people on the internet

approximately 2 billion people use the Internet today.8 Using this figure, the number of connected devices per person jumps to 6.25 in 2010, instead of 1.84. Of. A term used to describe the large demographic who spend a large portion of their day doing stupid things online (blogging, commenting on blogs, making google. 'Computers are marvellous!': older people embrace internet in lockdown Before the pandemic struck, 79-year-old Jim Whelan barely used his.

People on the internet -

The 20 Most Popular People On The Internet

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Gus Lubin

2011-02-08T17:54:00Z

Justin Bieber
You have no idea how popular Justin Bieberis.

In the past twelve months, more people have searched for the 16-year-old wonder on Google than have searched for "china," "jesus," or "boobs."

Bieber also left other celebrities in the dust. The only person who came close was Lady Gaga.

We identified the people who were searched for most in the past year, based on Google Trends. Since Google provides only comparative data, we compared everyone we could think of to Bieber. Feel free to check the data and post a comment if we left anyone off the list.

#20 Robert Pattinson

Robert Pattinson
Wikimedia Commons

Robert Pattinson is 16% as popular as Justin Bieber

Trend analysis: True Harry Potter fans recognize Robert Pattinson as Cedric, but most people know him as the star of Twilight, Edward Cullen.

His search traffic on Google peaked at the end of June/July of 2010 when the third Twilight movie came out.

Note: We searched for "pattinson," which turns up almost entirely hits for Robert Pattinson.

#19 Kesha

kesha
Wikimedia Commons

Kesha is 19% as popular as Justin Bieber

Trend analysis: Ke$ha came onto the pop music scene late in 2009 with her hit single "Tik Tok."

Ke$ha's Google popularity peaked in July 2010 when she went on tour with Rihanna and Nicki Minaj. She also spiked in December when she graced the cover of Billboard Magazine.

Note: We searched for "kesha

The world has become tightly connected since the internet. The web itself has replaced the practice of reading newspaper. Most of us now communicate through e-mails instead of paper and pen. We now watch networks or movies online, it has even become a wide business venture, so much so we can now make purchase and pay our bills through the internet. The web has also transformed friendships through various social media. It also provides us the possibility to reconnect with people from our childhood and it can be a life changing event.

Having a great idea is one thing. Turning that idea into a booming company through innovation and execution is what that matters most. Here, these are the people who have the biggest impact on the direction of the web: past, present, and future. They changed the internet and revolutionized the way we lead our lives today. Just imagine the world without internet. You can’t because it has become our daily life.

Vint Cerf and Bob Kahn

Father of the Internet.

The Father of Internet Vint Cerf, together with Bob Kahn created the TCP/IP suite of communication protocols. a language used by computers to talk to each other in a network. Vint Cerf once said that the internet is just a mirror of the population and spam is a side effect of a free service.

Tim Berners-Lee

Inventor of WWW.

Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web. He wrote the first web client and server and designed a way to create links, or hypertext, amid different pieces of online information. He now maintains standards for the web and continues to refine its design as a director of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Ray Tomlinson

Father of Email.

Programmer Ray Tomlinson, the Father of Email made it possible to exchange messages between machines in diverse locations; between universities, across continents, and oceans. He came up with the “@” symbol format for e-mail addresses. Today, more than a billion people around the world type @ sign every day.

Michael Hart

The birth of eBooks.

Michael Hart started the birth of eBooks and breaks down the bars of ignorance and illiteracy. He created the Project Gutenberg and was considered world’s first electronic library that changed the way we read. The collection includes public domain works and copyrighted works with express permission.

Gary Thuerk

The first Email spam.

Spamming is an old marketing technique. Gary Thuerk, sent his first mass e-mailing to customers over the Arpanet for Digital’s new T-series of VAX systems. What he didn’t realize at the time was that he had sent the world’s first spam.

Scott Fahlman

The first emoticon.

Scott Fahlman is credited with originating the first ASCII-based smiley emoticon, which he thought would help to distinguish between posts that should be taken humorously and those of a more serious nature. Now, everybody uses them in messenger programs, chat rooms, and e-mail.

Marc Andreessen

Netscape Navigator.(wikipedia)

Marc Andreessen revolutionized Internet navigation. He came up with first widely used Web browser called Mosaic which was later commercialised as the Netscape Navigator. Marc Andreessen is also co-founder and chairman of Ning and an investor in several startups including Digg, Plazes, and Twitter.

Jarkko Oikarinen

Internet Relay Chat, IRC.(wikipedia)

Jarkko Oikarinen developed the first real-time online chat tool in Finland known as Internet Relay Chat. IRC’s fame took off in 1991. When Iraq invaded Kuwait and radio and TV signals were shut down, thanks to IRC though up-to-date information was able to be distribute.

Robert Tappan Morris

First Worm Virus.

The concept of a worm virus is unique compare to the conventional hacking. Instead of getting into a network themselves, they send a small program they have coded to do the job. From this concept, Robert Tappan Morris created the Morris Worm. It’s one of the very first worm viruses to be sent out over the internet that inadvertently caused many thousands of dollars worth of damage and “loss of productivity” when it was released in the late 80s.

David Bohnett

Geocities.(wikipedia)

David Bohnett founded GeoCities in 1994, together with John Rezner. It grew to become the largest community on the Internet. He pioneered and championed the concept of providing free home pages to everyone on the web. The company shut down the service on October 27, 2009.

Ward Cunningham

The first Wiki.

American programmer Ward Cunningham developed the first wiki as a way to let people collaborate, create and edit online pages together. Cunningham named the wiki after the Hawaiian word for “quick.”

Sabeer Bhatia

Hotmail.(wikipedia)

Sabeer Bhatia founded Hotmail in which the uppercase letters spelling out HTML-the language used to write the base of a webpage. He got in the news when he sold the free e-mailing service , Hotmail to Microsoft for $400 million. He was awarded the “Entrepreneur of the Year” by Draper Fisher Jurvertson in 1998 and was noted by TIME as one of the “People to Watch” in international business in 2002. His most exciting acquisition of 2009 was Jaxtyr which he believes is set to overtake Skype in terms of free global calling.

Matt Drudge

The Drudge Report.(wikipedia)

Matt Drudge started the news aggregation website The Drudge Report. It gained popularity when he was the first outlet to break the news that later became the Monica Lewinsky scandal.

Larry Page and Sergey Brin

Google.(wikipedia)

Larry Page and Sergey Brin changed the way we search and use the Internet. They worked as a seamless team at the top of the search giant. Their company grew rapidly every year since it began. Page and Brin started with their own funds, but the site quickly outgrew their own existing resources. They later obtain private investments through Stanford. Larry Page, Sergey Brin and their company Google, continue to favor engineering over business.

Bill Gates

Microsoft.(wikipedia)

Bill Gates founded the software company called “Micro-Soft”. a combination of “microcomputer software.” Later on, Bill Gates developed a new GUI (Graphical User Interface) for a disk operating system. He called this new style Windows. He has all but accomplished his famous mission statement, to put “a computer on every desk and in every home”. at least in developed countries.

Steve Jobs

Apple.(wikipedia)

Steve Jobs innovative idea of a personal computer led him into revolutionizing the computer hardware and software industry. The Apple founder changed the way we work, play and communicate. He made simple and uncluttered web design stylish. The story of Apple and Steve Jobs is about determination, creative genius, pursuit of innovation with passion and purpose.

David Filo and Jerry Yang

Yahoo.(wikipedia)

David Filo and Jerry Yang started Yahoo! as a pastime and evolved into a universal brand that has changed the way people communicate with each other, find and access information and purchase things. The name Yahoo! is an acronym for “Yet Another Hierarchical Officious Oracle,” but Filo and Yang insist they selected the name because they liked the general definition of a yahoo: “rude, unsophisticated, uncouth.”

