oregon state parks columbia river gorge

Oregon is a state of forests and Klamath County is at the center of them all. Nestled between the Portland Metro area, the Columbia River Gorge. Earlier this week, federal and state agencies began reopening trails and limited day-use sites in the Columbia River Gorge. Meandering through the Cascade Range, the Columbia River Gorge stretches some 130 kilometers in length, reaching a depth of over 1,200 meters in.

Oregon state parks columbia river gorge -

Image, 2014, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Picnic area, Ainsworth State Park, Oregon, Historic Columbia River Highway. Image taken June 5, 2014.


Ainsworth State Park ...
Early Ainsworth State Park ...
The land of Ainsworth Park was donated to the State of Oregon in 1933 by John C. and Alice H. Ainsworth. John C. Ainsworth was a prominent Oregon businessman and the son of an early Oregon pioneer Captain J.C. Ainsworth. Captain Ainsworth was one of the founders of the Oregon Steam Navigation Company.

Historic Columbia River Highway ...
Ainsworth State Park, with day-use and campground facilities, is located along the Historic Columbia River Highway at River Mile (RM) 139. Downstream is Horsetail Falls and the Oneonta area, and upstream is the Oregon communities of Dodson and Warrendale. Further upstream is John B. Yeon State Park, another Historic Columbia River Highway park.

[More Historic Columbia River Highway]
[More HCRH Route]

Image, 2014, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Historic Columbia River Highway mileage marker, Picnic area, Ainsworth State Park, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2014.


Drinking Fountain ...
According to the 2000 National Historic Register "Historic Columbia River Highway" Nomination Form:
"This semi-circular masonry trough and faucet provided water for visitors and their vehicles. It was part of a fountain construction project conducted along many Oregon state highways in the 1920s."

"Motorists driving along the highways in the State of Oregon will occasionally pass a sign notifying them that there is good drinking water 300 feet ahead. At such places they will find an artistically designed drinking fountain erected by the Oregon State Highway Commission and a water supply which they may feel safe in using. ...

The fountains have bubblers for drinking, and a pool from which water for filling radiators may be dipped. ...

The water used is from live springs and is tested by the State to ascertain its suitablility for drinking before the erection of a fountain ...   ample parking space is provided so that cars may be parked off the highway. ...

At present there are some 30 fountains along the Oregon highways, and additional ones are placed wherever suitable conditions are found. The construction of these fountains by the Oregon State Highway Commission is in line with their policy of developing the scenic features of the highways of the State."


Source:    T.M. Davis, 1930, Highway Engineer, U.S. Bureau of Public Roads, "Drinking Fountains Along Oregon Highways", IN: "Public Roads", April 1930.


Image, 2014, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Fountain, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2014.
Image, 2014, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Fountain, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2014.
Image, 2014, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Fountain, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2014.
Image, 2014, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Fountain, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2014.


Ainsworth State Park in 1946 ...
AINSWORTH STATE PARK

"Ainsworth State Park entered at Mile Post 35.20 is the next one eastward. Practically all of this tract lies above the highway, with the highway and railroad rights-of-way clipping off a small triangle at the northwest corner. It is described as being in Section 3, Township 1 North of Range 6 East, W.M., in Multnomah County, Oregon containing forty acres. This area was a gift to the State of Oregon by the late J.C. Ainsworth, and Alice H. Ainsworth, his wife, by deed dated July 29, 1933.

The tract is well wooded, rising with a moderate slope near the highway, which increases in steepness in its southward ascent. Its special feature is a splendid, very cold, free flowing spring which wells from the hillside, below the highway surface level. To make this excellent supply of pure water available to the public, space was excavated for the installation of a concrete basin, with surrounding floor space, easily reached by a few downward concrete steps.

An old railroad grade at one time covered the spring, and a short distance westward, this has been widened to provide a limited parking space and a small, but very pleasant picnic area, where a table or two and a stove have been set up for public use in a bower of cool shady alders.

