Vegetable garden layout planner

vegetable garden layout planner

Garden Journal Planner Printable Vegetable Garden Planner Seed Organizer Plant Tracker Gardener Plan A4 A5 Letter Happy Planner Inserts. CandyPrintablesArt. Vegetables. SP291-M. Planning the Vegetable Garden. David W. Sams, Professor Emeritus s, Professor. Plant & Soil Science. Why Plan? A garden plan will save. Sketch out your vegetable garden plan on paper before planting. Figure out how much space to allot to individual plants — and don't forget to allow for space. vegetable garden layout planner

Vegetable garden layout planner -

Vegetable Garden Planner Printables

It is garden planning season, so with the planning comes vegetable garden planner printables.  We are going to share our step-by-step garden plan with you as we know many of you loved to see what we were up to with our gardens in previous years, pictures from our garden growing indoors and out! It helps to see other’s gardens and plans to help you plan your own.

Yes, successful gardening takes planning. We are not master gardeners, but merely city dwellers that want to make the most of our budget and our yard to produce some fresh, homegrown, organic produce. 

vegetable garden planner printables

 

Several years ago, Alex created downloads for me to use to help me have an even more efficient and effective garden plan. 

We have shared our plans in the past and along with those plans, we have shared our vegetable garden planner printables. We want you to be able to utilize these as well, no matter the type of gardening you are doing. Planning your garden on paper before helps to ensure a bit more success, along with saving the budget from not buying more than you need.

I have used these exact plans for years as they are simple enough to do the trick, while being effective at the same time. 

So….. I am sharing these downloads he created for me with you too as you prepare and plant gardens this year! We want to provide tools and resources when we can to make this thrifty life a little easier. This is one of those tools!

A Little History About Our Gardens

For the past several years, we have shared our personal garden plans and lots of gardening tips and tricks. We love to garden and growing your own food could be a good way to save money. 

So I want to share some ideas from our past years to help get the juices flowing for you! 

Well, let me start off by saying that we switched to square foot gardening after a few years of rough gardening and rough results from “row” gardens. We struggled with using the actual ground as our soil. In our area, the soil is terrible, filled with clay and very high maintenance.  Weeds, tough ground, terrible soil, etc.  So we finally made that switch a few years ago and it was finally awesome!

We followed Mel Bartholomew’s Square Foot Gardening Book. This is the EXACT one that we use!

all-new-square-foot-gardening

You can see the details and information on this book on Amazon HERE.

So of course we are doing square foot gardening again.  Not only is it low maintenance, but has very little weeds and nutrient rich soil for our food!

We also use Heirloom Seeds – I hope to harvest my own seeds to use again from these same plants!

Since one of the sheets from the vegetable garden planner printables set includes a square foot gardening planner, we thought it would be good to share how to build your own square foot garden box, because buying them is ridiculous! 

In fact, at places like Home Depot and Lowe’s, you can buy a 4’x4′ garden box kit that does not include a bottom (and we share in the post why a bottom is helpful) for nearly $70. BUT…with a few simple tools and about 30 minutes of your time, you can build one for about $25 with the bottom. This saves you loads of money and makes for a better garden box. 

The boxes were very easy to build and we shared the step-by-step DIY square foot garden box instructions in this post: 

how to build a square foot garden box

Now that I have shared our method that we prefer, the next step is planning. Note that you can use these vegetable garden planner printables for any method of gardening you prefer. Regardless, you need a plan! 

Here’s the steps I follow to plan and plant a produce garden!

Planting Schedule printable

Step#1 – Figure out what varieties I want to plant!

  • I use the Planting Schedule download and fill in the first line with the plant.
  • Then using planting guides or on the seed packs themselves, decide which ones need to be started indoors and which ones are planted directly in the ground.
  • I wait on the number of plants until another step. So I skip to the last section and write the start date based on when I want to harvest that food!  Often, I will be starting seedlings and different intervals to have food coming in at different times and not all at once!

companion garden Guide printable

Step #2 – Complete the Companion Guide

  • It is important to figure out which foods are friends and which ones are enemies – to put it in simple terms! This is called companion gardening and it is a simple, but very beneficial step to take to have a healthy, flourishing, bountiful garden!
  • I use the Companion Guide download. In the first box, write the plant name.  Then there are two sections – one for the “Friends” and one for the “Not’s.”
  • To find the friends and not’s of planting together, I use Almanac.com or OrganicGardening.com sites.

square foot garden printable

Step #3 – Write out your plan

  • Whether you are planting square foot gardens, rows or something else, it’s best to write it out so you don’t over or under plan.
  • For square foot gardening, it’s easy to write it out! I just use the Square Foot Garden Planner download to write what food will be planted in each “foot” and then the number of seeds or plants to be planted in each square foot.  You can research online how many of each type of plant can fit in a square foot, or use the official square foot gardening book which lays all of this out!

Step #4 – Finish the Planting Schedule

  • Go back to the first download and now fill-in how many seeds you need to plant.  It is best to add 10-20% more seedlings to plant as you will often lose some.  Worst case, if they all sprout and grow, then give some of your seedlings to others and bless others! But this excess will hopefully make up for seeds the don’t sprout or plants that don’t turn out very healthy.  So if I want 4 of something, I will plant 5 or 6, etc.

Finally, once you are all planned out…. get growing! Follow your “start dates” and start your seedlings!

We have several ideas for starting seedlings including these articles: 

how to make a seed starting light table

repurpose egg cartons for seedlings

Recycle Newspapers for seed starting plants

So here’s what we typical grow in any given year.  We have 6 square foot garden boxes now. We also have a potato tower for potatoes.  This is a great way to grow a bunch of potatoes in a small space. 

DIY Potato Tower

But here’s what’s going in the boxes:

  • 32 peas
  • 4 Tomatoes
  • 4 Cabbage
  • 4 Kale
  • 8 Cucumber
  • 6 Broccoli
  • 6 Cauliflower
  • 4 Pepper
  • 128 Carrots
  • 32 Beans
  • 32 Corn
  • 4 Spaghetti Squash
  • 36 Onion
  • 4 Zucchini
  • 4 Mixed Lettuce (this is one where you cut and it keeps regrowing)
  • 4 Spinach
  • 64 Radish
  • 8 Watermelon
  • 8 Cantaloupe

We already have a bunch of fruit all over our yard in the form of fruit trees and berry plants. So it makes for a nice, complete garden. 

With the above plan, the seeds I needed to start in the house were:

  • Tomatoes
  • Cabbage
  • Kale
  • Cauliflower
  • Pepper
  • Onions

The next question to answer is how to deal with the pests? 

We actually have a number of articles on natural pest control, pest control ideas without the use of chemicals so you can technically keep your garden organic in nature. 

To find these articles, head over to our Garden Gallery of Ideas

What are you growing this year?

Print off your Vegetable Garden Planner Printables 

 

 

See more Gardening Tips

See our Gardening Pinterest Board

 

 

Filed Under: Daily Dose of Thrifty, Downloads, Gardening

Источник: https://thethriftycouple.com/vegetable-garden-planner-printables/

A vegetable garden planner for a healthy and productive garden

For me, a detailed vegetable garden planner is essential to growing a productive and healthy vegetable garden. It keeps me on track of when to sow seeds indoors, helps make crop rotation simple, and allows me to maximum production with a succession planting schedule. Whether you’re starting your first food garden or are a seasoned vegetable gardener, consider creating your own custom planner to help you get more out of your garden. 

a vegetable garde planner helps you grow more food

Planning a new vegetable garden

When planning a new vegetable garden, start off right by picking a site that offers plenty of light. Most vegetables need at least eight hours of full sunlight to support healthy growth and maximize production. This is especially important for crops like tomatoes, peppers, and cucumbers that bear fruits. Leafy greens are more tolerant of less light, so if finding a spot with full sun is a struggle, stick to these vegetables.

Designing a vegetable garden

Designing a vegetable garden is an important step in your vegetable garden plan. A well-designed space has a huge impact on the amount of time you need to spend tending your garden. My garden consists of twenty raised beds and here is what I’ve learned when planning a new garden:

  • Raised beds are great for busy gardeners. Raised beds keep the garden looking tidy, let me plant intensively and grow more food in less space, and are less prone to weed problems (that said, it’s very important to stay on top of weeds and never let them go to seed!)
  • Bed size matters. In my raised bed garden, the beds are either four by eight-feet or four by ten-feet. These are common and convenient sizes as lumber is widely available in eight and ten-foot lengths. I would definitely recommend keeping bed width to four or five-feet. I’ve seen six or eight-foot wide raised beds but these are far too wide for you to comfortably reach the centre of the bed for planting, tending, and harvesting. One of the biggest benefits of growing in raised beds is that you don’t walk on the soil, which compacts it. By keeping beds narrow enough that you can easily reach the middle, you won’t need to trod on the soil. As for height, this will depend on your design style, existing soil, and budget. My beds are sixteen-inches tall which provide a place for me to sit while working in the garden.
  • Leave space for working. When I built my garden, I’ll admit it was tempting to cram more beds in my allotted space, but I was careful to leave enough room between each bed for easy access. I wanted space for a wheelbarrow and comfortable working. My main pathway is four-feet wide and secondary pathways are two-feet wide. I also left room for seating so I would have a spot to sit and enjoy the garden. 

For more information on gardening in raised beds, check out this list of raised bed articles which covers design, planning, soil, and planting. You may also be interested in my book, Groundbreaking Food Gardens which features 73 plans, ideas, and inspiration from food growing experts across North America and the UK. And if you’re looking to build a vegetable garden fast and on a budget, this article from our Jessica Walliser hands you an easy step-by-step method for doing just that.

vegetable garden planner

Annual vegetable garden planner

Once you’ve found your site and built your garden, the initial work is done but you’ll still need to stay organized from year to year to get the most from your space. Here are some considerations for planning and planting your vegetable garden, as well as advice on extending the harvest season into late autumn and winter. 

vegetable garden design

The three growing seasons

There are three main growing seasons in my vegetable garden year – the cool, warm and cold seasons. It’s important to understand the different growing seasons as you’ll need to match the crop to its best season. Of course there is overlap. For example, carrots thrive in the cool season of spring and fall, but with protection we also harvest them during the cold winter season.

  • Cool season – The cool season happens twice each year, in spring and again in fall when the temperatures are between 40 and 70 F (5 and 20 C). This is a time when leafy greens like lettuce and spinach thrive, as well as crops like broccoli, cabbage, beets, and carrots. I love gardening in the cool season when the temperatures are mild, there is usually ample moisture for the plants, and fewer blackflies and mosquitos which makes outdoor working more pleasant. There are also fewer garden pests like squash bugs and aphids, although I do have plenty of slugs to handpick each spring.
  • Warm season – The warm season is the stretch between the spring and fall frost dates. Warm season vegetables aren’t frost tolerant and need plenty of heat to produce a good yield. Examples of warm season crops include tomatoes, squash, cucumbers, and peppers. In short season areas, using season extenders like mini hoop tunnels, a greenhouse or polytunnel, or even just pre-warming the soil with black plastic can speed up growth and increase yield of warm season vegetables. 
  • Cold season – The cold season is long, cold, and dark in my zone 5 northern garden. Yet, it’s still a productive time as beneath my season extenders I have a good crop of cold-tolerant vegetables like scallions, leeks, kale, carrots, and winter salad greens. Most of these are seeded or transplanted in mid-to late summer.
leaf lettuce in a garden

Vegetable garden planting plan

Raise your hand if you love seed catalog season! Deciding what to grow each year is one of my favorite ways to pass the long winter days. As I’m going through the seed catalogs, I make a note of crops and varieties that pique my interest. I then go back over that list a few times, picking family favourite crops and varieties as well as new and new-to-me ones to try.