Brad Fitzpatrick

LiveJournal.(wikipedia)

Brad Fitzpatrick created LiveJournal, one of the earliest blogging platforms. He is seen on the Internet under the nickname bradfitz. He is also the author of a variety of free software projects such as memcached, used on LiveJournal, Facebook and YouTube. LiveJournal continues today as an online community where people can share updates on their lives via diaries and blogs. Members connect by creating a “friends list” that links to their pals’ recent entries.

Shawn Fanning

Napster.(wikipedia)

Shawn Fanning developed Napster, a peer-to-peer file-sharing program designed to let music fans find and trade music. Users put whatever files they were willing to share with others into special directories on their hard drives. The service had more than 25 million users at its peak in 2001, and was shut down after a series of high-profile lawsuits, not before helping to spark the digital music revolution now dominated by Apple. Napster has since been rebranded and acquired by Roxio.

Peter Thiel

Paypal.(wikipedia)

Peter Thiel is one of many Web luminaries associated with PayPal. PayPal had enabled people to transfer money to each other instantly. PayPal began giving a small group of developers access to its code, allowing them to work with its super-sophisticated transaction framework. Peter Thiel cofounded PayPal at age 31 and sold it to eBay four years later for $1.5 billion.

Pierre Morad Omidyar

Ebay.(wikipedia)

Pierre Omidyar set up an online marketplace that brought buyers and sellers together as never before, and pioneered the concept of quantifying the trustworthiness of an anonymous user. In building his auction empire, Omidyar counted on the power of the individual. Omidyar’s greatest strength is his insight into human nature. He understood that people would buy just about anything. one man’s junk is, in fact, another’s treasure.

Jimmy Wales

Wikipedia.(wikipedia)

Jimmy Wales founded the world’s largest encyclopaedia which carries articles that can easily be edited by anyone who can access the website. It was launched in 2001 and is currently the most popular general reference work on the Internet.

Stewart Butterfield and Caterina Fake.

Flickr.(wikipedia)

Photosharing website has become a part of everyday online life for millions of people. Stewart Butterfield, who with his wife Caterina Fake created Flickr that was born out of an online multi-player game that seemed to sum up everything the Web 2.0 people were trying to do. Flickr came along with an idea that you no longer had an album. Instead, you had a photo stream. Yahoo later on acquired Flickr in 2005.

Jonathan Abrams

Friendster.(wikipedia)

Jonathan Abrams built Friendster, together with Cris Emmanuel, offering many tools to help members find dates. He took the idea from Match.com. It’s the first social network to hit the big time and go mainstream. Members create profiles listing favorite movies and books (and dating status) and link up to friends, who linked to their friends, and so on.

Niklas Zennstrom

Skype.(wikipedia)

Niklas Zennstrom co-founded the fastest growing communications trend in history called Skype. It offered consumers worldwide a free software for making superior-quality calls using their computer and expanded its offering for Linux, MAC & PC and mobile/ handheld devices.

Bram Cohen

Bit Torrent.(wikipedia)

If Napster started the first generation of file sharing , Bram Cohen changed the face of file sharing by developing BitTorrent which has a massive following of users almost instantly. It uses the Golden Rule principle: the faster you upload, the faster you are allowed to download. BitTorrent breaks up files into many little portions, and as soon as a user has a piece, they instantly start uploading that part to other users. So almost everybody who is sharing a given file is simultaneously uploading and downloading pieces of the same file.

Reid Hoffman

LinkedIn. (wikipedia)

Reid Hoffman, a former executive vice president at PayPal, created LinkedIn as a professional social network allowing registered users to maintain a list of contact details of people they know and trust in business. Members can search for jobs, trade resumes, find new hires and keep up with the competition.

Matt Mullenweg

WordPress.(wikipedia)

Matt Mullenweg founded the world’s most used open source blogging and the greatest boon to freedom of expression known as WordPress. Some of the most popular websites run on WordPress are Techcrunch, Huffingtonpost, Mashable and more.

Chad Hurley, Steve Chen, and Jawed Karim

Youtube.(wikipedia)

Chad Hurley, Steve Chen, and Jawed Karim met as early employees at PayPal. They later started the internet’s most popular video-sharing site YouTube which is broadcasting more than 100 million short videos daily on myriad subjects. When creating YouTube, the three divided work based on skills: Chad Hurley designed the site’s interface and logo. Steve Chen and Jawed Karim divide technical duties making the site work. They later split management tasks, based on strengths and interests: Chad Hurley became CEO; Steve Chen, Chief Technology Officer. A year and a half later, Google acquired YouTube for a deal worth $1.65 billion in stock.

Craig Newmark

Craigslist.(wikipedia)

Craig Newmark started a site that dramatically altered the classified advertising universe called Craiglist. It was an object of fear for newspapers who felt threatened by the free-for-all classified advertising site. It began as an e-mail list for Newmark’s friends in the Bay Area. Since then, it has grown into an online database for classified ads for those seeking everything from housing to romance.

Julian Assange

WikiLeaks.(wikipedia)

Julian Assange founded a website dedicated to publishing classified documents stolen from around the world. He designed an advanced software for the Wikileaks shielding the identities of the thieves who steal these documents by completely erasing their identities before spreading the stolen documents to servers ‘all over the world’. As a result, no one can trace who’s given him what or when. The site depicts itself as the “uncensorable Wikipedia for untraceable mass document leaking and analysis” and has developed to be regarded as the most extensive and safest stage for whistleblowers to leak to.

Dick Costolo

FeedBurner.(wikipedia)

People generally check their preferred sites every now and then to see if there’s anything new. FeedBurner founder Dick Costolo created a news aggregator that automatically downloads an update that is visible in the places that interest you. An RSS feed, short for Really Simple Syndication, delivers those latest bits of media from their creator’s website to your computer. FeedBurner was later acquired by Google in 2007. Currently, Dick Costolo is Twitter’s Chief Operating Officer making twitter the next generation RSS.

Mark Zuckerberg

Facebook.(wikipedia)

Mark Zuckerberg founded Facebook to help students in universities keep in touch with friends. The “status update” started its rebirth in Facebook, where user after user tell their extended network of trusted friends what they’re doing. They also show off photos, upload videos, chat, make friends, meet old ones, join causes, groups, have fun and throw virtual sheep at one another. The site, which is believed to have 500 million registered users worldwide, has only four remaining countries left to conquer: Russia, Japan, China and Korea, according to Zuckerberg. Facebook is now twice as huge as Rupert Murdoch’s MySpace.

Jack Dorsey

Twitter.(wikipedia)

Jack Dorsey created Twitter to allow friends and family know what he was doing. The world’s fastest-growing communications medium let users broadcast their thoughts in 140 characters or less and repost someone else’s informative or amusing message to their own Twitter followers by Retweeting. No one thought people would want to follow strangers, or that celebrities would use Twitter to tell fans of their activities, or that businesses would use Twitter to announce discounts or launch new products.

Bonus: 3 More…

Christopher Poole

4chan message board.(wikipedia)

Christopher Poole, known online as “Moot,” started a message board called 4chan where people are free to be wrong. Unlike most web forums, 4chan does not have a registration system, allowing users to post anonymously. Moot believes in the value of multiple identities, including anonymity, in contrast to the merge of online and real-world identities occurring on Facebook and many other social networking sites.

Joshua Schachter

Delicious.(wikipedia)

Del.icio.us is a more sophisticated multiuser version of Muxway, wherein his first implementation of tags. Joshua Schachter began del.icio.us as a way for people to store and share their favorite Web-browsing bookmarks online. Instead of organizing them himself, or even creating a standard taxonomy of categories, Schachter used something called user tagging-people simply labeled the bookmarks by any name they wanted, and eventually the group as a whole effectively voted on them by either adopting those tags themselves or rejecting them. And now del.icio.us has been gobbled up by Yahoo, which hopes to extend the tagging principle to all sorts of its services.