The wooded area above the spring has been cleaned up and is a delightful restful place for anyone who enjoys the quiet peace of a pleasant, secluded forest.

The picnic area facilities, fire breaks, fire hazard reduction along the road and trail sides, camp ground clearing and lineal survey were all done by CCC forces in the second, third and fifth periods, in 1933-34 and 35. The water installation was also by CCC forces."

Signed:
W.A. Langille, State Parks Historian.

RECOMMENDATIONS:
"This is a wayside and possibly a few more tables might be added. Search should be made for a hillside contact of the spring developed by the wayside. If found, a fountain could be constructed at highway level, and the present spring development abandoned."

Signed:
S.H. Boardman, State Parks Superintendent, March 25, 1946.


Source:    W.A. Langille and S.H. Boardman, 1946, State Parks Historical Sketches: Columbia Gorge State Parks, courtesy of Oregon State Archives website, 2014.


Ainsworth State Park in 1965 ...
AINSWORTH STATE PARK

"The original portion of Ainsworth State Park, a 40-acre tract, was donated to the state by J. C. and Alice H. Ainsworth of Portland. The Highway Commission accepted the generous gift on August 8, 1933. Mr. and Mrs. Ainsworth thought that this area would serve the traveler as a place to rest and leisurely examine the flora of the beautiful Columbia River Gorge. It has served that purpose for many years past and will continue for many years to come.

Logging operations were started in 1946 on some adjoining land to the east of the park. This served as an impetus for acquisition of a 6-acre tract lying between the original tract and the highway. This parcel contained a good stand of fir timber and it was deemed necessary as a part of the park. It was purchased from Joseph A. Bucher on May 6, 1947. At the close of 1963 a total of 46 acres comprised the park.

Ainsworth Park was named to honor the donors. It is a beautifully timbered area adjoining the original Columbia River Scenic Highway right of way about one-half mile west from Dodson in Multnomah County. On the area and near the highway is a good spring which was developed by the Civilian Conservation Corps with elaborate stone work, steps and a fountain. Tables were placed nearby and trails provided throughout the area.

The land is an alluvial fan formed by debris from the canyon wall. It rises upward on a gentle slope to the south beyond the park limits to the base of the canyon wall.

Attendance during 1962 totaled 54,990 day visitors. No count was made in 1963.."


Source:    Chester H. Armstrong (compiler), 1965, "History of the Oregon State Parks: 1917-1963, published by Oregon State Parks.


Views ...

Image, 2014, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Picnic area, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2014.
Image, 2006, View north from Ainsworth State Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
View north from Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway. Image taken September 23, 2006.
Image, 2014, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Campground, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2014.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, November 2, 1805 ...










Источник: http://columbiariverimages.com/Regions/Places/ainsworth.html

WE
NEED
YOU

Current Status

Green means the beach’s most recent test results met relevant water quality standards.
Red means the beach’s most recent test results failed to meet water quality standards.
Grey means water quality information for the beach is too old (more than 7 days old) to be considered current, or that info is unavailable, or unreliable.

Historical Status

When swimming season is over or when a beach's water quality data has not been updated frequently enough (weekly) it goes into historical status. This means that rather than displaying current data it displays the beach's average water quality for that year.

Green means the beach passed water quality tests 95% of the time or more.
Yellow means the beach passed water quality tests 60-95% of the time.
Red means the beach failed water quality tests 40% of the time or more.

Special Status

We may manually set the status for a specific beach if we have concerns about the sampling protocol, if there is an emergency, if monitoring practices don't exist or have recently changed, or other reasons that render this site "special."