While I love growing ‘standard’ vegetables like potatoes, carrots, and lettuce, I also love to experiment with unusual and global crops like cucamelons, amaranth, and edible gourds. This became the topic of my third book, the award-winning Niki Jabbour’s Veggie Garden Remix. If you’re looking to shake up your annual vegetable garden, be sure to check it out.

Another important consideration when deciding which varieties to grow is resistance. If certain insects or diseases are annual problems in your garden, you should plan to grow resistant varieties of your favorite vegetables. For example, if you’re plagued with late tomato blight, opt for resistant varieties like ‘Defiant’ or ‘Mountain Magic’. If your basil is prone to downy mildew, try ‘Amazel’, ‘Prospera’, or ‘Rutgers Devotion DMR’.

Small space gardeners who don’t have a ‘back 40’ for their vegetable garden typically grow vegetables and herbs in small beds or containers. Happily, plant breeders have been busy developing compact or dwarf varieties of your favourite crops. There are many space-saving varieties like ‘Tom Thumb’ peas, ‘Patio Snacker’ cucumber, or ‘Patio Baby’ eggplant. Find a detailed list of compact varieties to grow HERE.  

When it comes time to actually starting seeds indoors, pay attention to the recommendations listed on the seed packet or in the seed catalog. Starting seeds too early isn’t a good idea as overgrown seedlings or those producing fruits while still immature typically never live up to their production potential. For more advice on the pitfalls of starting seeds too early, check out this article.

Frost Dates

If you’re new to gardening, you’ll want to find out your average spring and fall frost dates. These are your guides for timing when to seed or transplant. Cool season crops are generally planted a few weeks before the last spring frost and warm season crops after the last frost date has passed. The frost date is also important when calculating when to start seeds indoors under grow lights. For example, tomatoes are usually started indoors 6 to 8 weeks before the last expected spring frost. If you know your frost date is May 20th, you should sow your tomato seeds indoors around April 1st.

To calculate when to sow your seeds indoors, check out this helpful seed starting calculator from Johnny’s Selected Seeds.

The planting of cold season vegetables harvested in late fall and winter is based on the first fall frost, not the spring frost. For example, I love growing Napoli carrots in my winter garden. They take around 58 days to go from seed to harvest and I use that information to calculate when to plant for a fall and winter crop. I simply count backwards 58 days from my first expected fall frost date. However, because the days get shorter in autumn, I’ll add an extra week or so to the seeding date to make sure the carrots have adequate time to mature. That means my fall crop of Napoli carrots needs about 65 days to mature. Counting backwards from my average fall frost date of Oct 6th tells me that I need to seed my carrots around August 2nd.

Annual Soil Preparation

One of my main reasons of having my vegetable garden planner is to aim for the highest yield from each crop. To do that, I need to pay attention to soil health. We’ve all heard the advice to ‘feed the soil, not the plant,’ and this is a good rule to follow.I get a soil test every few years to access the health of my soil, adding organic amendments and nutrients when needed. I make my own compost (start a compost pile!) from kitchen and garden scraps and also make a few piles of shredded leaves each autumn to supply me with leaf mold compost.

I also feed my soil with aged manure, composted seaweed, and balanced organic granular fertilizers. These are added at the start of the planting season but also lightly between each crop. During the active growing season, I apply a liquid organic fertilizer every few weeks to high fertility crops like tomatoes, squash, and cucumbers. Container-grown vegetables also get regular application of liquid organic fertilizers. 

Finally, because I live in a region where the native soils tend to be acidic, I keep an eye on my soil pH, adding lime when necessary. Most crops grow best when the soil pH is in the 6.0 to 7.0 range.

succession planting

Crop Rotation

To be a savvy vegetable garden planner you need to consider crop rotation. Moving crops around the garden on a three or four year rotation schedule is the best way to reduce insect and disease problems and prevent nutrient depletion.Crop rotation sounds complicated but don’t worry, it’s really quite simple. I like to divide my vegetables by family – cabbage family, nightshade family, and pea family – and group each family together in the garden. These vegetable families are then rotated around the garden each year.

For example, if you have four beds you can maintain a four year crop rotation schedule by shifting each family to the next bed each year. If you only have a single bed, I would still recommend crop rotation, especially if you’re growing disease or insect prone vegetables like tomatoes. Try a three year crop rotation schedule by planting your tomato plants at one end of the bed in year 1, the opposite end in year 2, and in containers in year 3.

Vegetable families:

  • Cabbage family – broccoli, kale, cabbage, cauliflower, radishes, mustard greens, turnips
  • Nightshade family – tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, potatoes
  • Pea family – peas, beans
  • Gourd family – cucumbers, squash, melons
  • Carrot family – carrots, parsnips, celery
  • Amaranth family – spinach, Swiss chard, beets
succession planting

Succession Planting

When I’m planning what to grow in my vegetable garden I don’t just think about what to plant in spring, but I also think about what I’ll want to grow to take the place of the spring crops once they’re finished. For example, a spring crop of arugula can be followed by bush beans for summer followed by broccoli for autumn.

Succession planting is just planting another crop once an initial one has been harvested and is one of the best ways to grow the most food in your garden. When I order my spring seeds, I keep the summer, fall, and winter harvest seasons in mind. Many of my late season crops are planted or transplanted in mid to late summer. Ordering all the seeds I need for the entire year in my January seed orders helps keep me organized and ensures I have the seeds I need when I’m ready to plant. Plus, placing a few bulk orders saves on shipping costs over a bunch of smaller orders.

To organize my succession planting, I find it helps to have a sketch of my garden layout. On each bed, I then jot down what I wish to plant for spring, summer, and fall/winter. Then to expand my plan, I make a month by month planting list to remind me when to sow which seeds and how they need to be started – indoors under my grow lights or direct sown in the garden. This keeps my planting plan on schedule.

Common garden pests and diseases

I plan for potential pest and disease problems before I plant my garden. How? I choose disease and insect resistant varieties, I rotate my crops on a three to four year schedule, and I use lightweight insect barrier covers to deter pests. In my garden, my biggest issues are deer, flea beetles, and slugs, I have an electric fence surrounding my garden to keep the deer out. In a small space like a single raised bed, you can erect a mini hoop tunnel covered in insect barrier fabric, chicken wire, or deer netting overtop. This should be enough of a barrier to keep deer away from your vegetables.

As for insect pests and plant diseases, it’s important to take preventative steps, especially if your garden is plagued with the same issues year after year. As noted above, growing resistant varieties is key, but so is researching the most common pests you face and see how you can deter them. Jessica’s excellent book, Good Bug, Bad Bug is extremely helpful at identifying insect pests. Lightweight insect barriers are effective for squash bugs and flea beetles, diatomaceous earth for slugs, and a soil mulch of straw or shredded leaves can reduce the spread of soil-borne diseases like early tomato blight.

A year round vegetable garden planner

I love my year-round vegetable garden. I love that I can harvest a wide selection of organic vegetables all through the year, including the winter months. And I live in zone 5! I’ve written extensively about season extension in my award-winning book, The Year-Round Vegetable Gardener, but essentially I pair cold hardy crops with simple season extenders.

My winter food garden is filled with mini hoop tunnels, cold frames, and deep mulched beds. I also added a polytunnel in 2018 which has been a fantastic way to not only shelter winter crops. It also gives me a jump on the spring planting season and offers extra warmth to my heat-loving summer tomatoes and peppers from late spring through mid-autumn. I wrote about using a winter greenhouse in this article. 

3 season extenders for the home garden:

  • Cold frame – Cold frames are bottomless boxes with clear tops. The box can be made from wood, bricks, polycarbonate, or even straw bales. The top can be an old window or door, or specially built to fit the size of the box.
  • Mini hoop tunnel – A mini hoop tunnel looks like a small greenhouse and that’s exactly what it is. I make mine from 1/2 or 3/4 inch diameter PVC or metal conduit bent in a U-shape. The metal conduit is bent with a metal hoop bender. They’re spaced three to four feet apart in my raised beds and are covered with a sheet of clear polyethylene or row cover, depending on the season.
  • Deep mulching – This technique is perfect for stem crops like leeks and root vegetables like carrots, beets, and parsnips. Before the ground freezes in late autumn, deep mulch the bed with at least a foot deep layer of shredded leaves or straw. Top with an old row cover or other piece of material to hold the mulch in place. Harvest throughout winter.

For more information on creating a vegetable garden planner, check out the excellent book, Week by Week Vegetable Garden Planner which offers plenty of space for you to create your own custom plan.

You’ll find additional information and advice on food gardening in these helpful articles:

How do you plan your vegetable garden?

vegetable garden planner

Filed Under: Food Gardening, Garden Advice and TipsTagged With: Vegetable crops, Garden planning and design

Источник: https://savvygardening.com/vegetable-garden-planner/

Screenshots

Description

Provides you with clearly arranged information that you need to quickly compose your vegetable garden patch.

With good/bad influences between the vegetable varieties!

The Veggie Garden Planner provides you with clearly arranged information that you need to quickly compose your vegetable garden patch.

Before purchase we provide a free download so you can see for yourself what value the app provides.

Choose vegetables that harmonise well together. You will find information regarding good/bad neighbor plants for each vegetable.

For your chosen garden composition you get tabular overviews to quickly determine sowing/harvest times, and which interactions exist between vegetables.

As a purchasable bonus feature, you can visually arrange your vegetable patch with our Patch Plan Editor - with vital information regarding planting distance & good/bad neighbors at your fingertips.
You will also be warned of problematic crop rotations, e.g. if you place two plants with strong soil depletion at two consecutive seasons!

Note regarding the climate zone: The seedtimes and harvesttimes are adjusted to hardiness zones USDA 7-8 (e.g. Atlanta, Seattle or Central Europe). Please adapt accordingly.

Version 1.24

Small improvements and bugfixes

Ratings and Reviews

4.2 out of 5

2.7K Ratings

Some improvements but all in all

You can add your own veggies - you just need to look up the info and import a pic if you want some obscure rare vegetable that no one actually ever will eat because kids don’t like new things no matter how much effort you put into growing them.
You can add paths to plot things out by shape to be creative because you only get a tiny bit of spot that you need to rope off to keep said kids and the dog out of the only patch of sun you can find.
It gives you recommendations for space needed for each veggie so your potatoes don’t grow into the roots of the celery (to detractors this is why you can’t change the space the veggies take up) and it has most of the veggies I need - read: the ones these kids eat anyway.
A wish list:
If I could just slide the calendars for growing zones it would be helpful - just shift the months over maybe.
If I could add circles for container plants like tomatoes.

Lack-luster App, Read this before purchase.

**READ BEFORE PURCHASE** This app has potential but it seems as if the developers just threw it together. First off, when you download and pay for the app, you have to pay for different aspects of the app or else it will be useless. This seems like a sneaky way of getting customers to pay more for the app, multiple times. There is only a small list of vegetables to choose from and the developers curiously omitted some popular vegetables. You can add plants but you have to do your own research to add them which kind of defeats the purpose. Additionally, for some reason parts of the app are in German! You can create your own garden bed but it must be perfectly square. If you have a different shaped bed, you cannot use the plotting feature. When plotting the plants, the type of plant is in such a small font that you cannot see it without zooming in. This is annoying when trying to see the big picture. Often times when zooming or scrolling through the plot you end up accidentally moving the plants around. You cannot scroll all the way down either, the bottom of the screen is cut-off which is very frustrating. The only positive is the ability to quickly figure out companion plants. If I had to do it again I would definitely not purchase I wish I read the comments before. Save your money until they put some effort into the app but it doesn’t seem likely because the same complaints have been present for years.

More please

I think this is a great concept but I can’t finish with over half of the veggies and herbs I plan on planting missing. I realize I have the same complaint as most but really would love to see more varieties added. More squashes, okra, peppers etc. It would be neat to see suggestions for companion flowers as well. As for the climate, yes it would be nice to be able to choose a region and have more accurate information. If it were me I would just remove that part of the app until it could be improved. I would also have to agree with others that being able to edit the size of the beds would be nice. It took me forever to finally figure out how to at least delete one so I could fix it. Additionally it would be cool to be able to map out multiple beds in one screen to see the bigger picture. Also maybe a way to be able to see which plants and how many you’ve used from your list and which ones are left. Again this product seems like it has potential, just isn’t there yet.

The developer, Bento Software, indicated that the app’s privacy practices may include handling of data as described below. For more information, see the developer’s privacy policy.

Data Not Collected

The developer does not collect any data from this app.

Privacy practices may vary, for example, based on the features you use or your age. Learn More

Information

Seller
Bento Software UG (haftungsbeschraenkt)

Size
37.4 MB

Category
Lifestyle

Compatibility
iPhone
Requires iOS 9.3 or later.
iPad
Requires iPadOS 9.3 or later.
iPod touch
Requires iOS 9.3 or later.
Mac
Requires macOS 11.0 or later and a Mac with Apple M1 chip.
Languages

English, French, German, Spanish

Age Rating
4+

Copyright
© 2021 Bento Software

Price
Free

In-App Purchases

  1. Unlock All Veggie Varieties$1.99
  2. Unlock Patch Plan Editor$1.99
  3. Unlock Everything$3.99

Supports

  • Family Sharing

    With Family Sharing set up, up to six family members can use this app.

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Источник: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/veggie-garden-planner/id1329927332

Crop Planning: A year in my home Garden

hilary dahl

Crop planning for the vegetable garden often feels overwhelming to new (and experienced) growers. There are many different schools of thought on how to plan and layout annual crops. As a result, there’s lots of conflicting information out there to confuse the well-intentioned researcher.

At Seattle Urban Farm Co., we create plans for 70 gardens each year. Our garden plans are devised to maximize the garden’s productivity, while keeping them neat and tidy. We organize our plantings to make ongoing maintenance as easy as possible.

For gardens to be productive and tidy, we make sure they have plenty of light, water, and nutrients; we work to keep pest pressure low; and we succession plant new crops all season long. 

A key to our crop planning system is that we plant in individual rows and/or groups of the same crop. This has several advantages, including the following: 

  • When a particular crop is ready to be removed from the garden, you will be able to clear a whole row or section of the bed, leaving adequate space to plant another crop. (See: Crop Rotation and Lifespan)

  • Some crops have growth forms that make them incompatible with other plants. By planting your crops in groups, it’s easier to keep compatible plants together and incompatible plants apart. (See: Growth Form)

  • Concentrations of the same crop family are easier to manage—to apply fertilizers at the right time, thin the plants, etc.

Even within the bounds of these rules, there are infinite crop combinations. To illustrate these concepts, I’m going to walk you through the crop cycle over one year in my home garden. 

I chose the following crop plan because this garden is similar in size to many home gardens. It consists of two 4’ x 8’ beds and a surrounding 2’-wide L-shaped bed. In most years I am lucky enough to have more growing space than this (and I’ll take every square foot I can get!). However, I am hoping this particular year feels accessible to most gardeners- and it shows just how much food you can grow in a relatively small amount of space.

A quick note on reading the maps below: (T) means the crop was planted in the garden as a transplant and (D) means that the crop was direct sown. The crops in bold are the ones that were planted during the time period discussed in each map.

MARCH-APRIL
The first image shows the garden in March and April. Everything in the diagram, except the garlic, was planted during these early spring months. I just happened to be really into beets at this time, so I dedicated a lot of space to them. In other years, I would have probably divided the space dedicated to beets in half and added a planting of carrots.

March-April_Seattle Urban Farm Co.png

MAY-JUNE
In early May I plant my summer crops and many cut flower transplants. Later in the month, the first successions of the season are planted. Throughout the spring, I harvest my first planting of head lettuce. I harvest the last of these heads and replace them with peppers and a cucumber cage of sour gherkins. Bok choy thrives in the cool spring months, but starts to bolt when the weather warms, so I also harvest the last of these heads and replace them with a round of warm-season head lettuce. 

In this plan I have a row of shelling peas in front of a row of snap peas in a bed that’s less that 2 feet wide. This spacing works because the shelling peas are much shorter than the snap peas in both plant height and crop lifespan. I harvest and pull the shelling pea plants out of the garden in late June, about a month before the snap peas are finished. This allows the mature snap peas better air flow towards the end of their lifecycle, when they start to become susceptible to diseases such as powdery mildew.

May-June_Seattle Urban Farm Co.png

JULY-AUGUST
By mid-July, many of my remaining spring crops are ready to be pulled out of the garden. In the early weeks of July, I harvest the last of my peas and clear the plants to make room for fall broccoli, kale and cabbage. Onions and garlic have matured and are ready to cure out of the garden in the summer sun by mid-July. Once those come out, they are replaced with a planting of bush beans and beets. Mid-July in the PNW is the time to plant your final succession of beets, carrots and bush beans. If you push it much later, these crops won't have time to mature.

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Below: July 5th, Juy 19th and August 3rd

SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER
September is the tail end of the planting season in the PNW, and not all crops have time to mature this late in the season. The good news is that most gardens are full and bursting with produce this time of year, so there isn’t always room for new crops anyway. 

If you want to plant a swath of spinach to overwinter in your garden, early September is the time. Same with cilantro, which germinates quickly in the warm days of early summer, but resists bolting much longer in the cool days of fall. This is also the time to plant other shorter season cool-tolerant crops like turnips, arugula and radishes. 

In this garden, I cleared more than ½ of a 4x8 foot bed to make room for these fall crops. Carrots can overwinter in the garden, and beets can hold in the garden into the fall, but these crops also hold well for months in my refrigerator, so I’d rather dedicate this space to growing something new and increase my overall garden productivity. 

Also, I just want to make a quick note that I find that garden stakes are an essential tool for any high-yield gardener. You can see them featured pretty prominently in the images above. 3 foot wooden stakesare really useful when trying to wrangle bush beans and keep them from flopping over onto their neighboring crop. 6 foot stakes can be used in the same way for shelling peas, or any other short variety, and potatoes!

September-October_Seattle Urban Farm Co.png

Below: September 1st in onion/potato bed and September 3rd in original beet/brassica bed

NOVEMBER-FEBRUARY
I planted garlic and fava beans in November, but besides those two crops, everything that’s in the garden at this point has been in place and growing to maturity for the past few months.

My spring planted kale and broccoli was still looking healthy and robust, so I left them in overwinter. In late February both plants start producing again; the kale with new leaves and the broccoli with substantial side shoots or mini-florets.

My fall planted brassicas also held well. On warmer days I harvested heads of cabbage and broccoli and leaves of kale. Like cilantro, brassicas are less likely to bolt during the winter months, so there’s less of a rush to harvest crops like broccoli, which can flower quickly in the summer after the plant has put on a head.

I harvested much of the spinach in the fall, but left about an inch of each plant to photosynthesize. These overwintered plants started putting on new growth in mid-February, and provided a large harvest in early March. 

The remainder of the garden is cleared and topped with compost in November so that it’s ready to plant again the following March!

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Below: Pulling the last of my late summer planted beets on November 27th and snow on overwintering broccoli on December 9th

Products we truly could not work without:

Hilary Dahl

Hilary Dahl

Hilary Dahl is a co-owner of Seattle Urban Farm Company and host of the Encyclopedia Botanica podcast. For ten years Hilary Dahl has been helping beginning and experienced growers create beautiful and productive gardens. She has the unique experience of working in on a wide range of projects, from small backyard garden plots to multi-acre vegetable farms. She also works in her own garden every day after work. Hilary created the Encyclopedia Botanica podcast as a way to share effective and efficient garden management techniques, and as a way to spread her love of growing food and flowers!

Colin McCrate

Colin McCrate

Colin McCrate has been growing food organically for the past 20 years. He worked on a variety of small farms in the Midwest before moving to the west coast in 2003 to teach garden-based environmental education. He founded the Seattle Urban Farm Company in 2007 with the goal of applying years of horticultural and agricultural expertise to help aspiring growers get projects off the ground or more accurately; in the ground.

Over the past twelve years, he has helped guide hundreds of urban farmers through the design, construction and management of their own edible landscape. Colin is the author of three books; Food Grown Right, In Your Backyard(Mountaineers Books, 2012), High-Yield Vegetable Gardening (Storey Publishing, 2015) and Grow More Food (Storey Publishing, 2022); and is a garden writer for the Seattle Times.

Источник: https://www.seattleurbanfarmco.com/blog/2020/4/11/crop-planning

10 of the Best Free Garden Planners Available Online

10 of the Best Free Garden Planners Available Online

When you’re about to plan a garden, anything is possible. With so many types of gardens, plants, and layout options to choose from, a garden planner will help you stay on track. Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned gardener, we’ll show you how a free online journal will make this year your best garden yet.

The winter months offer perfect prep time, and the right garden planner for you will come with many added benefits beyond simply staying organized. Before you venture outside with your gloves and shovel in tow, try planning with a virtual garden for fast and reliable results.

Why a Garden Planner is Beneficial

garden planner

A free online garden planner can help you plan the layout of your garden, from what you want to grow, to where each plant goes. Plans like these help you stay organized while your garden thrives and is a great tool to help you think ahead. Use the planner continuously, and you’ll have an action plan off the bat that helps you create a stunning garden.

It doesn’t matter what season it is, or if you’re starting your garden from seeds. A planner can help make your garden a huge success this year. Many gardeners keep a garden journal to remember which plants worked and which didn’t quite work out in prior years, and this can even be helpful in remembering what time frame you have to plant outside or start your garden.

Greatest Garden Planner Benefits:

online journal

Beginners and pro gardeners alike take advantage of awesome garden planners for two main reasons:

  • They’re great for staying organized and remembering what plants your tried and when
  • A great planner will offer growing tips to yield a better harvest year after year, no matter what type of garden you tend.

However, there are many other benefits to using a garden planner. Depending on the option you choose, a garden planner can help:

  • Offer perfect harvest and planting times for veggies or other plants
  • Provide guidance on fertilizers and optimal sun exposure
  • Figure out how many plants you can grow in your garden
  • Prevent over-crowing plants to yield a better result
  • Make the most out of every inch of the space you have
  • Catalog and process photos with descriptions of each plant
  • Keep a shopping list or notes for next year

Use this information to decide which plants and vegetables you should plant in your garden and check out the cheat sheets each planner may offer to help your plants thrive better than ever.

Web-Based Planners are Easier than Ever

Web-based garden planner

With a web-based planner, you can zoom in and move your virtual garden around to place each feature where you want them, or rearrange as you see fit. You can use a template if you’re not sure where to start, or plan out your dream garden from scratch.

After you’ve created your garden plan, simply save the layout and revisit it as you go. Or, you can print out your plan if you’re more of a paper and pencil type of person. This way, you can make notes and changes directly onto the page and store them in a nice three-ring binder.

What’s great about printing out your plan is that you can write out a list of the supplies you’ll need to make your design work and take it with you when you visit the store. I find doing this helps me stay organized and on top of my game should I get to the store and find a better option I hadn’t previously considered. It’s also handy if problems pop up.

Online tools and free software applications make the process easier than ever, and you can try them out before you waste even a penny.

Online Garden Planners That Won’t Break the Bank

Whether you’re new to gardening or typically plan out your garden using old-fashioned pen and pencil, you’re going to love these online planners. Not only are they free, these are the best garden planners you can find online that allow you to customize yourworksheet, calculate rainfall and the amount of soil you may need, look up pest control and growing information, or keep a diary.

The following are the best online garden planners that are entirely free to use, with no added costs after you use the app a few times and fall in love with it. They won’t tease you into paying for an awesome product because they’re already great on their own.