Jeff Bezos

Amazon.(wikipedia)

Jeff Bezos founded the world’s biggest online store known as Amazon, which was originally named Cadabra Inc. He made online shopping faster and more personal than a trip to the local store. The company now introduced Kindle allowing readers to download books and other written materials and read them on this handheld device.

Источник: https://www.hongkiat.com/blog/40-people-who-changed-the-internet/

The Internet: Bringing people together virtually or pushing them away physically?

Cartoon: neglecting parrot

The Internet has the unique ability to connect any user with any other user, according to any quality possible — relationships, beliefs, viewpoints, goals, problems, identity, or interests. For example, using email and chatting software, connecting with family and friends who are far away geographically is cheaper and easier than calling or writing letters. Using a combination of the World Wide Web, chatting software, email, and discussion groups, minority groups that may have been ignored by traditional media have come together online to share information, support each other, and organize events.

However, critics of the Internet believe that Internet use, while connecting more people virtually, makes people more isolated socially because the more time they spend online, the less time they spend interacting in real life. They believe that electronic communication is not as in-depth or reliable as communication in person or on the phone. Critics also see a possibility of the Internet breaking people apart into minority groups, as a result of less dependence on mainstream media, a phenomenon known as "balkanization."

Critical forecasts of the future of the Internet, for example in the movie The Net, show people whose only friends are online buddies, whose real names are not even known. In these distopian worlds, social relationships are not even based on reality, but on the façades of other online users, whose anonymous interactions can be untruthful and unreliable. These people work from home, so there is no interaction with fellow employees, and their social lives are mingled with their work, which both revolve around the Internet. These distopian views are countered by utopian views of a global village, where anyone can reach out to anyone else and geographic barriers are nonexistent, because the Internet allows users to be always connected.

The two opposing viewpoints about the Internet have been debated extensively in the past few years, in part because several studies have recently emerged to support the viewpoint that Internet use has a negative effect on personal lives. These studies concluded that, among other things, the more time people spend on the Internet, the less they interact with family and friends physically and over the phone, the smaller their social circles become, and the more they feel depressed. The survey methods have been heavily criticized and several other studies dispute their conclusions. As society rapidly approaches full Internet integration, it is important to consider the consequences of being connected virtually, and whether it is worth the risk of becoming disconnected physically.

Источник: https://cs.stanford.edu/people/eroberts/cs201/projects/personal-lives/debate.html

Why much of the internet is closed off to blind people

Image source, James Jeffrey

As our everyday world moves increasingly online, the digital landscape presents new challenges for ensuring accessibility for the blind. A recent court challenge against Domino's pizza may be a watershed case guiding the rights of disabled people on the internet, writes James Jeffrey.

Each swipe 17-year-old Maysie Gonzales makes on her smart phone is accompanied by what sounds like the famous Stephen Hawking voice barking out orders at a relentless pace.

"Sometimes I speed it up to 350 words a minute, it depends what mood I am in," says Ms Gonzales, who lost her sight when she was two years old through retinal cancer.

Screen readers translate on-screen information into speech or Braille. They have broken open the internet for people who are blind or visually impaired, and for those with other disabilities.

But the device only works effectively on websites that are compatible.

"Sometimes it can be horrible, it depends on how the website has been set up," says Ms Gonzales.

If a website's digital infrastructure hasn't been correctly labelled, a blind person can be met with a barrage of "button! - button! - button!" or "link 1,752! - link 1,752! - link 1,752!" from that hyperactive mechanical-sounding voice.

Image source, James Jeffrey

Hence the case Guillermo Robles, who is blind, brought against Domino's Pizza after he was unable to use his screen reader to use the company's website and mobile app.

A federal court agreed with him, and now Domino's has petitioned the Supreme Court to hear Robles' case, in what could prove a landmark battle over the rights of disabled people on the internet.

"This isn't just about ordering the likes of pizza or surfing Amazon," says Chris Danielson, a representative with the National Federation of the Blind (NFB). "People are doing everything online nowadays, so it's about blind people being able to access the likes of online banking, applying for employment and doing the necessary online tests, accessing cloud-based tools in the workplace, and all the rest."

It's estimated that 7,600,000 Americans are technically blind - about 2.4% of the population - according to the NFB.

Image source, Joe Amon/Getty Images

"We've even been told by businesses before that they understand, but the fact is blind people are not a very big market," Mr Danielson says. "That's what we are dealing with."

Nowadays signs designating access for shoppers with disabilities - from parking spaces to restrooms to dressing rooms - are a ubiquitous part of the retail landscape.

This is thanks to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the 29-year-old federal law that prohibits discrimination based on disability.

But ADA requirements that are relatively clear when applied to physical stores - such as determining where ramps should go and what height grab bars should be - become much more difficult to discern with a website.

"The online environment was never intended to be covered by the ADA," says Stephanie Martz, senior vice-president and general counsel for the National Retail Federation (NRF), which along with other business groups like the Chamber of Commerce and the Restaurant Law Center has come out supporting Domino's.

Image source, SolStock/Getty Images

"The ADA took effect before the internet as we know it today existed, and more than 25 years later there is no clear objective guidance on what constitutes an 'accessible' website. There's not enough clarity in the law to know what is accountable."

But advocates like Mr Danielson counter that if one follows that logic then the whole US Constitution could be undermined. "If a 30-year-old law is deemed out of date and not applicable then that applies to a whole lot of laws."

As e-commerce has grown, retailers are increasingly faced with ADA lawsuits over lack of accessibility, particularly for the blind or visually impaired.

Website accessibility lawsuits hit a record high in 2018, with retail being the most frequently targeted industry. More lawsuits were filed in court in the first six months of 2018 (1,053) than in all of 2017 (814), according to the NRF.

The likes of Visa and Target have lost such lawsuits, and earlier this year a class-action was filed against Beyoncé's official website, alleging that Beyonce.com violates the ADA by denying visually impaired users equal access to its products and services.

"To be fair to businesses," Mr Danielson says, "there are lawyers taking advantage of the situation, but cutting the legs from under the ADA is an overcorrection… and stops the flow of legitimate plaintiffs."

Ultimately, those pushing for digital accessibility argue that businesses have no excuse for dragging their feet over it.

"It's not hard to do, it should just be part of best practice, not an additional line item, just like making sure a website loads quickly is," says Laura Kalbag, a website designer and author of Accessibility for Everyone.

"It basically just involves HTML coding, which even a blogger can do. If it is a huge website, it might take some time, but the work itself is not complicated."

Image source, James Jeffrey

She adds it is a myth that making a website accessible makes it ugly, there is no correlation - you can still have snazzy images and graphics.

Ms Gonzales says that because she is also gluten intolerant, she likes to use Domino's as it offers gluten-free pizzas, and she has managed to use its online site. But selecting toppings is tricky - and sometimes she has had to get her mother to step in.

That the courts are also stepping in is part of the problem, Ms Martz explains. "This should be dealt with by government and Congress amending the ADA."

Any discussion of accessibility should look at the whole picture - a blind person can always ring Domino's toll-free number and order that way, she adds.

"As a teacher who has to speak all day, sometimes, like everyone else, I don't want to get into another conversation and just want to do it online," Jeff Molzow, a blind instructor at the Criss Cole Rehabilitation Center which trains blind people to compete in the work force, says about why that toll-free number doesn't always appeal.

"Also, I want time to peruse the menu and make up my mind - you can't do that if you are speaking to someone on the phone."

The Domino's case is symptomatic, say many working with the blind, of the wider problem of how blind people, or anyone with a disability, are still not fully on society's radar.

Image source, James Jeffrey

"All the info is out there about digital accessibility. Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the internet, was discussing it in the mid-90s, and we have pushed it for years," says Jim Allan, an accessibility coordinator at the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired.