This means that this site has been issued a Blue Flag status for the current swimming season. This status does not indicate current water quality.
Red means the water at the site has water quality issues or there is an emergency.
Grey means there is no current water quality information, the beach is under construction, there has been an event that has rendered water quality information unreliable or unavailable.
See the beach description for more information regarding their special status.
Источник: https://www.theswimguide.org/beach/1791
Angel's Rest Trail Angel's Rest Hike Columbia River Gorge Angel's Rest Lookout Oregon Angels Rest Trail

Angel's Rest Lookout boast soaring views across Columbia River Gorge. Things get particularly heavenly at sunrise when the first rays of light grace the gorge. Angel's Rest Trail starts from Historic Columbia River Highway, just off Interstate 84, and rises 1,500 feet over a 4.8-mile round trip hike. In addition to superb sights at the top, the trail seals its Columbia River Gorge status... Read more.

Add to trails I’ve hiked
Add to trails I want to hikeTagged with · Cascade Range · Columbia River Gorge · Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area · Free Trails · Waterfalls
Distance: 4.8 miles · Elevation change: 1500 feet

By: Seth Smigelski Published: April 10, 2017 Last updated: September 9, 2019

Источник: https://www.hikespeak.com/tag/columbia-river-gorge/

Sheridan State Park, Columbia River Gorge, Oregon

Sheridan State Park

Among the many locations lost to time in the Columbia Gorge is Sheridan State Park. At one time this was a wayside along the Columbia River Highway, but was made inaccessible by the building of I-84 in 1960.

Luckily the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail allows us to once again visit this gorgeous location. It’s located roughly half way between Eagle Creek Overlook, and Cascade Locks. The park was named after Civil War General Philip H. Sheridan who, as a Lieutenant, was stationed in Oregon at Fort Yamhill. He played a leading role in the 1856 Cascades Massacre, which took place across the Columbia River, and this park was one of many local features named after him.

Sheridan State Park

The history sign here says:

“Sheridan State Park; fragments of the PAST”

“Increased traffic and larger, faster automobiles were too demanding of the Columbia River Highway. The Highway – once seen as a road ahead of its time – was soon too narrow, too slow, and too dangerous. The public clamored for a wider, faster route.”

“Construction of a water-level route through the gorge began in the 1930s. By the 1960s, Interstate 84, had replaced the Historic Columbia River Highway as the primary route through the gorge. With construction of the new road, portions of the old highway slowly fell to pieces – tunnels were backfilled and bridges were destroyed.”

“Today, thanks to a revival of interest in the historic highway, fragments of the past remain – now resurrected, restored and reconnected as the Historic Columbia River Highway and the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail.”

Related

Источник: http://pnwphotoblog.com/sheridan-state-park/

Most Oregon State Park campgrounds are now open

SALEM, Ore. — Most Oregon state campgrounds are open as of Tuesday, according to a timeline released by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department at the end of last month.

While a few campgrounds opened immediately, the vast majority were slated to open up June 9.

“I am cautiously delighted. We are working hard to welcome campers wherever we can safely do so, as soon as we can,” said OPRD director Lisa Sumption.

Campgrounds are only allowed to open if they meet the state public health guidelines, receive approval from the local community, and if the park has enough staffing, supplies, and equipment to open safely and "operate at a basic level."

Due to lost revenue over the preceding months of closures, Parks officials said that services at most campgrounds will be curtailed. Cabin and yurt camping won't be available "except in rare cases." Group camping remains closed across the state, due to distancing concerns.

RV and tent campers with existing reservations for a campground that opens will be honored beginning June 9. Not all sites or loops may be available at open campgrounds. For parks in the coastal region, there will be no walk-in or first come, first-served camping until further notice.

Also, the state's online reservation system has been shut down since April 28. It will reopen for new reservations sometime next week with a reduced window — between one day and two weeks in advance.

The following campgrounds opened Friday, May 29:

The vast majority of campgrounds opened on Tuesday, June 9 across Oregon:

Coast
Note: All group camping, cabins and yurts closed. No walk-in or first come, first-served camping until further notice. Additional services or changes will be on park page.