Check out the features of each, as they all offer different ways to help gardeners build their best green spaces. Try out a few different options and see what works best for your needs. You may find yourself using a certain planner for short time needs before committing to the right one for you all year around.

Here are the 10 best free garden planner options online:

1. Gardener’s Supply Company

Gardeners supply garden planner

If you’re looking for a completely free garden planner but you only grow vegetables in your kitchen, this is the perfect tool for you. Gardener’s Supply Company allows you to design productive veggie gardens based on the square footage of your space, rather than traditional rows. A grid helps you fill in the perfect amount of plants, or you can go with any of the 16 pre-planned options.

Simply drag and drop where each plant will go, print out your map, and you’re ready to plant. There’s even an encyclopedia with in-depth information to help you choose the best variety of veggies. You won’t be able to plan out your entire yard, but many users love the square foot gardening technique.

With a rainfall calculator, soil calculator to fill in raised garden boxes, and a disease and pest directory, your garden will be happy and healthy.

2. Better Homes and Gardens Plan-A-Garden

BHG Garden Planner

Plan-A-Garden is an easy-to-use, free tool on the Better Homes and Gardens website. You can see your garden layout in a realistic 3D setting, drag and drop each item where you’d like it to go, and check out the plan from a bird’s eye view.

This program has pre-made templates to help you get started, such as houses, fences, benches, and scenery. Customize your layout and add stones or brick paths as you see fit (and plants of course). There are hundreds of objects and types of trees, flowers, or shrubbery to choose from, and you can adjust the size of each or define the climate to find recommendations.

Save your progress online or export the list of plants to take to the store. This landscape design planner is totally free of charge, all you have to do is register.

3. Smart Gardener

Smart Gardener garden planner

Although this desktop planner comes with a few upgrade costs, you don’t need to pay anything to benefit from the program. It’s the easiest tool to plan and harvest your own vegetables indoors or out, and everything is entirely based on your personalized needs.

This program will ask you how many people are in your family to find the right number of veggies to grow, and allows you to choose the plants you enjoy most. It then calculates the amount of space you need to feed your family accurately.

From raised beds to various shapes and sizes, Smart Gardener has everything you need to create your perfect garden. Keep track of seed start dates, learn the best times to plant, create to-do lists to stay on track, join a community of gardeners, and buy plants from vendors like Baker Creek, Renee’s Garden, or Peaceful Valley.

The only thing you can’t do is add porches or pools into the mix.

4. BBC Virtual Garden Planner

BBC Virtual garden planner

Landscape your garden or plan out its contents, from fruits and vegetables to flowers and trees. The BBC Virtual Garden Planner has it all, and you can quickly design and visualize your space before you plant. Group your greenery harmoniously, explore the plant finder, plan out walkways, or allot pieces of your garden to specific purposes.

The best part about this free option is that you can experiment with various planting schemes and explore unique plans developed by some of the top garden designers in the nation.

5. Burpee Garden Time Planner

Burpee garden player

This option allows you to customize your garden based on specific information such as your location—complete with weather forecast conditions and average frost dates based on your zip code. Simply select the plants you want to grow the most, and the planner will show you the best dates to plant or sow seeds.

Plus, beginners will adore the how-to tutorials and videos with growing tips. The only downside is that you can’t differentiate between vegetable varieties. You can’t, for example, choose a type of tomato for your plan. The free version is also only available in tablet or mobile versions, and doesn’t allow you to plan individual garden beds.

6. Garden Planner Online

Garden Planner Online

Visualize and plan where each seedling will go well before you plant with this free tool, which offers planting schemes, visions for future growth patterns, and planting schedules so your garden has the best advantage.

Customize various designs and layouts, whether your garden in indoors, out, or even window box designs. Place fencing and bricks, experiment with trees and perennials, or create stunning walkways. The choice is yours with this free tool!

7. Vegetable Gardening Online

Vegetable gardening online planner

Perfect for beginners, Vegetable Gardening Online is a website that offers everything you need to plan your first garden. Zone charts and planting worksheets guide you through placing each plant with care, while a diary and growing information will show you how to keep your vegetables growing strong (even berries).

Additionally, you can find printable worksheets and fun coloring pages to keep your kids busy while you design your garden.

8. Marshalls Garden Visualizer

Marshalls Garden Planner

Because the real world is 3D, this free software offers a 3D interface, so you can configure everything your garden will need. You can virtually move around your space from all possible angles, and it’s easy for beginners to use.

This design software offers tons of ways to customize your garden and build your dream, from benches and gravel to any other element you can think up.

9. Gardena’s My Garden

Gardena

This virtual planner is more of a sketch-like bird’s eye view of your yard. With this web-based application, you can drag and drop plants and any other garden element exactly where you want it. Add in ponds or design taps to water your plants, and print your design to implement it in real life.

You can even use the pre-designed gardens if you’re not sure where to start. Just modify them to fit your requirements.

10. Kitchen Garden Planner

Kitchen Garden Planner

If your garden is confined to your kitchen counter, this Kitchen Garden Planner is designed to create personal and commercial indoor garden plans. There’s a paid premium version, but the free option is perfect if your growing a small home garden for your own needs.

Check out your garden in a final 3D view before you print it out or email it to share with friends and family. This garden planner is available online and it comes with over 26 options you can choose from.

 

There’s no doubt that a free online planner can help you create your perfect garden. The only question is which one is right for your needs.

Источник: https://gardenandhappy.com/free-garden-planners/

You may have some pretty big ideas for your garden this year, but do you know how to make them happen? If not, that’s where these awesome garden planning apps can help. Working on a budget? Many of these popular apps are free, although some do come with a minimal upfront cost, while others have recurring monthly or subscription fees. Search these apps for information on a number of topics—ranging from how to decide what to plant and how to lay out a garden to specific topics like planting pumpkin seeds to full-sun perennials. They’re also useful if you want to update the landscaping around your house, add to your perennial border, or identify that mystery flowering shrub that’s been growing next to your patio for years.

Depending on what you’re trying to accomplish—say, planting a fall vegetable garden or looking for deer-resistant garden plants, these planners can help with a swipe of the touch screen. Even better, most of these gardening apps are intuitive, so you don’t have to spend too much time playing around before you get the hang of them. Take a peek at our carefully curated list of the best garden planning apps to find the one that best suits your needs and can take your garden to the next level.

1Armitage’s Great Garden Plants

With this mobile app, you get tons of knowledge from a respected authority at your fingertips for a few dollars. Allan Armitage, PhD, professor emeritus of horticulture at the University of Georgia, offers a look at exactly what landscape, ornamental (and even houseplants!) you should choose for any garden setting. You’ll also learn about solutions for hungry deer, pest control, and native plants.

GET THE APP

2Kitchen Garden Planner at Gardener’s Supply

Need a layout for a new veggie garden? Use the free online planner to design a new bed or update an old one. The planner is simple to use, and you even can save, e-mail, and print your design—a perk not all free programs allow. The planner also gives in-depth planting tips and even tells you how many plants or seeds to buy. It’s an incredible tool for anyone interested in getting the most out of their edible garden.

GO TO WEBSITE

3Garden Manager

This brand-new app is all about helping you plan and manage your edible garden for a successful harvest. New to this stuff? No worries. The virtual gardening coach takes you through a list of questions to guide you about how, what, and when to plant. Three levels of subscription services guide you throughout the season and send reminders about what to do when. It’s also tied into weather stations so it can alert you when to cover the basil, for example, if an early frost is on the way.

GET THE APP

4Garden Planner

Design your garden and landscape by arranging trees, buildings, fences, decking, paths, and buildings with an easy drag-and-drop interface. The planner helps you lay out a vegetable garden, too, so you can maximize your space. A free trial lets you get your feet wet before deciding to purchase the reasonably-priced design software, with future updates coming in at no extra cost.

GET THE APP

5Garden Planner at Territorial Seed

For a reasonable annual subscription, you can draw vegetable garden plans of any size, get personalized e-mail planting reminders, and interact with other gardeners with this online planner. The free mobile app, Garden Journal, is another useful tool to track what and when you’ve planted and when you’ve watered, fertilized, and harvested. There’s also a disease and pest database to help you identify a host of potential issues. The system also uses climate data to send specific planting advice for your area.

GET THE APP

6SmartGardener

Need help deciding what to plant in your vegetable garden? For a minimal subscription fee, this online planner and accompanying mobile app help you plan and manage your garden from the daydreaming stage through the harvest. The planner tracks garden tasks and when to do them, sending weekly "To Do" e-mail lists so you’ll never forget when it’s time to weed or sow another row of lettuce. It also includes a journal where you can record your own comments, notes, and photos.

GET THE APP

7Gardena My Garden Planner

This web-based planner from a garden products company in the UK helps you draw and plan your landscaping including types of surfaces such as grass or paving, furniture or water features, and fences. It also gives the approximate mature size of plantings when placed in the grid, so you know what fits where. It doesn’t have a ton of in-depth features, but for a free tool, it’s worth a look.

GO TO WEBSITE

Arricca Elin SansoneArricca SanSone has written about health and lifestyle topics for Prevention, Country Living, Woman's Day, and more.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Источник: https://www.countryliving.com/gardening/garden-ideas/g32405397/virtual-garden-planner/

The easiest way to plan, grow and harvest your own food.

Personalized Vegetable Garden Planner

There are a lot of variables that go into planning a garden. Smart Gardener does all the hard work for you. We collect, calculate and create a smart personal profile of your garden just for you. Learn more about your profile.

garden growing conditions

The Right Plants for You

We make it easy to find the right plants, so you can’t go wrong. With over 3000 organic, GMO free, edible varieties to choose from (and buy from our partners), Smart Gardener offers you recommendations along with super simple ways to find plants suited to your growing conditions. Learn more about plants.

browse plants and get recommendations

An Optimized Vegetable Garden Plan

Get your garden plan so you can get out in the garden. Smart Gardener combines your selected plants, vegetable garden layout, and household size with complex planting variables, to help create a Smart Garden Plan just for you. Learn more about Garden Plan.

plan your garden

To Dos Just for Your Garden

We track all of your gardens’ tasks so you don’t have to. Our smart vegetable garden planner schedules all your gardens’ “To Dos,” from prepping to picking. View To Dos at a glance and get weekly email reminders when it’s time to get in your garden. Learn more about To Dos.

auto generated todos for your garden

A Garden Journal That Keeps Track of You

It’s a smart garden planner Journal that tracks, collects and shares. Our vegetable garden planner keeps your Journal up to date, so you don’t have to. But go ahead, enter notes, and photos too. It’s also finds and shares all other’s gardeners notes and photos about the same varieties you are growing. Learn more about your Journal.

journal for your garden

How Does Your Garden Grow?

Keep your garden thriving during these long, hot days with our advice on how to properly water your garden, and tips on the best types of mulch to use to keep your garden’s soil cool and moist. We’ve also have some guidance on saving your own seeds. Learn more about Tips and Tricks.

Tips and Tricks for your Garden
Источник: https://www.smartgardener.com/

Vegetable garden layout planner -

The easiest way to plan, grow and harvest your own food.