"But people still have low expectations of what blind people can do and don't use their imaginations about the possibilities - until they are hit with the fire hose of info from the likes of us, after which they get it."

The awareness of businesses and companies is improving but still slowly, says Mr Allan, noting that only federal and state websites are mandated to be fully accessible by all users. This despite digital accessibility being required by a much larger segment of society, especially as people age and start to lose sight and hearing.

"We treat disabled people as if they are different but that isn't the case, as digital accessibility affects all of us," says Ms Kalbag. "If nothing else, you should see it in a selfish way, as one day you will probably need this type of accessibility."

It is the same in the physical realm, where the likes of wheelchair access ramps are gladly embraced by mothers with prams and cyclists.

But even when digital accessibility is achieved, challenges remain for blind people that are familiar to all.

"Sometimes I worry about using social media too much, like everyone else," Ms Gonzalez says.

"But without my phone I would be very lost - I wouldn't be able to do much and would be very dependent on others, when I prefer to do it on my own."

More on this story

Источник: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-49694453

To create a useful website, you need to ask your self  “Why do people use the internet?” .

Understanding what motivates people to visit your site and what goals they are trying to achieve enables you to create a website that is engaging, useful and valuable.  The trick is to make sure their goals support your business goals, then your website will be valuable to both your visitors and your business.

Here is a list of 10 reasons people use the internet and how your website can benefit from that motivation.

1. To find information

The web is such a rich source of information. It is now possible to trace your family history as far back as records allow. Wikipedia is one of the most widely used wiki type based sites. There are numerous news channels that enable us to keep up to date with the latest news. Information on anything and everything is easily available. Most of information searches start with a search engine such as Google.

Your website should be an information rich site where people come to find information. This enables you to be seen as an expert and a thought leader in your chosen field.

2. To be educated

Online courses are appearing all over the internet. Universities and colleges provide distance learning to people who otherwise wouldn’t be able to access education. Experts are finding it easier to share their knowledge by e-learning. Make up lessons, music lessons, cooking demonstrations. It’s all out there.

Can you teach people how do do something using ? It will boost your credibility and expert status. Simple ‘how to’ videos can go a long way.

3. To solve problems

Want to know how to change a tyre? How can you help your baby sleep through the night? How to stop back ache? If you have a problem, chances are someone has written about their experience somewhere and how they solved it. The internet is bursting with people who want to help others by sharing their experiences.

What problems does your business solve? If you can show people how you can help them solve their problems they will keep coming back to your website when they have a problem. They will remember you because you have already helped them.

4. To being social

As a race, us humans are very sociable. We love being in groups, we love talking, we love sharing our ups and our downs, we need to laugh together and we need to cry together. The internet and its many successful social networks are proof of that. We are now more connected than before.

Sharing ‘back office’ information about your business shows a human side that people will connect with. Connecting on social media allows you to reach people you might not reach otherwise.

5. To communicate

Services like Skype and VOIP allow us to use the internet for talking to each other. There are numerous messaging services that allow the sending of text messages for quick communication.

Nothing can replace face to face meetings but it makes more sense to jump on Skype call if you want to reduce travel costs. It is good to give people an alternative method to communicate with you.

6. To store and share files using cloud storage

Dropbox and google drive are just a few of the great ways which we can store documents, photographs, music etc somewhere safe that is not on our computer. Increasing the accessibility of our files should our computers break or get stolen.

Being able to back up your business files in the cloud can help with peace of mind. Sharing files online can make your work accessible to clients or colleagues without the need for waiting for files to arrive by snail mail.

7. To use cloud applications

Adobe Creative Cloud is just one of many examples where programs that were once ran on our desktop such as Photoshop, can now be accessed from any device. You only need an internet connection.

There are many business tools such as CRMs or Email marketing that mean you don’t need to be in the office to continue your day to day business activities. Your office can be completely mobile. Many business tools can also integrate with your website for extra functionality e.g. cloud accounting tools can register online purchases and send out invoices.

8. To watch movies

Renting DVDs is fast becoming a thing of the past. NetFlix is one of several successful providers of streaming video straight to your TV.

People love watching video so it makes sense to include short video on your website where it makes sense to do so. Webinars are also popular as long as they are delivering value and not overly promotional.

9. To listen to music

There are also music services such as Apple music where you can listen to all your favourites hits with one monthly subscription.

10. To listen to podcasts

Podcasts are something you can create for your customers can download and listen to. They could be podcasts of you talking about something happening in your business that is useful and valuable to your customers.

11. To play games

Online gaming ranges from pre school kids colouring butterflies, to gambling in virtual casinos. The are games to satisfy every walk of life and every interest.

Gamification is becoming increasingly popular. Giving people the ability to play while on your website increases their engagement levels. Games can include quizzes, polls or prize draws.

12. To sell things

The internet has many platforms on which you can sell. If you are a shopkeeper you can create an online shop and increase your business drastically. If you are doing a garage clearance and just need to shift a few bits and bobs, sites like e-bay and Gumtree are useful.

Even if you don’t own a shop you can still sell your services online. This might help to streamline your processes.

13. To buy things

Equally, if you don’t want to trek to the shops, you can buy pretty much anything online. It is easy to compare prices and find bargains all from the comfort of your home.

14. To market their business

The power of digital marketing is increasing. With better tracking tools and cheeper pricing it is more accessible to small businesses than traditional marketing such as TV and radio.  Budget spends for the future are predicted to grow for digital marketing and decrease for traditional marketing.

If you are not involved in digital marketing you are missing out on a great opportunity

15. Finding customers

Combing marketing and social media, businesses can strike up conversations easier and quicker with potential customers online. Enabling them to find more leads and make more sales online.

As more potential customers visit your website it is important to have the ability to get their data so you can nurture them into a customer.

Источник: https://www.weiderweb.com/blog/15-reasons-why-people-use-the-internet-and-how-to-use-that-to-your-advantage/

People who use or operate the internet - thesaurus

Related words


bloggerati

noun

people who write successful and popular blogs

cyberbully

noun

someone who uses the internet or a mobilephone to sendmessages or images to another person that are intended to frighten or upset them

cybernaut

noun

informal someone who likesusing the internet a lot

digerati

noun

humorouspeople who have a lot of technicalknowledge of computers and the internet

digital immigrant

noun

someone who has not grown up usingtechnology such as the internet and mobilephones but has learned to use it later in life

digital native

noun

someone who has grown up usingtechnology such as the internet and mobilephones

dotcom

noun

a company that uses the internet to sell its products and services

e-business

noun

a company that operates on the internet

e-tailer

noun

a company that sellsthings on the internet

mouse potato

noun

informal someone who spends long periods of time using the internet or playing computer games

nethead

noun

informal someone who spends a lot of time on the internet and knows a lot about it

netizen

noun

informal someone who spends a lot of time using the internet

silver surfer

noun

informal a seniorcitizen who uses the internet

teleworker

noun

someone who works at home on a computer and communicates with their office or customers by phone or electronically

troll

noun

computingshowing disapproval someone who writesnegative and hostilecomments on a website in order to provokepeople

Viner

noun

someone who makes very shortfilms and shares them on the videosharingsiteVine

visitor

noun

computing someone who looks at a particularpage on the internet

webhead

noun

informal someone who spends a lot of time using the internet

webmaster

noun

someone whose job is to manage a website

Источник: https://www.macmillandictionary.com/thesaurus-category/british/people-who-use-or-operate-the-internet
(Drew Angerer/Getty Images News via Getty Images)

For the latest survey data on social media and messaging app use among adults, see Social Media Use in 2021.

Until recently, Facebook
had dominated the social media landscape among America’s youth – but it is no longer the most popular online platform among teens, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. Today, roughly half (51%) of U.S. teens ages 13 to 17 say they use Facebook, notably lower than the shares who use YouTube, Instagram or Snapchat.