  • Fort Stevens, near Astoria
  • Cape Lookout, near Tillamook (Loops A & B closed)
  • Nehalem Bay, south of Cannon Beach
  • Beverly Beach, north of Newport
  • South Beach, south of Newport
  • Jessie M. Honeyman, south of Florence
  • William M. Tugman, south of Reedsport
  • Sunset Bay, near Coos Bay (B Loop closed)
  • Bullards Beach, north of Bandon: (Horse camp closed)
  • Humbug Mountain, south of Port Orford
  • Harris Beach, in Brookings

Willamette Valley and Columbia River Gorge
Note: All group camping, cabins and yurts closed. Additional services or changes will be on park page.

Southern, Central and Eastern Oregon
Note: All group camping, cabins and yurts closed unless otherwise noted. Additional services or changes will be on park page.

  • The Cove Palisades, southwest of Madras
  • Prineville Reservoir, southeast of Prineville
  • Smith Rock, northeast of Redmond (bivouac tent camping only)
  • Deschutes River, east of The Dalles
  • LaPine, south of Bend (campground and rustic cabins open)
  • Tumalo, north of Bend
  • Collier Memorial, north of Klamath Falls
  • Joseph Stewart, northeast of Medford
  • Wallowa Lake, southeast of Enterprise
  • Farewell Bend, southeast of Huntington
  • Clyde Holliday, near John Day
Источник: https://www.kdrv.com/content/news/Most-Oregon-State-Park-campgrounds-are-now-open-571140371.html

Several Oregon state park campgrounds are reopening Friday with limited services and over two dozen more state park campgrounds are set to reopen in two weeks.

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department reopened seven first-come, first-served campgrounds in Eastern Oregon and expect to add dozens more throughout the state, including popular areas like the coast and the Columbia River Gorge.

The campgrounds reopening Friday are: Goose Lake State Recreation Area, Jackson F. Kimball State Recreation Site, Minam State Recreation Area, Hilgard Junction State Park, Catherine Creek State Park, Clyde Holliday State Recreation State and Cottonwood Canyon State Park.

OPRD director Lisa Sumption said she is delighted to be reopening campgrounds.

“We are working hard to welcome campers whenever we can safely do so, as soon as we can,” she said in a press release statement.

THANKS TO OUR SPONSOR:

Become a Sponsor

Sumption said state park campgrounds will reopen only when public health guidelines established by the Oregon Health Authority have been met within the county and when the local community and staff are ready.

All group camping, cabins and yurts are closed until further notice.

Earlier this week, federal and state agencies began reopening trails and limited day-use sites in the Columbia River Gorge, while crowd-attracting sites like campgrounds and visitor’s centers remain closed.

Agencies are working together to reopen and phase in access to public lands and waterways and are encouraging people to visit alternative areas across the region and disperse themselves as much as possible.

Most waterfalls, including Multnomah Falls and others along the stretch of the Historic Columbia River Highway known as “Waterfall Corridor,” remain closed because they draw crowds of visitors from around the world each summer.

Dog Mountain, Beacon Rock Trail and several other narrow hiking trails also remain closed. The trails in the closed Eagle Creek Fire area, including Eagle Creek Trail and the nearby day use site, also remain closed.

A bi-state, multi-organization campaign called Ready, Set, GOrge has a website listing what is open and closed in the Columbia River Gorge.

Starting June 9, at least 27 Oregon state park campground sites will reopen throughout the state, including popular areas Fort Stevens near Astoria, Nehalem Bay south of Cannon Beach, Silver Falls east of Salem and Memaloose near The Dalles. For a more updated list, check the Oregon Parks And Recreation Department website.

The online reservation system will reopen sometime next week and will accept new reservations one day to two weeks in advance.

THANKS TO OUR SPONSOR:

Become a Sponsor

Источник: https://www.opb.org/news/article/campgrounds-open-oregon-state-parks-may-29-2020/

: Oregon state parks columbia river gorge

BOONE COUNTY KY COURT RECORDS
FIRST PREMIER CC LOGIN
CAMBRIDGE SAVINGS BANK PORTER SQUARE HOURS
Oregon state parks columbia river gorge

youtube video

oregon state parks columbia river gorge

2 Replies to “Oregon state parks columbia river gorge”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *