedy villain, the hero learns who and why wrote a slander on Edmond.


However, revenge is not the only thing the hero plans. The former sailor supplies the ruined owner of the "Pharaoh" with money, thereby repaying the noble man for everything he did for Dantes. Edmond even gives the ship owner's daughter a diamond, having signed the anonymous gift "Sindbad the Sailor".

“Be happy, noble man! You deserve this happiness! .. And now - goodbye, philanthropy! May the god of vengeance give way to me, so that I punish the villains! "

Dantes, who is now hiding under the name and occasionally resorts to the images of the Abbot Busoni, and returns to the island, which made the hero rich. There, a man builds a magnificent castle, where he spends a lot of time alone, developing a plan for revenge.

Years later, the sudden appearance of a mysterious person fills Paris with rumors and speculation. The mighty Count of Monte Cristo, whose riches are legendary, is re-acquainted with the enemies who have reached a high social position over the past time.

At the first meeting, Dantes sets traps for the conspirators. The man subtly hints to the former prosecutor Villefort that he knows about the murder of an illegitimate child. Then the hero tells the newspapers how the former soldier (now General de Montser and the husband of Mercedes) acted unworthily with the Turkish Sultan. The banker Baron Danglars, who wrote the ill-fated anonymous letter, is being ruined.


As a result of cunning intrigues and complex manipulations, the Count of Monte Cristo achieves his own goal - his enemies are either dead or crazy. A man who has spent many years on revenge leaves wealth to two young lovers who have nothing to do with an unpleasant story. The hero sails to the island to spend the rest of his life in solitude.

Screen adaptations

The first film dedicated to just revenge was released in 1908. Hobart Bosworth played the leading role in the American version of "The Count of Monte Cristo". The artist returned to the image of Dantes in 1912 - director Colin Campbell invited Bosworth to his own adaptation of the novel.

In 1922, Fox Film released a new film based on the novel by Alexandre Dumas. The film "Monte Cristo" has long been considered lost, but was found in the archives of the studio. The role of Dantes was played by John Gilbert.


A joint creation of France and Italy came out in 1953. In the film adaptation, not all the characters described in the book are present, and the main character spends 17 years in the castle of If instead of the indicated 14. The role of the former sailor was entrusted to the actor.

In 1988, a Soviet director decided to transfer the adventures of Edmond Dantes to the screens. The film "The Prisoner of the Castle of If" consists of three parts. Filming took place in Italy, Odessa, Riga, Paris and in the Crimean city of Alupka. The image of Dantes was embodied at once by two actors: he played the role of a mature Edmond, and played the main character in his youth.


One of the most popular film adaptations was shown to the public in 1998. The mini-series "The Count of Monte Cristo" does not follow the plot of the novel of the same name verbatim. The creators of the picture changed the ending of the work and reduced the minor characters. The role of the prisoner of the Chateau d'If was played by an actor.

Quotes

"Today's friends are tomorrow's enemies."
"There is nothing that does not sell when you know how to offer the right price."
“You are always in a hurry to be happy. Those who have suffered for a long time can hardly believe their happiness. "
"One must yearn for death in order to understand how good life is."
Источник: https://apriori-nauka.ru/en/menedzhmenta/graf-monte-kristo-glavnyi-geroi-deistvuyushchie-personazhi-pobeg-iz.html

Edmond Dantès

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Also known as:

The Count of Monte Cristo
The King of the Cavern
The Vengeance Demon

Normal classes:
FGO Avenger.png

Strength:

Endurance:

Agility:

B[1][2]

A+[1][2]

C[1][2]

Mana:

Luck:

NP:

B[1][2]

?[1][2]

A[1][2]

Avenger

A[1][2]

Oblivion Correction

B[1][2]

Self-Replenishment (Mana)

D[1][2]

Determination of Steel

EX[1][2]

Golden Rule

A[1][2]

Wisdom of Predicament

A[2]

Monte Cristo Mythologie

Anti-Unit[1][2]

C[1][2]

Enfer Château d'If

Anti-Unit/Anti-Army[1][2]

A[1][2]→A+

Attendre, Espérer

Anti-Unit[1]

B[1]

Edmond Dantès (エドモン・ダンテス, Edomon Dantesu?), Class NameAvenger (アヴェンジャー, Avenjā?), is an Avenger-class Servantsummoned by Ritsuka Fujimaruin the Grand Ordersof Fate/Grand Order.

Profile[]

Identity[]

Popularly known as The Count of Monte Cristo (モンテ・クリスト伯, Monte Kurisuto-haku?) and the King of the Cavern (巌窟王, Gankutsuō?), the individual who possesses the world's greatest popularity as an avenger.[2]

The story of the King of the Cavern is treated as a literary creation by Alexandre Dumas (pere), but it has been confirmed in modern times that the "Abbe Faria" who guided Edmond when he was imprisoned on the Château d'If actually existed...[2]

Dumas and Edmond had met as Dumas was dining in a high class restaurant.

History[]

Living as a seaman in Marseille, Edmond was torn away from his love Mercédès after being imprisoned in the hellish Château d'If due to a false charge derived from an unscrupulous conspiracy. However, he did not fall into despair thanks to his mind of steel, and during his imprisonment, he met the similarly imprisoned Abbe Faria, who guided Edmond.[2]

  • Château d'If (シャトー・ディフ, Shatō Difu?)

After escaping his prison, Edmond eventually acquired the treasure of the Monte Cristo island, learned that his love and covetous affection towards Mercédès had been trampled upon and snatched away from him, and began a tragic revenge plot while concealing his identity. He swooped down upon Paris, dragging down the people who once deceived him, now the many leading figures reigning over France, into hell. At the end of his journey, he was reformed through his anguish and regret, leaving with his mistress Haydée – an Albanian princess who had been sold into slavery by Fernand de Morcerf (formerly Mondego), who had also betrayed Edmond, before the Count of Monte Cristo rescued her and eventually fell in love with her.[2]

That stern way of life; the revenge tragedy that concealed his identity; the love and covetous affection towards his lover Mercédès, which was trampled on and snatched away; and the journey that resulted in his reform due to his anguish and regret, are all applauded by the people - not only from France, but from all over the world - and he is remembered as "the most famous avenger in the world."[2]

Strange Tales of Heroic Spirit Lore ~King of the Cavern, Edmond Dantès~[]

October 1837. One year before enacting his vengeance, the Count of Monte Cristo carried out another tale of revenge as he had to avenge Abbe Faria, who he considered a second father. Faria was falsely accused as a rebel plotting the Italian unification and was imprisoned in the Chateau d'If by the "Three Wise Men" who desired the treasure of Monte Cristo.[3]

While waiting for the first one, Father Angelo Braga, to appear after inviting him to his home, Haydée warns Edmond that he should not have brought Angelo here, but Edmond tells her to go away as it is not yet time for the two of them to meet. When Concetta comes to his room to tell him that Angelo has arrived, she asks if he was talking to someone, and he says that it was just a phantom.[3]

The Count and Angelo talk over dinner. The Count was investigating the church and Angelo went for him who knows the location of the treasure. Edmond reveals how through knowledge, he was taught everything, from knowing how to live to how to fight, by Abbe Faria and calls him his second father, while also revealing that this was all a trap to lure Angelo who is one of the Three Wise Men who got Faria imprisoned. The food was poisoned and Angelo has taken a lethal dose, but it doesn't work because of his special Assembly of the Eight Sacrament training and he attacks Edmond. The Count attacks him with a pistol, but it can't even scratch him, so he has Concetta activate a trap which blows Angelo up along with the whole mansion. Angelo does barely survive but the Count finishes him off with one of Angelo's Black Keys, piercing his chest while he was surprised that monsters also have hearts. Then, Edmond declared that one is down.[4]

The Count of Monte Cristo moves to Rome to continue his revenge plot. While attending to an opera, the Count and Concetta discuss about their next objective. The target is a cardinal, and the plan is to lure him with money.[5] After that, one of Edmond's informants, one of many he has all over Europe, is killed. While at first the killing was thought to be by bandits or pirates, Concetta says that it "went over the line". The second set of killings was of a man who started an investment company in Spain, and his wife and 5-year-old daughter. The Count's group are the only ones who realize that these killings are connected as the man who was killed was one of Morrel's associates. The killings continue, and some of the corpses are left without a drop of blood.[6]

Edmond is sure that the killings are the doing of one of the Three Wise Men and is furious. The killer left behind a message by spelling out a word, letter by letter, with the organs of his victims: Tarantella. Edmond wonders if this is really how the Church works, if Tarantella is just crazy, if this is vengeance for Angelo, or if he's just playing around with people's lives. He tells Concetta to prepare, and they start a counterattack by spreading information that the Count of Monte Cristo would be holding a huge party as bait, and they rent the whole Villa Medici for this purpose.[7]

Haydée shows again and warns Edmond that this is way too dangerous. She wants him to live, and says that Faria would have wanted the same. Edmond says nobody knows what the dead want, and all he's doing is ridding himself of his own sorrows. Haydée wishes she could heal him of his sorrows, but Edmond tells her to begone, and to wait for him on the other side beyond love and hate.[8]

Tarantella shows up and notices that there is nobody else at the "party" besides him. He recognizes the Count by his white hair and explains that Faria turned his back on the Holy Church when he said that he wanted to save all life. Edmond says that those are the Church's teachings, but Tarantella explains that's just the Church's front, and the truth is different. Edmond says that they're a bunch of heretics, bloodstained murderers who themselves turned their backs on the Messiah and the Prophets, and activates a trap which fires spears at Tarantella, and then another trap which binds him with chains made to subdue tigers, but Tarantella breaks out easily. Edmond shoots him in the forehead but Tarantella gets back up and pulls out the spears.[9]

Tarantella uses a white lightning that burns Edmond and defeats him instantly, but doesn't kill him because he still needs to interrogate him. The Count asks if the Church is all composed of monsters, and Tarantella says that not all members have this power. The cardinal is a mere weak human for example, who isn't even an Executor - an inquisitor of the Sacred Church who represents the Will of God - like Angelo or Tarantella. Edmond is enraged by the claim that they're doing God's work and gets up again, blocking Tarantella's vision with his coat and stabbing him in the heart with a knife. Tarantella says that he's not just a mere Executor either, and asks where that foolish criminal Faria's treasure is while hitting Edmond with more of his lightning Magecraft. Edmond answers that both Tarantella and Angelo are idiots as there is no such thing as a "treasure". Tarantella observes that Edmond is imprevious to torture, as he doesn't fear death, or pain, or damage to his body, thinking that time in the Chateau d'If made him strong, so he says that he'll have Edmond recall what pain is like by destroying one of his belongings, and leaves. Edmond regrets listening to Ali and Concetta and not using explosives in the traps and accepts it was his own loss. Haydée calls out to the Count again and he asks her to give him more power. She says he already has it within him.[9]

The Count arrives to the inn where Concetta was waiting for him, but he is late and Tarantella finishes sucking Concetta's blood dry just as he arrives. Edmond realises that Tarantella is a Blood-Sucking Demon, a Vampire. Tarantella says that comparing him to Lord Ruthven makes sense, but that's not quite it as he is another thing, and presents himself by revealing his true name, Michael Roa Valdamjong, a being that devours humans.[10]

Faria wasn't able to tell Edmond about Dead Apostles and Michael Roa Valdamjong, the Monster of Ego and the evil reincarnator who dwells inside the hidden side of the Church, because the vampire put a curse on him. But Faria left Edmond "the treasure of darkness" he stole from the Church that would one day help Edmond out when he one day faces a non-human enemy that he would lose to - The Treasure of Monte Cristo, which has the power to remake a person anew.[10]

The Count of Monte Cristo laughs and says it doesn't matter what Roa is, as he, and not Roa, represents God's Will, and then starts burning with black flames. He immediately understands how it works, and how it's a weapon for him to burn his enemies.[10]

« To me belongeth Vengeance! »

(Edmond quotes the Holy Bible after proclaiming himself as the true Will of God)

Roa recognises the black fire as the Monte Cristo Mythologie, a legend hidden in the Mountain of the Messiah, the despair of those without God, the flames of Hell and the Void, and a power equal to that from the Age of Myths which forces a special Magic Circuit and Magic Crest into the user.[10]

The Count tells him to shut up and blasts Roa through the inn's wall. Roa runs, but Edmond flies after him, so they fight in the skies of Rome. The Dead Apostle traps Edmond with magic and blasts him with a powerful lightning, and then uses the moves of his multiple reincarnations, including the curses of the Seventh and the barriers of the Fourth. Edmond calls upon the fires of vengeance to eat his soul and turn into black flames, breaking the magical barrier imprisoning him and then proceeds to grab and burn Roa while laughing, the vampire noticing that damage dealt by those flames is not regenerating. The Count then declares that they'll just have to see whose soul is incinerated first. Roa rabidly shouts that there can't be such a thing as a fire that can burn even souls, but Edmond says those flames are right here. Roa can't heal and Edmond asks him to just try and pretend to be the Messiah in front of God again. Roa starts shouting that this can't be possible and starts to say he is a reincarnator; even if his body is destroyed, he is infinite. But Roa's rambling is cut off short by Edmond's declaration.[10]

« Despair. That... is Hell. I will not take pity upon you, rot away. »

(The Count of Monte Cristo declares his victory)

When the Count realizes it, he is standing alone and nothing is left of Roa but cinders. He feels something vanishing from his body, and believes that it is the Treasure of Monte Cristo. He realizes that he was saved by Faria once more. His body will never be enveloped in black flames again, not unless he's someday reborn as something as inhuman as a vampire. He prays for Concetta to watch over his vengeance. He heads for the cathedral and is stopped by a guard who demands to know who he is. He laughs and says that the Count of Monte Cristo has come for the cardinal.[11]

Some time later, the cardinal lost his position, and it's unknown if the Count of Monte Cristo ultimately killed him or not. Either way, his vengeance in Rome was over; but this was only the tale of the vengeance for Faria, the other vengeance. And so this is not the end but the beginning of the Count of Monte Cristo's story of vengeance in Paris.[12]

Appearance[]

Detective Edmond

Detective Edmond ~Spring Equinox Travelogue~ (探偵ヱドモン~春先旅情編~, Tantei Wedomon ~Harusaki Ryojō-hen~?) in Fate/Grand Order, illustrated by Kazuki Yone.

CE990

Detective Edmond ~True Mastermind Arc~ (探偵ヱドモン~真の黒幕編~?), illustrated by Kazuki Yone.

Personality[]

« My name is the .
Unknown to love, unknown to compassion, established as the black flame of grudge that blazes itself dazzlingly only by means of hatred and revenge; nothing but an Avenger who rages until he turns everything to ashes.
My favorite mistress, Haydée, is nowhere in this world, so this body shall remain a nemesis for eternity— »

(Avenger)

While his True Name is Edmond Dantès, Avenger perceives himself to be a different person from the seaman from Marseille. While in life he had abandoned his dark nature at the end of his gruesome and tragic revenge in Paris, his powerful and vengeful Monte Cristo persona has manifested as a Servant and is still acting as the "image of a nemesis", so he claims, "In that case, I am not Edmond." Therefore, he will never introduce himself as Edmond Dantès. His catchphrase is "Wait and Hope" (in French, "Attendre, Esperer"), which is a direct quotation from the ending of The Count of Monte Cristo in his farewell letter to his friend Maximilien Morrel.[2]

« One of my names is enough to strike terror into your heart, but I don't have to tell you what it is, do I? You've already guessed it, haven't you? Or rather, you remember it, for despite all my years of sorrow and torment, the joy of vengeance has made my face young again! »

(Monte Cristo to Fernand de Morcerf, from Chapter 54 of "The Count of Monte Cristo")

An avenger to fate and reality. Avenger always hates the irrationality and malice that is all over the world. At a first glance, it appears that his hatred is projected towards the whole world except on himself, but he is never a demon that hates innocent people. He hates and continues to deny reality itself that continues to reign while it is still full of atrocities and immoralities. Avenger defines himself as a “demon of eternal vengeance”. He is full of roughness and violence, hurting every person who approaches him, but...[1]

To the Master who do battle to rescue human history from incineration, Avenger has two forms to select from. Namely, the form as “himself that trifles with reality and a vicious fate (Edmond Dantès)“ representing his current self, and the form as “a person that is close to who he was before (King of the Cavern) as the materialized idol of hatred.[1] Particularly regarding the latter form, before long, Avenger will surely recognize the profile of his Master who continues to struggle, seemingly at first remembering Haydée, the princess of a ruined country, or Abbe Faria, who was his benefactor.

"They are not Abbe Faria."

"They are not Haydée."

Of course, Avenger himself in this form does not represent his current self. The Master who walks together with him is just one person in his past, present and future. Even though, the others should not be here. If that is the case, the feelings embraced then is also the sole thing that must be there in the past, and not here in the present.[1]

According to Shiki Ryougi, Edmond Dantès is the kind of person who one victory against him is enough for him to become an unexpectedly trustworthy ally, as only someone with great love and care would turn into such an Avenger after being betrayed by someone they love. That also means that Edmond loves humanity on a very fundamental level.[13]

If Angra Mainyu, born of hatred, is an avenger that speaks about love, the King of the Cavern, born of love, is an avenger that speaks about hatred.[1] Where one forgives and accepts evil as a inherent part of humanity, the other rages and strikes at it with vengeance.

Relationships[]

Amakusa Shirou Tokisada
Avenger highly appreciates his way of life. "That greed that saves the world is unquestionably the embodiment of human nature!"[1]
Jeanne d'Arc
Avenger doubts her current state of life. There is no reason to believe that she does not harbour the flames of vengeance as if she was betrayed by the world...[1]
Florence Nightingale
Even though he cannot so as far as recognize this particular case as a Heroic Spirit, this vengeful demon caught a glimpse of her who holds to herself an unwavering conviction, something that is dazzlingly beautiful, of which the current state of her soul have reached the domain of an idol.[1] He remembers the events of The Vengeance Demon Howls in the Prison Tower and so chooses to keep calling her Mercedes, which Nightingale assumes is evidence of brain damage that warrants surgery at the earliest possible convenience.
Angra Mainyu
Avenger respects him, for it is possible to say that this person is the original Avenger.[1]
Jeanne d’Arc (Alter) / Jeanne Alter Santa Lily
Avenger is quietly observing the fate of some girls for the materialization of a new Avenger.[1]
Napoléon Bonaparte
The man who was partly responsible for Edmond's imprisonment. The current Edmond bears no hatred towards the French conqueror.

Role[]

Fate/Grand Order[]

Event: The Garden of Order[]

Ritsuka’s party encounters Avenger, shrouded in darkness, in the woods outside Ogawa Apartment Complex. Avenger causes an unstable spiritron disruption to cut their connection with Romani Archaman to be cut off. Shiki Ryougi believes he is emitting a murderous aura, though Avenger declares he is nothing but pure rage. He then reveals the ghosts in the apartment are souls who were unrewarded in life, and their regrets keep from moving to the afterlife. Stating the ghosts need peace, he declares he’ll create a Hell for them using the grudge filled apartment if Hell itself denies them. He then leaves, warning the group not to stand in his way.[14]

The group later confronts Avenger on the roof, believing him to the mastermind behind the distortion. He tells them that his grudge shall never fade away, and even if the apartment will disappear, his work will continue. He refuses to give up until he remembers everything of the island of despair, the tower of incarceration, and the castle of treasures. Mash calls him a Heroic Spirit that shouldn’t exist in this world, but he refutes that Heroic Spirits and spirits of the dead are ultimately the same thing. Then, the greater ghost the group destroyed earlier appears. Mash believes it’s another one, but Avenger corrects that curses never disappear and declares the system of curses Solomon gave him is now complete. He declares resentment and killing will continue as long as the other exists, calling the hatred of the sacrificed his nourishment. After he states he’ll be worshiped as a god for creating an eternal hell, the greater ghost prepares to attack the group. Mash senses it has far more Magical Energy than before, saying its resentment increases with every defeat. if the ghost’s resentment continues to increase at its current rate, they won’t be able to destroy it. However, Shiki encourages her and Ritsuka to fight, saying to Avenger that all things have an end. Impressed by her claims, Avenger asks the group to show him they can deny the evil of humans, and prove to him nothing can exist for eternity.[15]

After the ghost is destroyed, Avenger jumps off the roof to flee. Shiki goes to stop him, but Romani warns Avenger is actually an illusion. Ritsuka stops her, and she kills the illusion of Avenger with a thrown knife. As Avenger disappears, Romani asks him why he created the distortion and who ordered him to do so. Avenger answers Chaldea’s enemy had ordered him to transform the apartment into a Singularity. But he used it to fuel his need for vengeance by using the Servants’ own desire for revenge. Ritsuka asks his identity before he disappears, but he only says Attendre et espérer... (Wait and hope)” as he fades away.[13]

Vengeful Demon's Wail at the Prison Tower[]

Edmond welcomes Ritsuka when their soul arrives in the recreation of Château d'If. He unveils himself and destroys the spirits trying to kill Ritsuka out of envy. Afterward, he explains where they are and introduces himself as Avenger. Exiting the prison cell, he explains to Ritsuka that they'll need to pass the seven Halls of Judgement to escape. He says neither their voice nor those of Chaldea can reach each other. He also warns if they die in the Halls or fails to escape in seven days, they'll die. He then reveals the current Château d'If is a recreation similar to a Singularity that Solomon uses as a hunting ground.[16]

Ritsuka and Edmond soon encounter the Phantom of the Opera. Edmond calls him a monster of envy who has come to kill Ritsuka. Edmond kills Phantom and commends Ritsuka for their skills as a Master.[16]

Edmond explains Ritsuka's body is still in Chaldea, along with everyone else there. However, the flow of time and space differs between Chaldea and the prison, so seven days in the prison equates to one in Chaldea. Edmond also reveals they will always begin in the same prison cell before exiting. The pair then encounters a mysterious woman asking for help. She explains she suddenly found herself in the prison with no memories. Edmond decides to call her Mercédès after she recalls she was searching for something important. Taking Mercédès with them, the pair reach the second hall.[17]

There Edmond asks Ritsuka if they ever felt lust, which the second hall represents. He further asks if they've ever given in to bestial urges, to which Fergus mac Róich loudly and proudly answers that he has. Edmond tells Ritsuka that all humans carry the inescapable sin of lust. Fergus decides to kill Ritsuka and Edmond after accusing them of trying to keep Mercédès from him. At Ritsuka's behest, Edmond kills Fergus to protect Mercédès. Afterward, he tells Ritsuka he'll kill them if they admit they cannot fight anymore.[17]

Edmond reveals the connection between Ritsuka's soul and their body is weakening. Leaving without Mercédès, the pair encounter the avatar of sloth, Gilles de Rais. Hearing Gilles spout how his blasphemy is an offering to God, Edmond says he represents sloth because he let himself fall into depravity. He then proceeds to kill Gilles.[18]

Later, Edmond immediately has Ritsuka go to the fourth hall, which represents wrath. Remarking on the subject of vengeance, he is angry that the fourth lord denies anger, the purest of emotion. He is furious that even as the fourth lord, she would still speak of salvation and forgiveness. But he will never forgive and looks forward to killing her.[19]

Arriving at the hall, he and Ritsuka are confronted by both Saber Gilles and Jeanne d'Arc, the avatar of wrath. Edmond says she willingly entered the prison tower to stop him. He believes Jeanne should be vengeful towards her betrayal and execution. Jeanne refutes his words and refuses to judge Ritsuka, saying she lacks the will and right. Instead, she has come to save Edmond’s soul. The notion infuriates Edmond, stating that none can save him. After killing Gilles, he prepares to do the same to Jeanne. But Jeanne retreats, refusing to give up on Edmond.[19]

Returning from scouting, Edmond immediately has Ritsuka go with him to the fifth hall. There they encounter the avatar of gluttony, Caligula, and defeat him.[20]

Later, Ritsuka and Edmond go to face off against the avatar of greed. At the sixth hall, they're confronted by Jeanne, who had been waiting for Edmond. She tells him that even with his uncontrollable rage, he can still ask for forgiveness and salvation. She knows that he has experienced it before. Jeanne's words send Edmond into a rage, and he prepares to kill her. He calms down a bit, though, when the avatar of greed, Amakusa Shirou Tokisada, arrives. Amakusa Shirou understands words and prayer cannot reach Edmond, yet he believes in him. He also knows he didn't join Solomon; Edmond admits he is uninterested in a being beyond love and hate. He tells Amakusa Shirou not to misunderstand him as he never helped save the world. Amakusa Shirou admits this is true, then fights Edmond with Jeanne.[21]

After being defeated, Amakusa Shirou warns Edmond that his black flames will destroy him one day. Edmond replies that not even God cannot change his state as an eternal Avenger. But Jeanne tells him that nothing is eternal, particularly evil. Edmond calls her and Amakusa Shirou weak, saying such weakness is why they became the avatars of wrath and greed. He suspects they'll meet and bids them farewell. Jeanne and Amakusa Shirou then disappear, praying that Edmond’s soul finds rest. Ritsuka asks if they were supposed to defeat them. Edmond answers their interest was in him, though he wonders what would've happened to Ritsuka if Jeanne and Amakusa Shirou succeeded.[21]

Not finding Mercédès in the prison cell, Ritsuka and Edmond head for the final hall. They find it empty, so to pass the time, Edmond tells the story of his revenge in the third person. While his living self abandoned vengeance after achieving his revenge, the Edmond recorded as a Heroic Spirit was the him who sought revenge. Mercédès then appears and attacks him with the wraiths in the prison that admire her. After Edmond destroys the ghosts, it is revealed Mercédès was meant to be the seventh lord before losing the role. Mercédès disappears, addressing Edmond by his True Name. Edmond denies that is his name, calling himself an eternal being of vengeance. He then attacks Ritsuka since only one can leave the prison, revealing himself to be the avatar of pride.[22]

After being defeated, he commends Ritsuka for achieving an ending filled with hope. He reveals Ritsuka became trapped in the prison when they carelessly said his name. Solomon placed a curse called the Evil Eye on them when they stared into his eyes back in London. Edmond laughs at how Solomon's trap failed, saying it's what he gets for choosing him. Ritsuka asks him if he'll disappear forever, wishing to see him again. Edmond tells them to wait and hope before disappearing.[22]

Final Singularity: Solomon[]

Edmond is the leader of the "special event" Servants to assist Chaldea against the Demon Gods Pillars. Once Ritsuka and Mash reach the Trash Heap, they're thrown into a place where no help can reach and Andromalius confronts the two. While he laughs at them for the futility of their actions, Edmond breaks through space-time at an impossible speed to help his accomplice, as hope always exists even in the middle of despair. Following him, all the other special event Servants show up to help. After the fight, Edmon fights alone against Andromalius, who is cursing the time they used him in their plan. Ritsuka and Mash use this chance to reach the throne of the Time Temple.[23]

Subspecies Singularity I: Shinjuku[]

Edmond was originally summon to free William Shakespeare from his imprisonment in Barrel Tower.[24]

He witnesses Jeanne Alter dive into the sewers per Sherlock Holmes‘ advice escaping Hessian Lobo. Together with her, he finally rescues Shakespeare, and they’re joined Hans Christian Andersen. He and Jeanne Alter then ambush James Moriarty, who dodges their attacks. Shakespeare and Andersen then combine their Noble Phantasms to summon the Great Detectives. While they cannot help physically, the detectives lend their strength to Ritsuka. Moriarty then uses the Grail to give himself magical energy equal to a Demon God. With three minutes before Bennu arrives, the group commence their final battle against Moriarty.[24]

Struggling against the group, Moriarty uses the Grail on himself once again. However, the detectives use this opportunity to grant Ritsuka their power. Ritsuka uses it to unveil Moriarty as the culprit which results in his strength being sapped. With Moriarty defeated and Bennu destroyed, the Singularity is resolved, so the Servants start to disappear. Having done what he was asked to do, Edmond decides it’s time for him to leave as well. Ritsuka asks him who asked him to help, but he never really answers. He tells them they have a long road ahead of them, though he doubtless they’ll cross paths again. He tells Ritsuka to remember punishment, deserving or otherwise, is always given, but they will never succumb to it. He disappears, assuring Ritsuka that he’ll be at their side when they call for him.[24]

Subspecies Singularity III: Shimosa[]

Edmond comes to Shimosa after being asked by Sherlock Holmes to help Ritsuka, knowing of his experiences involving dreams. He pretends to be a Christian missionary as a cover. Ritsuka and Miyamoto Musashi encounter him in Toke Castle town after they stopped a fight between Kiyohime and Otama. He directs the two to a nearby alleyway where they’ll see someone they’d do well to meet.[25]

Gathering intelligence, Edmond uncovers Amakusa Shirou Tokisada‘s plan to sacrifice Kiyohime to Onriedo Castle, and use her Tokugawa heritage as a catalyst to cast a far-ranging multilayered curse on the Tokugawa regime to destroy every world where the Tokugawa exists.[26]

When Toke Castle becomes Onriedo Castle, he fights an Orochi while Ritsuka’s party were fighting another one. He tells them that Kiyohime is being held captive in the castle, and of Amakusa Shirou’s plan involving her and it. Though she lacks blood from the immediate family, it will be sufficient for his plan, especially given that Iemitsu is only the third shogun. Edmond realizes Amakusa Shirou was searching for a parallel world where Matsudaira’s daughter was living near Edo following the Shimabara Rebellion. He tells the group to hurry to the castle to stop Amakusa Shirou, as the success of his plan means the destruction of many worlds, including Shimosa.[26]

He returns to Chaldea ahead of Ritsuka and Kotarou. Outside the facility he confronts Musashi, who eventually arrived there after becoming a Heroic Spirit following her death. He gives her a recording device to record a video message for Ritsuka before she leaves on her journey. Ritsuka runs into him on their way to their room to rest. Edmond denies being the missionary that helped them in Shimosa. He advises them to check their desk before going to sleep.[27]

Lostbelt No. 2: Gotterdammerung[]

Edmond makes a brief appearance when Ritsuka falls into a dream world after Sitonai forces a connection with them while they are forging a contract with Napoleon Bonaparte. He assists Ritsuka in finding their soul and sense of self and returns them to the real world.

Abilities[]

Avenger attacks by projecting his magical power by means of his hatred via Monte Cristo Mythologie. A black grudge effect occurs, giving damage to his opponent. Fundamentally, it is a poisonous system, where it primarily gives direct damage in addition to persistent damage and an abnormal grudge status effect.[1]

Dantes has a unique connection to Ritsuka's dreams, which allows him to protect them from the countless grudges and resentments of the enemies that they have fought throughout the Grand Orders.

Skills[]

Class Skills[]

  • Avenger (A Rank): One’s state of being as an avenger that gathers people’s hatred and resentment onto themselves; a way of being that became a Skill. Although it is easy for the hostility from his surroundings to be directed towards him, negative emotions directed towards Avenger will automatically be converted into his power.[1]
  • Oblivion Correction (B Rank): Although people, who are living beings, will be forgetful of many things, an avenger never forgets. An avenger’s attacks, which strike from beyond the people’s lapses of memory, will have their critical hit effects strengthened.[1]

Personal Skills[]

  • Determination of Steel (EX Rank): The dynamism and mind of steel of the man who walked on the path of revenge throughout his entire life after breaking out of the Château d’If (Tower of If) prison, which was even called the Hell on this Earth, becoming a Skill. A complete blockade of his sense of pain, resulting in effects such as the acquisition of a superhuman mind and body that is even able to endure ultrahigh-speed actions. It is a composite Skill that also primarily contains the effects of the Valor Skill and the Calm and Collected Skill.[1]
  • Golden Rule (A Rank): The Count of Monte Cristo attained everlasting wealth and political power by obtaining the “hidden treasure” told of by Abbe Faria in the Château d’If, so money is hardly a matter for him to be troubled with.[1]
  • Wisdom of Predicament (A Rank): The ability to call upon Luck with a precedence in critical situations. The wisdom brought about by the abundant knowledge he received from Abbe Faria and his own natural intelligence. By combining this with the special characteristics of his Extra Class, it becomes possible for him to use the Item Construction Skill, which is primarily a Caster’s Class Skill, at Rank B.[1]

Noble Phantasms[]

In addition to Monte Cristo Mythologie, he possesses the Noble PhantasmsEnfer Château d'If, his mental power of steel, and Attendre, Espérer, an unbelievable recovery Noble Phantasm that is also the agglomeration of all human knowledge into the words "Wait and Hope".[1]

Development[]

Creation and Conception[]

« I decided on a character that is constantly engulfed in black flames because of his aspect, being called the embodiment of the desire for revenge, and I arrived at this design with that thought. »

(Rui Komatsuzaki)


Rui Komatsuzaki is the character illustrator for Avenger, who also designed the characters for the Danganronpa Series.[1][2] His meta title "Super High School Level Heroic Spirit" also referenced the Danganronpa Series, where the characters are all Super High School Level students, and his design is reminiscent of Nagito Komaeda from the second game of the series. Hikaru Sakurai is the scenario writer for his character.[1]

Rather than go for the traditional image of a "cool old Count" for Dantès' character that Nasu feels was "brought to utter perfection" by Gonzo in their Gankutsuou anime, they wished to distance themselves from that characterization and instead went for a twist with a "younger count." He is a "Super High School Level Heroic Spirit", developed with the idea of having a "cool dark hero" and out of Nasu's desire for having a Komatsuzaki-developed Servant. Nasu feels that Dantès' "true worth" is in his third stage ascension appearance, the "condensation of his chuuni essence."[28][29]

References[]

Источник: https://typemoon.fandom.com/wiki/Edmond_Dant%C3%A8s

Fr. Francisco de Paula Sanchez 1849-1928 Father FRANCISCO DE PAULA SANCHEZ -- The Spanish Jesuit was Rizal's favorite teacher in Ateneo where the said priest taught Literature. It was under Fr. Sanchez that the young Rizal learned the Greek and Latin Classics. He encouraged Rizal to cultivate his literary skills, by writing essays and poetry. Mutual respect was  always there between mentor and student. Father Sanchez even became a staunch defender of the Noli. But in a letter to Blumentritt dated May 1890, Rizal described the priest; "Father Sanchez is a penetrating observer, although rather pessimistic, always looking at the bad side of things. When we were in school, we used to call him a 'dark spirit' and the students nicknamed him 'Paniki,' which is' a kind of bat". Rizal in his early years in Ateneo When Rizal was exiled in Dapitan, Father Sanchez was sent by his Jesuit superiors to try to reform his former student's radical s

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Источник: http://fyumul.blogspot.com/2013/01/rizals-favorite-count-of-monte-cristo.html

Count of montecristo

TITLEThe Count of Montecristo refers to the name assumed by Edmond Dantes in order to take back what was stolen from him; his love.

AUTHORAlexandre Dumas, pere, (1802-1870), prolific French playwright, historian, and author is best known today for his novel (first serialized in the magazine Le Siecle), The Three Musketeers (1844). Alexandre Dumas pere was born on 24 July 1802 in the village of Villers-Cotterets, just outside of Paris, France, the third child born to Marie Louise Labouret, daughter of an inn keeper, and Thomas Alexandre Davy de la Pailleterie (1762-1806) a military General under Napoleon. Alexandres grandfather, the Marquis Alexandre Davy de La Pailleterie (1710-1786) married a slave he fell in love with in San Domingo (now Haiti) named Marie Louise Cesette Dumas (d. 1772). Thomas took her last name when he characteristics of edmond dantes enlisted with the French army. After a falling out with Napoleon due to his criticism of the Egypt campaign, and a long imprisonment which left him in poor health, Thomas returned returned home a broken man with no pension.

After his death the family was left in dire financial straits. Alexandres mother set her best efforts to providing an education for her son although he proved to be less than enthusiastic about it. He attended Abbe Gregoires school before finding employment with a local notary to help support the family. In 1822 Dumas pere set off for Paris and was soon immersed in literary life. He worked as a scribe for the duc dOrleans, later to be King Louis Philippe when the 1830 revolution which Dumas pere participated in ousted King Charles X. He met noted playwrights and collaborated with them before making his own entrance to the stage at the Comedie francaise with his plays Henry III and His Court (1829), The Tower of Nesle (1832), Kean (1836), and his Byronic Antony (first performed in 1831) inspired by the works of Lord George Gordon Byron. An avid reader of William Shakespeare and Sir Walter Scott, his dramas were immensely popular, being among the first of the Romantic Movement along with friend and sometimes rival Victor Hugos (1802-1885). They were a decided change from the neoclassic style that dominated Parisian stages at the time.

During this period Dumas pere had a son, Alexandre fils (1824-1895) with his lover Marie Laure Catherine Labay (1794-1868) who also became a noted author and playwright, being admitted to the Academie francaise in 1874. Although Dumas pere kept up his womanising ways, in 1840 he married actress Ida Ferrier (1811-1859) and had an illegitimate daughter, Marie Alexandrine (b. 1831) with Belle Kreilssamner (1803-1875). After a short but terrifying bout of cholera during the epidemic of 1832, Dumas pere was ordered by his physician–“ when they have nothing more to say” [from The Glacier Land (1852)]–to take a tour of Europe; on 21 July 1832 he left Paris and embarked on his first of many travels which took him to such countries as Austria, the Netherlands, Spain, England, Germany, and North Africa. As was his wont, he kept remarkable records of his adventures included in Travel Impressions: In Switzerland (1834), A Year in Florence (1841), From Paris to Cadiz (1847), The Caucasus (1859), and Travel Impressions: In Russia (1860). Dumas pere continued his prodigious output of essays, short stories, and novels. With the success of The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers he sought a place of refuge to concentrate on further writings.

He bought land and built the Chateau de Monte Cristo (nicknamed Chateau dIf) in Port Marly, Yvelines, France, now a museum. There he worked when not lavishly entertaining guests, but it was not long before he had to sell it when his debts grew too much. In 1851 he fled to Brussels, Belgium to avoid creditors. Further titles published during this time were his Valois Romances including Queen Margot (1845), The Lady of Monsoreau (a.

ka. Chicot the Jester (1845), and The Forty-Five Guardsmen (1847); and The Regents Daughter (1845), The Two Dianas (1846), The Black Tulip (1850), The Wolf Leader (1857), The Companions of Jehu (1857), and his autobiography Mes Memoires (written between 1852-55). AAlexandre Dumas pere died on 5 December 1870 at his sons villa in Puys, near Dieppe, France. He was buried in the cemetery of Villers-Cotterets, but as of the year 2002 he now rests in the Pantheon in Paris, among other such notable French literary giants as Emile Zola, Victor Hugo, Jean Jacques Rousseau, and Francois-Marie Arouet Voltaire. CHARACTERS AND THEIR CHARCTERIZATION ??? Edmond Dantes – The protagonist of the novel. Dantes is an intelligent, honest, and loving man who turns bitter and vengeful after he is framed for a crime he does not commit. When Dantes finds himself free and enormously wealthy, he takes it upon himself to act as the agent of Providence, rewarding those who have helped him in his plight and punishing those responsible for his years of agony.

??? The Count of Monte Cristo – The identity Dantes assumes when he emerges from prison and inherits his vast fortune. As a result, the Count of Monte Cristo is usually associated with a coldness and bitterness that comes from an existence based solely on vengeance. ??? Lord Wilmore – The identity of an eccentric English nobleman that Dantes assumes when committing acts of random generosity. Lord Wilmore contrasts sharply with Monte Cristo, who is associated with Dantes??™s acts of bitterness and cruelty. Appropriately, Monte Cristo cites Lord Wilmore as one of his enemies. ??? Abbe Busoni – Another of Dantes??™s false personas.

The disguise of Abbe Busoni, an Italian priest, helps Dantes gain the characteristics of edmond dantes of the people whom the count wants to manipulate because the name connotes religious authority. ??? Sinbad the Sailor – The name Dantes uses as the signature for his anonymous gift to Morrel. Sinbad the Sailor is also the persona Dantes adopts during his time in Italy. ??? Mercedes – Dantes??™s beautiful and good fiancee. Though Mercedes marries another man, Fernand Mondego, while Dantes is in prison, she never stops loving Dantes. Mercedes is one of the few whom Dantes both punishes (for her disloyalty) and rewards (for her enduring love and underlying goodness). ??? Abbe Faria – A priest and brilliant thinker whom Dantes meets in prison. Abbe Faria becomes Dantes??™s intellectual father: during their many years as prisoners, he teaches Dantes history, science, art, and many languages.

He then bequeaths to Dantes his vast hidden fortune. Abbe Faria is the most important catalyst in Dantes??™s transformation into the vengeful Count of Monte Cristo. ??? Fernand Mondego – Dantes??™s rival for Mercedes??™ affections.

Mondego helps in framing Dantes for treason and then marries Mercedes himself when Dantes is imprisoned. Through acts of treachery Mondego becomes a wealthy and powerful man and takes on the name of the Count de Morcerf. He is the first victim of Dantes??™s vengeance. ??? Baron Danglars – A greedy, envious cohort of Mondego. Danglars hatches the plot to frame Dantes for treason. Like Mondego, he becomes wealthy and powerful, but loses everything when Monte Cristo takes his revenge. Danglars??™s obsession with the accumulation of wealth makes him an easy target for Monte Cristo, who has seemingly limitless wealth on hand to exact his revenge.

??? Caderousse – A lazy, drunk, and greedy man. Caderousse is present when the plot to frame Dantes is hatched, but he does not take an active part in the crime. Unlike Danglars and Mondego, Caderousse never finds his fortune, instead making his living through petty crime and the occasional murder. ??? Gerard de Villefort? -?  The blindly ambitious public prosecutor responsible for sentencing Dantes to life in prison.

Like the others, Villefort eventually receives punishment from Dantes. Villefort stands out as Monte Cristo??™s biggest opposition, as he employs his own power to judge people and mete out punishments. ??? Monsieur Morrel ? -?  The kind, honest shipowner who was once Dantes??™s boss. Morrel does bank of america atm check deposit near me in his power to free Dantes from prison and tries to save Dantes??™s father from death. When Dantes emerges from prison, he discovers that Morrel is about to descend into financial ruin, so he carries out an elaborate plot to save his one true friend.

??? Louis Dantes? -?  Dantes??™s father. Grief-stricken, Louis Dantes starves himself to death when Dantes is imprisoned. It is primarily for his father??™s death that Dantes seeks vengeance. ??? Maximilian Morrel? -?  The son of Monsieur Morrel. Brave and honorable like his father, Maximilian becomes Dantes??™s primary beneficiary. Maximilian and his love, Valentine, survive to the end of the story as two good and happy people, personally unaffected by the vices of power, wealth, and position. ??? Albert de Morcerf? -?  The son of Fernand Mondego and Mercedes.

Unlike his father, Albert is brave, honest, and kind. Mercedes??™s devotion to both Albert and Dantes allows Monte Cristo to realize her unchanging love for him and causes him to think more deeply about his sole desire for revenge. ??? Valentine Villefort? -?  Villefort??™s saintly and beautiful daughter. Like Maximilian Morrel, her true love, she falls under Dantes??™s protection. ??? Noirtier? -?  Villefort??™s father. Once a powerful French revolutionary, Noirtier is brilliant and willful, even when paralyzed by a stroke.

He proves a worthy opponent to his son??™s selfish ambitions. ??? Haydee? -?  The daughter of Ali Pacha, the vizier of the Greek state of Yanina. Haydee is sold into slavery after her father is betrayed by Mondego and murdered. Dantes purchases Haydee??™s freedom and watches her grow into adulthood, eventually falling in love with her. ??? Signor Bertuccio? -?  Dantes??™s steward.

Though Bertuccio is loyal and adept, Dantes chooses him as his steward not for his personal qualities but because of his vendetta against Villefort. ??? Benedetto? -?  The illegitimate son of Villefort and Madame Danglars. Though raised lovingly by Bertuccio and Bertuccio??™s widowed sister-in-law, Benedetto nonetheless turns to a life of brutality and crime.

Handsome, charming, and a wonderful liar, Benedetto plays the part of Andrea Cavalcanti in one of Dantes??™s elaborate revenge schemes. ??? Madame d??™Villefort? -?  Villefort??™s murderous wife. Devoted wholly to her son Edward, Madame d??™Villefort turns to crime in order to ensure his fortune. ??? Julie Herbaut? -?  The daughter of Monsieur Morrel and sister of Maximilian. Angelically good and blissfully in love, Julie and her husband, Emmanuel, prove to Monte Cristo that it is possible to be truly satisfied with one??™s life. ??? Emmanuel Herbaut? -?  Julie??™s husband.

Emmanuel is just as noble and perpetually happy as his wife, Julie. ??? Madame Danglars? -?  Danglars??™s wife. Greedy, conniving, and disloyal, Madame Danglars engages in a never-ending string of love affairs that help bring her husband to the brink of financial ruin. ??? Eugenie Danglars? -?  The Danglars??™ daughter. A brilliant musician, Eugenie longs for her independence and despises men.

On the eve of her wedding, she flees for Italy with her true love, Louise d??™Armilly. ??? Louise d??™Armilly? -?  Eugenie Danglars??™s music teacher and constant companion. ??? Lucien Debray? -?  The secretary to the French minister of the interior. Debray illegally leaks government secrets to his lover, Madame Danglars, so that she can invest wisely with her husband??™s money.

??? Ali? -?  Dantes??™s mute Nubian slave. Ali is amazingly adept with all sorts of weapons. ??? Luigi Vampa? -?  A famous Roman bandit. Vampa is indebted to Dantes for once setting him free, and he puts himself at the service of Dantes??™s vengeful ends. ??? Major Cavalcanti? -?  A poor and crooked man whom Dantes resurrects as a phony Italian nobleman.

??? Edward d??™Villefort? -?  The Villeforts??™ spoiled son. Edward is an innocent victim of Dantes??™s elaborate revenge scheme. ??? Beauchamp? -?  A well-known journalist and good friend to Albert de Morcerf. ??? Franz d??™Epinay? -?  Another good friend to Albert de Morcerf. D??™Epinay is the unwanted fiance of Valentine Villefort. ??? Marquis of Saint-Meran? -?  The father of Villefort??™s first wife, who dies shortly after her wedding day. ??? Marquise of Saint-Meran? -?  The wife of the Marquis of Saint-Meran.

??? Jacopo? -?  A smuggler who helps Dantes win his freedom. When Jacopo proves his selfless loyalty, Dantes rewards him by buying the poor man his own ship and crew. ??? Ali Pacha ? -?  A Greek nationalist leader whom Mondego betrays. This betrayal leads to Ali Pacha??™s murder at the hands of the Turks and the seizure of his kingdom. Ali Pacha??™s wife and his daughter, Haydee, are sold into slavery.

??? Baron of Chateau-Renaud? -?  An aristocrat and diplomat. Chateau-Renaud is nearly killed in battle in Constantinople, but Maximilian Morrel saves him at the last second. Chateau-Renaud introduces Maximilian into Parisian society, which leads to Maximilian and Dantes crossing paths. ??? Peppino? -? An Italian shepherd who has been arrested and sentenced to death for the crime of being an accomplice to bandits, when he merely provided them with food. Monte Cristo buys Peppino his freedom. ??? Countess G??” -? A beautiful Italian aristocrat who suspects that Monte Cristo is a vampire. VOCABULARY OR KEY WORDS 1.

Alacrity. Page 219 Liveliness and eagerness; “ he accepted with alacrity”; “ the smartness of the pace soon exhausted him. Celeridad prontitud Jose was waiting with alacrity for his Christmas present. 2. Perspicacious Page 251 Acutely insightful and wise; “ much too perspicacious to be taken in by such a spurious argument”; “ observant and thoughtful, he was given to .

. clear-eyed: mentally acute or penetratingly discerning; “ too clear-eyed not to see what problems would follow”; “ chaos could be prevented only by clear-sighted leadership”; “ much too perspicacious to be taken in by so spurious an argument” De forma perspicaz The little girl showed to be perspicacious while talking to the teacher about her whereabouts while playing hide and seek. 3. Conscription Page 158 Compulsory military service. Servicio militar compulsorio. The father did not want to leave the family, but he was called to conscription.

4. Frejus Page137 Is a coastal town on the Cote dAzur and commune in the Var department. Un pueblo de la costa de Cote dAzur The trip to Ferjus was fascinating. 5. Entrusts Page 197 Made responsible for something Ser responsable de algo. The treasure was entrusted to the government. 6.

Goddam Common misspelling of goddamn Frase comun para denotar molestia. Goddam! I was supposed to be in that car. 7. Curtsied Page 211 Respectful bow made by women, consisting of bending the knees and lowering the body. Un gesto de respeto realizado por una mujer que consiste en doblar un poco las rodillas y bajar el cuerpo. The Queen Isabell curtsied each of her guests prior to entering the ballroom. 8. Unprepossessing Page 3 Unattractive Poco atractivo The offer was unprepossessing, but he had no choice and accepted.

9. Velvety Page 13 Suggestive of or resembling velvet; smooth or soft. Parecido a la tela de seda. She a beautiful and velvety dress; she looked amazing. 10. Endeavored Page 97 To exert oneself to do or effect something; make an effort, strive. Esforzarse. Julio endeavored in order to obtain a good grade on the math class.

11. Pickaxe Page 111 Pick. Piqueta The farmer used the pickaxe to take out the tree in order for the water to flow. 12. Brocades Page 227 Fabric woven with an elaborate raised design, often using gold or silver thread. Tela elaborada con detalles a relieve, usualmente realizados con hilos en oro o plata. The dress had brocades all over; she looked like a princess in her wedding dress. 13.

Plucking Page 231 To pull off or out from the place of growth, as fruit, flowers, or feathers. Arrancar del lugar de nacimiento como frutas, flores o plumas. Ana was plucking the hen feathers and everyone was watching while she prepared to cook a great meal. 14.

Catacombs Page 179 An underground cementary, one consisting of tunnels and romos with recesses dugo ut for coffins and tumbs. Un cementerio bajo el nivel del terreno The catacombs were a very scary place for everyone characteristics of edmond dantes the tour. Rendezvous Page 180 An agreement to meet at a certain time or place. Arreglo para encontrarse en algun lugar o a alguna hora. The rendezvous was set for Wednesday afternoon. Prosaic Page 198 Commonplace or dull. Un lugar comun. Einstein had a prosaic mind.

Probity Page 235 Integrity and uprightness; honesty. Integridad, honestidad. Giving back the money to the people was an act of probity. Cicerone Page 484 A guide who conducts sightseersGuia de personas sin visionShe became his cicerone after the accident that almost cost him his life. Expiation Page 485 The act of making amends El acto de corregir The dying woman needed expiation for her sins. Quay Page 490 A landing place Un lugar para aterrizar The quay was vast enough for the boat.

Starboard Page 110 The right-hand side of or direction from a vessel or aircraft facing forward. Estribor The ship was traveling starboard but the storm was hitting the boat very hard. Discomfited Page 222 To confuse; to frustrate the plans Frustar algun evento. The plans were discomfited as a consequence of the accident. Coquettishly Page 232 Flirting Coquetear She was behaving too coquettishly for her age. Garb Page 289 Fashion or mode of dress.

Moda para vestirse. Her garb was the envy of every woman in the party. Phlegmatically Page 384 Not easily excited to action or display of emotion. No se exita facilmente. She was acting phlegmatically; she seemed to be under the influence of some drug. SETTING ??? On the 24th of February, 1815, the watch-tower of Notre-Dame de la Garde signaled the arrival of the three master Pharaoh, from Smyrna, Trieste, and Naples.

Chapter I, page 11. ??? Before him, at a distance of a hundred fathoms, rose the black, steep rock on which stood the frowning Chateau D??™If. Chapter VII, page 56. ??? Exalted by the feeling of liberty, Dantes continued to cleave the waves in what he reckoned should be a direct line for the Isle of Tiboulen. Chapter XVII, page 125POINT OF VIEWThe novel is narrated by an anonymous voice; speaks in the third person, focusing almost entirely on outward action and behavior rather than delving into the psychological realities of the characters. THEMEWhen Dantes escapes from prison, he is obsessed with gaining revenge against those who betrayed him, as well as rewarding those who remained loyal to him.

The revenge theme drives the entire narrative, and Dantes, as Monte Cristo, pursues it patiently and ruthlessly. He believes he is one of those “ extraordinary beings” who act as agents of divine Providence. He brings punishment when it is deserved and when it is due. Monte Cristo states this quite explicitly to Villefort when they first meet in Paris and engage in a philosophical discussion (Chapter 48, “ Ideology”). Monte Cristo takes Villefort to task for thinking about justice only in terms of human law and society.

He, on the other hand, is aware of a more profound reality. He tells the astonished Villefort of an encounter he had with Satan, in which he declared that “ the most beautiful, noblest, most sublime thing in the world is to recompense and punish.” Dantes requested that he become Providence itself. Satan told him that the most he could aspire to was to be an agent of Providence.

Eventually, Monte Cristo comes to see the limitations that attend a human being who seeks to appropriate to himself a function of the divine. Having previously used the Biblical notion that the sins of the father are visited on the children to justify the devastation he was prepared to wreak on whole families, he is brought up in shock at the death of the innocent nine-year-old Edouard. He realizes that even though Edouard is the son of Villefort, one of the guilty men, Edouard does not deserve the death he receives.

For the first time, this supremely self-confident man doubts the wisdom of his mission of revenge. Monte Cristo feels he has gone too far and can no longer say, “ God is for and with me.” With unaccustomed humility, he acknowledges to Maximilien that the gods operate with a kind of infallibility that is not permissible to a mere man. He leaves Paris with many regrets, although he tries to reassure himself that he never misused the power he was given for any “ personal good or to any useless cause.” But he cannot shake off his misgivings: “ Having reached the summit of his vengeance by a long and tortuous path, he saw an abyss of doubt on the other side of the mountain.” Although a visit to the Chateau dIf rekindles his sense of righteousness about his mission, fortifying him for his final revenge on Danglars, he is still a changed man. He tells Danglars that he forgives him, because Monte Cristo himself is in need of forgiveness for what he has done.

PLOTA t the age of nineteen, Edmond Dantes seems to have the perfect life. He is about to become the captain of a ship, he is engaged to a beautiful and kind young woman, Mercedes, and he is well liked by almost everyone who knows him. This perfect life, however, stirs up dangerous jealousy among some of Dantes??™s so-called friends.

Danglars, the treasurer of Dantes??™s ship, envies Dantes??™s early career success; Fernand Mondego is in love with Dantes??™s fiancee and so covets his amorous success; his neighbor Caderousse is simply envious that Dantes is so much luckier in life than he is. Together, these three men draft a letter accusing Dantes of treason. There is some truth to their accusations: as a favor to his recently deceased captain, Dantes is carrying a letter from Napoleon to a group of Bonapartist sympathizers in Paris. Though Dantes himself has no political leanings, the undertaking is enough to implicate him for treason. On the day of his wedding, Dantes is arrested for his alleged crimes. The deputy public prosecutor, Villefort, sees through the plot to frame Dantes and is prepared to set him free.

At the last moment, though, Dantes jeopardizes his freedom by revealing the name of the man to whom he is supposed to deliver Napoleon??™s letter. The man, Noirtier, is Villefort??™s father. Terrified that any public knowledge of his father??™s treasonous activities will thwart his own ambitions, Villefort decides to send Dantes to prison for life.

Despite the entreaties of Monsieur Morrel, Dantes??™s kind and honest boss, Dantes is sent to the infamous Chateau d??™If, where the most dangerous political prisoners are kept. While in prison, Dantes meets Abbe Faria, an Italian priest and intellectual, who has been jailed for his political views. Faria teaches Dantes history, science, philosophy, and languages, turning him into a well-educated what city is the murder capital of canada. Faria also bequeaths to Dantes a large treasure hidden on the island of Monte Cristo, and he tells him how to find it should he ever escape. When Faria dies, Dantes hides himself in the abbe??™s shroud, thinking that he will be buried and then dig his way out. Instead, Dantes is thrown into the sea, and is able to cut himself loose and swim to freedom.

Dantes travels to Monte Cristo and finds Faria??™s enormous treasure. He considers his fortune a gift from God, given to him for the sole purpose of rewarding those who have tried to help him and, more important, punishing those who have hurt him. Disguising himself as an Italian priest who answers to the name of Abbe Busoni, he travels back to Marseilles and visits Caderousse, who is now struggling to make a living as an innkeeper. From Caderousse he learns the details of the plot to frame him. In addition, Dantes learns that his father has died of grief in his absence and that Mercedes has married Fernand Mondego. Most frustrating, he learns that both Danglars and Mondego have become rich and powerful and are living happily in Paris. As a reward for this information, and for Caderousse??™s apparent regret over the part he played in Dantes??™s downfall, Dantes gives Caderousse a valuable diamond.

Before leaving Marseilles, Dantes anonymously saves Morrel from financial ruin. Ten years later, Dantes emerges in Rome, calling himself the Count of Monte Cristo. He seems to be all knowing and unstoppable. In Rome Dantes ingratiates himself to Albert de Morcerf, son of Fernand Mondego and Mercedes, by saving him from bandits. In return for the favor, Albert introduces Dantes to Parisian society.

None of his old cohorts recognize the mysterious count as Edmond Dantes, though Mercedes does. Dantes is thus able to insinuate himself effortlessly into the lives of Danglars, Mondego, and Villefort. Armed with damning knowledge about each of them that he has gathered over the past decade, Dantes sets an elaborate scheme of revenge into motion.

Mondego, now known as the Count de Morcerf, is the first to be punished. Dantes exposes Morcerf??™s darkest secret: Morcerf made his fortune by betraying his former patron, the Greek vizier Ali Pacha, and he then sold Ali Pacha??™s wife and daughter into slavery. Ali Pacha??™s daughter, Haydee, who has lived with Dantes ever since he bought her freedom seven years earlier, testifies against Morcerf in front of the senate, irreversibly ruining his good name. Ashamed by Morcerf??™s treachery, Albert and Mercedes flee, leaving their tainted fortune behind. Morcerf commits suicide. Villefort??™s punishment comes slowly and in several stages. Dantes first takes advantage of Madame de Villefort??™s murderous intent, subtly tutoring her in the uses of poison. As Madame de Villefort wreaks her havoc, killing off each member of the household in turn, Dantes plants the seeds for yet another public expose.

In court, it is revealed that Villefort is guilty of attempted infanticide, as he tried to bury his illegitimate baby while it was still alive. Believing that everyone he loves is dead and knowing that he will soon have to answer severe criminal charges, Villefort goes insane. For his revenge on Danglars, Dantes simply plays upon his enemy??™s greed. He opens various false credit accounts with Danglars that cost him vast amounts of money. He also manipulates Danglars??™s unfaithful and dishonest wife, costing Danglars more money, and helps Danglars??™s daughter, Eugenie, run away with her female companion. Finally, when Danglars is nearly broke and about to flee without paying any of his creditors, Dantes has the Italian bandit Luigi Vampa kidnap him and relieve him of his remaining money.

Dantes spares Danglars??™s life, but leaves him penniless. Meanwhile, as these acts of vengeance play out, Dantes also tries to complete one more act of goodness. Dantes wishes to help the brave and honorable Maximilian Morrel, the son of the kind shipowner, so he hatches an elaborate plot to save Maximilian??™s fiancee, Valentine Villefort, from her murderous stepmother, to ensure that the couple will be truly happy forever. Dantes gives Valentine a pill that makes her appear dead and then carries her off to the island of Monte Cristo. For a month Dantes allows Maximilian to believe that Valentine is dead, which causes Maximilian to long for death himself. Dantes then reveals that Valentine is alive. Having known the depths of despair, Maximilian is now able to experience the heights of ecstasy.

Dantes too ultimately finds happiness, when he allows himself to fall in love with the adoring and walmart canada stock price today Haydee. CONFLICT ??? Man vs. himself – Edmond Dantes takes justice into his own hands because he is dismayed by the limitations of society??™s criminal justice system. Societal justice has allowed his enemies to slip through the cracks, going unpunished for the heinous crimes they have committed against him. Moreover, even if his enemies??™ crimes were uncovered, Dantes does not believe that their punishment would be true justice.

Though his enemies have caused him years of emotional anguish, the most that they themselves would be forced to suffer would be a few seconds of pain, followed by death. Considering himself an agent of Providence, Dantes aims to carry out divine justice where he feels human justice has failed. He sets out to punish his enemies as he believes they should be punished: by destroying all that is dear to them, just as they have done to him. Yet what Dantes ultimately learns, as he sometimes wreaks havoc in the lives of the innocent as well as the guilty, is that justice carried out by human beings is inherently limited. The limits of such justice lie in the limits of human beings themselves. Lacking God??™s omniscience and omnipotence, human beings are simply not capable of??” or justified in??” carrying out the work of Providence. Dumas??™s final message in this epic work of crime and punishment is that human beings must simply resign themselves to allowing God to reward and punish??” when and how God sees fit.

??? Man vs. man – Dantes??™s enemies betray him out of an envy that arises from just this problem: despite the blessings these men have in their own lives, Dantes??™s relatively superior position sends them into a rage of dissatisfaction. Caderousse exemplifies this psychological deficiency, finding fault in virtually every positive circumstance that life throws his way. Caderousse could easily be a happy man, as he is healthy, clever, and reasonably well off, yet he is unable to view his circumstances in such a way as to feel happy.

At the other end of the spectrum are Julie and Emmanuel Herbaut??” they are fully capable of feeling happiness, even in the face of pressing poverty and other hardships. The Dantes of the early chapters, umpqua bank locations vancouver washington thrilled with the small happiness that God has granted him, provides another example of the good and easily satisfied man, while the Dantes of later chapters, who has emerged from prison unable to find happiness unless he exacts his complicated revenge, provides an example of the bad and unsatisfiable man. COMPLICATIONSThe most important complications happens at the beginning of the story when Edmond is arrested without any reason and send to prison. CLIMAX OR TURNING POINTDantes slowly brings complete devastation upon Caderousse, Fernand, Villefort, and Danglars. PROBLEM SOLVEDDantes enables the blissful union of Maximilian Morrel and Val-entine Villefort; Dantes finally opens himself to emotions other than gratitude and vengeance. ENDINGAt the end the Count of Monte Cristo understands that his life is with the woman he loves, Heydee and leaves with her to be happy.

FLAHBACKS ??? ??? Oh, yes, I remember him perfectly, he died last February??? Page 165 ??? Formerly there must have been a fireplace in my cell which was doubtless closed up sometime before I came. Page 91 ??? My readers will remember that the new or rather old, acquaintances of the Count of Monte Cristo were Maximilian, Julie and Emmanuel. Page 269 ??? Well, I selected the cartilages of the heads of these fishes, and you can scarcely imagine the delight with which I welcomed the arrival of each Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday, as affording me the means of increasing my stock of pens; for I will freely confess that my historical labors have been my greatest solace and relief. Page 189 ??? Now I remember quite well, that on the table round which they were sitting were pens, ink, and paper. Oh, the heartless, treacherous scoundrels!??? exclaimed Dantes, pressing his hand to his throbbing brows.

Page 203 ??? As he had twenty times touched at Leghorn, he remembered a barber in St. Ferdinand Street; he went there to have his beard and hair cut. Page 261 ??? For a moment Dantes was speechless; then he remembered that these caves might have been filled up by some accident, or even stopped up, for the sake of greater security, by Cardinal Spada. Page 270 ??? ??? And now,??? he exclaimed, remembering the tale of the Arabian fisherman, which Faria had related to him, ??? now, open sesame!??? Page 289 ??? After dinner Morrel usually went out and used to take his coffee at the Phocaean club, and read the Semaphore. Page 353 ??? Twice or thrice during the dance the young girl had glanced at Luigi, and each time she saw that he was pale and that his features were agitated, once even the blade of his knife, half drawn from its sheath, had dazzled her eyes with its sinister glare. Page 312SYMBOLISM ??? ??? I. . .

have been taken by Satan into the highest mountain in the earth, and when there he. . .

said he to me, ??? Child of earth, what wouldst thou have to make thee adore me??™. . I replied, ??? Listen .

. I wish to be Providence myself, for I feel that the most beautiful, noblest, most sublime thing in the world, is to recompense and punish.??™??? Page 259MOOD OR TONE ??? He felt he had passed beyond the bounds of vengeance, and that he could no longer say, ??? God is for and with me.??? Page 484 ??? Oh, forgive me! Let me live! Remember that I am your wife! Page 561 ??? ??? Fernand, you mean, madame,??? returned Boone county distillery Cristo with bitter irony.

Page 469 ??? ??? But remember this,??? continued M. d??™Avrigny solemnly and slowly. Page 444 ??? ??? Very well then??? the Marquise rejoined. Page 43SIMILARITIESThere two characters throughout this story that excels similar characteristics; Mercedes and Louis Dantes are capable of loving until the last consequences. The each knows that Edmond is not guilty of what he had been accused and furthermore is sure that he has the strength to overcome his destiny. They each lose their faith at the end of the road. Both characters have faith in humanity which is why they become victims. DIFFERENCESThe obvious difference is between Edmond and Fernand Mondego.

While Edmond??™s life is all about family and being faithful; Fernand pots a series of events to send Edmond to prison, or worst yet, to die in order to gain the woman he claims to love. OPINIONThere are two main characters with whom I felt identified. In first place the character of Edmond, not are at&t stores open today Count of Monte Cristo. Edmond loved with all his heart, gave everything for his family and wanted to succeed in life. Never the less life had another destiny for him. The other character has to be Haydee; she loved the Count of Monte Cristo because she saw in him all the goodness. This man took her in when she needed it the most and she was grateful for such a noble action. She was patient until Monte Cristo saw in her all the love they had for each other.

Even though there is no question that the motives of revenge were clear, Dumas made love triumph against all odds. STUDENT??™S CREATIVITYA good ending for this story would have been the reconciliation between Edmond and Mercedes. This possibility would provide a new ending, but under my point of view, the one provided to the reader by Alexandre Dumas is a very complete and coherent one.

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15 Things You Might Not Know About The Count of Monte Cristo

Most everyone knows the story of Edmond Dantès, the wrongfully-incarcerated (and consequently revenge-obsessed) hero of Alexandre Dumas’ 1844 novel The Count of Monte Cristo. But did you know these 15 facts about the classic?

1. THE PREMISE WAS INSPIRED BY A REAL LIFE STORY OF A VENGEFUL SHOEMAKER.

Dumas’ appetite for action-packed tales led him to the 1838 publication Memoirs from the Archives of Paris Police, a collection of true crime stories arranged by author Jacques Peuchet. Among the accounts featured was the particularly macabre tale of Nîmes-born shoemaker Pierre Picaud, who was framed for treason by three men who lusted after his wealthy fiancée. Popular appropriation of the legend of Picaud has him earning the affection of someone wealthy and childless (possibly a priest) he was assigned to serve. After the man died, Picaud became his sole beneficiary and extremely wealthy. Later, on Picaud’s deathbed, he offered a small fortune to one of his friends, Allut, for the name of those who betrayed him. After getting the information, Picaud (who had been faking his death) went on to pursue increasingly vicious revenge quests against the three men who wronged him, saving the most brutal sentence for the man who went on to marry Picaud’s fiancée. And after killing the third conspirator, Picaud himself was murdered by Allut, the friend who had identified the betrayers.

2. THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO DREW FURTHER INSPIRATION FROM THE AUTHOR’S FATHER.

A swashbuckler in the tradition of great literary heroes, Thomas-Alexandre Dumas—born Alexandre Davy de la Pailleterie—certainly epitomized the “self-made man” characterization that made the titular Count such a winning figure. Born in the French colony of Saint Domingue to an enslaved African mother, Thomas-Alexandre followed his nobleman father back to mainland France, pursuing formal education and military enlistment. Ultimately seizing a position as a general, Thomas-Alexandre still holds the distinction of being the highest-ranking person of color in a Continental European army. 

3. DUMAS GOT THE TITLE FROM A BOAT TRIP HE TOOK WITH NAPOLEON’S NEPHEW.

Knowing little of the author’s proclivity for impromptu seafaring expeditions, Jerôme Bonaparte—former King of Westphalia and brother of Napoleon—asked Dumas to play host and tour guide to his 19-year-old son, also named Napoleon, during his visit to Italy in 1842. Dumas encouraged the young prince to brave an ad-hoc boat trip, enjoying stops at the islands of Elba, Portoferraio, and ultimately the remote landmass Montecristo. Although Prince Napoleon grew quite ill on the trip, Dumas was so taken with the latter isle’s geological beauty and ample game that he vowed to name his next (and ultimately most successful) novel for it. 

4. THE STORY WAS RELEASED AS A SERIAL OVER A TWO-YEAR SPAN.

Following its completion in 1844, The Count of Monte Cristo was first printed by Journal des débats. The French newspaper offered the story as a regular serial, publishing the first of 18 segments on August 28, 1844 and the final on January 15, 1846. The Count of Monte Cristo’s original hardcover incarnation also used this method, publishing likewise as a series of 18 distinct volumes between 1844 and 1845. 

5. THE BOOK WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED WITH ITS TITLE MISSPELLED.

The editions published in this time period, and most of those released through the 1850s, bore the kind of spelling error that keeps copy editors awake at night. These early copies of the book were published as The Count of Monte Christo. It was 1846 before the first correction of this flaw was made, and only in 1860 did the circulation of correctly spelled copies outstrip the erroneous ones.

6. EARLY PUBLICATIONS OF THE BOOK REMOVED REFERENCES TO HOMOSEXUALITY.

Although Dumas never outright confirmed that his Count of Monte Cristo characters Eugénie Danglars and her music teacher Louise d’Armilly were sexually and romantically involved, his allusions on the topic were enough to stir the ire of some conservative publishers of the era. Contemporaneous English-language translations of the novel deleted scenes showcasing the characters’ intimate relationship—including one featuring the pair lying in bed together—which would only reappear in English-language translations 150 years later.

7. A FAMOUS AUTHOR’S WIFE MADE ONE ENGLISH TRANSLATION OF THE NOVEL.

A number of English-language translations of The Count of Monte Cristo entered circulation in the years following the story’s initial publication. An unabridged interpretation of the text reached England in the mid-1800s via the good graces of Emma Lavinia Gifford, the wife of novelist Thomas Hardy. 

8. NOBODY KNOWS WHO TRANSLATED ANOTHER EDITION.

However, the most widely circulated English version, published in 1846, never carried the name of its translator. The book was identified only by the name of its publishing company, Chapman and Hall. 

9. THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO WAS THE MOST POPULAR BOOK IN EUROPE.

English writer and historian George Saintsbury, born just after the initial publication of the novel, estimated in an 1878 issue of The Fortnightly Review that The Count of Monte Cristo was, “at its first appearance, and for some time subsequently, the most popular book in Europe. Perhaps no novel within a given number of years had so many readers and penetrated into so many countries.” Granted, Saintsbury went on to malign said popularity, decreeing that only the first volume of the story, if any fraction, ever truly deserved such praise.

10. ANOTHER CLASSIC NOVEL WAS INSPIRED BY DUMAS’ STORY.

Thirty-six years after Journal des débats first published The Count of Monte Cristo, American politician, lawyer, and army general Lew Wallace turned his own hobby of creative fiction into a bona fide career with the novel Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ. Chief among the novels that influenced the part-time author’s tale was Dumas’ revenge epic, and he even likened himself to the Count during the writing of Ben-Hur in his autobiography.

11. ONE PUBLISHER ATTEMPTED TO MAKE THE LANGUAGE MORE ACCESSIBLE.

In 1996, Penguin Classics issued a new English-language translation of The Count of Monte Cristo, as penned by Robin Buss. The edition endeavored to provide a modern and casual alternative to the archaic or otherwise ostentatious language of earlier translations, with Buss replacing phrasings like "His wife visited for him, and this was the received thing in the world," with the altogether more digestible “His wife visited on his behalf; this was accepted in society.” 

12. A WELL-KNOWN BRITISH COMEDIAN WROTE A “MODERN UPDATE” OF THE NOVEL.

Stephen Fry, though celebrated most for his humorous exploits, is hardly without his successes in the realm of drama. Alongside Golden Globe Award-nominated performances and thoughtful documentary projects are Fry’s literary feats, one of which is his 2000 thriller, The Stars’ Tennis Balls, a modern-day retelling of the Count of Monte Cristo story. 

13. THERE HAVE BEEN 40 SCREEN ADAPTATIONS OF THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO.

Dumas ranks among the likes of William Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, and Fyodor Dostoevsky on the list of writers whose works are most frequently adapted for the big screen. The Count of Monte Cristo trounces even Dumas’ own duly popular The Three Musketeers in its translations to the moving picture, boasting at least 40 individual depictions across the media of film and television. The Count of Monte Cristo’s relationship with cinema dates all the way back to 1908, when the short film Monte Cristo was released in Italy by director Luigi Maggi.

14. THE STORY GAVE ONE FAMOUS SCREENWRITER HIS PEN NAME.

Due to the cunning duplicity of Dumas’ hero Edmond Dantès, his name has become a popular alias throughout pop culture. Some figures have even adopted the moniker as a nom de plume, notably one renowned screenwriter. Although Dantès is the name attributed to scripts for the films Beethoven, Maid in Manhattan, and Drillbit Taylor, they were each written by teen flick icon John Hughes.

15. IT'S LENT ITS NAME TO A VERY UNHEALTHY SANDWICH.

In the 1920s, a deep fried sandwich consisting of white bread, ham, turkey, and Swiss cheese was developed, most likely in California. Based on the French croque monsieur, it became popular in the '40s under the name Monte Cristo. While no one is sure about the name’s origin, the timing (and spelling) has led many to believe that it was named after the movie adaptations that were so popular at the time.

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Источник: https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/64861/15-things-you-might-not-know-about-count-monte-cristo

Count monte cristo is the main character. Acting characters. Jail break

Where he met with Napoleon Bonaparte and Marshal Bertrand (later said that with Murat), who instructs him to deliver the letter to Paris. By this Edmond fulfills the last will of the captain of the "Pharaoh", who died shortly before.

Upon arrival in Marseille, the owner of the ship Morrel wants to appoint Dantes captain, and Edmond himself is going to marry a Catalan Mercedes from a nearby fishing village.

However, the accountant Danglars claims to be the captain, and her cousin Fernand also wants to marry Mercedes. Both of them and Dantes' neighbor, the envious tailor Cadrusse, met in a tavern, where Danglars had a plan to inform Edmond that he was a Bonapartist agent. He writes an anonymous letter to the prosecutor, but Caderousse is against libel. Therefore, Danglars pretends to throw out a denunciation, but gives a sign to Fernand to deliver the letter to the prosecutor. Fernand vividly plays his part in the conspiracy.

Edmond Dantes, after several years in prison, decides to commit suicide and begins to throw food out the window. And when he is almost dying, he suddenly hears that someone is digging near his cell. Dantes begins to dig towards him and meets Abbot Faria, an Italian learned monk who is considered crazy because he claims the existence of a certain treasure.

Jail break

Edmond Dantes and Abbot Faria prepare to escape together. But before escaping, Faria has a seizure with partial paralysis. Dantes remains with the abbot. Every day they communicate, the abbot teaches him the sciences and foreign languages. In addition, Faria reveals to him the secret of the treasure on the island of Montecristo.

After another seizure, the abbot dies. The guard of the castle sews the deceased into a bag, going to bury in the evening. Dantes carries the corpse to his cell, and he sews himself into a bag. As a dead man, he is thrown into the sea, where he swims to a neighboring island. In the morning he is picked up by local smugglers. Dantes made friends with new comrades, and the captain appreciated him as a skillful sailor.

The island of Montecristo is uninhabited and is used by smugglers as a transit point. Dantes by cunning, pretending to be sick, manages to stay on the island, where he finds a treasure.

Return

Dantes, having become rich, did not forget those who did him good.

He told his fellow smugglers that he had received an inheritance and generously rewarded everyone. He gave the sailor Jacopo, who saved him, a large boat, the inhabitants of the village where Mercedes lived - a fishing boat.

Under the guise of Count Monte Cristo, Dantes enters high society. In addition, he at times reincarnates as Lord Wilmore, Abbot Busoni. For sailors, he is "Sindbad the Sailor".

The count does not kill like an ordinary murderer, he acts with cunning: as a result, Fernand commits suicide, Villefort loses his entire family and goes mad, and Danglars with the remnants of wealth are robbed by robbers and taken prisoner. The Count of Monte Cristo did not want the death of an innocent child (Villefort's son), so he stops taking revenge and releases Danglars ruined, but alive.

At the end of the novel, the Count and Haide sail away by ship, and on the island of Montecristo with his underground palace they leave Morrel's son with his beloved, Valentina de Villefort, daughter of the Comte de Villefort.

Heroes of the novel

In the novel a large number of heroes, the main ones are described below.

  • Edmond Dantes - the main character. A sailor unjustly imprisoned. After escaping, he becomes rich, noble and famous, under the name Count of Monte Cristo.
  • Abbot Faria- Edmond Dantes's comrade in prison, a learned monk who discovered the secret of the treasure on the island of Monte Cristo.
  • Fernand Mondego- a relative of Mercedes who wants to marry her. Later he becomes Lieutenant General, Comte de Morcer and Peer of France.
  • Mercedes- the bride of Edmond Dantes, who later became the wife of Fernand.
    • Albert de Morcer- the son of Fernand and Mercedes.
  • Danglars- an accountant at the "Pharaoh", gave the idea of ​​denunciation of Dantes, later becomes a baron and a wealthy banker.
    • Ermina Danglars- wife of Danglars, former lover of the Crown Attorney de Villefort, who is fond of the stock market game.
    • Eugenie Danglars- the daughter of the spouses Danglars, who dreams of becoming an independent artist.
  • Gerard de Villefort- Assistant Attorney of Marseille, then became the Crown Attorney of Paris.
    • Eloise de Villefort- the second wife of the Crown Attorney, ready to do anything for her son Edward.
    • Noirtier de Villefort- Father of the Crown Prosecutor, a former Girondist and senator of Napoleon, chairman of the Bonapartist club, later a paralytic.
    • Valentina de Villefort(in the original - Valencienne) - Villefort's eldest daughter from his first marriage, a wealthy heiress, actually a nurse with her grandfather, beloved of Maximillian Morrel.
    • Edouard de Villefort- the young son of the Crown Attorney from his second marriage, a spoiled and cruel child.
  • Gaspard Cadrousse- Dantes' neighbor, at first a tailor, and later an innkeeper, became an accomplice in the murder, a fugitive from hard labor.
  • Bertuccio- the business manager of the Count of Monte Cristo, a retired Corsican smuggler, Benedetto's adoptive father.
  • Benedetto- a fugitive from hard labor, illegitimate son of the Crown Attorney and Baroness Characteristics of edmond dantes Morrel- Marseilles merchant, owner of the ship "Pharaoh", benefactor of Dantes.
    • Maximilian Morrel- son of Pierre Morrel, officer, protege of the Count of Monte Cristo.
  • Dr. d'Avrigny- family doctor Vilforov, who was the first to suspect the terrible secret of this family.
  • Franz d'Epinay- the groom forced upon Valentina de Villefort, friend of Albert de Morcer, son of Baron d'Epinay, killed in a duel by Noirtier de Villefort.
  • Lucien Debré- Secretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of France, current lover and partner in the exchange game of Baroness Danglars.
  • Beauchamp- journalist, friend of Albert de Morcer.
  • Haide- the slave of the count, the daughter of Ali-Tebelin, the Yanin pasha, devoted to Fernand.
  • Luigi Wampa- a noble shepherd who became the leader of a band of robbers in the vicinity of Rome.
  • Jacopo- a sailor from a smuggler's ship, saved Dantes when he drowned after escaping from the castle of If.

Success of the novel

The success of the novel "Monte Cristo" surpassed all previous works of the writer. It was at that time one of the greatest successes of any novel in France. Based on the novel, they stage performances in theaters. Earnings allow Alexandre Dumas to buy a villa in addition to a house. He calls the luxurious palace Monte Cristo, and he himself begins to lead a life worthy of his hero.

Hero prototype

One of the prototypes of the hero of the novel was a certain Francois Picot, who, according to a denunciation-joke of his acquaintances, ended up in prison, where he spent about 7 years. In prison, he looked after a sick priest, who, before his death, told the secret about a hidden treasure. After his release, François Pico found out the cause of his misadventures and began to take revenge, killing all but one of the informers. The last informant, Antoine Allu, guessed everything and himself killed Francois Picot, after which he fled to England. In 1828, Antoine Allu confessed before his death, and the priest wrote down the story, which soon became public.

Alexandre Dumas became interested in this story, but he did not like the trivial killer. Therefore, the Count of Monte Cristo did not harm anyone with his own hands, but only directed misfortunes to his enemies.

Sloppy plot

As in most of Dumas's works, the text of the novel contains many negligence and inconsistent passages. For example, in the first chapter, Dantes assures Morrel that he has no complaints about Danglars as an accountant, he is ready to continue serving with him. On the other hand, in prison, in a conversation with Faria, Dantes reports that he discovered some kind of fraud in Danglars' accounts. In the same conversation with Faria, Dantes clearly recalls that on the table of the conspirators in the gazebo, he noticed a pen, ink and paper. But if you re-read the scene in the gazebo, it becomes clear that all of the above Danglars demanded 69 f to celsius Dantes left.

Another example: in chapter XIII, Albert informs Franz that in college "he was very strong in Greek." And later, visiting the count, he confesses to Monte Cristo that he does not understand a word in Greek. In both cases, there was absolutely no point in Albert lying.

Also in prison, Dantes learns that the abbot's treasure is worth two million scuds, which is equal to seventeen million francs. But at the end of the book, he tells Maximillian about the one hundred millionth fortune. It can be assumed that Dantes increased his capital during this time, but it is very difficult to make from seventeen to one hundred million, even in ten years. And if you take into account the fact that in every country he bought himself a mansion (like in France) and spent about six million a year, such an increase in capital seems impossible. Although the abbot may not have been fully aware of the size of the treasure

Drug motives

"The Count of Monte Cristo" contains information about the effects of hashish - the protagonist of the novel is a connoisseur and lover of this, rare in those years, drug. The text mentions that he uses Egyptian dawamesk and homemade hashish-opium pills mixed in equal parts (as a sleeping pill). The action of Dawamesk is described in detail in Chapter X of Volume II ("Sinbad the Sailor"): here the Count of Monte Cristo treats them to the young Baron Franz d'Epinay, through whom he expects to enter the high society of Paris. After a while Franz feels “That a strange transformation is taking place with him. All the fatigue that had accumulated during the day, all the anxiety caused by the events of the evening, disappeared, as in that first minute of rest, when you are still so awake that you feel the approach of sleep. His body acquired a disembodied lightness, thoughts brightened inexpressibly, feelings were doubly heightened ". Soon he falls into a oneiroid hallucinosis of romantic-erotic content, during which he gradually falls asleep.

The second volume of the novel was written by Alexandre Dumas in 1844. It reflects the author's personal impressions of his visits to the "Club of Assassins", where he had the opportunity to taste dawamesc. According to the testimony of contemporaries, Dumas ate this drug very willingly, and after using it he became extremely talkative. During the existence of the "Club" he wrote many famous works - in particular, all three novels about the Musketeers.

Continuations of the novel

Alexandre Dumas did not write the sequels of the novel, however, many sequels are known, some of which were allegedly found in the writer's archive after his death (or attributed to Dumas-son). But judging by the style of writing and description of events, neither the father nor the son of Dumas could write such works.

Film "Son of Monte Cristo" (1940, USA)

novel en: The Stars "Tennis Balls, written in the year by Stephen Fry, uses motives from the novel The Count of Monte Cristo.

On March 31st, German rock metal band Vanden Plas released the album Christ 0, using a modernized version of the story of the Count of Monte Cristo.

Screen adaptations

Many films have been filmed based on the novel.

  • The Count of Monte Cristo, USA, starring Robert Donath
  • Count of Monte Cristo - France, Italy, starring Jean Mare
  • Count of Monte Cristo - France, Italy, starring Louis Jourdan
  • The Count of Monte Cristo - TV movie, UK-Italy, starring Richard Chamberlain
  • Prisoner of the If Castle - USSR - France, starring - Victor Avilov, Mikhail Boyarsky.
  • Count of Monte Cristo - TV series, Germany -France -Italy, starring Gerard Depardieu, Ornella Muti.
  • The Earl of Monte Cristo, USA, UK, Ireland, starring James Caviezel.
  • Favorsky - TV series, Russia, starring Ilya Shakunov, Alexander Lykov, Valery Degtyar, Andrey Zibrov, Nodar Mgaloblishvili, Tara Amirkhanova. (The plot of the novel by Dumas is shifted to modern times- USSR / Russia / Baltic States / Armenia period 1982-1999).
  • "Count Krestovsky" (2005, a television series was shot by Russian filmmakers, where the story of Count Monte Cristo in the USSR of the 1980s was played up)
  • "MonteCristo" - Argentina, TV series.
  • "MonteCristo" - Russia, TV series.
  • "Gankutsuou" - "Count of Monte Cristo" (Ruler of the Cave), - - anime film Japan, also uses the motives of the plot of the novel.

Theatrical performances

Links

  • Count of Monte Cristo, parts 1-3 in the library of Maxim Moshkov
  • Count of Monte Cristo, parts 4-6 in the library of Maxim Moshkov
  • Island of Monte Cristo - Everything about the Count of Monte Cristo.
  • Wikisource's Le Comte de Monte-Cristo is the original version of the novel (in French).

Sources of


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Edmond Dantes- the main character, a sailor, unjustly imprisoned. After escaping, he becomes rich, noble and famous under the name of Count of Monte Cristo. Also used names: Abbot Busoni, Lord Wilmore, Maltese Zakkone, Sinbad the Sailor.


Abbot Faria- Edmond Dantes's comrade in prison, a learned monk who revealed to him the secret of the treasure on the island of Monte Cristo.
Fernand Mondego- Cousin Mercedes, a fisherman who wants to marry her. Later he becomes Lieutenant General, Comte de Morcer and Peer of France.

Mercedes Herrera- the bride of Edmond Dantes, who later became the wife of Fernand.

Albert de Morcer- the son of Fernand and Mercedes.

Danglars- an accountant at the "Pharaoh", submitted the idea of ​​denunciation to Dantes, later became a baron and a wealthy banker.


Ermina Danglars- the wife of Danglars, in the past the widow of the Marquis de Nargon and the mistress of the Crown Attorney de Villefort, who is fond of the stock market game. Biological mother of Benedetto.
Eugenie Danglars- the daughter of the spouses Danglars, who dreams of becoming an independent artist.

Gerard de Villefort- Assistant Attorney of Marseille, then became the Crown Attorney of Paris. Biological father of Benedetto.


René de Saint-Meran- the first wife of Villefort, mother of Valentina, daughter of the Marquis and Marquise de Saint-Meran.
Eloise de Villefort- the second wife of the Crown Attorney, ready to do anything for her son Edouard.
Noirtier de Villefort- Father of the Crown Prosecutor, former Jacobin and senator of Napoleon, chairman of the Bonapartist club, later paralyzed. "Despite this, he thinks, he desires, he acts."
Valentina de Villefort- Villefort's eldest daughter from his first marriage, a wealthy heiress, in fact a nurse with her grandfather, the beloved of Maximilian Morrel.
Edouard de Villefort- the young son of the Crown Attorney from his second marriage, a spoiled and cruel child.

Gaspard Cadrousse- Dantes' neighbor, first a tailor, and later an innkeeper. For some time he was a smuggler, later became an accomplice in a murder, a fugitive from hard labor.
Giovanni Bertuccio- the business manager of the Count of Monte Cristo, a retired Corsican smuggler, Benedetto's adoptive father.
Benedetto- a fugitive from hard labor, the illegitimate son of the royal attorney and Baroness Danglars. He was known in Parisian society as Viscount Andrea Cavalcanti.
Pierre Morrel- Marseilles merchant, owner of the ship "Pharaoh", benefactor of Dantes.

Maximilian Morrel- the son of Pierre Morrel, captain of the Spagi, protege of the Count of Monte Cristo.
Julie Morrell (Herbaugh)- the daughter of Pierre Morrel.
Emmanuelle Herbaud- Julie's husband.
Penelon- the old boatswain of the "Pharaoh", helps Dantes when he saves Pierre Morrel from bankruptcy and shame. After serving at sea, he became a gardener for Julie and Emmanuel Herbaud.
Cocles- Pierre Morrel's treasurer, who remained faithful to him to the end. Then he became the gatekeeper for Julie and Emmanuel Herbaud.

Dr. d'Avrigny- family doctor Vilforov, who was the first to suspect the terrible secret of this family.
Franz d'Epinay- the groom, imposed on Valentina de Villefort, friend of Albert de Morcer, son of General de Quesnel (Baron d'Epinay), killed in a duel by Noirtier de Villefort.
Lucien Debré- Secretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of France, the current lover and partner in the exchange game of Baroness Danglars.
Beauchamp- Editor of the newspaper "Impartial Voice", a friend of Albert de Morser.
Raoul de Chateau-Renaud- French aristocrat, baron, friend of the Viscount de Morcer (like the three previous ones).
Haide- the slave of the count, the daughter of Ali-Tebelin, the Yaninsky pasha, betrayed by Fernand.



Luigi Wampa- a young shepherd who became the leader of a band of robbers in the vicinity of Rome. Obliged to the Count of Monte Cristo for life and freedom, in return he vowed never to touch either the Count himself or his friends.
Peppino- a robber from the gang of Luigi Wampa, rescued by the Count of Monte Cristo from the guillotine and later kidnapped Danglars when he fled to Italy.
Jacopo- a Corsican sailor from the tartans of the smugglers of "Young Amelia", who saved Dantes when he was drowning after escaping from the castle-prison of If. Subsequently - the captain of the yacht of the Count.
Batistin- Valet of the Count of Monte Cristo.

Ali- slave, servant of the Count of Monte Cristo, dumb Nubian (with his tongue cut off).

Alexander Dumas wrote the novel in 1845. The work was an overwhelming success with the public. The reason for the creation of the work was the story that the writer heard about a real island where a cache of treasures is hidden. The narrative is divided in six parts. The protagonist of the novel, Count of Monte Cristo, aka Edmun Dantes, suffered undeservedly and wants to restore justice. Let's tell summary.

In contact with

Part I. An insidious plan leads to imprisonment

The events of The Count of Monte Cristo begin in Marseille. A ship enters the harbor, the commander of which was killed during the voyage. A young but promising sailor named Edmond Dantes took command of the ship..

The owner of the ship, Mr. Morrel, from the ship's accountant Danglars, learns about the delay of the ship on the island of Elba.

The young man replies that he was following the last order of the ship's captain. Dantes undertakes to fulfill the request of the emperor - to convey the letter to the conspirator, M. Noirtier.

Mr. Morrell officially appoints a promising young man as the new captain of the ship. Dantes goes home to see his old father and beautiful bride Mercedes from the village of Catalana.

At this time, Danglars, jealous of the lucky sailor, together with Cadrusse, who robbed the old man Dantes, conspiring to denigrate an innocent youth. They are joined by Fernand Mondego, who wants to marry Mercedes. Danglars composes a letter without the author, the letter reaches the assistant prosecutor of Marseille, Gerard de Villefort.

Attention! Caderousse is old man Dantes' housemate.

The groom Mercedes is detained right during the celebration and taken to Monsieur Villefort. The seaman confesses to the prosecutor that he did come to the Elbe, but this is not considered a crime. The fatal mistake of Edmun Dantes was the mention of a letter for Mr. Noirtier, who is Gerard's father. An ardent opponent of the emperor's power, the Marseilles prosecutor cannot sacrifice his career. The prosecutor burns the letter, and orders the detainee as a witness to be sent to the castle of If, a political prison in the middle of the sea.

Gerard Villefort visits Paris, where he asks for an audience with the king, informs the monarch of the emperor's plans, which he learned from the letter, for which he receives a promotion.

Five years have passed. Prison gnaws at Dantes, his mind fades, the guy decides to die of hunger. One evening Dantes hears a noise behind the wall. The desperate prisoner guesses that someone is digging. The young man decides to dig towards him and after a few weeks he meets a new friend. This is an abbot from the next cell named Faria. For a long time, friends are preparing an escape, along the way, the abbot teaches Dantes the sciences. Faria is not young, his strength is dying out, he did not live to see the fulfillment of what was planned. Before death the old man talks about wealth buried on the island of Monte Cristo.

Plans are changing dramatically. Edmun overhears the conversation of the jailers about the burial of Faria, drags the body of the dead priest to his cell, and takes his place. Dantes did not take into account only one thing - the dead thrown off a cliff. Unsuspecting jailers throw the body into the water. The former prisoner successfully gets out, swims to the rock sticking out of the sea. Rescuers young man become smugglers.

Part II. Circumstances are in favor of Dantes

Edmun Dantes is on the ship of his rescuers for several months, having won the confidence of the commander. One day a young man gets a chance to get to the very island of Monte Cristo, which was mentioned by the late Abbot Faria.

The sly man fakes his own fall from a height, pretends to be mortally wounded in order to stay on the island. The ship leaves without him.

Edmun Dantes finds a treasure. Soon the smugglers return back, the daredevil announces to them that he is recovering.

In Livorno, Dantes acquires a ship and chooses a course for Marseille. Over the long period of the hero's absence, a lot has changed:

  • the father of the future Count of Monte Cristo died;
  • the fiancee Mercedes married Fernand, who changed his last name to de Morcer and received the rank of general;
  • accountant Danglars became a banker;
  • Villefort was promoted to Crown Attorney;
  • Caderousse was now the owner of the inn.

Edmun visits Caderousse disguised as Abbot Busoni, shows him a diamond, the money from the sale of which must be distributed equally among mutual acquaintances. The unsuspecting innkeeper reveals the secret of a conspiracy against young Dantes.

After visiting Caderousse, Edmun, posing as Lord Wilmore, visits the mayor of Marseille with a request to familiarize himself with his case, as well as to pay off the debts of Mr. Morrel, who has become bankrupt. Morrel wants to die, but a letter signed by Sinbad the Sailor brings the bankrupt owner of the company back to life. The Morrel family will bless the unknown savior.

Parisian nobleman Franz d'Epinay is going to Italy, on the way visiting the legendary island, whose owner calls himself Sinbad the Sailor. Later, in Rome, d'Epinay recognizes the owner of the island, who introduces himself as the name of the count Monte Cristo.

Important! Sinbad the Sailor, Abbot Busoni, Lord Wilmore, Count of Monte Cristo - all these characters are played by the main character of the work.

Viscount Albert de Morcer, son of Fernand and Mercedes, travels with Franz. Albert is kidnapped by bandits, the count rescues a young man. Morser invites the main character to France.

Part III. Hello Paris

The scene is Paris. The Count of Monte Cristo arrives at the time appointed by Albert. The latter introduces him to his comrades, including the young Maximilian Morrel.

The protagonist acquires a house formerly owned by the Marquis de Saint-Meran, father-in-law of the Crown Prosecutor. Count's steward, Bertuccio, reveals the secret of the house.

Brother Bertuccio was killed, and the Crown Attorney refused to assist in the investigation of the crime. Bertuccio vowed to kill Villefort.

A few months later, Bertuccio discovers that he secretly visits the house where his pregnant mistress lives. Bertuccio saw Gerard buried a living baby. The manager gave the child a second life - Bertuccio's daughter-in-law took over the upbringing of the child.

Note! Benedetto (that was the name of the young man saved by Bertuccio) had a bad character and bad manners, which led him to hard labor.

Bertuccio shares another secret - Cadrusse killed the jeweler, to whom he sold the diamond, and shot his wife. The innkeeper was convicted.

Monte Cristo opens unlimited credit from Danglars. Count Ali's servant saves Villefort's wife from an accident, and, thanks to this, deserves the recognition of the whole family.

It is revealed that Valentina, in love with Maximilian Morrel, is another illegitimate child of the Crown Attorney. Valentina's family, with the exception of her grandfather, is eager to marry the girl off to Franz d'Epinay.

With the count, a pupil arrived in France, the charming beauty Haide, perceived by everyone as his mistress. One day Haide sees a man who betrayed her people, and sold it, Gaide. It was Fernand de Morcer.

Part IV. The beginning of revenge

The hero, who became the Count of Monte Cristo, stubbornly prepares the ground for revenge: he invites his offenders to a dinner party, where he publicly announces about the allegedly found corpse of a baby, which makes Villefort and Madame Danglard turn pale - after all, this is theirs common child. Ms. Danglars husband is suffering colossal losses due to false information.

A certain Andrea Cavalcanti arrives in Paris - Benedetto in disguise. The guy wants to have a wedding with Danglars daughter. But his plans are thwarted by Cadrusse, eager for his own benefit. Benedetto is intimidated and pays him money. The escaped convict wants rob the Count of Monte Cristo. In the former home of Saint-Meran, the innkeeper encounters the Abbot Busoni. Under dictation, Caderousse writes an incriminating letter for the banker about his future son-in-law.

Attention! Andrea Cavalcanti and Benedetto are one person.

De Morser throws a ball where the hero, who has changed over the years, meets Mercedes. The woman recognizes her former lover in the form of the Count of Monte Cristo, but does not show it.

Part V. Masks dropped

In first choice bank nj house of de Villefort, a series of deaths occurs. The conclusion is obvious - the killer lives nearby. Events are made public. The now paralyzed old man Noirtier breaks the engagement of his granddaughter Valentina with the young d'Epinay.

Reckoning overtakes Fernand - the newspaper publishes wells fargo recruitment contact number article describing his dishonorable actions during the service. At meetings in the Chamber, which includes Morser, Haide appears with evidence of the general's crimes.

The offended Albert challenges the culprit of his father's troubles to a duel, and upon learning the truth, asks his forgiveness. Albert and Mercedes leave Paris. Fernand learns the real name of his avenger. The general broke down and shot himself.

Danglars is suffering losses. There remains the hope of arranging the marriage of his daughter with Cavalcanti. When the prenuptial agreement was signed, the protagonist personally handed the letter written by Cadrus to the banker. Danglar's daughter flees, the financier is ruined. Benedetto also runs, he is caught trying to cross the border. At the trial, the illegitimate son of the prosecutor reveals the truth about his relationship with Villefort.

Part VI. Interchange

Valentine is poisoned. It becomes known that the poisoner is Villefort's second wife hoping to get an inheritance. The prosecutor's wife poisons her child, then drinks the poison herself. The man's mind grows cloudy.

All the heroes of the novel get what they deserve. Cadrusse and Fernand are dead, the prosecutor Villefort is insane, Danglars fell to the same robbers who once captured Albert de Morser.

Valentina's fatal illness was played by Noirtier together with the count. Lovers Valentina and Maximilian are reunited, the Count of Monte Cristo floats away, leaving the island and treasures to the young couple.

Dumas' novel The Count of Monte Cristo - plot, content

Output

The author of the novel "The Count of Monte Cristo" makes the reader think about the goals life path. Whatever the circumstances, it is important not to let your inner strength break down, you can see this on the example of the main character.

This article tells about an adventure novel that was created in the years 1844-1845. The topic of our today's story is the characteristics of its heroes and a summary. "The Count of Monte Cristo" is a work by A. Dumas (father). He is a recognized classic of French literature. Many of his works, including "The Count of Monte Cristo", cause the most positive reviews from readers. First, we will acquaint you with a brief summary, and then we will move on to characterizing the heroes of the work of interest to us.

Imagine the protagonist of a novel written by (father). It is Dantes, a Marseilles sailor from the ship "Pharaoh". He went on a regular voyage to Elba, where he met with Marshal Bertrand, who instructed Edmond (this is the name of the protagonist) to deliver the letter to Paris. Dantes also met here with Napoleon Bonaparte. Edmond agreed to deliver the letter, thus fulfilling the last wishes of the captain of the ship "Pharaoh", who had died shortly before. Morrel, the owner of the ship, upon arrival in Marseille, decided to appoint Dantes in charge.

Denunciation of Edmond

Edmond was about to marry Mercedes, a Catholic from a nearby village. With this girl, however, he wants to connect his fate and Fernand, her cousin. Accountant Danglars (Edmond suspects him of deception) begins to fear for his place. Danglars, Fernand and the tailor Cadrousse, Dantes' envious neighbor, meet in the tavern. Danglars has a plan to inform Dantes that he is a supposedly Bonapartist subordinate. For this, he writes an anonymous letter to the prosecutor, but Cadrusse is against this plan. Therefore, Danglar has to pretend that he destroyed the denunciation. He tells Fernand to deliver a letter to the prosecutor, which is what his cousin Mercedes does.

Arrest and imprisonment in the castle

During the wedding with the chosen one, Dantes is arrested. Cadrousse understands everything, but is silent, because he is afraid that they will think that he is involved in a political case. The protagonist is taken to Villefort, the assistant to the Crown Attorney, who tries to conduct the case honestly. He is going to release the innocent, but learns that Dantes had to hand over the letter to his father Noirtier, a Bonapartist. Villefort realizes that if this fact becomes known, his career may come to an end. Therefore, he decides in this situation to sacrifice Edmond. Villefort burns the letter, and Edmond is sent without trial or investigation to the Château d'If, in conclusion. He himself is in a hurry to Paris in order to warn of the impending coup of King Louis XVIII.

Fateful meeting

We continue to describe the summary. "The Count of Monte Cristo" is a work that is very interesting to read. Events keep in suspense until the very end. Alexandre Dumas (father) goes on to say that after a few years in prison, Dantes decides to commit suicide. He starts throwing food out the window. However, a few days later, when he was almost dying, Edmond suddenly heard someone digging the ground near his cell. The main character starts digging a tunnel from his side.

He meets a scientist-clergyman from Italy, Abbot Faria. The abbot is considered crazy, since he constantly talks about the existence of a multimillion-dollar treasure, and only he knows where it is. Faria's personality makes a huge impression on the protagonist. This already elderly person is full of hope and love for life. He works all the time: he writes scientific works, even being imprisoned, makes tools and steadily prepares an escape. Faria, after listening to the story of the protagonist, restores the course of events. He reveals to Dantes the culprits and the reason for his imprisonment. Edmond swears vengeance on his enemies. He asks Faria to become his mentor in life and teacher in the sciences. We will not dwell on this in detail, describing the summary. "The Count of Monte Cristo" is a voluminous work, so we can only tell about the main events.

Edmond learns about the treasure

The Abbot and Edmond prepare together to escape. When everything is ready, Faria suddenly has a seizure. The right side of the abbot's body is paralyzed. The main character refuses to escape alone and decides to stay with Faria. They communicate, the abbot teaches Edmond foreign languages ​​and sciences. In addition, he reveals to the main character the secret of the treasure, which is buried on about. Monte Cristo. Faria learned about him when he served as a librarian for one of the descendants of Cardinal Spada, who hid his wealth from Pope Alexander VI and Caesar Borgia, his son.

Escape of Edmond, meeting with the smugglers

The abbot dies after another seizure. Going to bury the deceased in the evening, the warders sew his body into a sack. Dantes, who has come to say goodbye to the deceased, is illuminated by an idea. Edmond Dantes decides to transfer the body of the abbot to his cell; The main character is thrown into the sea like a dead man. With difficulty Edmond gets out of the bag. He manages to swim to a neighboring island. Thus, the protagonist leaves the castle of If. Local smugglers pick it up in the morning. Dantes meets new comrades. He was appreciated as a skillful sailor by their captain. Dantes, being at large, learns that he spent 14 years in prison.

Edmond finds treasure, gifts to smugglers

No one lives on the island of Monte Cristo. It is used as a staging post by smugglers from a work by Alexandre Dumas ("The Count of Monte Cristo"). Edmond pretends to be sick and with the help of this trick remains on the island, where he finds a buried treasure. Having become rich, the main character did not forget those who were kind to him. He told his fellow smugglers that he had received an inheritance, and he rewarded them all generously.

The protagonist begins an investigation

After that, Edmond decides to start his own investigation in order to find out what happened after his arrest with his fiancee, father, friends and enemies. He visits Cadrousse under the guise of a priest who allegedly fulfills the last will of Dantes and bequeaths the diamond to his friends: Mercedes, Danglars, Fernand and Cadrousse. The latter keeps the tavern. At the sight of a diamond, greed seizes him, and he forgets about caution. Caderousse tells Edmond the truth about his arrest and what happened after that. Dantes's father fell into characteristics of edmond dantes and died of hunger, Mercedes was also very grieved.

Morrel tried to fight for Dantes to be released and supported his father. Caderousse also said that Mercedes had married Fernand, and Monsieur Morrel, former owner Edmond is practically broke. Fernand and Danglars are now rich. They belong to the upper world and must be happy. Danglars became a millionaire banker, has the title of baron. Fernand is now General, Peer of France, Comte de Morcer.

Saving Morrel

Edmond returns to Marseille. Here he learns that Morrel is really on the verge of ruin. He only hopes for the return of the "Pharaoh" with cargo, the ship on which Dantes once sailed. However, the news comes that the ship sank in a storm (although the captain and crew miraculously escaped). Dantes finds out about all this when he comes to the armature disguised as Agent Morrel. The main character gives Morrell the last reprieve on behalf of him. It is already coming to an end, and he cannot pay off. Morrel, in order to avoid shame, decides to commit suicide. At the last moment, however, redeemed bills are brought in, visa prepaid debit card pin number the new "Pharaoh" enters the port. Morrel and his family are saved. Dantes is watching them from afar. Out of gratitude, he closed Morrel's account, and now he wants to take revenge on his enemies.

The mysterious Count of Monte Cristo

9 years have passed. Alexandre Dumas continues to describe further events. The Count of Monte Cristo, eccentric and mysterious, succeeds Edmond Dantes. This is just one of the images that the protagonist created. He is also known to some as Abbot Busoni, Lord Wilmore and others. The Italian smugglers and robbers, whom he was able to unite and subjugate, like many travelers and sailors, know the protagonist under the name of Sinbad the Sailor. Over the past years, he has already managed to visit many parts of the world and significantly expand his education. The Count of Monte Cristo, moreover, learned to skillfully manipulate people. He is the owner of a fast ship. And in the caves on the island of Monte Cristo, he has a hidden underground palace. Here he receives travelers.

Dantes, disguised as a count, is a member of high French society. He intrigues him and delights in his unusual lifestyle and wealth. The main character has a dumb servant Ali, about whom he says that if he disobeys him, he will be killed. The count is in charge of Giovanni Bertuccio, a Corsican smuggler who has his own accounts with Villefort. In the meantime, Villefort had already become the Crown Prosecutor of Paris. The count, in addition, contains Gaide - a slave, whom he treats at first as a daughter. This is the daughter of Pasha Ali-Tebelin, whom Fernand treacherously killed.

Implementation of the plan of revenge

The main character begins to gradually implement his plan of revenge. He believes that the death of enemies is insufficient payment for the suffering caused. The count sees himself as an instrument of Providence, an instrument of justice. He inflicts blows on victims gradually. As a result, Fernand is disgraced, his wife and son left him, and ultimately he commits suicide. Villefort loses his mind and loses his entire family. Danglars goes bankrupt and flees France. The robbers who obey Monte Cristo take him prisoner in Italy. They rob Danglars of the last remnants of his fortune. The count, however, was already tired of revenge. He realized that fair retribution for criminals had done irreparable damage to many innocent people. A heavy burden on the conscience of the protagonist lay the consciousness of this. Therefore, he releases Danglars, even allows him to take 50 thousand francs with him.

Final events

So we come to the end, describing a summary. "The Count of Monte Cristo" ends with the hero, who realized that he did not love Gaide with his father's love, and sailed away with her on the ship. He leaves the island of Monte Cristo with all its riches as a gift to Maximilian, the son of Morrel, and also to Valentina de Villefort, his beloved, the daughter of the prosecutor.

Count of Monte Cristo (Edmond Dantes)

Monte Cristo (aka E. Dantes) is the protagonist of the work written by A. Dumas (father). The history of its real prototype was gleaned by the author from the archives of the Paris police. A victim of a prank, the shoemaker was imprisoned in a castle. Here he courted a prisoner, a prelate, who bequeathed him a large fortune. The shoemaker, finding himself free, took revenge on his enemies, but he himself died at the hands of the last of the survivors. The name Monte Cristo was inspired by the name of a small island located near the Elbe.

It should be noted that by the end of the work, when the guilty are mercilessly punished, neither Monte Cristo himself nor the reader experiences the necessary satisfaction (except, perhaps, for the youngest reader, for whom this image is intended). The main character of the novel is so strongly transformed that he acts unrecognized among people who knew him before. The motive of inner transformation is the structuring motive of his character. One can only speak of an implicit, dotted "shining" through the image of the calculating and cold avenger of Monte Cristo of Edmond's direct disinterestedness. He can be combined typologically with such characters as Joseph the Beautiful and Odysseus, who, after many years, were met by loved ones and were not recognized by them. Mercedes, unlike Penelope, could not wait for her lover, she decided that he was dead. And unlike Jacob, the old father did not endure separation from his son. The hero of Dumas is reborn, not maturing. Edmond's credulity and simplicity are transformed into romantic mystery, demonism. In addition, the way of his being is changing: Edmond lives a natural life, and the Count of Monte Cristo, whose character description is given in some detail in the novel, controls the lives of other people without having his own.

Danglars

This is an accountant who served on "Pharaoh". This person is envious. It was he who initiated the denunciation of Dantes. We can say that Baron Danglars is the most fallen hero of all in the novel, but he did not feel any remorse. He managed to leave Marseilles. Danglars was engaged in supplies for the French army during spanish war and got rich on it. The hero's only love was money. That is why Monte Cristo exploited this weakness as revenge. The robber Luigi Wampa, a friend of the count, kidnapped Danglars at his request and began to starve him, offering the hero to buy food for millions. When Danglars had no money left at all, the count decided to let him go. Thus, this character was the first of those who were spared by the main character. However, he was the last one who deserved to be forgiven by the Count of Monte Cristo. The book, which was written by Credit one application went from approved to processing Dumas, makes you wonder about the reasons for this.

Gaspard Cadrousse

Who was the neighbor of the protagonist and his father. Gaspard is one of the participants in the denunciation of Dantes. But it can be justified by the fact that he was drunk and therefore did not take seriously the writing of the denunciation, believing that it was a joke. Later, the hero became the owner of the inn. Greed forced him to kill a man and become a criminal. Edmond several times, in different guises, gave Caderousse a chance to improve. In fact, he did not even take revenge on him, but only gave him the right to choose, which was a test for him. The Count of Monte Cristo, as revenge, presented Cadrousse with a choice - to leave the criminal past or to continue the wicked path. He could not refuse the profit and decided to rob the count, but fell from Benedetto, his "friend", with whom he committed the robbery.

Gerard de Villefort

This hero of the work is an assistant to the Crown Attorney. He put Edmond in prison only because he had a letter from Napoleon, which was addressed to Villefort's father. He then rose to the position of Crown Attorney. The past of this hero was not impeccable, which the Count of Monte Cristo took advantage of for revenge. Gerard had love affair with Madame Danglars. An unwanted child was born from her. Villefort buried it in the garden of a house located in Auteuillet. Monte Cristo first bought this house. Then, inviting the light of Paris, he showed the audience a reenactment of the night when the child was buried alive. Benedetto with his help became a defendant, and it turned out that he is the son of Villefort. Gerard's wife turned out to be a poisoner. All this led to the fact that Villefort went mad.

Fernand Mondego

This hero is a fisherman, Mercedes' cousin. He was in love with her, so he decided to betray Edmond. After that, Fernand was recruited. He managed to rise to the rank of general, and also receive the title of count. When Greece revolted against Turkey, Fernand betrayed Ali-Tibelin, Ioannina's pasha. Monte Cristo's revenge was sophisticated. He announced the circumstances under which Ali-Tibelin died. This led to the contempt of Albert and Mercedes. Fernand's story ended with a shot in the temple.

Abbot Faria

The novel "The Count of Monte Cristo" introduces us to another interesting character. This is an Italian priest who became Edmond's second father. He was his cellmate at the Chateau d'If. Faria is the sage who taught Dantes everything. Everyone believed that he was crazy, because he offered treasures for his freedom. And only Edmond learned that these treasures actually existed.

Pierre Morrel

Undoubtedly, Morrel is a positive hero in the work "The Count of Monte Cristo". Pierre (that was his name) - best friend Edmona, owner of the ship "Pharaoh". Dumas ("The Count of Monte Cristo") portrayed him as the noblest man. When Dantes was arrested, he went to Villefort several times in order to ask for him. When Morrel did not have the money to pay off his debts, he was ready to wash away the shame with his blood. However, Dantes saved him. Pierre was sure that he should thank Edmond for saving his honor, although he appeared to him under the guise of an agent of a banking house.

So, you met the main characters of the novel. The Count of Monte Cristo is a book worth reading. It will be especially interesting for young readers. Many of them are simply delighted with the work of Alexandre Dumas - "The Count of Monte Cristo". This novel is known all over the world for a reason.

We have described only briefly the work "The Count of Monte Cristo". Parts that are not so important for the development of the plot have been omitted by us. However, this retelling gives an idea of ​​the main events of the novel.

The gloomy prisoner of the If castle is recognized as a real symbol just retribution. The fate of Edmond Dantes, which he described in detail, is known to residents of all countries. The brave sailor paid with happiness and freedom just for building own life honestly and with dignity. Well, the desire to punish the scoundrels who robbed a young man of his family, career and youth can be called more than justified.

History of creation

Biography of Edmond Dantes is full of incredible events, so it is doubly surprising that the character of Alexandre Dumas has a prototype. The story that the writer told in the novel "The Count of Monte Cristo", Dumas heard during boat trip on Mediterranean Sea.

Noticing the island of Montecristo from the side of the ship, the man inquired about the legends associated with this peculiar place. The sailors told the writer a fascinating tale that interested Dumas. Returning home, the writer sat down to work, and in 1844 the novel was published.

The prototype of the unusual hero was the shoemaker Francois Picot, who was born in the town of Nîmes. In 1807, the man was accused of espionage on the basis of an anonymous note. François spent 7 years in prison, during which he met an Italian priest. After his escape, Pico found the savings of a new friend, returned to his homeland and killed everyone who was involved in the anonymous letter. True, unlike the hero of Dumas, François killed the fourth conspirator, about whom the shoemaker was not aware.

"Count of Monte Cristo"


Edmond Dantes was born into a poor family living on the outskirts of Marseille. The boy's mother died long ago, and the father was involved in raising the hero. Already at the age of 18, Edmond mastered the profession of a sailor and made a career on the three-masted ship "Pharaoh".

“He was a young man of eighteen or twenty years old, tall, slender, with beautiful black eyes and jet-black hair; his whole appearance breathed with that calmness and determination, which are characteristic of people who from childhood are accustomed to struggle with danger. "

The young man was away from home for a long time, so the elder Dantes was assisted by the sailor's bride Mercedes, a girl who lived in a neighboring village. During the next voyage, the captain of the Pharaoh died suddenly, and Edmond was offered the position of ship manager.

Such a happy and successful fate caused discontent and envy among the local population. Wanting to harm Dantes, three friends of the sailor send an anonymous denunciation to the prosecutor, accusing the man of commitment.


Alas, who does not know about the tricks of his enemies, Dantes honestly admits during interrogation that he recently met with a dubious person. Such a statement became fatal - the prosecutor, involved in no less dirty affairs, decides to make a scapegoat out of Edmond. Dantes is sentenced to life imprisonment in one of the most guarded and inaccessible prisons in France - the Château d'If.

The first five years of imprisonment become hell for Edmond. A man who understands that he is not guilty of anything even tries to commit suicide. The hero stops eating, throws the meager food out the window. From sad thoughts and suicide attempts, Dantes is distracted by strange sounds behind the wall. A man who has not spoken to a living person for many months understands that he is not alone and that there is a companion in misfortune nearby.


The hero and the stranger behind the wall break through an underground passage. So Edmond ends up in the next cell, where Abbot Faria languishes. The men decide to escape from the hated prison, breaking their way through the earthen walls. Shortly before the end of the tunnel, Dantes' friend dies. Before his death, the abbot reveals a secret to Edmond - gold is buried on the island of Monte Cristo, which was hidden 300 years ago.

Grieving about the death of a friend, Dantes realizes that the death of Faria is a chance to escape from prison faster than the hero planned. The man drags the deceased into his own cell, while he hides in a body bag. The next morning, the guards throw out the hiding Dantes into the sea.


Having hardly got out of the bag, the man meets among the waves of the sea smugglers who take the former prisoner of the If castle to the island of Monte Cristo. There, following the abbot's prompts, Edmond finds gold. Well now main task for the hero becomes vengeance on those who deprived him of happy life and sent him to prison for 14 years.

Hiding his true identity under the name of Abbot Busoni, Dantes visits the first conspirator, a former tailor and current owner of the Cadrousse inn. From a greedy villain, the hero learns who and why wrote a slander on Edmond.


However, revenge is not the only thing the hero plans. The former sailor supplies the ruined owner of the "Pharaoh" with money, thereby repaying the noble man for everything he did for Dantes. Edmond even gives the ship owner's daughter a diamond, having signed the anonymous gift "Sindbad the Sailor".

“Be happy, noble man! You deserve this happiness! . And now - goodbye, philanthropy! May the god of vengeance give way to me, so that I punish the villains! "

Dantes, who is now hiding under the name and occasionally resorts to the images of the Abbot Busoni, and returns to the island, which made the hero rich. There, a man builds a magnificent castle, where he spends a lot of time alone, developing a plan for revenge.

Years later, the sudden appearance of a mysterious person fills Paris with rumors and speculation. The mighty Count of Monte Cristo, whose riches are legendary, is re-acquainted with the enemies who have reached a high social position over the past time.

At the first meeting, Dantes sets traps for the conspirators. The man subtly hints to the former prosecutor Villefort that he knows about the murder of an illegitimate child. Then the hero tells the newspapers how the former soldier (now General de Montser and the husband of Mercedes) acted unworthily with the Turkish Sultan. The banker Baron Danglars, who wrote the ill-fated anonymous letter, is being ruined.


As a result of cunning intrigues and complex manipulations, the Count of Monte Cristo achieves his own goal - his enemies are either dead or crazy. A man who has spent many years on revenge leaves wealth to two young lovers who have nothing to do with an unpleasant story. The hero sails to the island to spend the rest of his life in solitude.

Screen adaptations

The first film dedicated to just revenge was released in 1908. Hobart Bosworth played the leading role in the American version of "The Count of Monte Cristo". The artist returned to the image of Dantes in 1912 - director Colin Campbell invited Bosworth to his own adaptation of the novel.

In 1922, Fox Film released a new film based on the novel by Alexandre Dumas. The film "Monte Cristo" has long been considered lost, but was found in the archives of the studio. The role of Dantes was played by John Gilbert.


A joint creation of France and Italy came out in 1953. In the film adaptation, not all the characters described in the book are present, and the main character spends 17 years in the castle of If instead of the indicated 14. The role of the former sailor was entrusted to the actor.

In 1988, a Soviet director decided to transfer the adventures of Edmond Dantes to the screens. The film "The Prisoner of the Castle of If" consists of three parts. Filming took place in Italy, Odessa, Riga, Paris and in the Crimean city of Alupka. The image of Dantes was embodied at once by two actors: he played the role of a mature Edmond, and played the main character in his youth.


One of the most popular film adaptations was shown to the public in 1998. The mini-series "The Count of Monte Cristo" does not follow the plot of the novel of the same name verbatim. The creators of the picture changed the ending of the work and reduced the minor characters. The role of the prisoner of the Chateau d'If was played by an actor.

Quotes

"Today's friends are tomorrow's enemies."
"There is nothing that does not sell when you know how to offer the right price."
“You are always in a hurry to be happy. Those who have suffered for a long time can hardly believe their happiness. "
"One must yearn for death in order to understand how good life is."
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What does Lord Wilmore do in The Count of Monte Cristo?

What does Lord Wilmore do in The Count of Monte Cristo?

Lord Wilmore The identity of an eccentric English nobleman that Dantès assumes when committing acts of random generosity. Lord Wilmore contrasts sharply with Monte Cristo, who is associated with Dantès’s acts of bitterness and cruelty.

Who is Luigi vampa?

Luigi Vampa Chief of a large gang of bandits, whose headquarters are in the ancient catacombs outside of Rome.

Who is the villain in The Count of Monte Cristo?

Fernand Mondego

Who is Franz Epinay father?

Franz d’Epinay is the childhood friend of Albert de Morcerf. As a child his father was politically murdered by Noirtier de Villefort.

Who does Edmond Dantes marry?

At the age of nineteen, Edmond Dantès seems to have the perfect life. He is about to become the captain of a ship, he is engaged to a beautiful and kind young woman, Mercédès, and he is well liked by almost everyone who knows him.

Is Albert the son of Edmond Dantes?

Furthermore, Mondego has married Mercédès, and the two have a son named Albert. Having established himself in Parisian society, and having distanced himself from Edmond Dantès, the Count is able to formulate his plans of revenge against the men who betrayed him.

Is Edmond Dantes black?

The description of him in the later parts of the book describe his skin as almost bone-white, following his years in the Chateau d’If out of sunlight. His hair, it’s true, is black and his eyes are described as black. However, there’s no indication that his ancestry is anything but white French.

What did Mondego do wrong to Dantes?

The wicked Fernand Mondego is Edmond Dantès’s main antagonist. He is deeply jealous of Dantès for winning the heart of his cousin Mercedes, for whom he has unrequited feelings. Mondego knows that so long as Dantès is in the picture, he will never be able to be with Mercedes. So he resolves to have him destroyed.

What does D if mean in French?

It’s a place. It means ‘of If’. Not the same as ‘if I’m English. Château d’If – Wikipedia.

Is the Chateau d’If real?

The Château d’If is a fortress (later a prison) located on the island of If, the smallest island in the Frioul archipelago situated in the Mediterranean Sea about 1.5 kilometres (7⁄8 mile) offshore in the Bay of Marseille in southeastern France.

Is the Count of Monte Cristo real?

Alexandre Dumas’ famous story, The Count of Monte Cristo, was a fictional story based on real events. One of its characters, a mad-genius of a scientist who writes his greatest work in prison, was based on a real person. Alexandre Dumas tells the story of Edmond Dantès, a wrongfully imprisoned man.

How long was Monte Cristo in jail?

fourteen years

Why did caderousse kill his wife?

Caderousse was one of the minds behind Edmond’s imprisonment. After speaking to Caderousse, Edmond (disguised as the Abbé Busoni) at first believes that Caderousse is innocent and gives him a diamond. However, Caderousse kills his wife and a jeweler to keep the money for himself.

Who does the Count of Monte Cristo marry?

Engaged to Baron Franz d’Épinay. She is 19 years old with chestnut hair, dark blue eyes, and “long white hands”. Monsieur Noirtier de Villefort: The father of Gérard de Villefort and grandfather of Valentine, Édouard (and, without knowing it, Benedetto).

Is Edmond Dantes a hero?

Edmond Dantès is considered a Byronic Hero because he was traumatized, arrogant, and very intelligent.

Is the Count of Monte Cristo a hero or a villain?

Edmond Dantès, fictional character, the hero of the novel The Count of Monte Cristo (1844–45) by Alexandre Dumas père. When Dantès is imprisoned as a young sailor because of the treachery of four acquaintances, he spends the rest of his life plotting and then carrying out plans for revenge against his betrayers.

What was Edmond Dantes accused of?

treason

What is a Byronic hero in literature?

A Byronic hero is a type of fictional character who is a moody, brooding rebel, often one haunted by a dark secret from his past. Byronic hero is used in the discussion of literature to describe a type of character that appears not just in the works of Byron himself but also in many other works of fiction.

Is James Bond a Byronic hero?

James Bond, a cunning and dashing spy, exemplifies the traits of a Byronic Hero through risk taking actions, a miserable childhood, and a sexually appealing charisma.

Is Deadpool a Byronic hero?

Deadpool, however, is not arrogant, prideful or dark. Humor is his key attribute, and while his humor is definitely a way of deflecting many of his emotional issues, he still is only partially Byronic.

Is Batman a Byronic hero?

This version of Batman is a self-destructive maniac. In literary terms, he’s a Byronic Hero. Batman as a Byronic Hero The term is named after Lord Byron, an English nobleman and poet of the Romantic period. The Byronic Hero is a heightened version of the Romantic Hero that I talked about in the last article.

Is Batman an antihero?

Superheroes like Batman is a very good example of an antihero. Unlike an ordinary conventional qualities hero, he uses various deceitful techniques to fight crime and corruption in Gotham, a city where an ethical hero would face a very terrifying situation.

Is Batman a romantic hero?

Of course the one and only Batmanhe symbolizes a perfect romantic hero. Batmanhunts criminals in a dark city that’s atmosphere is purely romantic; it displays the mood that batman feels and shows how everything is dark and he is the light.

How is Jack Sparrow a Byronic hero?

The character Captain Jack Sparrow in Pirates of the Caribbean serves as a Byronic Hero in order to display the contrast of good and evil that can be found in every individual.

How is Jack Sparrow a hero?

Though he is a pirate, Jack is a good man, doing what he deems necessary to keep himself and his friends out of trouble, though usually failing at doing so. Jack was finally the hero that he really is and saved Will Turner as a proof of his redemption and is considered one of Disney’s most popular modern heroes.

What are the characteristics of the Byronic hero?

Byronic heroes tend to exhibit many of the following personality traits: cynicism, arrogance, absolute disrespect for authority, psychological depth, emotional moodiness, past trauma, intelligence, nihilism, dark humor, self-destructive impulses, mysteriousness, sexual attractiveness, world- weariness, hyper- …

What is Jack Sparrow’s catchphrase?

“Not all treasure is silver and gold, mate.” Jack’s deepest and most profound quote.

What is Jack Sparrow’s accent?

British accent

What does Jack Sparrow say?

Spoken about Jack Sparrow “You will never get the gold! We will never surrender!”

Источник: https://easierwithpractice.com/what-does-lord-wilmore-do-in-the-count-of-monte-cristo/

Edmond Dantès

AvengerEdmondDantesStage1.png

AvengerDantesStage2.png

AvengerDantesStage3.png

FGO The Count of Monte Cristo.png

Also known as:

The Count of Monte Cristo
The King of the Cavern
The Vengeance Demon

Normal classes:
FGO Avenger.png

Strength:

Endurance:

Agility:

B[1][2]

A+[1][2]

C[1][2]

Mana:

Luck:

NP:

B[1][2]

?[1][2]

A[1][2]

Avenger

A[1][2]

Oblivion Correction

B[1][2]

Self-Replenishment (Mana)

D[1][2]

Determination of Steel

EX[1][2]

Golden Rule

A[1][2]

Wisdom of Predicament

A[2]

Monte Cristo Mythologie

Anti-Unit[1][2]

C[1][2]

Enfer Château d'If

Anti-Unit/Anti-Army[1][2]

A[1][2]→A+

Attendre, Espérer

Anti-Unit[1]

B[1]

Edmond Dantès (エドモン・ダンテス, Edomon Dantesu?), Class NameAvenger (アヴェンジャー, characteristics of edmond dantes, is an Avenger-class Servantsummoned by Ritsuka Fujimaruin the Grand Ordersof Fate/Grand Order.

Profile[]

Identity[]

Popularly known as The Count of Monte Cristo (モンテ・クリスト伯, Monte Kurisuto-haku?) and the King of the Cavern (巌窟王, Gankutsuō?), the individual who possesses the world's greatest popularity as an avenger.[2]

The story of the King of the Cavern is treated as a literary creation by Alexandre Dumas (pere), but it has been confirmed in modern times that the "Abbe Faria" who guided Edmond when he was imprisoned on the Château d'If actually existed.[2]

Dumas and Edmond had met as Dumas was dining in a high class restaurant.

History[]

Living as a seaman in Marseille, Edmond was torn away from his love Mercédès after being imprisoned in the hellish Château d'If due to a false charge derived from an unscrupulous conspiracy. However, he did not fall into despair thanks to his mind of steel, and during his imprisonment, he met the similarly imprisoned Abbe Faria, who guided Edmond.[2]

  • Château d'If (シャトー・ディフ, Shatō Difu?)

After escaping his prison, Edmond eventually acquired the treasure of the Monte Cristo island, learned that his love and covetous affection towards Mercédès had been trampled upon and snatched away from him, and began a tragic revenge plot while concealing his identity. He swooped down upon Paris, dragging down the people who once deceived him, now the many leading figures reigning over France, into hell. At the end of his journey, he was reformed through his anguish and regret, leaving with his mistress Haydée – an Albanian princess who had been sold into slavery by Fernand de Morcerf (formerly Mondego), who had also betrayed Edmond, before the Count of Monte Cristo rescued her and eventually fell in love with her.[2]

That stern way of characteristics of edmond dantes the revenge tragedy that concealed his identity; the love and covetous affection towards his lover Mercédès, which was trampled on and snatched away; and the journey that resulted in his reform due to his anguish and regret, are all applauded by the people - not only from France, but from all over the world - and he is remembered as "the most famous avenger in the world."[2]

Strange Tales of Heroic Spirit Lore ~King of the Cavern, Edmond Dantès~[]

October 1837. One year before enacting his vengeance, the Count of Monte Cristo carried out another tale of revenge as he had to avenge Abbe Faria, who he considered a second father. Faria was falsely accused as a rebel plotting the Italian unification and was imprisoned in the Chateau d'If by the "Three Wise Men" who desired the treasure of Monte Cristo.[3]

While waiting for the first one, Father Angelo Braga, to appear after inviting him to his home, Haydée warns Edmond that he should not have brought Angelo here, but Edmond tells her to go away as it is not yet time for the two of them to meet. When Concetta comes to his room to tell him that Angelo has arrived, she asks if he was talking to someone, and he says that it was just a phantom.[3]

The Count and Angelo talk over dinner. The Count was investigating the church and Angelo went for him who knows the location of the treasure. Edmond reveals how through knowledge, he was taught everything, from knowing how to live to how to fight, by Abbe Faria and calls him his second father, while also revealing that this was all a trap to lure Angelo who is one of the Three Wise Men who got Faria imprisoned. The food was poisoned and Angelo has taken a lethal dose, but it doesn't work because of his special Assembly of the Eight Sacrament training and he attacks Edmond. The Count attacks him with a pistol, but it can't even scratch him, so he has Concetta activate a trap which blows Angelo up along with the whole mansion. Angelo does barely survive but the Count finishes him off with one of Angelo's Black Keys, piercing his chest while he was surprised that monsters also have hearts. Then, Edmond declared that one is down.[4]

The Count of Monte Cristo moves to Rome to continue his revenge plot. While attending to an opera, the Count and Concetta discuss about their next objective. The target is a cardinal, and the plan is to lure him with money.[5] After that, one of Edmond's informants, one of many he has all over Europe, is killed. While at first the killing was thought to be by bandits or pirates, Concetta says that it "went over the line". The second set of killings was of a man who started an investment company in Spain, and his wife and 5-year-old daughter. The Count's group are the only ones who realize that these killings are connected as the man who was killed was one of Morrel's associates. The killings continue, and some of the corpses are left without a drop of blood.[6]

Edmond is sure that the killings are the doing of one of the Three Wise Men and is furious. The killer left behind a message by spelling out a word, letter by letter, with the organs of his victims: Tarantella. Edmond wonders if this is really how the Church works, if Tarantella is just crazy, if this is vengeance for Angelo, or if he's just playing around with people's lives. He tells Concetta to prepare, and they start a counterattack by spreading information that the Count of Monte Cristo would be holding a huge party as bait, and they rent the whole Villa Medici for this purpose.[7]

Haydée shows again and warns Edmond that this is way too dangerous. She wants him to live, and says that Faria would have wanted the same. Edmond says nobody knows what the dead want, and all he's doing is ridding himself of his own sorrows. Haydée wishes she could heal him of his sorrows, but Edmond tells her to begone, and to wait for him on the other side beyond love and hate.[8]

Tarantella shows up and notices that there is nobody else at the "party" besides him. He recognizes the Count by his white hair and explains that Faria turned his back on the Holy Church when he said that he wanted to save all life. Edmond says that those are the Church's teachings, but Tarantella explains that's just the Church's front, and the truth is different. Edmond says that they're a bunch of heretics, bloodstained murderers who themselves turned their backs on the Messiah and the Prophets, and activates a trap which fires spears at Tarantella, and then another trap which binds him with chains made to subdue tigers, but Tarantella breaks out easily. Edmond shoots him in the forehead but Tarantella gets back up and pulls out the spears.[9]

Tarantella uses a white lightning that burns Edmond and defeats him instantly, but doesn't kill him because he still needs to interrogate him. The Count asks if the Church is all composed of monsters, and Tarantella says that not all members have this power. The cardinal is a mere weak human for example, who isn't even an Executor - an inquisitor of the Sacred Church who represents the Will of God - like Angelo or Tarantella. Edmond is enraged by the claim that they're doing God's work and gets up again, blocking Tarantella's vision with his coat and stabbing him in the heart with a knife. Tarantella says that he's not just a mere Executor either, and asks where that foolish criminal Faria's treasure is while hitting Edmond with more of his lightning Magecraft. Edmond answers that both Tarantella and Angelo are idiots as there is no such thing as a "treasure". Tarantella observes that Edmond is imprevious to torture, as he doesn't fear death, or pain, or damage to his body, thinking that time in the Chateau d'If made him strong, so he says that he'll have Edmond recall what pain is like by destroying one of his belongings, and leaves. Edmond regrets listening to Ali and Concetta and not using explosives in the traps and accepts it was his own loss. Haydée calls out to the Count again and he asks her to give him more power. She says he already has it within him.[9]

The Count arrives to the inn where Concetta was waiting for him, but he is late and Tarantella finishes sucking Concetta's blood dry just as he arrives. Edmond realises that Tarantella is a Blood-Sucking Demon, a Vampire. Tarantella says that comparing him to Lord Ruthven makes sense, but that's not quite it as he is another thing, and presents himself by revealing his true name, Michael Roa Valdamjong, a characteristics of edmond dantes that devours humans.[10]

Faria wasn't able to tell Edmond about Dead Apostles and Michael Roa Valdamjong, the Monster of Ego and the evil reincarnator who dwells inside the hidden side of the Characteristics of edmond dantes, because the vampire put a curse on him. But Faria left Edmond "the treasure of darkness" he stole from the Church that would one day help Edmond out when he one day faces a non-human enemy that he would lose to - The Treasure of Monte Cristo, which has the power to remake a person anew.[10]

The Count of Monte Cristo laughs and says it doesn't matter what Roa is, as he, and not Roa, represents God's Will, and then starts burning with black flames. He immediately understands how it works, and how it's a weapon for him to burn his enemies.[10]

« To me belongeth Vengeance! »

(Edmond quotes the Holy Bible after proclaiming himself as the true Will of God)

Roa recognises the black fire as the Monte Cristo Mythologie, a legend hidden in the Mountain of the Messiah, the despair of those without God, the flames of Hell and the Void, and a power equal to that from the Age of Myths which forces a special Magic Circuit and Magic Crest into the user.[10]

The Count tells him to shut up and blasts Roa through the inn's wall. Roa runs, but Edmond flies after him, so they fight in the skies of Rome. The Dead Apostle traps Edmond with magic and blasts him with a powerful lightning, and then uses the moves of his multiple reincarnations, including the curses of the Seventh and the barriers of the Fourth. Edmond calls upon the fires of vengeance to eat his soul and turn into black flames, breaking the magical barrier imprisoning him and then proceeds to grab and burn Roa while laughing, the vampire noticing that damage dealt by those flames is not regenerating. The Count then declares that they'll just have to see whose soul is incinerated first. Roa rabidly shouts that there can't be such a thing as a fire that can burn even souls, but Edmond says those flames are right here. Roa can't heal and Edmond asks him to just try and pretend to be the Messiah in front of God again. Roa starts shouting that this can't be possible and starts to say he is a reincarnator; even if his body is destroyed, he is infinite. But Roa's rambling is cut off short by Edmond's declaration.[10]

« Despair. That. is Hell. I will not take pity upon you, rot away. »

(The Count of Monte Cristo declares his victory)

When the Count realizes it, he is standing alone and nothing is left of Roa but cinders. He feels something vanishing from his body, and believes that it is the Treasure of Monte Cristo. He realizes that he was saved by Faria once more. His body will never be enveloped in black flames again, not unless he's someday reborn as something as inhuman as a vampire. He prays for Concetta to watch over his vengeance. He heads for the cathedral and is stopped by a guard who what time does walmart hair salon open today to know who he is. He laughs and says that the Count of Monte Cristo has come for the cardinal.[11]

Some time later, the cardinal lost his position, and it's unknown if the Count of Monte Cristo ultimately killed him or not. Either way, his vengeance in Rome was over; but this was only the tale of the vengeance for Faria, the other vengeance. And so this is not the end but the beginning of the Count of Monte Cristo's story of vengeance in Paris.[12]

Appearance[]

Detective Edmond

Detective Edmond ~Spring Equinox Travelogue~ (探偵ヱドモン~春先旅情編~, Tantei Wedomon ~Harusaki Ryojō-hen~?) in Fate/Grand Order, illustrated by Kazuki Yone.

CE990

Detective Edmond ~True Mastermind Arc~ (探偵ヱドモン~真の黒幕編~?), illustrated by Kazuki Yone.

Personality[]

« My name is the .
Unknown to love, unknown to compassion, established as the black flame of grudge that blazes itself dazzlingly only by means of hatred and revenge; nothing but an Avenger who rages until he turns everything to ashes.
My favorite mistress, Haydée, is nowhere in this world, so this body shall remain a nemesis for eternity— »

(Avenger)

While his True Name is Edmond Dantès, Avenger perceives himself to be a different person from the seaman from Marseille. While in life he had abandoned his dark nature at the end of his gruesome and tragic revenge in Paris, his powerful and vengeful Monte Cristo persona has manifested as a Servant and is still acting what is the definition of capital murder the "image of a nemesis", so he claims, "In that case, I am not Edmond." Therefore, he will never introduce himself as Edmond Dantès. His catchphrase is "Wait and Hope" (in French, "Attendre, Esperer"), which is a direct quotation from the ending of The Count of Monte Cristo in his farewell letter to his friend Maximilien Morrel.[2]

« One of my names is enough to strike terror into your heart, but I don't have to tell you what it is, do I? You've already guessed it, haven't you? Or rather, you remember it, for despite all my years of sorrow and torment, the joy of vengeance has made my face young again! »

(Monte Cristo to Fernand de Morcerf, from Chapter 54 of "The Count of Monte Cristo")

An avenger to fate and reality. Avenger always hates the irrationality and malice that is all over the world. At a first glance, it appears that his hatred is projected towards the whole world except on himself, but he is never a demon that hates innocent people. He hates and continues to deny reality itself that continues to reign while it is still full of atrocities and immoralities. Avenger defines himself as a “demon of eternal vengeance”. He is full of roughness and violence, hurting every person who approaches him, but.[1]

To the Master who do battle to rescue human history from incineration, Avenger has two forms to select from. Namely, the form as “himself that trifles with reality and a vicious fate (Edmond Dantès)“ representing his current self, and the form as “a person that is close to who he was before (King of the Cavern) as the materialized idol of hatred.[1] Particularly regarding the latter form, before long, Avenger will surely recognize the profile of his Master who continues to struggle, seemingly at first remembering Haydée, the princess of a ruined country, or Abbe Faria, who was his benefactor.

"They are not Abbe Faria."

"They are not Haydée."

Of course, Avenger himself in this form does not represent his current self. The Master who walks together with him is just one person in his past, present and future. Even though, the others should not be here. If that is the case, the feelings embraced then is also the sole thing that must be there in the past, and not here in the present.[1]

According to Shiki Ryougi, Edmond Dantès is the kind of person who one victory against him is enough for him to become an unexpectedly trustworthy ally, as only someone with great love and care would turn into such an Avenger after being betrayed by someone they love. That also means that Edmond loves humanity on a very fundamental level.[13]

If Angra Mainyu, born of hatred, is an avenger that speaks about love, the King of the Cavern, born of love, is an avenger that speaks about hatred.[1] Where one forgives and accepts evil as a inherent part of humanity, the other rages and strikes at it with vengeance.

Relationships[]

Amakusa Shirou Tokisada
Avenger highly appreciates his way of life. "That greed that saves the world is unquestionably the embodiment of human nature!"[1]
Jeanne d'Arc
Avenger doubts her current state of life. There is no reason to believe that she does not harbour the flames of vengeance as if she was betrayed by the world.[1]
Florence Nightingale
Even though he cannot so as far as recognize this particular case as a Heroic Spirit, this vengeful demon caught a glimpse of her who holds to herself an unwavering conviction, something that is dazzlingly beautiful, of which the current state of her soul have reached the domain of an idol.[1] He remembers the events of The Vengeance Demon Howls in the Prison Tower and so chooses to keep calling her Mercedes, which Nightingale assumes is evidence of brain damage that warrants surgery at the earliest possible convenience.
Angra Mainyu
Avenger respects him, for it is possible to say that this person is the original Avenger.[1]
Jeanne d’Arc (Alter) / Jeanne Alter Santa Lily
Avenger is quietly observing the fate of some girls for the materialization of a new Avenger.[1]
Napoléon Bonaparte
The man who was partly responsible for Edmond's imprisonment. The current Edmond bears no hatred towards the French conqueror.

Role[]

Fate/Grand Order[]

Event: The Garden of Order[]

Ritsuka’s party encounters Avenger, shrouded in darkness, in the woods outside Ogawa Apartment Complex. Avenger causes an unstable spiritron disruption to cut their connection with Romani Archaman to be cut off. Shiki Ryougi believes he is emitting a murderous aura, though Avenger declares he is nothing but pure rage. He then reveals the ghosts in the apartment are souls who were unrewarded in life, and their regrets keep from moving to the afterlife. Stating the ghosts need peace, he declares he’ll create a Hell for them using the grudge filled apartment if Hell itself denies them. He then leaves, warning the group not to stand in his way.[14]

The group later confronts Avenger on the roof, believing him to the mastermind behind the distortion. He tells them that his grudge shall never fade away, and even if the apartment will disappear, his work will continue. He refuses to give up until he remembers everything of the island of despair, the tower of incarceration, and the castle of treasures. Mash calls him a Heroic Spirit that shouldn’t exist in this world, but he refutes that Heroic Spirits and spirits of the dead are ultimately the same thing. Then, the greater ghost the group destroyed earlier appears. Mash believes it’s another one, but Avenger corrects that curses never disappear and declares the system of curses Solomon gave him is now complete. He declares resentment and killing will continue as long as the other exists, calling the hatred of the sacrificed his nourishment. After he states he’ll be worshiped as a god for creating an eternal hell, the greater ghost prepares to attack the group. Mash senses it has far more Magical Energy than before, saying its resentment increases with every defeat. if the ghost’s resentment continues to increase at its current rate, they won’t be able to destroy it. However, Shiki encourages her and Ritsuka to fight, saying to Avenger that all things have an end. Impressed by her claims, Avenger asks the group to show him they can deny the evil of humans, and prove to him nothing can exist for eternity.[15]

After the ghost is destroyed, Avenger jumps off the roof to flee. Shiki goes to stop him, but Romani warns Avenger is actually an illusion. Ritsuka stops her, and she kills the illusion of Avenger with a thrown knife. As Avenger disappears, Romani asks him why he created the distortion and who ordered him to do so. Avenger answers Chaldea’s enemy had ordered him to transform the apartment into a Singularity. But he used it to fuel his need for vengeance by using the Servants’ own desire for revenge. Ritsuka asks his identity before he disappears, but he only says Attendre et espérer. (Wait and hope)” as he fades away.[13]

Vengeful Demon's Wail at the Prison Tower[]

Edmond welcomes Ritsuka when their soul arrives in the recreation of Château d'If. He unveils himself and destroys the spirits trying to kill Ritsuka out of envy. Afterward, he explains where they are and introduces himself as Avenger. Exiting the prison cell, he explains to Ritsuka that they'll need to pass the seven Halls of Judgement to escape. He says neither their voice nor those of Chaldea can reach each other. He also warns if they die in the Halls or fails to escape in seven days, they'll die. He then reveals the current Château d'If is a recreation similar to a Singularity that Solomon uses as a hunting ground.[16]

Ritsuka and Edmond soon encounter the Phantom of the Opera. Edmond calls him a monster of envy who has come to kill Ritsuka. Edmond kills Phantom and commends Ritsuka for their skills as a Master.[16]

Edmond explains Ritsuka's body is still in Chaldea, along with everyone else there. However, the flow of time and space differs between Chaldea and the prison, so seven days in the prison equates to one in Chaldea. Edmond also reveals they will always begin in the same prison cell before exiting. The pair then encounters a mysterious woman asking for help. She explains she suddenly found herself in the prison with no memories. Edmond decides to call her Mercédès after she recalls she was searching for something important. Taking Mercédès with them, the pair reach the second hall.[17]

There Edmond asks Ritsuka if they ever felt lust, which the second hall represents. He further asks if they've ever given in to bestial urges, to which Fergus mac Róich loudly and proudly answers that he has. Edmond tells Ritsuka that all humans carry the inescapable sin of lust. Fergus decides to kill Ritsuka and Edmond after accusing them of trying to keep Mercédès from him. At Ritsuka's behest, Edmond kills Fergus to protect Mercédès. Afterward, he tells Ritsuka he'll kill them if they admit they cannot fight anymore.[17]

Edmond reveals the connection between Ritsuka's soul and their body is weakening. Leaving without Mercédès, the pair encounter the avatar of sloth, Gilles de Rais. Hearing Gilles spout how his blasphemy is an offering to God, Edmond says he represents sloth because he let himself fall into depravity. He then proceeds to kill Gilles.[18]

Later, Edmond immediately has Ritsuka go to the fourth hall, which represents wrath. Remarking on the subject of vengeance, he is angry that the fourth lord denies anger, the purest of emotion. He is furious that even as the fourth lord, she would still speak of salvation and forgiveness. But he will never forgive and looks forward to killing her.[19]

Arriving at the hall, he and Ritsuka are confronted by both Saber Gilles and Jeanne d'Arc, the avatar of wrath. Edmond says she willingly entered the prison tower to stop him. He believes Jeanne should be vengeful towards her betrayal and execution. Jeanne refutes his words and refuses to judge Ritsuka, saying she lacks the will and right. Instead, she has come to save Edmond’s soul. The notion infuriates Edmond, stating that none can save him. After killing Gilles, he prepares to do the same to Jeanne. But Jeanne retreats, refusing to give up on Edmond.[19]

Returning from scouting, Edmond immediately has Ritsuka go with him to the fifth hall. There they encounter the avatar of gluttony, Caligula, and defeat him.[20]

Later, Ritsuka and Edmond go to face off against the avatar of greed. At the sixth hall, they're confronted by Jeanne, who had been waiting for Edmond. She tells him that even with his uncontrollable rage, he can still ask for forgiveness and salvation. She knows that he has experienced it before. Jeanne's words send Edmond into a rage, and he prepares to kill her. He calms down a bit, though, when the avatar of greed, Amakusa Shirou Tokisada, arrives. Amakusa Shirou understands words and prayer cannot reach Edmond, yet he believes in him. He also knows he didn't join Solomon; Edmond admits he is uninterested in a being beyond love and hate. He tells Amakusa Shirou not to misunderstand him as he never helped save the world. Amakusa Shirou admits this is true, then fights Edmond with Jeanne.[21]

After being defeated, Amakusa Shirou warns Edmond that his black flames will destroy him one day. Edmond replies that not even God cannot change his state as an eternal Avenger. But Jeanne tells him that nothing is eternal, particularly evil. Edmond calls her and Amakusa Shirou weak, characteristics of edmond dantes such weakness is why they became the avatars of wrath and greed. He suspects they'll meet and bids them farewell. Jeanne and Amakusa Shirou then disappear, praying that Edmond’s soul finds rest. Ritsuka asks if they were supposed to defeat them. Edmond answers their interest was in him, though he wonders what would've happened to Ritsuka if Jeanne and Amakusa Shirou succeeded.[21]

Not finding Mercédès in the prison cell, Ritsuka and Edmond head for the final hall. They find it empty, so to pass the time, Edmond tells the story of his revenge in the third person. While his living self abandoned vengeance after achieving his revenge, the Edmond recorded as a Heroic Spirit was the him who sought revenge. Mercédès then appears and attacks him with the wraiths in the prison that admire her. After Edmond destroys the ghosts, it is revealed Mercédès was meant to be the seventh lord before losing the role. Mercédès disappears, addressing Edmond by his True Name. Edmond denies that is his name, calling himself an eternal being of vengeance. He then attacks Ritsuka since only one can leave the prison, revealing himself to be the avatar of pride.[22]

After being defeated, he commends Ritsuka for achieving an ending filled with hope. He reveals Ritsuka became trapped in the prison when they carelessly said his name. Solomon placed a curse called the Evil Eye on them when they stared into his eyes back in London. Edmond laughs at how Solomon's trap failed, saying it's what he gets for choosing him. Ritsuka asks him if he'll disappear forever, wishing to see him again. Edmond tells them to wait and hope before disappearing.[22]

Final Singularity: Solomon[]

Edmond is the leader of the "special event" Servants to assist Chaldea against the Demon Gods Pillars. Once Ritsuka and Mash reach the Trash Heap, they're thrown into a place where no help can reach and Andromalius confronts the two. While he laughs at them for the futility of their actions, Edmond breaks through space-time at an impossible speed to help his accomplice, as hope always exists even in the middle of despair. Following him, all the other special event Servants show up to help. After the fight, Edmon fights alone against Andromalius, who is cursing the time they used him in their plan. Ritsuka and Mash use this chance to reach the throne of the Time Temple.[23]

Subspecies Singularity I: Shinjuku[]

Edmond was originally summon to free William Shakespeare from his imprisonment in Barrel Tower.[24]

He witnesses Jeanne Alter dive into the sewers per Sherlock Holmes‘ advice escaping Hessian Lobo. Together with her, he finally rescues Shakespeare, and they’re joined Hans Christian Andersen. He and Jeanne Alter then ambush James Moriarty, who dodges their attacks. Shakespeare and Andersen then combine their Noble Phantasms to summon the Great Detectives. While they cannot help physically, the detectives lend their strength to Ritsuka. Moriarty then uses the Grail to give himself magical energy equal to a Demon God. With three minutes before Bennu arrives, the group commence their final battle against Moriarty.[24]

Struggling against the group, Moriarty uses the Grail on himself once again. However, the detectives use this opportunity to grant Ritsuka their power. Ritsuka uses it to unveil Moriarty as the culprit which results in his strength being sapped. With Moriarty defeated and Bennu destroyed, the Singularity is resolved, so the Servants start to disappear. Having done what he was asked to do, Edmond decides it’s time for him to leave as well. Ritsuka asks him who asked him to help, but he never really answers. He tells them they have a long road ahead of them, though he doubtless they’ll cross paths again. He tells Ritsuka to remember punishment, deserving or otherwise, is always given, but they will never succumb to it. He disappears, assuring Ritsuka that he’ll be at their side when they call for him.[24]

Subspecies Singularity III: Shimosa[]

Edmond comes to Shimosa after being asked by Sherlock Holmes to help Ritsuka, knowing of his experiences involving dreams. He pretends to be a Christian missionary as a cover. Ritsuka and Miyamoto Musashi encounter him in Toke Castle town after they stopped a fight between Kiyohime and Otama. He directs the two to a nearby alleyway where they’ll see someone they’d do well to meet.[25]

Gathering intelligence, Edmond uncovers Amakusa Shirou Tokisada‘s plan to sacrifice Kiyohime to Onriedo Castle, and use her Tokugawa heritage as a catalyst to cast a far-ranging multilayered curse on the Tokugawa regime to destroy every world where the Tokugawa exists.[26]

When Toke Castle becomes Onriedo Castle, he fights an Orochi while Ritsuka’s party were fighting another one. He tells them that Kiyohime is being held captive in the castle, and of Amakusa Shirou’s plan involving her and it. Though she lacks blood from the immediate family, it will be sufficient for his plan, especially given that Iemitsu is only the chase bank android app not working shogun. Edmond realizes Amakusa Shirou was searching for a parallel world where Matsudaira’s daughter was living near Edo following the Shimabara Rebellion. He tells the group to hurry to the castle to stop Amakusa Shirou, as the success of his plan means the destruction of many worlds, including Shimosa.[26]

He returns to Chaldea ahead of Ritsuka and Kotarou. Outside the facility he confronts Musashi, who eventually arrived there after becoming a Heroic Spirit following her death. He gives her a recording device to record a video message for Ritsuka before she leaves on her journey. Ritsuka runs into him on their way to their room to rest. Edmond denies being the missionary that helped them in Shimosa. He advises them to check their desk before going to sleep.[27]

Lostbelt No. 2: Gotterdammerung[]

Edmond makes a brief appearance when Ritsuka falls into a dream world after Sitonai forces a connection with them while they are forging a contract with Napoleon Bonaparte. He assists Ritsuka in finding their soul and sense of self and returns them to the real world.

Abilities[]

Avenger attacks by projecting his magical power by means of his hatred via Monte Cristo Mythologie. A black grudge effect occurs, giving damage to his opponent. Fundamentally, it is a poisonous system, where it primarily gives direct damage in addition to persistent damage and an abnormal grudge status effect.[1]

Dantes has a unique connection to Ritsuka's dreams, which allows him to protect them from the countless grudges and resentments of the enemies that they have fought throughout the Grand Orders.

Skills[]

Class Skills[]

  • Avenger (A Rank): One’s state of being as an avenger that gathers people’s hatred and resentment onto themselves; a way of being that became a Skill. Although it is easy for the hostility from his surroundings to be directed towards him, negative emotions directed towards Avenger will automatically be converted into his power.[1]
  • Oblivion Correction (B Rank): Although people, who are living beings, will be forgetful of many things, an avenger never forgets. An avenger’s attacks, which strike from beyond the people’s lapses of memory, will have their critical hit effects strengthened.[1]

Personal Skills[]

  • Determination of Steel (EX Rank): The dynamism and mind of steel of the man who walked on the path of revenge throughout his entire life after breaking out of the Château d’If (Tower of If) prison, which was even called the Hell on this Earth, becoming a Skill. A complete blockade of his sense of pain, resulting in effects such as the acquisition of a superhuman mind and body that is even able to endure ultrahigh-speed actions. It is a composite Skill that also primarily contains the effects of the Valor Skill and the Calm and Collected Skill.[1]
  • Golden Rule (A Rank): The Count of Monte Cristo attained everlasting wealth and political power by obtaining the “hidden treasure” told of by Abbe Faria in the Château d’If, so money is hardly a matter for him to be troubled with.[1]
  • Wisdom of Predicament (A Rank): The ability to call upon Luck with a precedence in critical situations. The wisdom brought about by the abundant knowledge he received from Abbe Faria and his own natural intelligence. By combining this with the special characteristics of his Extra Class, it becomes possible for him to use the Item Construction Skill, which is primarily a Caster’s Class Skill, at Rank B.[1]

Noble Phantasms[]

In addition to Monte Cristo Mythologie, he possesses the Noble PhantasmsEnfer Château d'If, his mental power of steel, and Attendre, Espérer, an unbelievable recovery Noble Phantasm that is also the agglomeration of all human knowledge into the words "Wait and Hope".[1]

Development[]

Creation and Conception[]

« I decided on a character that is constantly engulfed in black flames because of his aspect, being called the embodiment of the desire for revenge, and I arrived at this design with that thought. »

(Rui Komatsuzaki)


Rui Komatsuzaki is the character illustrator for Avenger, who also designed the characters for the Danganronpa Series.[1][2] His meta title "Super High School Level Heroic Spirit" also referenced the Danganronpa Series, where the characters are all Super High School Level students, and his design is reminiscent of Nagito Komaeda from the second game of the series. Hikaru Sakurai is the scenario writer for his character.[1]

Rather than go for the traditional image of a "cool old Count" for Dantès' character that Nasu feels was "brought to utter perfection" by Gonzo in their Gankutsuou anime, they wished to distance themselves from that characterization and instead went for a twist with a "younger count." He is a "Super High School Level Heroic Spirit", developed with the idea of having a "cool dark hero" and out of Nasu's desire for having a Komatsuzaki-developed Servant. Nasu feels that Dantès' "true worth" is in his third stage ascension appearance, the "condensation of his chuuni essence."[28][29]

References[]

Источник: https://typemoon.fandom.com/wiki/Edmond_Dant%C3%A8s

What did the Count of Monte Cristo want? Monte Cristo has two goals — to reward those who were kind to him and his aging father, and to punish those responsible for his imprisonment. For the latter, he plans slow and painful punishment.

What is the bad credit high down payment mortgage of The Count of Monte Cristo? In The Count of Monte Cristo, justice and punishment are a central theme. The protagonist is Edmond Dantès, a young sailor with a fiancée and a promising future. He is imprisoned for being a Bonapartist agent. While in captivity, he realizes that this was the result of his friends’ jealousy and cowardice.

What does Edmond Dantès want? In the series, Edmond seeks revenge on Baron Danglars for burning down his village and murdering his fiancée.

Why did The Count of Monte Cristo want to take revenge? The Count chose this form of revenge because he knew that Caderousse could not resist the temptation of extra money. The Count punished him in this fashion because Caderousse took away all the money that Dantès left for his father. This loss of money caused Dantès’ father to starve to death.

What did the Count of Monte Cristo want? – Related Questions

What is the main plot of The Count of Monte Cristo?

A young man, falsely imprisoned by his jealous “friend”, escapes and uses a hidden treasure to exact his revenge. ‘The Count of Monte Cristo’ is an adaptation of the Alexander Dumas tale by the same name.

What is the moral lesson in The Count of Monte Cristo?

The lesson that Dumas makes quite clear in The Count of Monte Cristo is that pure revenge does not satisfy.

Is Count of Monte Cristo about revenge?

Disguised as the rich Count of Monte Cristo, Dantès takes revenge on the three men responsible for his unjust imprisonment: Fernand, now Count de Morcerf and Mercédès’ husband; Danglars, now a baron and a wealthy banker; and Villefort, now Prosecutor/procureur du roi — all are now living in Paris.

Is Edmond Dantès innocent?

Before his imprisonment, Edmond Dantès is a kind, innocent, honest, and loving man. While in prison, however, Dantès undergoes a great change. He becomes bitter and vengeful as he obsesses over the wrongs committed against him.

Is Edmond Dantès bad?

Dantes is morally innocent; he keeps the secret of the letter out of honesty and loyalty, and believes firmly in the French government’s justice (represented by Villefort); however, these noble qualities lead him to his doom.

Who does Edmond Dantès marry?

At the age of nineteen, Edmond Dantès seems to have the perfect life. He is about to become the captain of a ship, he is engaged to a beautiful and kind young woman, Mercédès, and he is well liked by almost everyone who knows him.

Who betrayed Edmond Dantes?

Danglars is the one who conceives of the conspiracy against Dantès, and he is the one responsible for writing the treacherous, anonymous note which sends Dantès to prison for fourteen years.

Why does Edmond Dantes want revenge?

Dantes got revenge on danglars because he was part of the plot to put him in jail and because he wanted to take dantes position as captain. After caderousse escaped from jail, he tried to rob the count, greedy, and the count got the pleasure of watching as caderousse was killed by one of his companions.

How does Monte Cristo get revenge on danglars?

The Count of Monte Cristo wreaks revenge upon de Villefort by giving poison to Mme. de Villefort. She poisons the maternal grandparents, but de Villefort does not want the police involved as this attention will be damaging to his reputation.

Is Albert the son of Edmond Dantes?

In Dumas’s The Count of Monte Cristo, Albert de Morcerf is son to Fernand Mondego—the Count de Morcerf—and Mercédès, who was Edmond Dantès’ former sweetheart. Albert sends a letter to Franz with instructions on how to free him.

What did Mondego do wrong to Dantès?

In the novel, Mondego is Mercedes’ cousin, and harbors unrequited feelings for her. Jealous of Dantes for winning her heart, he hatches a plan to have Dantes imprisoned. Wanting to keep his father’s Bonapartist sympathies secret, Villefort destroys the original letter and charges Dantes with treason.

Is Count of Monte Cristo worth reading?

This classic story of wrongful imprisonment, hidden treasure, and revenge is truly a masterpiece. Alexandre Dumas’ famous novel Characteristics of edmond dantes Count of Monte Cristo has seen life not only in print but in film and television, but one cannot appreciate the novel unless you read it in its entire unabridged length.

Why is a Monte Cristo called a Monte Cristo?

What Is A Monte Cristo Sandwich? “Monte Cristo” is a tribute to the French novel The Count of Monte Christo by Alexander Dumas. As such, the sandwich’s name suggests its French origins. Food historians generally think that the Monte Cristo sandwich is a variation of a French Croque Monsieur.

What does it mean Monte Cristo?

A fried or grilled sandwich with cheese and ham or turkey, typically dipped in egg before being cooked. ‘the delicious Monte Cristo with prosciutto and gouda’

Is Edmond Dantes revenge justified?

It is mostly shown with the main character of the book, Edmond Dantes. His revenge was justified even though some of his acts of revenge had unintended outcomes for others. Danglars was the man behind the fraud letter, which sent Dantes to the chateau d’if for treason.

Who is Luigi vampa?

LUIGI VAMPA: KING OF BANDITS. Vampa is the best in the business, a real class act. He effortlessly kidnaps Albert de Morcerf – and Danglars, for that matter – and still finds the time to read books by Plutarch and Caesar.

Why did danglars betray Dantes?

Why did danglars betray Dantes? Fernand was the fisherman who betrayed Dantes because he was in love with Mercedes. Military glory brought him a fortune, and he changed his name to Count de Morcerf. He commits suicide after Monte Cristo reveals his military treason.

Is the Count of Monte Cristo a classic?

The book is considered a literary classic today. According to Luc Sante, “The Count of Monte Cristo has become a fixture of Western civilization’s literature, as inescapable and immediately identifiable as Mickey Mouse, and the story of Little Red Riding Hood.”

What does the Count of Monte Cristo regret?

Quote 1. “I regret now,” said he, “having helped you in your late inquiries, or having given you the information I did.” “Why so?” inquired Dantès. “Because it has instilled a new passion in your heart—that of vengeance.”

Is the Chateau d if a real place?

The Château d’If (French pronunciation: ​[ʃɑto dif]) is a fortress and former prison located on the Île d’If, the smallest island in the Frioul archipelago, situated about 1.5 kilometres (7⁄8 mile) offshore from Marseille in southeastern France.

How long did Mercedes wait for Dantes?

From Quiz: The Count Of Monte Cristo. Question by author cony53. She says 2 years until he gets his Captain’s papers.

Источник: https://cementanswers.com/what-did-the-count-of-monte-cristo-want/
characteristics of edmond dantes

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