This shift in teens’ social media use is just one example of how the technology landscape for young people has evolved since the Center’s last survey of teens and technology use in 2014-2015. Most notably, smartphone ownership has become a nearly ubiquitous element of teen life: 95% of teens now report they have a smartphone or access to one. These mobile connections are in turn fueling more-persistent online activities: 45% of teens now say they are online on a near-constant basis.

The survey also finds there is no clear consensus among teens about the effect that social media has on the lives of young people today. Minorities of teens describe that effect as mostly positive (31%) or mostly negative (24%), but the largest share (45%) says that effect has been neither positive nor negative.

These are some of the main findings from the Center’s survey of U.S. teens conducted March 7-April 10, 2018. Throughout the report, “teens” refers to those ages 13 to 17.

Facebook is no longer the dominant online platform among teens

The social media landscape in which teens reside looks markedly different than it did as recently as three years ago. In the Center’s 2014-2015 survey of teen social media use, 71% of teens reported being Facebook users. No other platform was used by a clear majority of teens at the time: Around half (52%) of teens said they used Instagram, while 41% reported using Snapchat.

In 2018, three online platforms other than Facebook – YouTube, Instagram and Snapchat – are used by sizable majorities of this age group. Meanwhile, 51% of teens now say they use Facebook. The shares of teens who use Twitter and Tumblr are largely comparable to the shares who did so in the 2014-2015 survey.

For the most part, teens tend to use similar platforms regardless of their demographic characteristics, but there are exceptions. Notably, lower-income teens are more likely to gravitate toward Facebook than those from higher-income households – a trend consistent with previous Center surveys. Seven-in-ten teens living in households earning less than $30,000 a year say they use Facebook, compared with 36% whose annual family income is $75,000 or more. (For details on social media platform use by different demographic groups, see Appendix A.)

It is important to note there were some changes in question wording between Pew Research Center’s 2014-2015 and 2018 surveys of teen social media use. YouTube and Reddit were not included as options in the 2014-2015 survey but were included in the current survey. In addition, the 2014-2015 survey required respondents to provide an explicit response for whether or not they used each platform, while the 2018 survey presented respondents with a list of sites and allowed them to select the ones they use. Even so, it is clear the social media environment today revolves less around a single platform than it did three years ago.

When it comes to which one of these online platforms teens use the most, roughly one-third say they visit Snapchat (35%) or YouTube (32%) most often, while 15% say the same of Instagram. By comparison, 10% of teens say Facebook is their most-used online platform, and even fewer cite Twitter, Reddit or Tumblr as the site they visit most often.

Again, lower-income teens are far more likely than those from higher income households to say Facebook is the online platform they use most often (22% vs. 4%). There are also some differences related to gender and to race and ethnicity when it comes to teens’ most-used sites. Girls are more likely than boys to say Snapchat is the site they use most often (42% vs. 29%), while boys are more inclined than girls to identify YouTube as their go-to platform (39% vs. 25%). Additionally, white teens (41%) are more likely than Hispanic (29%) or black (23%) teens to say Snapchat is the online platform they use most often, while black teens are more likely than whites to identify Facebook as their most used site (26% vs. 7%).

Teens have mixed views on the impact of social media on their lives

Despite the nearly ubiquitous presence of social media in their lives, there is no clear consensus among teens about these platforms’ ultimate impact on people their age. A plurality of teens (45%) believe social media has a neither positive nor negative effect on people their age. Meanwhile, roughly three-in-ten teens (31%) say social media has had a mostly positive impact, while 24% describe its effect as mostly negative.

Given the opportunity to explain their views in their own words, teens who say social media has had a mostly positive effect tended to stress issues related to connectivity and connection with others. Some 40% of these respondents said that social media has had a positive impact because it helps them keep in touch and interact with others. Many of these responses emphasize how social media has made it easier to communicate with family and friends and to connect with new people:

“I think social media have a positive effect because it lets you talk to family members far away.” (Girl, age 14)

“I feel that social media can make people my age feel less lonely or alone. It creates a space where you can interact with people.” (Girl, age 15)

“It enables people to connect with friends easily and be able to make new friends as well.” (Boy, age 15)

Others in this group cite the greater access to news and information that social media facilitates (16%), or being able to connect with people who share similar interests (15%):

“My mom had to get a ride to the library to get what I have in my hand all the time. She reminds me of that a lot.” (Girl, age 14)

“It has given many kids my age an outlet to express their opinions and emotions, and connect with people who feel the same way.” (Girl, age 15)

Smaller shares argue that social media is a good venue for entertainment (9%), that it offers a space for self-expression (7%) or that it allows teens to get support from others (5%) or to learn new things in general (4%).

“Because a lot of things created or made can spread joy.” (Boy, age 17)

“[Social media] allows us to communicate freely and see what everyone else is doing. [It] gives us a voice that can reach many people.” (Boy, age 15)

“We can connect easier with people from different places and we are more likely to ask for help through social media which can save people.” (Girl, age 15)

There is slightly less consensus among teens who say social media has had a mostly negative effect on people their age. The top response (mentioned by 27% of these teens) is that social media has led to more bullying and the overall spread of rumors.

“Gives people a bigger audience to speak and teach hate and belittle each other.” (Boy, age 13)

“People can say whatever they want with anonymity and I think that has a negative impact.” (Boy, age 15)

“Because teens are killing people all because of the things they see on social media or because of the things that happened on social media.” (Girl, age 14)

Meanwhile, 17% of these respondents feel these platforms harm relationships and result in less meaningful human interactions. Similar shares think social media distorts reality and gives teens an unrealistic view of other people’s lives (15%), or that teens spend too much time on social media (14%).

“It has a negative impact on social (in-person) interactions.” (Boy, age 17)

“It makes it harder for people to socialize in real life, because they become accustomed to not interacting with people in person.” (Girl, age 15)

“It provides a fake image of someone’s life. It sometimes makes me feel that their life is perfect when it is not.” (Girl, age 15)

“[Teens] would rather go scrolling on their phones instead of doing their homework, and it’s so easy to do so. It’s just a huge distraction.” (Boy, age 17)

Another 12% criticize social media for influencing teens to give in to peer pressure, while smaller shares express concerns that these sites could lead to psychological issues or drama.

Vast majority of teens have access to a home computer or smartphone

Some 95% of teens now say they have or have access to a smartphone, which represents a 22-percentage-point increase from the 73% of teens who said this in 2014-2015. Smartphone ownership is nearly universal among teens of different genders, races and ethnicities and socioeconomic backgrounds.

A more nuanced story emerges when it comes to teens’ access to computers. While 88% of teens report having access to a desktop or laptop computer at home, access varies greatly by income level. Fully 96% of teens from households with an annual income of $75,000 or more per year say they have access to a computer at home, but that share falls to 75% among those from households earning less than $30,000 a year.

Computer access also varies by the level of education among parents. Teens who have a parent with a bachelor’s degree or more are more likely to say they have access to a computer than teens whose parents have a high school diploma or less (94% vs. 78%).

A growing share of teens describe their internet use as near-constant

As smartphone access has become more prevalent, a growing share of teens now report using the internet on a near-constant basis. Some 45% of teens say they use the internet “almost constantly,” a figure that has nearly doubled from the 24% who said this in the 2014-2015 survey. Another 44% say they go online several times a day, meaning roughly nine-in-ten teens go online at least multiple times per day.

There are some differences in teens’ frequency of internet use by gender, as well as race and ethnicity. Half of teenage girls (50%) are near-constant online users, compared with 39% of teenage boys. And Hispanic teens are more likely than whites to report using the internet almost constantly (54% vs. 41%).

A majority of both boys and girls play video games, but gaming is nearly universal for boys

Overall, 84% of teens say they have or have access to a game console at home, and 90% say they play video games of any kind (whether on a computer, game console or cellphone). While a substantial majority of girls report having access to a game console at home (75%) or playing video games in general (83%), those shares are even higher among boys. Roughly nine-in-ten boys (92%) have or have access to a game console at home, and 97% say they play video games in some form or fashion.

There has been growth in game console ownership among Hispanic teens and teens from lower-income families since the Center’s previous study of the teen technology landscape in 2014-2015. The share of Hispanics who say they have access to a game console at home grew by 10 percentage points during this time period. And 85% of teens from households earning less than $30,000 a year now say they have a game console at home, up from 67% in 2014-2015.

Источник: https://www.pewresearch.org/internet/2018/05/31/teens-social-media-technology-2018/

youtube video

The Internet: Bringing people together virtually or pushing them away physically?

Cartoon: neglecting parrot

The Internet has the unique ability to connect any user with any other user, according to any quality possible — relationships, beliefs, viewpoints, goals, problems, identity, or interests. For example, using email and chatting software, connecting with family and friends who are far away geographically is cheaper and easier than calling or writing letters. Using a combination of the World Wide Web, chatting software, email, and discussion groups, minority groups that may have been ignored by traditional media have come together online to share information, support each other, and organize events.

However, critics of the Internet believe that Internet use, while connecting more people virtually, makes people more isolated socially because the more time they spend online, the less time they spend interacting in real life. They believe that electronic communication is not as in-depth or reliable as communication in person or on the phone. Critics also see a possibility of the Internet breaking people apart into minority groups, as a result of less dependence on mainstream media, a phenomenon known as "balkanization."

Critical forecasts of the future of the Internet, for example in the movie The Net, show people whose only friends are online buddies, whose real names are not even known. In these distopian worlds, social relationships are not even based on reality, but on the façades of other online users, whose anonymous interactions can be untruthful and unreliable. These people work from home, so there is no interaction with fellow employees, and their social lives are mingled with their work, which both revolve around the Internet. These distopian views are countered by utopian views of a global village, where anyone can reach out to anyone else and geographic barriers are nonexistent, because the Internet allows users to be always connected.

The two opposing viewpoints about the Internet have been debated extensively in the past few years, in part because several studies have recently emerged to support the viewpoint that Internet use has a negative effect on personal lives. These studies concluded that, among other things, the more time people spend on the Internet, the less they interact with family and friends physically and over the phone, the smaller their social circles become, and the more they feel depressed. The survey methods have been heavily criticized and several other studies dispute their conclusions. As society rapidly approaches full Internet integration, it is important to consider the consequences of being connected virtually, and whether it is worth the risk of becoming disconnected physically.

Источник: https://cs.stanford.edu/people/eroberts/cs201/projects/personal-lives/debate.html

Social Network Usage & Growth Statistics: How Many People Use Social Media in 2021?

Since its inception in 1996, social media has managed to infiltrate half of the 7.7 billion people in the world. Social network platforms almost tripled their total user base in the last decade, from 970 million in 2010 to the number passing 4.48 billion users in July 2021.

The spectacular year-on-year adoption of new users on the platforms is, however, slowing down. It now relies on the continuous growth in the number of people with internet access and smartphones, particularly in developing regions.

So, how big is social media and how has it evolved today?

In this awesome statistical roundup, you’ll discover the latest social network data by the numbers and key demographics, here’s a summary of what you’ll learn below:

So without further ado, let’s dive into the top 12 statistics you cannot miss surrounding one of the fastest adopted technologies in the last century.

Social Media Usage Statistics (Top Picks)

  • 4.48 billion people currently use social media worldwide, up more than double from 2.07 billion in 2015
  • The average social media user engages with an average of 6.6 various social media platforms
  • The social media growth rate since 2015 is an average of 12.5% year-over-year. However, growth is on the decline with 2019-2020 data revealing a 9.2% growth rate
  • By region, social media growth in 2019-2020 is led by Asia: +16.98%, Africa +13.92%, South America +8.00%, North America +6.96%, Europe +4.32%, and Australasia +4.9%
  • 60.99% of the 7.87 billion people in the world use social media, of eligible audiences aged 13+, there is 63% that are active users
  • 93.33% of internet users are on social media; however, a titanic 85% of mobile internet users are active on networks
  • Out of 4.48 billion social media users, 99% access websites or apps through a mobile device, with only 1.32% accessing platforms exclusively via desktop
  • Globally, the average time a person spends on social media a day is 2 hours 24 minutes; if someone signed up at 16 and lived to 70, they would spend 5.7 years of their life on it
  • Facebook is the leading social network at 2.9 billion monthly active users, followed by YouTube (2.3 billion), WhatsApp (2 billion), FB Messenger (1.3 billion), and WeChat (1.2 billion)
  • 72.3% of the total US population actively use social media, totaling a number of 240 million people
  • In the US, 54% of social media users are female, while the remaining 46% are male, compared with a global average of 45.6% for female, and 54.4% for male.

How many people use social media?

As of 2021, the number of people using social media is over 4.48 billion worldwide, with the average user accessing 6.6 social media platforms on a monthly basis. Popular platforms like Facebook have over 65.86% of their monthly users logging in to use social media daily.

All social networks report growth data on the number of monthly active users or MAU’s rather than the number of accounts, as this data is more accurate for measuring actual use and territory penetration.

What percentage of people use social media?

The current percentage of people using social media is 56.8% of the world’s total population. However, when we look into platform penetration rates from people in eligible audiences, 93.33% of 4.8 billion global internet users and 85% of 5.27 billion mobile phone users are on social media.

Key Statistics:

  • 4.48 billion people use social media worldwide, according to platform reports on the current number of active users
  • 56.8% of the world’s population is active on social media when looking at eligible audiences aged 13+ years, rising to 82% in North America
  • Out of 7.87 billion people in the world, 56.8% of the population use social networks, regardless of age or internet access
  • Out of 4.8 billion internet users, 93.33% are active users
  • Out of 5.27 billion unique mobile phone users, 85% are active users
  • Out of 4.48 billion social media users, 99% access the websites or apps through a mobile device

How many social media accounts does the average person have?

According to the Global Web Index, the average number of social media accounts a millennial or Gen Z-er has is 8.4 worldwide, up 75% from 4.8 accounts in 2014. The study of 46 countries with internet users aged 16 to 64 shows Japan had the lowest average number of social network accounts at 3.8, comparably India had the highest with people on the internet per person.

Key Statistics:

  • The average number of social media accounts is 8.4 per person in 2020
  • The growth in the number of accounts per person is up 75% from 4.8 accounts per person in 2014 to 8.4 in 2020
  • Firstly, the growth of multi-networking relates to the widening of platform choice. Secondly, it’s also down to specialization of individual platforms, e.g., Instagram (photos), YouTube (video), and LinkedIn (work)

5 Highlights for Backlinko’s audience:

  • India: Averages 11.4 accounts per person
  • USA: Averages 7.1 accounts per person
  • UK: Averages 6.9 accounts per person
  • Canada: Averages 6.8 accounts per person
  • Japan: Averages 3.8 accounts per person

How many people use social networks for business?

40% of all internet users worldwide use social media for work purposes. In the U.S., only 27% of people actively use social media in their jobs, compared with the highest by country in Indonesia at 65%, or the lowest at 13% in Israel.

5 Highlights for Backlinko’s audience:

  • India:47% of people use it for work
  • Canada:31% of people use it for work
  • Australia:30% of people use it for work
  • USA:27% of people use it for work
  • UK:27% of people use it for work

Social media usage by gender

The current global average gender split of social media users is 54% men versus 46% women. However, in the US, women are the leading user base; 76% of all female internet users have social network accounts compared with 72% of all men.

Which gender uses social media more by region?

  • North America:54% female vs. 46% male users
  • South America:52% female vs. 48% male users
  • Western Europe:50% female vs. 50% male users
  • Southern Africa:52% female vs. 48% male users
  • Southern Asia:27% female vs. 73% male users
  • Oceania:53% female vs. 47% male users

Which gender uses social media more by platform?

As you can see from the data above, social network usage is different for men and women globally when examining location. Perhaps the most notable gap in gender differences is where we look at the use by the platform.

When looking at the top 8 social platforms by monthly active users, YouTube, LinkedIn, Twitter, and TikTok index higher in male users. Sites like Facebook and Instagram are more female orientated, especially Pinterest, which dominates with female audiences.

Social networkMale (% usage)Female (% usage)
Facebook6375
Instagram3143
Twitter2421
LinkedIn2924
Pinterest1542
Snapchat2424
YouTube7868
TikTok5644
Reddit158
WhatsApp2119

Global social media growth rates

How much does social networking grow year on year?

In 2021, there are 4.48 billion people actively using social media in the world, and this is an increase of 13.13% year-on-year from 3.69 billion in 2020. Back in 2015, there were only 2.07 billion users – that’s an overall increase in users of 115.59% in just six years.

6 Year Social Media Growth Statistics:

  • 2021: 4.480 billion active users (+13.13%)
  • 2020: 3.960 billion active users (+13.7%)
  • 2019: 3.484 billion active users (+9.2%)
  • 2018: 3.196 billion active users (+9.0%)
  • 2017: 2.796 billion active users (+21%)
  • 2016: 2.307 billion active users (+11%)
  • 2015: 2.078 billion active users

Top 10: Growth of social media users by country

According to Keipo’s analysis, the country with the most significant social media growth in 2019-2020 was India, with 130 million new users joining platforms – equivalent to 9.6% of their total population. In second place was China (15 m), Indonesia (12 m), Brazil (11 m), Iran (9.4 m), and the USA in 6th place with 6.9 million new users.

Below, we have the top 20 social media growth rankings by country, representing the largest number of users, not percentage increase:

Growth of social media users by region

The total number of people using social media grew by 9.2% between April 2019 and Jan 2020. When looking at the number of people growing by region, Europe had the slowest activation of new active users at 4.9%. Whereas Asia was the most considerable social media user base growth at 16.98%, followed by Africa increasing by 13.92%

Social media growth by region 2019-2020:

  • North America: +6.96%
  • South America: +8.00%
  • Europe: +4.32%
  • Africa: +13.92%
  • Asia: +16.98%
  • Australasia: +4.9%

Day one: When did social media start?

The rise of social media began back in 1996 with the release of the networking site Bolt (now closed). Shortly after, in 1997, Six Degrees was released where users could add friends and make profiles. Following that, services like AOL Instant Messenger, Live Journal, and Friendster launched all paving the way for the leader, Facebook, in 2004.

Timeline: Early days of social media

  • 1996: The first social networking and video website is Bolt, which was active from 1996-2007
  • 1997: A site called Six Degrees was created where users could upload profile information and connect with users by making ‘friends’
  • 1997: AOL launched its Instant Messenger service, who acquired it from an Israeli based company, it was originally called ICQ and launched in 1996
  • 1999: This was the launch of LiveJournal, the first popular blogging platform
  • 2000: Habbo, a game based networking site, was released
  • 2002: Friendster launched, where users made profiles, connected, and share content
  • 2003: LinkedIn launched the first business-orientated social networking site
  • 2004: Facebook, the most popular platform of people on the internet time launches

Sources:GlobalWebIndex, Pew Research, Wikipedia, Social media platforms & Kepio’s Analysis

Social media penetration by country

Which country has the most active social media users in the world?

Social media penetration = active users vs. total population.

According to Statista’s data from 2020, the most active country is the U.A.E., with 99% of its population using social media. The average penetration rate globally is 49%. When isolating the data to eligible users aged 13+, the average social media penetration rate is 63%.

Key Statistics by the total population

  • On average, 49% of the world are active social media users, regardless of age
  • On average, 63% of the world’s population aged 13+ are active on social media
  • USA has 70% regardless of age, 83% for only those aged 13+ years
  • UK has 66% regardless of age, 79% for only those aged 13+ years
  • Canada has 67% people on the internet of age, 77% for only those aged 13+ years
  • Australia has 71% regardless of age, 85% for only those aged 13+ years
  • India has people on the internet regardless of age, 38% for only those aged 13+ years

In which countries can networks look to expand?

Social media has the most substantial opportunity for growth in developing countries, with billions of new users to sign up. Think tank data company Pew Research Center noted a steady increase in internet and smartphone adoption, which significantly relates to the growth of social media in certain developing countries bremen ohio regions.

In 2014 there was a median of 42% of people that accessed the internet occasionally, now this figure must be well over 65%, which was the last number recorded from the Pew study in 2017. There was a similar story for the adoption of smartphone use also, doubling to almost 42% in the same period.

Advertising revenue will not grow at the same rate

Unfortunately, social networks looking to expand in these territories will make a lot less from the advertising profits per user, so user volume is critical for their earnings.

For example, Facebook reports the average revenue per user would be $41.41 for signing someone up in the US; however, in the Asia-Pacific region, that figure lies at $3.57.

Sources:Statista, Statista, Data Reportal, Social media platforms & Kepio’s Analysis

Social media in the US by the numbers

What percentage of Americans are on social media?

According to platform statements, the number of social media users in the US is 240 million the farmers bank in frankfort in 2020, meaning 72.3% of Americans are actively using sites monthly. The most popular platforms in the United States are YouTube at 81.9% and Facebook at 73.4% among internet users aged 16 to 64.

Number of Americans on social media:

The US social media penetration is calculated by the total number of active social network users versus the total population or those aged 13+.

  • 72.3% of the total US population have social network accounts, regardless of age, totaling a number of 231.47 million people

US social media use by gender:

In America, social media is more prevalent among women, in particular, Snapchat and Pinterest, whereas men are using sites like YouTube and Twitter more.

US social media use by ethnicity:

The percentage of social media use versus the total population by race for the entire US population is:

  • 80% Hispanic
  • 77% Black
  • 69% White

US social media use by age:

Unsurprisingly, the percentage of Americans using social media by age is primarily Gen Z and Millennials.

  • 84% of those aged 18-29
  • 81% of those aged 30-49
  • 73% of those aged 50-64
  • 45% of those aged 65+

Sources:Pew Research,­ Data Reportal, Brandwatch, Social media platforms & People on the internet Analysis

Social media growth in the US

What is the current growth rate of social media in the US?

70% of the US population has active social media accounts, with a year-on-year growth rate of 3.1% from 2019-2020. An original record of the US market size was 5% in 2005, growth in the US took just under 6 years to penetrate 50% of America’s population in 2011.

Key Statistics:

  • America’s social media growth rate between 2020 and 2021 was 4.3%
  • The total number of users in America has grown by 10 million between 2020 and 2021

US growth of social media users by platform

A selection of surveys conducted by the Pew Research Center 2012-2019 shows the percentage of US adults who state they use the following apps on their phone or desktop.

Key US Network Growth Statistics 2020-2021:

Sources:Statista, Pew Research, OurWorldInData, Data Reportal, eMarketer, Social media platforms & Kepio’s Analysis

Most popular social media platforms

What are the most used social media sites?

In 2020, Facebook is the leading social network with people with 2.85 billion of 4.48 billion social media users worldwide. YouTube and WhatsApp follow this with over 2 billion, then Messenger, WeChat, and Instagram, all having 1 billion or more users.

NetworkActive users (MM)
Facebook2853
YouTube2291
WhatsApp2000
Instagram1386
FB Messenger1300
WeChat1242
TikTok732
QQ606
Douyin600
Telegram550
Sina Weibo530
Snapchat514
Kuaishou481
Pinterest478
Reddit430
Twitter397
Quora300

Average time spent on social media

How much time do people spend on social media each day?

In 2020, the average time spent on social media per day is 2 hours 25 minutes globally for users aged 16 to 64 on any device.

In comparison, the time spent on ecb srep by the average person in the US is 2 hours and 7 minutes, 18 minutes less than the global average.

The World Health Organization estimates global life expectancy to be 73 years. If the average person persisted with the same social media usage, they would spend 5.7 years / 2,080 days on platforms in their eligible lifespan.

Key Statistics:

  • Globally, the average time a person spends on social media a day is 2 hours 25 minutes / 145 minutes
  • The average person will spend 5.7 years on social media from the age of 16+ to the average life expectancy of 70
  • The average person will spend 36.5 days a year on platforms from the age of 16+
  • Out of the 46 countries surveyed, people in the Philippines spend the most daily time networking at 4h 15m
  • People in Japan spend the least daily time on networking at 51 minutes

Time spent outer banks nc hotels tripadvisor social media by country

Below, we have the average daily time spent on social media in hours and minutes from 46 countries; the data source is the Global Web Index 2020 report.

5 Highlights for Backlinko’s audience:

  • Brazil – 3 hours 42 minutes
  • U.S.A. – 2 hours 7 minutes
  • U.K. – 1 hour 49 minutes
  • Australia – 1 hour 45 minutes
  • South Korea – 1 hour 8 minutes

Daily time on social media growth statistics

Below, we have the growth in time spent on social media in minutes; the data source is from all internet users from 47 countries, aged 16 to 64, and on any device.

YearTime (minutes)Growth (%)
Q3 201511106.70
Q3 201612815.00
Q3 201713404.70
Q3 201814206.00
Q3 201914401.40
Q3 202014500.69

How often do Americans use social media sites?

Below we have the frequency of visits Americans have to these popular social media sites, all platforms other than Twitter get at least half of their users visiting the platform every single day.

PlatformUse “Less often” (%)Use “Weekly” (%)Use “Daily” (%)
Facebook91774
Snapchat221761
Instagram162163
Twitter292942
YouTube173251

Social Media Usage by Device

What’s the percentage of social media usage on mobile vs. desktop?

In regards to social media usage by device, 99% of people in the world access networks on a mobile device (tablet or phone). Around 78% are solely accessing platforms from their mobile phone, compared with only 1.32% visiting their social networks via only their desktop.

What’s the internet’s mobile vs. tablet market share?

According to StatCounter, the current mobile vs. desktop market share worldwide is weighted more towards mobile, with 55.89% of people accessing the internet on a feature or smartphone. Only 41.36% of people now access the internet on desktop (leaving 2.74% on tablets).

By comparison, this shows just how “mobile” social media is.

Key Statistics:

  • 99% or 4.43 billion social media users access networks using a mobile device
  • 78% or 2.97 billion users access networks exclusively on their mobile phone
  • 1.32% or 50 million exclusively access networks on a desktop
  • 20% or 760 million users use both desktop and mobile phones
  • There are 3.50 billion smartphones in the world, which means 84.85% of smartphone owner’s access social media from their phones
  • There are 5.27 billion unique mobile phone users in the world

Sources:Data Reportal, BankMyCell, Statcounter

Conclusion

There you have it for my rise of social media statistics roundup.

In terms of technology adoption, it’s mind-blowing to see how quickly a social network can explode. For example, TikTok was on one in five devices connected to the internet in 24 months.

Now I’d like to hear from you:

What else would you like to see added to this roundup? Or have a question?

Either way, please jump in and leave a comment below.

Источник: https://backlinko.com/social-media-users

List of countries by number of Internet users

Wikipedia list article

Further information: Global Internet usage

See also: List of countries by number of broadband Internet subscriptions

Ambox current red Asia Australia.svg

This article needs to be updated. Please help update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information.(November 2021)

Below is a sortable list of countries by number of Internet users, for 2020. Internet users are defined as persons who accessed the Internet in the last 12 months from any device, including mobile phones.[Note 1] Percentage is the percentage of a country's population that are Internet users. Estimates are derived either from household surveys or from Internet subscription data.[4]

All United Nations member states are included, except North Korea, whose number of internet users is estimated at a few thousand.[5]

Data from Statista and Internet World Stats estimates the total number of people on the internet users in 2021 is between 4.3 billion to 5 billion active users[6][7]

Region 2005 2010 2017 2019[12]
Africa 2% 10% 21.8% 28.2%
Americas 36% 49% 65.9% 77.2%
Arab States 8% 26% 43.7% 51.6%
Asia and Pacific 9% 23% 43.9% 48.4%
Commonwealth of
Independent States
10% 34% 67.7% 72.2%
Europe 46% 67% 79.6% 82.5%

Table[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_number_of_Internet_users

People who use or operate the internet - thesaurus

Related words


bloggerati

noun

people who write successful and popular blogs

cyberbully

noun

someone who uses the internet or a mobilephone to sendmessages or images to another person that are intended to frighten or upset them

cybernaut

noun

informal someone who likesusing the internet a lot

digerati

noun

humorouspeople who have a lot of technicalknowledge of computers and the internet

digital immigrant

noun

someone who has not grown up usingtechnology such as the internet and mobilephones but has learned to use it later in life

digital native

noun

someone who has grown up usingtechnology such as the internet and mobilephones

dotcom

noun

a company that uses the internet to sell its products and services

e-business

noun

what credit card has the best cash back company that operates on the internet

e-tailer

noun

a company that sellsthings on the internet

mouse potato

noun

informal someone who spends long periods of time using the internet or playing computer games

nethead

noun

informal someone who spends a lot of time on the internet and knows a lot about it

netizen

noun

informal someone who spends a lot of time using the internet

silver surfer

noun

informal a seniorcitizen who uses the internet

teleworker

noun

someone who works at home on a computer and communicates with their office or customers by phone or electronically

troll

noun

computingshowing disapproval someone who writesnegative and hostilecomments on a website in order to provokepeople

Viner

noun

someone who makes very shortfilms and shares them on the videosharingsiteVine

visitor

noun

computing someone who looks at a particularpage on the internet

webhead

noun

informal someone who spends a lot of time using the internet

webmaster

noun

someone whose job is to manage a website

Источник: https://www.macmillandictionary.com/thesaurus-category/british/people-who-use-or-operate-the-internet

The 20 Most Popular People On The Internet

US Markets Loading.HMS

Gus Lubin

2011-02-08T17:54:00Z

Justin Bieber
You have no idea how popular Justin Bieberis.

In the past twelve months, more people have searched for the 16-year-old wonder on Google than have searched for "china," "jesus," or "boobs."

Bieber also left other celebrities in the dust. The only person who came close was Lady Gaga.

We identified the people who were searched for most in the past year, based on Google Trends. Since Google provides only comparative data, we compared everyone we could think of to Bieber. Feel free to check the data and post a comment if we left anyone off the list.

#20 Robert Pattinson

Robert Pattinson
Wikimedia Commons

Robert Pattinson is 16% as popular as Justin Bieber

Trend analysis: True Harry Potter fans recognize Robert Pattinson as Cedric, but most people know him as the star of Twilight, Edward Cullen.

His search traffic on Google peaked at the end of June/July of 2010 when the third Twilight movie came out.

Note: We searched for "pattinson," which turns up almost entirely hits for Robert Pattinson.

#19 Kesha

kesha
Wikimedia Commons people on the internet www capital one banking open a checking account online for free

Kesha is 19% as popular as Justin Bieber

Trend analysis: Ke$ha came onto the pop music scene late in 2009 with her hit single "Tik Tok."

Ke$ha's Google popularity peaked in July 2010 when she went on tour with Rihanna and Nicki Minaj. She also spiked in December when she graced the cover of Billboard Magazine.

Note: We searched for "kesha

: People on the internet

People on the internet
People on the internet
People on the internet
People on the internet
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