Personalized Vegetable Garden Planner

There are a lot of variables that go into planning a garden. Smart Gardener does all the hard work for you. We collect, calculate and create a smart personal profile of your garden just for you. Learn more about your profile.

garden growing conditions

The Right Plants for You

We make it easy to find the right plants, so you can’t go wrong. With over 3000 organic, GMO free, edible varieties to choose from (and buy from our partners), Smart Gardener offers you recommendations along with super simple ways to find plants suited to your growing conditions. Learn more about plants.

browse plants and get recommendations

An Optimized Vegetable Garden Plan

Get your garden plan so you can get out in the garden. Smart Gardener combines your selected plants, vegetable garden layout, and household size with complex planting variables, to help create a Smart Garden Plan just for you. Learn more about Garden Plan.

plan your garden

To Dos Just for Your Garden

We track all of your gardens’ tasks so you don’t have to. Our smart vegetable garden planner schedules all your gardens’ “To Dos,” from prepping to picking. View To Dos at a glance and get weekly email reminders when it’s time to get in your garden. Learn more about To Dos.

auto generated todos for your garden

A Garden Journal That Keeps Track of You

It’s a smart garden planner Journal that tracks, collects and shares. Our vegetable garden planner keeps your Journal up to date, so you don’t have to. But go ahead, enter notes, and photos too. It’s also finds and shares all other’s gardeners notes and photos about the same varieties you are growing. Learn more about your Journal.

journal for your garden

How Does Your Garden Grow?

Keep your garden thriving during these long, hot days with our advice on how to properly water your garden, and tips on the best types of mulch to use to keep your garden’s soil cool and moist. We’ve also have some guidance on saving your own seeds. Learn more about Tips and Tricks.

Tips and Tricks for your Garden
Источник: https://www.smartgardener.com/

Plant List for 2015 Garden 1 https://happihomemade.com/vegetable-garden-plan/

Detailed image of a 5,000+ Sq Ft Vegetable Garden Plan.

I am so excited to share all the details of my 5,000+ Sq Ft Vegetable Garden Plan with you today!

I am sure that you have read the advice to plant a small garden if you are a beginner.  Here is my advice:

If you are a new gardener with the intention of building a large garden, prepare yourself to work EXTREMELY HARD if you want to be successful.

This is my 3rd season gardening, and I have had a lot of success so far.  My husband and I built our dream home out on 13 acres in the country in the spring of 2013.  We moved in at the end of May after a whirlwind 3 month building project.

On of my requests was that hubby build me a garden ASAP so I didn’t miss the growing season.

And by June 1, I was planting my very first vegetable garden (I am married to a saint).  The size of my very first vegetable garden was 1,000 sq ft.  Here are some photos from my first year gardening:

Five photos of Sarah Koontz's first vegetable garden.

I had a lot more time to prepare for my second year of gardening.  I spent a good portion of the winter studying up on intensive gardening techniques, and discovering ways to extend my short growing season when planting a large garden.

 I live in zone 4a, so a few more weeks on either side of the growing season could really change things for me.

I learned how to start my own seeds (read my top 10 Seed Starting Hacks), asked hubby to build hoop houses and cold frames, and planted my first cold hardy vegetables out mid-April.  That was a full month and a half ahead of the previous year.  Here are photos from my second year gardening:

A photo collage of the planting and harvesting of a Zone 4a vegetable garden.

What a difference a year can make?!?

I had a blast learning how to get the MOST out of MY FRUGAL DIY garden last season (here are 70 of my favorite FRUGAL Gardening Resources).

I learned a lot about companion planting, succession planting, and season extension.  My garden produced a beautiful crop (although we did suffer from an extremely early hard frost, and a few rounds of hail).

I was able to can and preserve a lot of the harvest, and we are still enjoying the fruits of our summer toil!

But I truly want to be as self sufficient as a northerner can possibly be, and our garden simply was NOT BIG ENOUGH!

 So last fall we extended our garden to a full 75’x75’…ENTER my 5,000+ Sq Ft Vegetable Garden Plan! 

I have spent the last few months making a vegetable garden plan, and I am looking forward to getting my hands dirty this season. Here are some photos from our expansion project:Three photos of the makings of a 5,000+ Sq Ft Vegetable Garden Plan.

It is my hope to post frequent updates this gardening season on our progress and experience with our large vegetable garden. (Click Here to read an Update from 7/27/2015)  I will be planting approximately 60 different varieties of fruit, vegetables, flowers and herbs.  

Here is a downloadable .PDF of the plants I will be growing in my 5,000+ sq ft vegetable garden this year.

Click the Image to Download:

I have often wished that more large-scale gardeners shared their plans online, so I hope this is a benefit to you!  Click the Image below to view a closeup of my 5,000+ Zone 4 Vegetable Garden Plan:

View Detailed Garden Plan:

An image of a 2015 gardening plan.

>>Click Here for my 2016 Garden Plan <<

I also believe in the value of a detailed garden schedule.  I always do the math pre-season and work hard to develop a planting schedule.  I figure out when I will need to start certain seeds indoors, schedule a plan to harden them off and plant them outside.

I refer to my garden schedule regularly throughout the growing season.  It is so nice to start the week by looking at my garden schedule and work with the confidence that I am not forgetting anything.

As the season progresses, I will keep track of my garden tasks in a journal.  Keeping good records of planting schedules, fertilizing schedules, and harvest dates will create a valuable resource to help me  plan my 2016 garden.

I am sure that I will make minor changes to this plan as we go throughout the season, but this is what I have for now (if you live in a different gardening zone, these dates will not apply to you):

Click the Image to Download:

Calendar of when to plant in your own garden.

 Are you planning a vegetable garden this year?  What can I do to help?

Best Mattress That Relieve Of Allergies

Источник: https://happihomemade.com/vegetable-garden-plan/

Screenshots

Description

Provides you with clearly arranged information that you need to quickly compose your vegetable garden patch.

With good/bad influences between the vegetable varieties!

The Veggie Garden Planner provides you with clearly arranged information that you need to quickly compose your vegetable garden patch.

Before purchase we provide a free download so you can see for yourself what value the app provides.

Choose vegetables that harmonise well together. You will find information regarding good/bad neighbor plants for each vegetable.

For your chosen garden composition you get tabular overviews to quickly determine sowing/harvest times, and which interactions exist between vegetables.

As a purchasable bonus feature, you can visually arrange your vegetable patch with our Patch Plan Editor - with vital information regarding planting distance & good/bad neighbors at your fingertips.
You will also be warned of problematic crop rotations, e.g. if you place two plants with strong soil depletion at two consecutive seasons!

Note regarding the climate zone: The seedtimes and harvesttimes are adjusted to hardiness zones USDA 7-8 (e.g. Atlanta, Seattle or Central Europe). Please adapt accordingly.

Version 1.24

Small improvements and bugfixes

Ratings and Reviews

4.2 out of 5

2.7K Ratings

Some improvements but all in all

You can add your own veggies - you just need to look up the info and import a pic if you want some obscure rare vegetable that no one actually ever will eat because kids don’t like new things no matter how much effort you put into growing them.
You can add paths to plot things out by shape to be creative because you only get a tiny bit of spot that you need to rope off to keep said kids and the dog out of the only patch of sun you can find.
It gives you recommendations for space needed for each veggie so your potatoes don’t grow into the roots of the celery (to detractors this is why you can’t change the space the veggies take up) and it has most of the veggies I need - read: the ones these kids eat anyway.
A wish list:
If I could just slide the calendars for growing zones it would be helpful - just shift the months over maybe.
If I could add circles for container plants like tomatoes.

Lack-luster App, Read this before purchase.

**READ BEFORE PURCHASE** This app has potential but it seems as if the developers just threw it together. First off, when you download and pay for the app, you have to pay for different aspects of the app or else it will be useless. This seems like a sneaky way of getting customers to pay more for the app, multiple times. There is only a small list of vegetables to choose from and the developers curiously omitted some popular vegetables. You can add plants but you have to do your own research to add them which kind of defeats the purpose. Additionally, for some reason parts of the app are in German! You can create your own garden bed but it must be perfectly square. If you have a different shaped bed, you cannot use the plotting feature. When plotting the plants, the type of plant is in such a small font that you cannot see it without zooming in. This is annoying when trying to see the big picture. Often times when zooming or scrolling through the plot you end up accidentally moving the plants around. You cannot scroll all the way down either, the bottom of the screen is cut-off which is very frustrating. The only positive is the ability to quickly figure out companion plants. If I had to do it again I would definitely not purchase I wish I read the comments before. Save your money until they put some effort into the app but it doesn’t seem likely because the same complaints have been present for years.

More please

I think this is a great concept but I can’t finish with over half of the veggies and herbs I plan on planting missing. I realize I have the same complaint as most but really would love to see more varieties added. More squashes, okra, peppers etc. It would be neat to see suggestions for companion flowers as well. As for the climate, yes it would be nice to be able to choose a region and have more accurate information. If it were me I would just remove that part of the app until it could be improved. I would also have to agree with others that being able to edit the size of the beds would be nice. It took me forever to finally figure out how to at least delete one so I could fix it. Additionally it would be cool to be able to map out multiple beds in one screen to see the bigger picture. Also maybe a way to be able to see which plants and how many you’ve used from your list and which ones are left. Again this product seems like it has potential, just isn’t there yet.

The developer, Bento Software, indicated that the app’s privacy practices may include handling of data as described below. For more information, see the developer’s privacy policy.

Data Not Collected

The developer does not collect any data from this app.

Privacy practices may vary, for example, based on the features you use or your age. Learn More

Information

Seller
Bento Software UG (haftungsbeschraenkt)

Size
37.4 MB

Category
Lifestyle

Compatibility
iPhone
Requires iOS 9.3 or later.
iPad
Requires iPadOS 9.3 or later.
iPod touch
Requires iOS 9.3 or later.
Mac
Requires macOS 11.0 or later and a Mac with Apple M1 chip.
Languages

English, French, German, Spanish

Age Rating
4+

Copyright
© 2021 Bento Software

Price
Free

In-App Purchases

  1. Unlock All Veggie Varieties$1.99
  2. Unlock Patch Plan Editor$1.99
  3. Unlock Everything$3.99

Supports

  • Family Sharing

    With Family Sharing set up, up to six family members can use this app.

You Might Also Like

Источник: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/veggie-garden-planner/id1329927332

Crop Planning: A year in my home Garden

hilary dahl

Crop planning for the vegetable garden often feels overwhelming to new (and experienced) growers. There are many different schools of thought on how to plan and layout annual crops. As a result, there’s lots of conflicting information out there to confuse the well-intentioned researcher.

At Seattle Urban Farm Co., we create plans for 70 gardens each year. Our garden plans are devised to maximize the garden’s productivity, while keeping them neat and tidy. We organize our plantings to make ongoing maintenance as easy as possible.

For gardens to be productive and tidy, we make sure they have plenty of light, water, and nutrients; we work to keep pest pressure low; and we succession plant new crops all season long. 

A key to our crop planning system is that we plant in individual rows and/or groups of the same crop. This has several advantages, including the following: 

  • When a particular crop is ready to be removed from the garden, you will be able to clear a whole row or section of the bed, leaving adequate space to plant another crop. (See: Crop Rotation and Lifespan)

  • Some crops have growth forms that make them incompatible with other plants. By planting your crops in groups, it’s easier to keep compatible plants together and incompatible plants apart. (See: Growth Form)

  • Concentrations of the same crop family are easier to manage—to apply fertilizers at the right time, thin the plants, etc.

Even within the bounds of these rules, there are infinite crop combinations. To illustrate these concepts, I’m going to walk you through the crop cycle over one year in my home garden. 

I chose the following crop plan because this garden is similar in size to many home gardens. It consists of two 4’ x 8’ beds and a surrounding 2’-wide L-shaped bed. In most years I am lucky enough to have more growing space than this (and I’ll take every square foot I can get!). However, I am hoping this particular year feels accessible to most gardeners- and it shows just how much food you can grow in a relatively small amount of space.

A quick note on reading the maps below: (T) means the crop was planted in the garden as a transplant and (D) means that the crop was direct sown. The crops in bold are the ones that were planted during the time period discussed in each map.

MARCH-APRIL
The first image shows the garden in March and April. Everything in the diagram, except the garlic, was planted during these early spring months. I just happened to be really into beets at this time, so I dedicated a lot of space to them. In other years, I would have probably divided the space dedicated to beets in half and added a planting of carrots.

March-April_Seattle Urban Farm Co.png

MAY-JUNE
In early May I plant my summer crops and many cut flower transplants. Later in the month, the first successions of the season are planted. Throughout the spring, I harvest my first planting of head lettuce. I harvest the last of these heads and replace them with peppers and a cucumber cage of sour gherkins. Bok choy thrives in the cool spring months, but starts to bolt when the weather warms, so I also harvest the last of these heads and replace them with a round of warm-season head lettuce. 

In this plan I have a row of shelling peas in front of a row of snap peas in a bed that’s less that 2 feet wide. This spacing works because the shelling peas are much shorter than the snap peas in both plant height and crop lifespan. I harvest and pull the shelling pea plants out of the garden in late June, about a month before the snap peas are finished. This allows the mature snap peas better air flow towards the end of their lifecycle, when they start to become susceptible to diseases such as powdery mildew.

May-June_Seattle Urban Farm Co.png

JULY-AUGUST
By mid-July, many of my remaining spring crops are ready to be pulled out of the garden. In the early weeks of July, I harvest the last of my peas and clear the plants to make room for fall broccoli, kale and cabbage. Onions and garlic have matured and are ready to cure out of the garden in the summer sun by mid-July. Once those come out, they are replaced with a planting of bush beans and beets. Mid-July in the PNW is the time to plant your final succession of beets, carrots and bush beans. If you push it much later, these crops won't have time to mature.

July-August_Seattle Urban Farm Co.png

Below: July 5th, Juy 19th and August 3rd

SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER
September is the tail end of the planting season in the PNW, and not all crops have time to mature this late in the season. The good news is that most gardens are full and bursting with produce this time of year, so there isn’t always room for new crops anyway. 

If you want to plant a swath of spinach to overwinter in your garden, early September is the time. Same with cilantro, which germinates quickly in the warm days of early summer, but resists bolting much longer in the cool days of fall. This is also the time to plant other shorter season cool-tolerant crops like turnips, arugula and radishes. 

In this garden, I cleared more than ½ of a 4x8 foot bed to make room for these fall crops. Carrots can overwinter in the garden, and beets can hold in the garden into the fall, but these crops also hold well for months in my refrigerator, so I’d rather dedicate this space to growing something new and increase my overall garden productivity. 

Also, I just want to make a quick note that I find that garden stakes are an essential tool for any high-yield gardener. You can see them featured pretty prominently in the images above. 3 foot wooden stakesare really useful when trying to wrangle bush beans and keep them from flopping over onto their neighboring crop. 6 foot stakes can be used in the same way for shelling peas, or any other short variety, and potatoes!

September-October_Seattle Urban Farm Co.png

Below: September 1st in onion/potato bed and September 3rd in original beet/brassica bed

NOVEMBER-FEBRUARY
I planted garlic and fava beans in November, but besides those two crops, everything that’s in the garden at this point has been in place and growing to maturity for the past few months.

My spring planted kale and broccoli was still looking healthy and robust, so I left them in overwinter. In late February both plants start producing again; the kale with new leaves and the broccoli with substantial side shoots or mini-florets.

My fall planted brassicas also held well. On warmer days I harvested heads of cabbage and broccoli and leaves of kale. Like cilantro, brassicas are less likely to bolt during the winter months, so there’s less of a rush to harvest crops like broccoli, which can flower quickly in the summer after the plant has put on a head.

I harvested much of the spinach in the fall, but left about an inch of each plant to photosynthesize. These overwintered plants started putting on new growth in mid-February, and provided a large harvest in early March. 

The remainder of the garden is cleared and topped with compost in November so that it’s ready to plant again the following March!

November-February_Seattle Urban Farm Co.png

Below: Pulling the last of my late summer planted beets on November 27th and snow on overwintering broccoli on December 9th

Products we truly could not work without:

Hilary Dahl

Hilary Dahl

Hilary Dahl is a co-owner of Seattle Urban Farm Company and host of the Encyclopedia Botanica podcast. For ten years Hilary Dahl has been helping beginning and experienced growers create beautiful and productive gardens. She has the unique experience of working in on a wide range of projects, from small backyard garden plots to multi-acre vegetable farms. She also works in her own garden every day after work. Hilary created the Encyclopedia Botanica podcast as a way to share effective and efficient garden management techniques, and as a way to spread her love of growing food and flowers!

Colin McCrate

Colin McCrate

Colin McCrate has been growing food organically for the past 20 years. He worked on a variety of small farms in the Midwest before moving to the west coast in 2003 to teach garden-based environmental education. He founded the Seattle Urban Farm Company in 2007 with the goal of applying years of horticultural and agricultural expertise to help aspiring growers get projects off the ground or more accurately; in the ground.

Over the past twelve years, he has helped guide hundreds of urban farmers through the design, construction and management of their own edible landscape. Colin is the author of three books; Food Grown Right, In Your Backyard(Mountaineers Books, 2012), High-Yield Vegetable Gardening (Storey Publishing, 2015) and Grow More Food (Storey Publishing, 2022); and is a garden writer for the Seattle Times.

Источник: https://www.seattleurbanfarmco.com/blog/2020/4/11/crop-planning

11 Garden Planners and Programs

Plan-a-Garden

Plan-A-Garden from Better Homes & Gardens is easy to use because it supports drag and drop. Plus, all the objects you add to the garden are 3D to make it look more realistic than a simple bird's eye view like some of these planners support.

To help you build your garden, the planner walks you through a wizard. First, just select a background scene from the pre-made templates, like the house you see here. Then, you can drag fences, benches, and arbors into the scene to customize the look. Finally, you get to brush a surface onto your gardens, such as a lawn, brick path, stones, tiles, or gravel.

Of course, you're able to include all sorts of plants in the garden. There are tons of trees, vines, shrubs, bulbs, and more that are simple to add via drag and drop. Some of these objects can be filtered by type, size, and light to help find the ones you want.

Your garden can be saved online so you never lose your progress. When completely finished, you're able to save the image of the garden you've made as well as export a list of the plants you've included in your garden.

Something I don't much like about Better Homes and Gardens' Plan-A-Garden when compared to the other online garden planners from this list is that it's not as easy to add objects and plants to the garden. You only get one view to see the garden from, so moving objects around on the screen becomes a bit limited.

GardenPuzzle is another garden planner that's very similar in layout to Plan-A-Garden.

Источник: https://www.thespruce.com/free-garden-planners-1357749

Vegetable Garden Planner Printables

It is garden planning season, so with the planning comes vegetable garden planner printables.  We are going to share our step-by-step garden plan with you as we know many of you loved to see what we were up to with our gardens in previous years, pictures from our garden growing indoors and out! It helps to see other’s gardens and plans to help you plan your own.

Yes, successful gardening takes planning. We are not master gardeners, but merely city dwellers that want to make the most of our budget and our yard to produce some fresh, homegrown, organic produce. 

vegetable garden planner printables

 

Several years ago, Alex created downloads for me to use to help me have an even more efficient and effective garden plan. 

We have shared our plans in the past and along with those plans, we have shared our vegetable garden planner printables. We want you to be able to utilize these as well, no matter the type of gardening you are doing. Planning your garden on paper before helps to ensure a bit more success, along with saving the budget from not buying more than you need.

I have used these exact plans for years as they are simple enough to do the trick, while being effective at the same time. 

So….. I am sharing these downloads he created for me with you too as you prepare and plant gardens this year! We want to provide tools and resources when we can to make this thrifty life a little easier. This is one of those tools!

A Little History About Our Gardens

For the past several years, we have shared our personal garden plans and lots of gardening tips and tricks. We love to garden and growing your own food could be a good way to save money. 

So I want to share some ideas from our past years to help get the juices flowing for you! 

Well, let me start off by saying that we switched to square foot gardening after a few years of rough gardening and rough results from “row” gardens. We struggled with using the actual ground as our soil. In our area, the soil is terrible, filled with clay and very high maintenance.  Weeds, tough ground, terrible soil, etc.  So we finally made that switch a few years ago and it was finally awesome!

We followed Mel Bartholomew’s Square Foot Gardening Book. This is the EXACT one that we use!

all-new-square-foot-gardening

You can see the details and information on this book on Amazon HERE.

So of course we are doing square foot gardening again.  Not only is it low maintenance, but has very little weeds and nutrient rich soil for our food!

We also use Heirloom Seeds – I hope to harvest my own seeds to use again from these same plants!

Since one of the sheets from the vegetable garden planner printables set includes a square foot gardening planner, we thought it would be good to share how to build your own square foot garden box, because buying them is ridiculous! 

In fact, at places like Home Depot and Lowe’s, you can buy a 4’x4′ garden box kit that does not include a bottom (and we share in the post why a bottom is helpful) for nearly $70. BUT…with a few simple tools and about 30 minutes of your time, you can build one for about $25 with the bottom. This saves you loads of money and makes for a better garden box. 

The boxes were very easy to build and we shared the step-by-step DIY square foot garden box instructions in this post: 

how to build a square foot garden box

Now that I have shared our method that we prefer, the next step is planning. Note that you can use these vegetable garden planner printables for any method of gardening you prefer. Regardless, you need a plan! 

Here’s the steps I follow to plan and plant a produce garden!

Planting Schedule printable

Step#1 – Figure out what varieties I want to plant!

  • I use the Planting Schedule download and fill in the first line with the plant.
  • Then using planting guides or on the seed packs themselves, decide which ones need to be started indoors and which ones are planted directly in the ground.
  • I wait on the number of plants until another step. So I skip to the last section and write the start date based on when I want to harvest that food!  Often, I will be starting seedlings and different intervals to have food coming in at different times and not all at once!

companion garden Guide printable

Step #2 – Complete the Companion Guide

  • It is important to figure out which foods are friends and which ones are enemies – to put it in simple terms! This is called companion gardening and it is a simple, but very beneficial step to take to have a healthy, flourishing, bountiful garden!
  • I use the Companion Guide download. In the first box, write the plant name.  Then there are two sections – one for the “Friends” and one for the “Not’s.”
  • To find the friends and not’s of planting together, I use Almanac.com or OrganicGardening.com sites.

square foot garden printable

Step #3 – Write out your plan

  • Whether you are planting square foot gardens, rows or something else, it’s best to write it out so you don’t over or under plan.
  • For square foot gardening, it’s easy to write it out! I just use the Square Foot Garden Planner download to write what food will be planted in each “foot” and then the number of seeds or plants to be planted in each square foot.  You can research online how many of each type of plant can fit in a square foot, or use the official square foot gardening book which lays all of this out!

Step #4 – Finish the Planting Schedule

  • Go back to the first download and now fill-in how many seeds you need to plant.  It is best to add 10-20% more seedlings to plant as you will often lose some.  Worst case, if they all sprout and grow, then give some of your seedlings to others and bless others! But this excess will hopefully make up for seeds the don’t sprout or plants that don’t turn out very healthy.  So if I want 4 of something, I will plant 5 or 6, etc.

Finally, once you are all planned out…. get growing! Follow your “start dates” and start your seedlings!

We have several ideas for starting seedlings including these articles: 

how to make a seed starting light table

repurpose egg cartons for seedlings

Recycle Newspapers for seed starting plants

So here’s what we typical grow in any given year.  We have 6 square foot garden boxes now. We also have a potato tower for potatoes.  This is a great way to grow a bunch of potatoes in a small space. 

DIY Potato Tower

But here’s what’s going in the boxes:

  • 32 peas
  • 4 Tomatoes
  • 4 Cabbage
  • 4 Kale
  • 8 Cucumber
  • 6 Broccoli
  • 6 Cauliflower
  • 4 Pepper
  • 128 Carrots
  • 32 Beans
  • 32 Corn
  • 4 Spaghetti Squash
  • 36 Onion
  • 4 Zucchini
  • 4 Mixed Lettuce (this is one where you cut and it keeps regrowing)
  • 4 Spinach
  • 64 Radish
  • 8 Watermelon
  • 8 Cantaloupe

We already have a bunch of fruit all over our yard in the form of fruit trees and berry plants. So it makes for a nice, complete garden. 

With the above plan, the seeds I needed to start in the house were:

  • Tomatoes
  • Cabbage
  • Kale
  • Cauliflower
  • Pepper
  • Onions

The next question to answer is how to deal with the pests? 

We actually have a number of articles on natural pest control, pest control ideas without the use of chemicals so you can technically keep your garden organic in nature. 

To find these articles, head over to our Garden Gallery of Ideas

What are you growing this year?

Print off your Vegetable Garden Planner Printables 

 

 

See more Gardening Tips

See our Gardening Pinterest Board

 

 

Filed Under: Daily Dose of Thrifty, Downloads, Gardening

Источник: https://thethriftycouple.com/vegetable-garden-planner-printables/

: Vegetable garden layout planner

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The easiest way to plan, grow and harvest your own food.

Personalized Vegetable Garden Planner

There are a lot of variables that go into planning a garden. Smart Gardener does all the hard work for you. We collect, calculate and create a smart personal profile of your garden just for you. Learn more about your profile.

garden growing conditions

The Right Plants for You

vegetable garden layout planner We make it easy to find the right plants, so you can’t go wrong. With over 3000 organic, GMO free, edible varieties to choose from (and buy from our partners), Smart Gardener offers you recommendations along with super simple ways to find plants suited to your growing conditions. Learn more about plants.

browse plants and get recommendations

An Optimized Vegetable Garden Plan

Get your garden plan so you can get out in the garden. Smart Gardener combines your selected dvdfab crack reddit - Free Activators plants, vegetable garden layout, and household size with complex planting variables, to help create a Smart Garden Plan just for you. Learn more about Garden Plan.

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To Dos Just for Your Garden

We track all of your gardens’ tasks so you don’t have to. Our smart vegetable garden planner vegetable garden layout planner schedules all your gardens’ “To Dos,” from prepping to picking. View To Dos at a glance and get weekly email reminders when it’s time to get in your garden. Learn more about To Dos.

auto generated todos for your garden

A Garden Journal That Keeps Track of You

It’s a smart garden planner Journal that tracks, collects and shares. Our vegetable garden adobe after effects free download full version planner keeps your Journal up to date, so you don’t have to. But go ahead, enter notes, and photos too. It’s also finds and shares all other’s gardeners notes and photos about the same varieties you are growing. Learn more about your Journal.

journal for your garden

How Does Your Garden Grow?

Keep your garden thriving during these long, hot days with our advice on how to properly water your garden, and tips on the best types vegetable garden layout planner of mulch to use to keep your garden’s soil YTD 6.9.8 Crack Download - Crack Key For U and moist. We’ve also have some guidance on saving your own seeds. Learn more about Tips and Tricks.

Tips and Tricks for your Garden
Источник: https://www.smartgardener.com/

10 of the Best Free Garden Planners Available Online

10 of the Best Free Garden Planners Available Online

When you’re about to plan a garden, anything is possible. With so many types of gardens, plants, and layout options to choose from, a garden planner will help you stay on track. Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned gardener, we’ll show you how a free online journal will make this year your best garden yet.

The winter months offer perfect prep time, and the right garden planner for you will come with many added benefits beyond simply staying organized. Before you venture outside with your gloves and shovel in tow, try planning with a virtual garden for fast and reliable results.

Why a Garden Planner is Beneficial

garden planner

A free online garden planner can help you plan the layout of your garden, from what you want to grow, to where each plant goes. Plans like these help you stay organized while your garden thrives and is a great tool to help you think ahead. Use the planner continuously, and you’ll have an action plan off the bat that helps you create a stunning garden.

It doesn’t matter what season it is, or if you’re starting your garden from seeds. A planner can help make your garden a huge success this year. Many gardeners keep a garden journal to remember which plants worked and which didn’t quite work out in prior years, and this can even be helpful in remembering what time frame you have to plant outside or start your garden.

Greatest Garden Planner Benefits:

online journal

Beginners and pro gardeners alike take advantage of awesome garden planners for two main reasons:

  • They’re great for staying organized and remembering what plants your tried and when
  • A great planner will offer growing tips to yield a better harvest year after year, no matter what type of garden you tend.

However, there are many other SHAREit Crack 5.8.10 to using a garden planner. Depending on the option you choose, a garden planner can help:

  • Offer perfect harvest and planting times for veggies or other plants
  • Provide guidance on fertilizers and optimal sun exposure
  • Figure out how many plants you can grow in your garden
  • Prevent over-crowing plants to yield a better result
  • Make the most out of every inch of the space you have
  • Catalog and process photos with descriptions of each plant
  • Keep a shopping list or notes for next year

Use this information to decide which plants and vegetables you should plant in your garden and check out the cheat sheets each planner may offer to help your plants thrive better than ever.

Web-Based Planners are Easier than Ever

Web-based garden planner

With a web-based planner, you can zoom in and move your virtual garden around to place each feature where you want them, or rearrange as you see fit. You can use a template if you’re not sure where to start, or plan out your dream garden from scratch.

After you’ve created your garden plan, simply save the layout and revisit it as you go. Or, you can print out your plan if you’re more of a paper and pencil type of person. This way, you can make notes and changes directly onto the page and store them in a nice three-ring binder.

What’s great about printing out your plan is that you can write out a list of the supplies you’ll need to make your design work and take it with you when you visit the store. I find doing this helps me stay organized and on top of my game should I get to the store and find a better option I hadn’t previously considered. It’s also handy if problems pop up.

Online tools and free software applications make the process easier than ever, and you can try them out before you waste even a penny.

Online Garden Planners That Won’t Break the Bank

Whether you’re new to gardening or typically plan out your garden using old-fashioned pen and pencil, you’re going to love these online planners. Not only are they free, these are the best garden planners you can find online that allow you to customize yourworksheet, calculate rainfall and the amount of soil you may need, look up pest control and growing information, or keep a diary.

The following are the best online garden planners that are entirely free to use, with no added costs after you use the app a few times and fall in love with it. They won’t tease you into paying for an awesome product because they’re already great on their own.

Check out the features of each, as they all offer different ways to help gardeners build their best green spaces. Try out a few different options and see what works best for your needs. You may find yourself using a certain planner for short time needs before committing to the right one for you all year around.

Here are the 10 best free garden planner options online:

1. Gardener’s Supply Company

Gardeners supply garden planner

If you’re looking for a completely free garden planner but you only grow vegetables in your kitchen, this is the perfect tool for you. Gardener’s Supply Company allows you to design productive veggie gardens based on the square footage of your space, rather than traditional rows. A grid helps you fill in the perfect amount of plants, or you can go with any of the 16 pre-planned options.

Simply drag and drop where each plant will go, print out your map, and you’re ready to plant. There’s even an encyclopedia with in-depth information to help you choose the best variety of veggies. You won’t be able to plan out your entire yard, but many users love the square foot gardening technique.

With a rainfall calculator, soil calculator magic blu-ray copier fill in raised garden boxes, and a disease and pest directory, your garden will be happy and healthy.

2. Better Homes and Gardens Plan-A-Garden

BHG Garden Planner

Plan-A-Garden is an easy-to-use, free tool on the Better Homes and Gardens website. You can see your garden layout in a realistic 3D setting, drag and drop each item where you’d like it to go, and check out the plan from a bird’s eye view.

This program has pre-made templates to help you get started, online music player - Activators Patch as houses, fences, benches, and scenery. Customize your layout and add stones or brick paths as you see fit (and plants of course). There are hundreds of objects and types of trees, flowers, or shrubbery to choose from, and you can adjust the size of each or define the climate to find recommendations.

Save your progress online or export the list of plants to take to the store. This landscape design planner is totally free of charge, all you have to do is register.

3. Smart Gardener

Smart Gardener garden planner

Although this desktop planner comes with a few upgrade costs, you don’t need to pay anything to benefit from the program. It’s the easiest tool to plan and harvest your own vegetables indoors or out, and everything is entirely based on your personalized needs.

This program will ask you how many people are in your family to find the right number of veggies to grow, and allows you to choose the plants you enjoy most. It then calculates the amount of space you need to feed your family accurately.

From raised beds to various shapes and sizes, Smart Gardener has everything you need to create your perfect garden. Keep track of seed start dates, learn the best times to plant, create to-do lists to stay on track, join a community of gardeners, and buy plants from vendors like Baker Creek, Renee’s Garden, or Peaceful Valley.

The only thing you can’t do is add porches or pools into the mix.

4. BBC Virtual Garden Planner

BBC Virtual garden planner

Landscape your garden or plan out its contents, from fruits and vegetables to flowers and trees. The BBC Virtual Garden Planner has it all, and you can quickly design and visualize your space before you plant. Group your greenery harmoniously, explore the plant finder, plan out walkways, or allot pieces of your garden to specific purposes.

The best part about this free option is that you can experiment with various planting schemes and explore unique plans developed by some of the top garden designers in the nation.

5. Burpee Garden Time Planner

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This option allows you to customize your garden based on specific information such as your location—complete with weather forecast conditions and average frost dates based on your zip code. Simply vegetable garden layout planner the plants you want to grow the most, and the planner will show you the best dates to plant or sow seeds.

Plus, beginners will adore the how-to tutorials and videos with growing tips. The only downside is that you can’t differentiate between vegetable varieties. You can’t, for example, choose a type of tomato for your plan. The free version is also only available in tablet or mobile versions, and doesn’t allow you to plan individual garden beds.

6. Garden Planner Online

Garden Planner Online

Visualize and plan where each seedling will go well before you plant with this free tool, which offers planting schemes, visions for future growth patterns, and planting schedules so your garden has the best advantage.

Customize various designs and layouts, whether your garden in indoors, out, or even window box designs. Place fencing and bricks, experiment with trees and perennials, or create stunning walkways. The choice is yours with this free tool!

7. Vegetable Gardening Online

Vegetable gardening online planner

Perfect for beginners, Vegetable Gardening Online is a website that offers everything you need to plan your first garden. Zone charts and planting worksheets guide you through placing each plant with care, while a diary and growing information will show you how to keep your vegetables growing strong (even berries).

Additionally, you can find printable worksheets and fun coloring pages to keep your kids busy while you design your garden.

8. Marshalls Garden Visualizer

Marshalls Garden Planner

Because the real world is 3D, this free software offers a 3D interface, so you can configure everything your garden will need. You can virtually move around your space from all possible angles, and it’s easy for beginners to use.

This design software offers tons of ways to customize your garden and build your dream, from benches and gravel to any other element you can think up.

9. Gardena’s My Garden

Gardena

This virtual planner is more of a sketch-like bird’s eye view of your yard. With this web-based application, you can drag vegetable garden layout planner drop plants and any other garden element exactly where you want it. Add in ponds or design taps to water your plants, and print your design to implement it in real life.

You can even use the pre-designed gardens if you’re not sure where to start. Just modify them vegetable garden layout planner fit your requirements.

10. Kitchen Garden Planner

Kitchen Garden Planner

If your garden is confined to your kitchen counter, this Kitchen Garden Planner is designed to create personal and commercial indoor garden plans. There’s a paid premium version, but the free option is perfect if your growing a small home garden for your own needs.

Check out your garden in a final 3D view before you print it out or email it to share with friends and family. This garden planner is available online and it comes with over 26 options you can choose from.

 

There’s no doubt that a free online planner can help you create your perfect garden. The only question is which one is right for your needs.

Источник: https://gardenandhappy.com/free-garden-planners/

Plant List for 2015 Garden 1 https://happihomemade.com/vegetable-garden-plan/

Detailed image of a 5,000+ Sq Ft Vegetable Garden Plan.

I am so excited to share all the details of my 5,000+ Sq Ft Vegetable Garden Plan with you today!

I am sure that you have read the advice to plant a small garden if you are a beginner.  Here is my advice:

If you are a new gardener with the intention of building a large garden, prepare yourself to work EXTREMELY HARD if you want to be successful.

This is my 3rd season gardening, and I have had a lot of success so far.  My husband and I built our dream home out on 13 acres in the country in the spring of 2013.  We moved in at the end of May after a whirlwind 3 month building project.

On of my requests was that hubby build me a garden ASAP so I didn’t miss the growing season.

And by June 1, I was planting my very first vegetable garden (I am married to a saint).  The size of my very first vegetable garden was 1,000 sq ft.  Here are some photos from my first year gardening:

Five photos of Sarah Koontz's first vegetable garden.

I had a lot more time to prepare for my second year of gardening.  I spent a good portion of the winter studying up on intensive gardening techniques, and discovering ways to extend my short growing season when planting a large garden.

 I live in zone 4a, so a few more weeks on either side of the growing season could really change things for me.

I learned how to start my own seeds (read my top 10 Seed Starting Hacks), asked hubby to build hoop houses and cold frames, and planted my first cold hardy vegetables out mid-April.  That was a full month and a half ahead of the previous year.  Here are photos from my second year gardening:

A photo collage of the planting and harvesting of a Zone 4a vegetable garden.

What a difference a year can make?!?

I had a blast learning how to get the MOST out of MY FRUGAL DIY garden last season (here are viewcompanion premium - Free Activators of my favorite FRUGAL Gardening Resources).

I learned a lot about companion planting, succession planting, and season extension.  My garden produced a beautiful crop (although we did suffer from an extremely early hard frost, and a few rounds of hail).

I was able to can and preserve a lot of the harvest, and we are still enjoying the fruits of our summer toil!

But I truly want to be as self sufficient as a northerner can possibly be, and our garden simply was NOT BIG ENOUGH!

 So last fall we extended our garden to a full 75’x75’…ENTER my 5,000+ Sq Ft Vegetable Garden Plan! 

I have spent the last few months making a vegetable garden plan, and I am looking forward to getting my hands dirty this season. Here are some photos from our expansion project:Three photos of the makings of a 5,000+ Sq Ft Vegetable Garden Plan.free youtube to mp3 converter crack - Free Activators height="667">

It is my hope to post frequent updates this gardening season on our progress and experience with our large vegetable garden. (Click Here to read an Update from 7/27/2015)  I will be planting approximately 60 different varieties of fruit, vegetables, flowers and herbs.  

Here is a downloadable .PDF of the plants I will be growing in my 5,000+ sq ft vegetable garden this year.

Click the Image to Download:

I have often wished that more large-scale gardeners shared their plans online, so I hope this is a benefit to you!  Click the Image below to view a closeup of my 5,000+ Zone 4 Vegetable Garden Plan:

View Detailed Garden Plan:

An image of a 2015 gardening plan.

>>Click Here for my 2016 Garden Plan <<

I also believe in the value of a detailed garden schedule.  I always do the math pre-season and work hard to develop a planting schedule.  I figure out when I will need to start certain seeds indoors, schedule a plan to harden them off and plant them outside.

I refer to my garden schedule regularly throughout the growing season.  It is so nice to start the week by looking at my garden schedule and work with the confidence that I am not forgetting anything.

As the season progresses, I will keep track of my garden tasks in a journal.  Keeping good records of planting schedules, fertilizing schedules, and harvest dates will create a valuable resource to help me  plan my 2016 garden.

I am sure that I will make minor changes to this plan as we go throughout the season, but this is what I have for now (if you live in a different gardening zone, these dates will not apply to you):

Click the Image to Download:

Calendar of when to plant in your own garden.

 Are you planning a vegetable garden this year?  What can I do to help?

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Источник: https://happihomemade.com/vegetable-garden-plan/

11 Garden Planners and Programs

Plan-a-Garden

Plan-A-Garden from Better Homes & Gardens is easy to use because it supports drag and drop. Plus, all the objects you add to the garden are 3D to make it look more realistic than a simple vegetable garden layout planner eye view like some of these planners support.

To help you build your garden, the planner walks you through a wizard. First, just select a background scene from the pre-made templates, like the house you see here. Then, you can drag fences, benches, and arbors into the scene to customize the look. Finally, you get to brush a surface onto your gardens, such as a lawn, brick path, stones, tiles, or gravel.

Of course, you're able to include all sorts of plants in the garden. There are tons of trees, vines, shrubs, bulbs, and more that are simple to add via drag and drop. Some of these objects can be filtered by type, size, and light to help find the ones you want.

Your garden tenorshare ultdata reddit be saved online so you never lose your progress. When completely finished, you're able to save the image of the garden you've made as well as export a list of the plants you've included in your garden.

Something I don't much like about Better Homes and Gardens' Plan-A-Garden when compared to the other online garden planners from this list is that it's not as easy to add objects and plants to the garden. You only get one view to see the garden from, so moving objects around on the screen becomes a bit limited.

GardenPuzzle is another garden planner that's very similar in layout to Plan-A-Garden.

Источник: https://www.thespruce.com/free-garden-planners-1357749

Vegetable Garden Planner Printables

It is garden planning season, so with the planning comes vegetable garden planner printables.  We are going to share our step-by-step garden plan with you as we know many of you loved to see what we were up to with our gardens in previous years, pictures from our garden growing indoors and out! It helps to see other’s gardens and plans to help you plan your own.

Yes, successful gardening takes planning. We are not master gardeners, but merely city dwellers that want to make the most of our budget and our yard to produce some fresh, homegrown, organic produce. 

vegetable garden planner printables

 

Several years ago, Alex created downloads for me to use to help me have an even more efficient and effective garden plan. 

We have shared our plans in the past and along with those plans, we have shared our vegetable garden planner printables. We want you to be able to utilize these as well, no matter the type of gardening you are doing. Planning your garden on paper before helps to ensure a bit more success, along with saving the budget from not buying more than you need.

I have used these exact plans for years as they are simple enough to do the trick, while being effective at the same time. 

So…. I am sharing these downloads he created for me with you too as you prepare and plant gardens this year! We want to provide tools and resources when we can to make this thrifty life a little easier. This is one of those tools!

A Little History About Our Gardens

For the past several years, we have shared our personal garden plans and lots of gardening tips and tricks. We love to garden and growing your own food could be a good way to save money. 

So I want to share some ideas from our past years to help get the juices flowing for you! 

Well, let me start off by saying that we switched to square foot gardening after a few years of rough gardening and rough results from “row” gardens. We struggled with using the actual ground as our soil. In our area, the soil is terrible, filled with clay and very high maintenance.  Weeds, tough ground, terrible soil, etc.  So we finally made that switch a few years ago and it was finally awesome!

We followed Mel Bartholomew’s Square Foot Gardening Book. This is the EXACT one that we use!

all-new-square-foot-gardening

You can see the details and information on this book on Amazon HERE.

So of course we are doing square foot gardening again.  Not only is it low maintenance, but has very little weeds and nutrient rich soil for our food!

We also use Heirloom Seeds – I hope to harvest my own seeds to use again from these same plants!

Since one of the sheets from the vegetable garden planner printables set includes a square foot gardening planner, we thought it would be good to share how to build your own square foot garden box, because buying them is ridiculous! 

In fact, at places like Home Depot and Lowe’s, you can buy a 4’x4′ garden box kit that does not include a bottom (and we share in the post why a bottom is helpful) for nearly $70. BUT…with a few simple tools and about 30 minutes of your time, you can build one for about $25 with the bottom. This saves you loads of money and makes for a better garden box. 

The boxes were very easy to build and we shared the step-by-step DIY square foot garden box instructions in this post: 

how to build a square foot garden box

Now that I have shared our method that we prefer, the next step is planning. Note that you can use these vegetable garden planner printables for any method of gardening you prefer. Regardless, you need a plan! 

Here’s the steps I follow to plan and plant a produce garden!

Planting Schedule printable

Step#1 – Figure out what varieties I want to plant!

  • I use the Planting Schedule download and fill in the first line with the plant.
  • Then using planting guides or on the seed packs themselves, decide which ones need to be started indoors and which ones are planted directly in the ground.
  • I wait on the number of plants until another step. So I skip to the last section and write the start date based on when I want to harvest that food!  Often, I will be starting seedlings and different intervals to have food coming in at different times and not all at once!

companion garden Guide printable

Step #2 – Complete the Companion Guide

  • It is important to figure out which foods are friends and which ones are enemies – to put it in simple terms! This is called companion gardening and it is a simple, but very beneficial step to take to have a healthy, flourishing, bountiful garden!
  • I vegetable garden layout planner the Companion Guide download. In the first box, write the plant name.  Then there are two sections – one for the “Friends” and one for the “Not’s.”
  • To find the friends and not’s of planting together, I use Almanac.com or OrganicGardening.com sites.

square foot garden printable

Step #3 – Write out your plan

  • Whether you are planting square foot gardens, rows or something else, it’s best to write it out so you don’t over or under plan.
  • For square foot gardening, it’s easy to write it out! I just use the Square Foot Garden Planner download to write what food will be planted in each “foot” and then the number of seeds or plants to be planted in each square foot.  You can research online how many of each type of vegetable garden layout planner can fit in a square foot, or use the official square foot gardening book which lays all of this out!

Step #4 – Finish the Planting Schedule

  • Go back to the first download and now fill-in how many seeds you need to plant.  It is best to add 10-20% more seedlings to plant as you will often lose some.  Worst case, if they all sprout and grow, then give some of your seedlings to others and bless others! But this excess will hopefully make up for seeds the don’t sprout or plants that don’t turn out very healthy.  So if I want 4 jriver media center 24 crack - Activators Patch something, I will plant 5 or 6, etc.

Finally, once you are all planned out…. get growing! Follow your “start dates” and start your seedlings!

We have several ideas for starting seedlings including these articles: 

how to make a seed starting light table

repurpose egg cartons for seedlings

Recycle Newspapers for seed starting plants

So here’s what we typical grow in any given year.  We have 6 square foot garden boxes now. We also have a potato tower for potatoes.  This is a carlson survey software free download way to grow a bunch of potatoes in a small space. 

DIY Potato Tower

But here’s what’s going in the boxes:

  • 32 peas
  • 4 Tomatoes
  • 4 Cabbage
  • 4 Kale
  • 8 Cucumber
  • 6 Broccoli
  • 6 Cauliflower
  • 4 Pepper
  • 128 Carrots
  • 32 Beans
  • 32 Corn
  • 4 Spaghetti Squash
  • 36 Onion
  • 4 Zucchini
  • 4 Mixed Lettuce (this is one where you cut and it keeps regrowing)
  • 4 Spinach
  • 64 Radish
  • 8 Watermelon
  • 8 Cantaloupe

We already have a bunch of fruit all over our yard in the form of fruit trees and berry plants. So it makes for a nice, complete garden. 

With the above plan, the seeds I needed to start in vegetable garden layout planner house were:

  • Tomatoes
  • Cabbage
  • Kale
  • Cauliflower
  • Pepper
  • Onions

The next question to answer is how to deal with the pests? 

We actually have a number of articles on natural pest control, pest control ideas without the use of chemicals so you can technically keep your garden organic in nature. 

To find these articles, head over to our Garden Gallery of Ideas

What are you growing this year?

Print off your Vegetable Garden Planner Printables 

 

 

See more Gardening Tips

See our Gardening Pinterest Board

 

 

Filed Under: Daily Dose of Thrifty, Downloads, Gardening

Источник: https://thethriftycouple.com/vegetable-garden-planner-printables/

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