who was the wicked witch of the west

The Wicked Witch of the West from the 1939 film version of The Wizard of Oz, is arguably one of the most well-known characters in all of. In the interview below, esteemed actress Margaret Hamilton, who portrayed The Wicked Witch of the West in Wizard of Oz, tells about one of her first scenes. Margaret Hamilton as the Wicked Witch of the West. It's ironic that this very sweet and loving former kindergarten teacher is best known for her.

Who was the wicked witch of the west -

The Wizard of Oz Invented the ‘Good Witch’

Culture

Eighty years ago, MGM’s sparkly pink rendering of Glinda expanded American pop culture’s definition of free-flying women.

By Pam Grossman

Whenever I introduce myself as a witch who writes about witches, the conversation often turns to The Wizard of Oz, and when it does, I’m always tempted to focus on the movie’s verdant villain. Many fans delight in the Wicked Witch of the West’s deranged cackle and her lust for power and ruby pumps. Even when she meets her demise at Dorothy’s hands, she goes down in style, seething: “Who would have thought a good little girl like you could destroy my beautiful wickedness?” The filmmaker John Waters (Pink Flamingos, Hairspray) has said, “That line inspired my life. I sometimes say it to myself before I go to sleep, like a prayer.”

Still, on the 80th anniversary of the movie that made the Wicked Witch famous, I find myself more drawn to her pastel counterpart, Glinda the Good Witch of the North. She was arguably the first American pop-culture figure to prove that, despite their reputation for diabolical antics, witches could be benevolent beings. Though there had been two silent-film adaptations of the Oz story before MGM’s The Wizard of Oz came out in August 1939, the typical moviegoer would have been most familiar with screen witches who were creepy old crones or black-frocked fairy-tale monstresses out to get wide-eyed ingenues. In all her rosy-pink goodness, Glinda was literally and figuratively a witch of a different color and an unlikely feminist force.

It can be easy at first to dismiss the Good Witch as frivolous when compared with her nemesis. “Of the two Witches, good and bad, can there be anyone who’d choose to spend five minutes with Glinda?” Salman Rushdie once asked in The New Yorker, calling her “a silly pain in the neck.” It’s true that there’s a cartoonish high femininity to Glinda: her butterfly-bedazzled pageant gown, her honeyed singing. And then there’s the way her character affirms old-fashioned ideas about the value of beauty: “Only bad witches are ugly,” Glinda tells Dorothy upon their meeting. In Oz, prettiness and virtue are conflated, and Glinda is the fairest of them all.

Billie Burke, the 54-year-old actor who played Glinda, also prized beauty, and some of her opinions on the matter come across as retrograde today. “To be a woman, it seems to me, is a responsibility which means giving, understanding, bearing, and loving. To begin with, these things require being as attractive as possible,” she declares in her 1959 autobiography, With Powder on My Nose. But she thought the wise and gracious Glinda was a departure from the (in her words) “skitter-wits” and “spoony ladies with bird-foolish voices” that she was known for playing. She came to consider Glinda her favorite role, though she’d insist on referring to the character as a “good fairy” rather than a “good witch,” thereby distancing herself from the very word that the film sought to redefine for the better.

As Burke recognized, there’s more to Glinda than her saccharine trappings. When the Wicked Witch threatens her, she responds with a laugh: “Oh, rubbish! You have no power here. Be gone, before somebody drops a house on you too.” Glinda later asks Dorothy whether she has a broomstick for flying to the Emerald City. “Well, then, you’ll have to walk,” the Good Witch replies when Dorothy says no. Glinda then sends the child to brave the wilds of Oz with nothing more than a canine companion and some flashy footwear. Beneath Glinda’s tulle outfit is a spine of steel—and a belief that a young woman like Dorothy could grow one and become independent too.


Delving into the provenance of Glinda’s character reveals a lineage of thinkers who saw the witch as a symbol of female autonomy. Though witches have most often been treated throughout history as evil both in fiction and in real life, sentiments began to change in the 19th century as anticlerical, individualist values took hold across Europe. It was during this time that historians and writers including Jules Michelet and Charles Godfrey Leland wrote books that romanticized witches, often reframing witch-hunt victims as women who’d been wrongfully vilified because of their exceptional physical and mystical capabilities. Per Michelet’s best-selling book, La Sorcière of 1862: “By the fineness of her intuitions, the cunning of her wiles—often fantastic, often beneficent—she is a Witch, and casts spells, at least and lowest lulls pain to sleep and softens the blow of calamity.”

The ideas of Michelet and like-minded writers influenced Matilda Joslyn Gage, an American suffragist, abolitionist, and theosophist. She posited that women were accused as witches in the early modern era because the Church found their intellect threatening. “The witch was in reality the profoundest thinker, the most advanced scientist of those ages,” she writes in her feminist treatise of 1893, Woman, Church, and State. Her vision of so-called witches being brilliant luminaries apparently inspired her son-in-law, L. Frank Baum, to incorporate that notion into his children’s-book series about the fantastical land of Oz. (Some writers have surmised that “Glinda” is a play on Gage’s name.)

Like Gage, Baum was a proponent of equal rights for women, and he wrote several pro-suffrage editorials in the South Dakota newspaper he owned briefly, the Aberdeen Saturday Pioneer. Although his book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, published in 1900, is titled after a man, it is fundamentally a female-centric story: a tale about a girl’s journey through a land governed by four magical women. There are actually two good witches in Baum’s original version: Glinda is the witch of the South, not the North, in his telling, and she doesn’t appear until the second-to-last chapter. The book states that she is not only “kind to everyone,” but also “the most powerful of all the Witches.”

On closer examination, the airy Technicolor Glinda is an exemplar of female leadership in keeping with Baum’s vision. She is, after all, a ruler, and it’s her decisions that drive much of the film’s plot. A maternal Merlin of a sort, Glinda is both a generous guide and a firm teacher. She assists Dorothy in key moments, giving her the ruby slippers and changing the weather to wake her out of a poppy-induced stupor. But she doesn’t let the young heroine take the easy way out. At the end of the film, she explains that she chose not to tell Dorothy that the girl had the power to heel-click herself home from the get-go, so that Dorothy could “learn it for herself.” Glinda knows Dorothy will awaken to her full potential and become self-sufficient only by facing each hex and hoax head-on. This cinematic Glinda is not only a sorceress then, but also a sage. It’s clear why Oprah Winfrey chose to be styled as the Oz sovereign for the Harper’s Bazaar 2015 Icons issue, declaring, “Glinda is a spiritual goddess.” The Good Witch may float in a bubble, but she has plenty of gravitas.

Glinda’s arrival on-screen blazed an iridescent trail for the aspirational witch characters that followed. It also opened the door for a new type of narrative featuring the witch as a protagonist, and not just as a villain or sparkly sidekick. Though the specific conflicts that these lead witches face vary from script to script, each must negotiate her relationship to the power she has—and whether her magic is seen as an asset or a threat is often a reflection of the sexual politics of her time. Veronica Lake’s Jennifer in I Married a Witch (1942) and Kim Novak’s Gillian Holroyd in Bell, Book and Candle (1958) are charming, glamorous women who use witchcraft to manipulate the men they fancy. But they have to relinquish their gifts in exchange for true love, prioritizing conjugal bliss over conjuration. Elizabeth Montgomery’s Samantha Stephens, of the 1960s show Bewitched, must constantly choose between her desire to be a “normal” housewife to please her husband and her own need to use her (super)natural abilities—a tension that many second-wave feminists would have recognized.

The witches of ’90s films such as Practical Magic and The Craft deploy vengeance spells against their male abusers. These occult guerrilla girls manifested in the movies during a decade when sexual harassment came to the fore of public discussion, partly because of the riot grrrl movement and Anita Hill’s testimony at the Clarence Thomas hearing. And the enchanting champions of the Harry Potter films and the Netflix series Chilling Adventures of Sabrina display a cautiously hopeful outlook about the intersection of magic and social justice. The Potter films and original books can be read as an allegory about the fight against prejudice. Sabrina has plotlines that center black and queer characters, which is especially fitting when one considers that witchcraft has been historically linked to marginalized groups. Such fictional covens reflect not only the diversity of TV audiences, but also the broad range of contemporary witchcraft practitioners who draw from non-Europeantraditions. It’s notable that in HarryPotter and Sabrina, 21st-century witches get to keep their powers and use them to save the world. Slowly but surely, as feminism has evolved and expanded, the pop-culture witch has shape-shifted along with it.

Today many people—including me—proudly describe themselves as witches. Sometimes the label is chosen to signify one’s engagement in some form of modern witchcraft; just as often, it’s used as a way to express opposition to patriarchal constraints. But no matter the connotation, Glinda helped pave that yellow brick road for us, amplifying the notion that a witch is someone we can root for or, better yet, be.

Источник: https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2019/08/80-years-ago-wizard-oz-invented-good-witch-glinda/596749/

The Wicked Witch of the West

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wicked witch west We bring you a single chapter from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by y L. Frank Baum. This quintessentially American fairy tale was first published in 1900. Perhaps you have seen the extremely famous musical film, starring Judy Garland (made in 1939).

We chose this chapter in the spirit of Halloween - so expect a few scary moments when with wolves, bees, crows, and winged monkeys.

As we are starting in the middle, we had better tell you the story so far.

Dorothy is an orphan who lives on a farm in the America, in the state of Kansas. One day the farmhouse, with Dorothy and her little dog (Toto) inside, is picked up by a giant wind called a cyclone and she is swept away to the land of Oz. She walks down a yellow brick road and meets a scarecrow, a tin woodman, and a cowardly lion. They are all on their way to the Emerald City seek help from the wonderful Wizard of Oz. The wizard agrees to help them, but first they must kill the Wicked Witch of the West. And this is the story of how they set out to do just that.

Read by Natasha. Duration 28.37.
Proofread by Claire Deakin.

The soldier with the green whiskers led them through the streets of the Emerald City until they reached the room where the Guardian of the Gates lived. This officer unlocked their spectacles to put them back in his great box, and then he politely opened the gate for our friends.

“Which road leads to the Wicked Witch of the West?” asked Dorothy.

“There is no road,” answered the Guardian of the Gates. “No one ever wishes to go that way.”

“How, then, are we to find her?” Enquired the girl.

“That will be easy,” replied the man, “for when she knows you are in the country of the Winkies she will find you, and make you all her slaves.”

“Perhaps not,” said the scarecrow, “for we mean to destroy her.”

“Oh, that is different,” said the Guardian of the Gates. “No one has ever destroyed her before, so I naturally thought she would make slaves of you, as she has of the rest. Take care; for she is wicked and fierce, and may not allow you to destroy her. Keep to the west, where the sun sets, and you cannot fail to find her.”

They thanked him and bade him goodbye, and turned toward the west, walking over fields of soft grass dotted here and there with daisies and buttercups. Dorothy still wore the pretty silk dress she had put on in the palace, but now, to her surprise, she found it was no longer green, but pure white. The ribbon around Toto’s neck had also lost its green color and was as white as Dorothy’s dress.

The Emerald City was soon left far behind. As they advanced, the ground became rougher and hillier, for there were no farms or houses in this country of the west, and the ground was untilled.

In the afternoon the sun shone hot in their faces, for there were no trees to offer them shade; so that before night time Dorothy, Toto and the Lion were tired, and lay down upon the grass and fell asleep, with the Woodman and Scarecrow keeping watch.

Now the Wicked Witch of the West had but one eye, yet that was as powerful as a telescope, and could see everywhere. So, as she sat in the door of her castle, she happened to look around and saw Dorothy lying asleep, with her friends all about her. They were a long distance off, but the Wicked Witch was angry to find them in her country; so she blew upon a silver whistle that hung around her neck.

At once there came running to her from all directions a pack of great wolves. They had long legs, fierce eyes and sharp teeth.

“Go to those people,” said the witch, “and tear them to pieces.”

“Are you not going to make them your slaves?” Asked the leader of the wolves.

“No,” she answered, “one is of tin, one of straw, one is a girl and another a lion. None of them are fit to work, so you may tear them into small pieces.”

“Very well,” said the wolf, and he dashed away at full speed, followed by the others.

It was lucky the scarecrow and the woodman were wide awake and heard the wolves coming.

“This is my fight,” said the woodman, “so get behind me and I will meet them as they come.”

He seized his axe, which he had made very sharp, and as the leader of the wolves came on the tin woodman swung his arm and chopped the wolf’s head from its body, so that it immediately died. As soon as he could raise his axe another wolf came up, who also fell under the sharp edge of the tin woodman’s weapon. There were forty wolves, and forty times a wolf was killed, so that at last they all lay dead in a heap before the woodman.

Then he put down his axe and sat beside the scarecrow, who said, “It was a good fight, my friend.”

They waited until Dorothy awoke the next morning. The little girl was quite frightened when she saw the great pile of shaggy wolves, but the tin woodman told her all. She thanked him for saving them and sat down to breakfast, after which they started again upon their journey.

Now this same morning the Wicked Witch came to the door of her castle and looked out with her one eye that could see far off. She saw all her wolves lying dead, and the strangers still travelling through her country. This made her angrier than before, and she blew her silver whistle twice.

Straightway a great flock of wild crows came flying toward her, enough to darken the sky.

The Wicked Witch said to the king crow, “Fly at once to the strangers; peck out their eyes and tear them to pieces.”

The wild crows flew in one great flock toward Dorothy and her companions. When the little girl saw them coming she was afraid, but the scarecrow said, “This is my battle, so lie down beside me and you will not be harmed.”

So they all lay upon the ground except the scarecrow, and he stood up and stretched out his arms. When the crows saw him they were frightened, as these birds always are by scarecrows, and did not dare to come any nearer. The king crow said, “It is only a stuffed man. I will peck his eyes out.”

The king crow flew at the scarecrow, who caught it by the head and twisted its neck until it died. Then another crow flew at him, and the scarecrow twisted its neck also. There were forty crows, and forty times the scarecrow twisted a neck, until at last all were lying dead beside him. Then he called to his companions to rise, and again they went upon their journey.

When the Wicked Witch looked out again and saw all her crows lying in a heap, she got into a terrible rage, and blew three times upon her silver whistle. Forthwith there was heard a great buzzing in the air, and a swarm of black bees came flying toward her.

“Go to the strangers and sting them to death!” Commanded the witch, and the bees turned and flew rapidly until they came to where Dorothy and her friends were walking. The woodman had seen them coming, however, and the scarecrow decided what to do.

“Take out my straw and scatter it over the little girl, the dog and the lion,” he said to the woodman, “and the bees won't be able to sting them.” This the woodman did, and as Dorothy lay close beside the lion and held Toto in her arms, the straw covered them entirely.

The bees came and found no one but the woodman to sting, so they flew at him and broke off all their stings against the tin, without hurting the woodman at all. As bees cannot live when their stings are broken that was the end of the black bees, and they lay scattered thickly about the woodman, like little heaps of fine coal.

Then Dorothy and the lion got up, and the girl helped the tin woodman put the straw back into the scarecrow again, until he was as good as new. So they started upon their journey once more.

The Wicked Witch was so angry when she saw her black bees in little heaps, like fine coal, that she stamped her foot and tore her hair and gnashed her teeth. Then she called a dozen of her slaves, who were the Winkies, and gave them sharp spears, telling them to go to the strangers and destroy them.

The Winkies were not brave people, but they had to do as they were told. So they marched away until they came near to Dorothy. Then the lion gave a great roar and sprang towards them, and the poor Winkies were so frightened that they ran back as fast as they could.

When they returned to the castle the Wicked Witch beat them well with a strap, and sent them back to their work, after which she sat down to think what she should do next. She could not understand how all her plans to destroy these strangers had failed; but she was a powerful Witch, as well as a wicked one, and she soon made up her mind how to act.

There was, in her cupboard, a golden cap, with a circle of diamonds and rubies running around it. This golden cap had a charm - Whoever owned it could call three times upon the winged monkeys, who would obey any order they were given. No person could command these strange creatures more than three times. Twice already the Wicked Witch had used the charm of the cap. Once was when she had made the Winkies her slaves, and set herself to rule over their country. The winged monkeys had helped her do this. The second time was when she had fought against the Great Oz himself, and driven him out of the land of the West - The winged monkeys had also helped her in doing this. Only once more could she use this golden cap, for which reason she did not like to do so until all her other powers were exhausted. Now that her fierce wolves, her wild crows and her stinging bees were gone, and her slaves had been scared away by the cowardly lion, she saw there was only one way left to destroy Dorothy and her friends.

So the Wicked Witch took the golden cap from her cupboard and placed it upon her head. Then she stood upon her left foot and said slowly, “Ep-pe, pep-pe, kak-ke!”

Next she stood upon her right foot and said, “Hil-lo, hol-lo, hel-lo!”

After this she stood upon both feet and cried in a loud voice, “Ziz-zy, zuz-zy, zik!”

Now the charm began to work. The sky was darkened, and a low rumbling sound was heard in the air. There was a rushing of many wings, a great chattering and laughing, and the sun came out of the dark sky to show the Wicked Witch surrounded by a crowd of monkeys, each with a pair of immense and powerful wings on his shoulders.

One, much bigger than the others, who seemed to be their leader, flew close to the witch and said, “You have called us for the third and last time. What do you command?”

“Go to the strangers who are within my land and destroy them all except the lion,” said the Wicked Witch. “Bring that beast to me, for I have a mind to harness him like a horse, and make him work.”

“Your commands shall be obeyed,” said the leader. Then, with a great deal of chattering and noise, the winged monkeys flew away to the place where Dorothy and her friends were walking.

Some of the monkeys seized the tin woodman and carried him through the air until they were over a country thickly covered with sharp rocks. Here they dropped the poor woodman, who fell a great distance to the rocks, where he lay so battered and dented that he could neither move nor groan.

Other monkeys caught the scarecrow, and with their long fingers pulled all of the straw out of his clothes and head. They made his hat and boots and clothes into a small bundle and threw it into the top branches of a tall tree.

The remaining monkeys threw pieces of stout rope around the lion and wound many coils about his body and head and legs, until he was unable to bite or scratch or struggle in any way. Then they lifted him up and flew away with him to the witch’s castle, where he was placed in a small yard with a high iron fence around it, so that he could not escape.

Dorothy they did not harm at all. She stood, with Toto in her arms, watching the sad fate of her comrades and thinking it would soon be her turn. The leader of the winged monkeys flew up to her, his long, hairy arms stretched out and his ugly face grinning terribly; but he saw the mark of the Good Witch’s kiss upon her forehead and stopped short, motioning the others not to touch her.

“We dare not harm this little girl,” he said to them, “for she is protected by the power of good, and that is greater than the power of evil. All we can do is to carry her to the castle of the Wicked Witch and leave her there.”

So, carefully and gently, they lifted Dorothy in their arms and carried her swiftly through the air until they came to the castle, where they set her down upon the front doorstep. Then the leader said to the witch, “We have obeyed you as far as we were able. The tin woodman and the scarecrow are destroyed, and the lion is tied up in your yard. The little girl we dared not harm, nor the dog she carries in her arms. Your power over our band is now ended, and you will never see us again.”

Then all the winged monkeys, with much laughing and chattering and noise, flew into the air and were soon out of sight.

The Wicked Witch was both surprised and worried when she saw the mark on Dorothy’s forehead, for she knew well that neither the winged monkeys, nor she, dare hurt the girl in any way. She looked down at Dorothy’s feet, and seeing the silver shoes, began to tremble with fear, for she knew what powerful charm belonged to them. At first the witch was tempted to run away from Dorothy; but she happened to look into the child’s eyes and saw how simple the soul behind them was, and that the little girl did not know of the wonderful power the silver shoes gave her. So the Wicked Witch laughed to herself, and thought, “I can still make her my slave, for she does not know how to use her power.” Then she said to Dorothy, harshly and severely, “Come with me, and see that you mind everything I tell you, for if you do not I will make an end of you, as I did of the tin woodman and the scarecrow.”

Dorothy followed her through the many beautiful rooms in her castle until they came to the kitchen, where the witch bade her clean the pots and kettles and sweep the floor and keep the fire fed with wood. Dorothy went to work meekly, with her mind made up to work as hard as she could; for she was glad the Wicked Witch had decided not to kill her.

With Dorothy hard at work, the witch thought she would go into the courtyard and harness the cowardly lion like a horse; it would amuse her, she was sure, to make him draw her chariot whenever she wished to go to drive. But as she opened the gate the lion gave a loud roar and bounded at her so fiercely that the witch was afraid, and ran out and shut the gate again.

“If I cannot harness you,” said the witch to the lion, speaking through the bars of the gate, “I can starve you. You shall have nothing to eat until you do as I wish.”

So after that she took no food to the imprisoned lion; but every day she came to the gate at noon and asked, “Are you ready to be harnessed like a horse?”

The Lion would answer, “No. If you come into this yard, I will bite you.”

The reason the lion did not have to do as the witch wished was that every night, while the woman was asleep, Dorothy carried him food from the cupboard. After he had eaten he would lie down on his bed of straw, and Dorothy would lie beside him and put her head on his soft, shaggy mane, while they talked of their troubles and tried to plan some way of escape. But they could find no way to get out of the castle, for it was constantly guarded by the yellow winkies, who were the slaves of the Wicked Witch and too afraid of her not to do as she told them.

The girl had to work hard during the day, and often the witch threatened to beat her with the same old umbrella she always carried in her hand.In truth, she did not dare to strike Dorothy, because of the mark upon her forehead. The child did not know this, and was full of fear for herself and Toto. Once the witch struck Toto a blow with her umbrella and the brave little dog flew at her and bit her leg in return. The witch did not bleed where she was bitten, for she was so wicked that the blood in her had dried up many years before.

Dorothy’s life became very sad as she grew to understand that it would be harder than ever to get back to Kansas and Aunt Em again. Sometimes she would cry bitterly for hours, with Toto sitting at her feet and looking into her face, whining dismally to show how sorry he was for his little mistress. Toto did not really care whether he was in Kansas or the Land of Oz so long as Dorothy was with him; but he knew the little girl was unhappy, and that made him unhappy too.

Now the Wicked Witch had a great longing to have for her own the silver shoes which the girl always wore. Her bees and her crows and her wolves were lying in heaps and drying up, and she had used up all the power of the golden cap; but if she could only get hold of the silver shoes, they would give her more power than all the other things she had lost. She watched Dorothy carefully, to see if she ever took off her shoes, thinking she might steal them. The child was so proud of her pretty shoes, however, that she never took them off except at night and when she took her bath. The witch was too much afraid of the dark to dare go in Dorothy’s room at night to take the shoes, and her dread of water was greater than her fear of the dark, so she never came near when Dorothy was bathing. Indeed, the old witch never touched water, nor ever let water touch her in any way.

The wicked creature was very cunning, and she finally thought of a trick that would give her what she wanted. She placed a bar of iron in the middle of the kitchen floor, and then by her magic arts made the iron invisible to human eyes - so that when Dorothy walked across the floor she stumbled over the bar, not being able to see it, and fell at full length. She was not much hurt, but in her fall one of the silver shoes came off. Before she could reach it, the witch had snatched it away and put it on her own skinny foot.

The wicked woman was greatly pleased with the success of her trick, for as long as she had one of the shoes she owned half the power of their charm, and Dorothy could not use it against her, even had she known how to do so.

The little girl, seeing she had lost one of her pretty shoes, grew angry, and said to the witch, “Give me back my shoe!”

“I will not,” retorted the witch, “for it is now my shoe, and not yours.”

“You are a wicked creature!” Cried Dorothy. “You have no right to take my shoe from me.”

“I shall keep it, just the same,” said the witch, laughing at her, “and someday I shall get the other one from you, too.”

This made Dorothy so very angry that she picked up the bucket of water that stood near and dashed it over the witch, wetting her from head to foot. Instantly the wicked woman gave a loud cry of fear, and then, as Dorothy looked at her in wonder, the witch began to shrink and fall away.

“See what you have done!” She screamed. “In a minute I shall melt away.”

“I’m very sorry, indeed,” said Dorothy, who was truly frightened to see the witch actually melting away like brown sugar before her very eyes.

“Didn’t you know water would be the end of me?” Asked the witch, in a wailing, despairing voice.

“Of course not,” answered Dorothy. “How should I?”

“Well, in a few minutes I shall be all melted, and you will have the castle to yourself. I have been wicked in my day, but I never thought a little girl like you would ever be able to melt me and end my wicked deeds. Look out, here I go!”

With these words the witch fell down in a brown, melted, shapeless mass and began to spread over the clean boards of the kitchen floor. Seeing that she had really melted away to nothing, Dorothy drew another bucket of water and threw it over the mess. She then swept it all out the door. After picking out the silver shoe, which was all that was left of the old woman, she cleaned and dried it with a cloth, and put it on her foot again. Then, being at last free to do as she chose, she ran out to the courtyard to tell the lion that the Wicked Witch of the West had come to an end, and that they were no longer prisoners in a strange land.

Источник: https://www.storynory.com/the-wicked-witch-of-the-west/

The Wicked Witch of the West

History

The Witch ruled Oz with an army of flying monkeys and other evil witches. When Dorothy Baum came to Oz, she joined the rebellion against the Witch who turned three freedom fighters into a lion, a scarecrow and a tin man as punishment. She kills Dorothy at one point, but she is resurrected and the Good Witch of the North, who protects her from the Wicked Witch's powers with a kiss. The Witch kills the Tin Man and eventually Dorothy returns to Earth.

In 1935, the Wicked Witch is captured by Dorothy, who cuts out her tongue. Dorothy attempts to kill the Wicked Witch by cutting off her head, burning her, and dousing her with holy water, to no avail. Out of options, Dorothy brings the Wicked Witch to the Men of Letters Bunker to find a way to kill her. Working with James Haggerty and Peter Jenkins, Dorothy tries to come up with a plan, but the Witch breaks free and possesses Jenkins, forcing Haggerty to kill him. Unable to defeat the Witch, Dorothy casts a spell that binds them. Haggerty works for the rest of his career on finding a way to defeat the Witch and comes up with the idea that poppy seed extract can stun the Witch from the Oz books. He makes a deal with a fairy in case the Witch ever breaks free.

In 2013, the Witch was accidentally freed by Dean and battled the Winchesters, Dorothy and Charlie Bradbury to get the Key and bring her army to Earth. She nearly succeeded but was finally killed by Charlie with the ruby slippers.

Characteristics

The Wicked Witch, having come from Oz was able to demonstrate various abilities that witches from this dimension appear to be incapable of.

Powers and abilities

  • Incorporeal form – The Wicked Witch can take on a green smoke form, allowing easy fast escape out any situations.
  • Invulnerability – The Wicked Witch was shown to be invulnerable to decapitation, fire and holy water. However, when he tongue was cut out by Dorothy it did not grow back.
  • Possession – The Wicked Witch was shown to be able to take possession of people's minds with a single touch.

Weaknesses

  • Binding magic – The Wicked Witch can be bound with magic.
  • Poppy seed extract – While it will not kill her, it is able to stun her.
  • Ruby slippers – Being imbued with magic from Oz, the ruby slippers were capable of killing her.
  • Warding – The Wicked Witch was shown unable to cross the warding / binding sigils that were keeping Crowley captive.

Episodes

4.06 Yellow Fever

While watching The Wizard of Oz, Frank O'Brien claimed that the Wicked Witch ("green bitch") was out to get him before his death.

9.04 Slumber Party

While investigating an ancient computer in the Bunker, Dean accidentally knocks over the bottle containing the spell Dorothy used to bind herself and the Witch, releasing both. The Witch resumes her search for the key to Oz, attacking Sam and Dorothy before being driven off by a poppy seed extract bullet. She finds Dean and Charlie Bradbury and gets the key from them and kills Charlie who sacrifices herself for Dean who retaliates by shooting the Wicked Witch with a poppy bullet, forcing her to retreat to the vents to recover. Dean has Ezekiel resurrect Charlie and the Witch attacks him and Sam while they are hunting for her. She takes Sam hostage and unable to get a clean shot, Dean tackles her. The Witch is able to possess them however and sends them after Dorothy and Charlie, revealing her true plan to them through Sam and Dean. The Witch casts a spell to summon her army and opens the door, but Charlie stabs her in the back of the head with one of the ruby slippers and then in the face with the other when she turns around, killing her. Charlie manages to close the door in time and the Witch's plan is foiled. When she is killed, all that remains of her is her black cloak.

Trivia

Источник: http://www.supernaturalwiki.com/The_Wicked_Witch_of_the_West

Does the Wicked Witch of the West know she can be killed by water?

I'm not sure if this is explicit in the original Frank L Baum The Wonderful Wizard of Oz or the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz.

However in the book she does carry an umbrella, instead of a broom as in the film, a very convenient thing for someone allergic to water, and possibly more than a coincidence, almost as though she didn't want to get wet...

Once the Witch struck Toto a blow with her umbrella and the brave little dog flew at her and bit her leg in return.

- The Wonderful Wizard of Oz - Chapter 12 - The Search for the Wicked Witch

The wicked witch of the south Singra in the book The Lost King of Oz is afraid of water killing her, though whether this is because she know it's bad for them or because of what happened to the wicked witch of the West and Mombi is open for speculation.

As the canonicity of Oz is pretty fluid due to so many people putting their spin on things I'm also going to mention the 2013 film Oz The Great and Powerful Theodora who becomes the wicked witch knows water is dangerous to her as she is burnt by her own tears, even before becoming wicked.

theodora burning tears

And a further twist from further along the canonicity scale, in the musical Wicked which I have recently seen for the first time:

The weakness to water is something that has been made up and Elphaba (the name of the Wicked Witch in this iteration) uses the belief everyone has in this to fake her own death to be with the man she loves.

Источник: https://scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/117765/does-the-wicked-witch-of-the-west-know-she-can-be-killed-by-water/117879

The Wicked Witch of the West was originally supposed to be a beautiful yet villainous figure. In the words of Wizard of Oz producer Mervyn LeRoy, she would be "repulsive in deeds and manner, but she won't be too hideous to look at. I don't want her to scare children away from the theater."

LeRoy originally cast Gale Sondergaard as the Witch. Sondergaard tested for the role with makeup and glamorous gowns, but LeRoy changed his mind. He tried to have Sondergaard look unattractive, but eventually, the pair agreed that playing an "ugly" witch could ruin her image. 

Hamilton tested for the part instead, picking out "the oldest, crummiest-looking clothes I could find, some dirty things that sort of hung on me like a Mother Hubbard. And then a little shawl."

According to Hamilton, "There was no witch's hat, and I really looked more like an old hag. And I cackled and screamed and said a few lines from the script." She was hired in October 1938.

Источник: https://www.ranker.com/list/wicked-witch-margaret-hamilton-career/melissa-sartore

History Guy: Actress who played witch in ‘Wizard of Oz’ visited Topeka in 1979


Tim Hrenchir 

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Theodora's Arrival By Fire - Oz The Great And Powerful

The Wicked Witch of the West

History

The Witch ruled Oz with an army of flying monkeys and other evil witches. When Dorothy Baum came to Oz, she joined the rebellion against the Witch who turned three freedom fighters into a lion, a scarecrow and a tin man as punishment. She kills Dorothy at one point, but she is resurrected and the Good Witch of the North, who protects her from the Wicked Witch's powers with a kiss. The Witch kills the Tin Man and eventually Dorothy returns to Earth.

In 1935, the Wicked Witch is captured by Dorothy, who cuts out her tongue. Dorothy attempts who was the wicked witch of the west kill the Wicked Witch by cutting off her head, burning her, and dousing her with holy water, to no avail. Out of options, Dorothy brings the Wicked Witch to the Men of Letters Bunker to find a way to kill her. Working with James Haggerty and Peter Jenkins, Dorothy tries to come up with a plan, but the Witch breaks free and possesses Jenkins, forcing Haggerty to kill him. Unable to defeat the Witch, Dorothy casts a spell that binds them. Haggerty works for the rest of his career on finding a way to defeat the Witch and comes up with the idea that poppy seed extract can stun the Witch from the Oz books. He makes a deal with a fairy in case the Witch ever breaks free.

In 2013, the Witch was accidentally freed by Dean and battled the Winchesters, Dorothy and Charlie Bradbury to get the Key and bring her army to Earth. She nearly succeeded but was finally killed by Charlie with the ruby slippers.

Characteristics

The Wicked Witch, having come from Oz was able to demonstrate various abilities that witches from this dimension appear to be incapable of.

Powers and abilities

  • Incorporeal form – The Wicked Witch can take on a green smoke form, allowing easy fast escape out any situations.
  • Invulnerability – The Wicked Witch was shown to be invulnerable to decapitation, fire and holy water. However, when he tongue was cut out by Dorothy it did not grow back.
  • Possession – The Wicked Witch was shown to be able to take possession of people's minds with a single touch.

Weaknesses

  • Binding magic – The Wicked Witch can be bound with magic.
  • Poppy seed extract – While it will not kill her, it is able to stun her.
  • Ruby slippers – Being imbued with magic from Oz, the ruby slippers were capable of killing her.
  • Warding – The Wicked Witch was shown unable to cross the warding / binding sigils that were keeping Crowley captive.

Episodes

4.06 Yellow Fever

While watching The Wizard of Oz, Frank O'Brien claimed that the Wicked Witch ("green bitch") was out to get him before his death.

9.04 Slumber Party

While investigating an ancient computer in the Bunker, Dean accidentally knocks over the bottle containing the spell Dorothy used to bind herself and the Witch, releasing both. The Witch resumes her search for the key to Oz, attacking Sam and Dorothy before being driven off by a poppy seed extract bullet. She finds Dean and Charlie Bradbury and gets the key from them and kills Charlie who sacrifices herself for Dean who retaliates by shooting the Wicked Witch with a poppy bullet, forcing her to retreat to the vents to recover. Dean has Ezekiel resurrect Charlie and the Witch attacks him and Sam while they are hunting for her. She takes Sam hostage and unable to get a clean shot, Dean tackles her. The Witch is able to possess them however and sends them after Dorothy and Charlie, revealing her true plan to them through Sam and Dean. The Witch casts a spell to summon her army and opens the door, but Charlie stabs her in the back of the head with one of the ruby slippers and then in the face with the other when she turns around, killing her. Charlie manages to close the door in time and the Witch's plan is foiled. When she is killed, all that remains of her is her black cloak.

Trivia

Источник: http://www.supernaturalwiki.com/The_Wicked_Witch_of_the_West

The Curse of Playing the Wicked Witch of the West

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Illustrations by Sophie Margolin .

Margaret Hamilton almost did not get cast as the Wicked Witch of the West in the 1939 film TheWizard of Oz.

The former kindergarten teacher had already donned the black hat in a Cleveland stage production of L. Frank Baum’s classic children’s book, but producer Mervyn LeRoy had initially wanted a more prominent actress to play the witch in what would become one of the most iconic films of all time.

A single mom with a spiked chin and prominent nose, Hamilton was not exactly a casting director’s mental image of a movie star. She would often hear that she needed plastic surgery to remove the bump on her nose if she ever wanted to move her career beyond community theater and brief appearances in films.

But Hamilton had gone into acting for the money, so she looked past these indignities and accepted any role that came her way. By the time the auditions for TheWizard of Oz came around, she had already played her share of spinsters and villains, both in theater productions and Hollywood films like Way Down East and TheFarmer Takes a Wife, both released in 1935.

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Margaret Hamilton as the Wicked Witch of the West, with Judy Garland as Dorothy Gale in “The Wizard of Oz.” Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons .

Still, Hamilton had not yet secured the leading lady type of role that would have earned her serious consideration for the part of the Wicked Witch. But after Oscar winner Gale Sondergaard declined the role, concerned that it would make her look too ugly, LeRoy decided to take a chance on Hamilton. She was in her late 30s at the time and, by now, way beyond caring about what people would think of her looks.

Plus, she had the cackle. Thanks to her career as a kindergarten teacher, Hamilton had a keen understanding of child psychology. When the time came for her to audition for TheWizard of Oz, she played up the cackle that sent shivers down the spines of the producers and other cast members, and would later come to terrify generations of kids.

During production, no one suspected how successful the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film would become. The actors focused merely on playing their roles and enduring the arduous days of filming. While Judy Garland was adhering to a famously strict diet of chicken soup, coffee and diet pills, Hamilton was covering herself in green paint and putting her life at risk for the dangerous stunts expected of the Wicked Witch of the West.

In one scene, Hamilton escapes from Munchkinland in a flaming ball of fire, swearing an oath of vengeance. Paul Miles Schneider, a Wizard of Oz expert who met Hamilton when he was 6 years old in 1969, said that filming this scene required her to slip into a trap door before the fire was set on stage. Hamilton would wave her broom and cackle as the awestruck munchkins looked on.

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In one of the takes, the fire spread before Hamilton had time to get into the door. Her broom caught ablaze, giving her painful second-degree burns on her face, and third-degree burns on her hand, as stage assistants frantically rushed to her aid.

In addition to putting out the fire, they hurried to stop the copper-based makeup paint from getting into her bloodstream. “If you have an open wound and you have copper going into that, you can die,” Schneider said. “They worked really hard to remove the makeup very fast. It was a scary time.”

The pain was, as can be imagined, unbearable. As crew members rushed to remove Hamilton’s green paint with rubbing alcohol, the fire still blazing, Hamilton tried to maintain her composure. It took her about six weeks to recover from the accident, and afterward she had to wear green gloves to cover serious who was the wicked witch of the west on her hands.

Still, Hamilton persevered and continued playing the part. She even refused to seek compensation for the accident because she was worried that, even if she got some money, she would become a Hollywood pariah. Instead, she had the producers agree not to shoot any more scenes using real fire, and to tone down the other dangerous stunts.

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Hamilton delivering her now-iconic line as the Wicked Witch of the West. Image courtesy of Giphy .

Shooting continued, and in 1939 the film hit the big screen. Compared to Judy Garland’s Dorothy, Hamilton’s role was minor — she had less than 12 minutes of screen time. Yet, even though it took years for the film to be recognized as a critical success, Hamilton’s iconic line, “I’ll get you, my pretty, and your little dog too!” as well as the scene where she melts at Dorothy’s feet, have become two of the most enduring moments in cinema history.

By the 1960s, the film had reached cult status. Schneider’s mother, who had worked as an actress, and his grandfather, an executive at Warner Brothers, made connections to set up a backstage meeting for the then-6-year-old while on a family trip to New York. By then, nearly three decades had passed since the release of the film, and Hamilton had gone back to her roots in theater. She was starring in a Lincoln Center revival of Oklahoma!

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Even though they were only able to speak for a few minutes, Schneider would never forget the experience of meeting the actress from his favorite film. He remembers Hamilton as kind and patient in answering his questions about how she was able to fly and disappear into a cloud of smoke.

“She did not treat me like a little kid, even at the age of 6,” Schneider said. “She treated kids like people.” Hamilton explained that, to shoot the scene in which she disappears into the air, she had worn a long dress, which crew members tacked to the floor and pumped up with dry ice. As the fumes came up, Hamilton was lowered onto a platform that was not visible because of the smoke.

Schneider says such interactions were not at all out of character for Hamilton. “She was wonderful with children,” Schneider said. “I don’t know if she was making up for the sins of the movie and being the most frightening thing on the screen, but any child who met her had a warm, loving experience.”

Even though their meeting was brief, Hamilton promised to send a postcard to Schneider’s home in Kansas — and he received a signed one less than a week later. She also agreed to help him with a school assignment by becoming his pen pal. Over the course of an entire year, Schneider and Hamilton exchanged letters. He would write about his friends and days at school while she would reply with little notes of encouragement and stories from the theater.

Hamilton received hundreds of letters from other children all over the country, who would recall her notorious witch cackle and, in some cases, ask why she was so mean to Dorothy. Even during filming, Hamilton worried that her role would leave kids with the impression that she was scary — according to another Wizard of Oz expert, film critic Ryan Jay. Mild-mannered and sweet in real life, Hamilton would never have wanted anyone to be terrified of her.

“Everyone described her as so sweet and so approachable and so kind in her demeanor and personality,” Jay reported. “People of all ages wouldn’t believe it was really her until they asked her to do the cackle.”

But the role of the Wicked Witch of the West would take on a life of its own. Hamilton’s ability to scare became firmly rooted in the public’s mind. In the years that followed the film, she would take on a number of different roles, but it became nearly impossible for anyone to see her as anything other than the witch bent on destroying Dorothy and her dog Toto. Eventually, she started turning down opportunities to appear as the Wicked Witch.

“I suppose I’ve turned down a fortune too, but I just don’t want to spoil the magic,” Hamilton told the Associated Press in 1973. “Little children’s minds can’t cope with seeing a mean witch alive again.”

Post- Oz, Hamilton did play more witches, though, in films like the 1951 Comin’ Round the Mountain. She also played the mother of Morticia Addams in a few episodes of The Addams Family, as well as villains and spinsters on Broadway. Hamilton would also put her Wicked Witch of the West costume back on for episodes of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood and Sesame Street (which were eventually pulled from the air after parents complained that they were too frightening, even though Hamilton never missed a chance to help children see the witch’s human side.)

“[The Wicked Witch of the West] is also is what we sometimes refer to as ‘frustrated’ — she’s very unhappy because she never gets what she wants, Mr. Rogers,” Hamilton said in a 1975 episode of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood. “Most of us get something … but as far as we know that witch has never got what she wanted.”

But eventually, she tired of playing the villain. She started turning down offers to recreate the witch altogether. She felt it was just too scary.

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Hamilton with Oscar the Grouch on “Sesame Street,” 1976. Photos courtesy of Wikimedia Commons .

“Many times, I see mothers and little children, and the mothers always recognize me as the witch,” Hamilton said in 1973. “Often, they say to the kids, ‘Don’t you know who she is? She’s the witch in the ‘Wizard of Oz.’ Then the kids look disappointed and say, ‘But I thought she melted.’ It’s as though they think maybe I’m going to go back and cause trouble for Dorothy again.”

Hamilton died in 1985 in a nursing home at the age of who was the wicked witch of the west, after starring in more than 75 films and stage productions. Even though her fame had made it impossible for her to ever go back to regular school teaching, she still found a way to be around kids her whole life. At different points, Hamilton served on the Beverly Hills Board of Education, worked as a Sunday school teacher, and even made a guest appearance at a university children’s literature class. While it cannot be said definitively whether she would have preferred to spend her life leading a classroom full of kids, it is safe to say that the impact she had on children was incomparable — even if it came from playing one of the world’s scariest villains.

Veronika Bondarenko is a professional journalist whose work has appeared in Slate, Refinery29, Business Insider, and The Gothamist. She has a bachelor of arts in English and French from UBC and a master of journalism degree from the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism.

Источник: https://getpocket.com/explore/item/the-curse-of-playing-the-wicked-witch-of-the-west

The Wizard Of Oz: Things Only Adults Notice In The Classic Movie

By Blaire Erskine/Oct. 10, 2019 2:11 pm EST/Updated: Aug. 11, 2020 4:04 pm EST

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's The Wizard of Oz is the most influential film of all time, according to a group of researchers from the University of Turin (via Vanity Fair). Considering The Wizard of Oz, which was adapted from the children's novel written by L. Frank Baum and published in 1900, made its theatrical debut in 1939, the film's continued relevance in today's popular culture is quite an impressive feat. 

That said, the fact that The Wizard of Ozstill resonates with audiences isn't exactly surprising. After all, the film's overarching themes of seeing the good in every person, appreciating what you have, and learning to bloom where you're planted are essentially timeless. However, there's more to this technicolor fantasy film than what meets the eye. 

While The Wizard of Oz is commonly viewed as a cinematic childhood staple, the story of Dorothy Gale trying to find her way back to Kansas is one that resonates with all ages. And, if you're like us, rewatching The Wizard of Oz as an adult will likely leave you seeing Dorothy and friends in a whole new light. Here's a look at things only adults notice in The Wizard of Oz.

The Wicked Witch of the West is right to be upset in The Wizard of Oz

In 2007, Time listed The Wizard of Oz's Wicked Witch of the West as one of cinema's all-time greatest villains. According to the publication, the vengeful witch (played to perfection by Margaret Hamilton) was "an out-of-the-closet sadist."  

There's no doubt that the Wicked Witch of the West is a quintessential villain, with her evil grin, green skin, and unmistakable cackle. However, as an adult, it's hard to blame the Wicked Witch of the West for being, well, wicked. After all, her sister (aptly called the Wicked Witch of the East) had just been killed in a tragic accident involving a flying farmhouse from Kansas and an unfortunate instance of being in the wrong place at the wrong time. 

As if that wasn't heartbreaking enough, when the Wicked Witch of the West came to the scene of the fatal accident to collect her sister's belongings (her ruby slippers), Glinda the Good Witch took the shoes from the dead witch's feet and gifted them to the girl who caused her death in the first place! Yeah, we'd be angry, too.

Why is there no Good Witch of the South in The Wizard of Oz?

Dorothy Gale is one of cinema's most memorable characters. And, of course, The Wizard of Oz would be nothing without Dorothy's beloved BFFs — the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, and the Cowardly Lion. In addition to Dorothy and her gang, viewers are introduced to three witches throughout the course of the film — Glinda (a.k.a. the Good Witch of the North), the Wicked Witch of the West, and the Wicked Witch of the East (may her wicked soul rest in peace). However, as adults, we can't help but notice that one directionally named witch is mysteriously missing. Whatever happened capital one 360 checking account foreign transaction fee the Good Witch of the South?

In L. Frank Baum's children's novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, the Good Witch of the North is the one who greets Dorothy when her house lands in Oz. According to The Atlantic, Glinda the Good Witch comes from the South, and she doesn't even make an appearance until the second-to-last chapter when Dorothy seeks her help to return home. Perhaps the film adaptation combined the Good Witches to streamline the storytelling process?

The Wizard of Oz's Dorothy Gale is a feminist hero

Throughout her quest in The Wizard of Oz, Dorothy Gale makes friends with a brainless scarecrow, a heartless tin man, and a cowardly lion — all of whom curiously resemble the three farmhands who work for her Auntie Em and Uncle Henry back in Kansas. 

While Dorothy is often shown in distress throughout the movie, she's far from the stereotypical typical "damsel in distress" character. Her three male cohorts do help her escape from the Wicked Witch's castle toward the end of the film, but it's Dorothy who ultimately saves the Scarecrow's life, kills the evil witch, and bravely confronts the most powerful man in all of Oz when he tries to take advantage of her and her trusting, good-natured friends. According to The New York Times, L. Frank Baum, author of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, was a feminist, once writing in a newspaper editorial that men who did not support feminist aspirations were "selfish, opinionated, conceited or unjust — and perhaps all four combined." 

Considering Dorothy was the brainchild of a feminist ally, it makes sense that she ultimately became the hero of her own story.

Is The Wizard of Oz a study in imposter syndrome?

Defined by Harvard Business Review as "a collection of feelings of inadequacy that persist despite evident success," imposter syndrome is a seed of self-doubt that, when planted in your mind, can have you feeling like a Scooby-Doo villain just waiting to be unmasked by those meddling kids. 

The titular wizard in The Wizard of Oz is a personified example of an imposter syndrome sufferer's worst nightmare. After the Wizard of Oz lives years posing as a powerful, disembodied being, Toto pulls back the curtain to expose the Wizard for who he truly is — a lowly "humbug." Once exposed, the fake wizard admits he's just a man from Kansas who accepted the gig as Wizard of Oz after being swept away from his home by a cyclone. 

However, despite being a humbug, he is able to help Dorothy's pals by gifting them with the realization that the things they were searching for (heart, brains, and courage) have been within them all along. In doing so, he proves that he is, in fact, great and powerful in his ability to help others — no curtain or special effects required.

A dream within a dream within The Wizard of Oz

In an attempt to prevent Dorothy and her friends from entering the Emerald City and gaining access to the great and powerful Wizard of Oz, the Wicked Witch of the West conjures up an obstacle as dangerous as it is beautiful — a field of poppies. Poppies, of course, are famously known for being a source of opium, which was once commonly used for pain relief and sleep aid. Upon entering the field of flowers, Dorothy and the Cowardly Lion are both lulled into a deep sleep by the poppies, much to the Wicked Witch of the West's delight.

As we know, The Wizard of Oz ends with Dorothy waking up in her bed and realizing her adventures in Oz were all part of a dream she had after being knocked unconscious during the tornado. With that in mind, it's interesting that Dorothy's unconscious brain was able to imagine falling into a deep, dreamlike state while already very much in an actual deep, dreamlike state. Inception, anyone?

What happened to Dorothy's parents in The Wizard of Oz?

Dorothy Gale's sepia-tone life as a farm girl — a stark contrast to the technicolor adventureland of Oz — is introduced to viewers early on in The Wizard of Oz, as are Dorothy's guardians, Auntie Em and Uncle Henry. The film does a thorough job of welcoming its audience into the seemingly dull, small-town life that leaves Dorothy yearning for a "land that [she'd] heard of once in a lullaby." However, it doesn't even begin to scratch the surface of Dorothy's backstory — namely, the circumstances that led to her living with her aunt and uncle. 

Though Dorothy never once mentions her biological parents, we can't help but wonder why they're no longer around. Fortunately, Dorothy doesn't seem too upset by their absence, leaving viewers to assume that living with Auntie Em and Uncle Henry isn't a new development in our heroine's life.

However, while the movie avoids the topic of Dorothy's parents entirely, L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz refers to her as an orphan, meaning Dorothy's mom and dad likely didn't leave of their own volition.

What kind of message is The Wizard of Oz really sending to kids?

Arguably the most famous quote from The Wizard of Oz is Dorothy's line, "There's no place like home." However, as adults, this sentimental quip feels more like an anti-exploration PSA. 

Before she leaves Oz for Kansas, the Tin Man asks Dorothy what she's learned, to which she replies, "If I ever go looking for my heart's desire again, I won't look any further than my own backyard. Because, if it isn't there, I never really lost it to begin with." When she finally wakes up in the comfort of her own bed, Dorothy says, "I'm not going to leave here ever, ever again, because I love you all!" She continues, exclaiming, "Oh, Auntie Em, there's no place like home!"

We love home as much as the next person, but it certainly seems that the overarching takeaway from The Wizard of Oz was meant to discourage young people from adventuring any further from their own backyards. Sorry, Dorothy, but that's not a message we can get behind.

The Wizard of Oz's Toto should have been on a leash

Even the most well-behaved dogs can act up once in a while. And, unless you and your loyal companion are visiting a place specifically designed for off-leash dogs, it's probably best to utilize a leash — just in case your predictable pup springs for a moment of spontaneity. 

One thing's for certain: Toto, Dorothy's adorable pooch in who was the wicked witch of the west Wizard of Oz, definitely could have benefited from a leash. Though undeniably cute, Toto proves himself to be a bit of a troublemaker in the film's very first scene. 

The Wizard of Oz opens with a shot of Toto running on a dirt path alongside a concerned-looking Dorothy. Why is Dorothy worried, you ask? Well, as Dorothy reveals, Toto has just snapped and bit Almira Gulch (the Kansas counterpart of the Wicked Witch of the West). Later, Miss Gulch arrives at Auntie Em and Uncle Henry's house demanding to have Toto put to sleep for what he did. Luckily, the little pup was able to escape — but a simple leash for Toto likely would have saved Dorothy some tears.

How long was The Wizard of Who was the wicked witch of the west Dorothy actually unconscious?

The Wizard of Oz has a runtime of 1 hour and 42 minutes, according to IMDb, but, of course, Dorothy spent more than two hours in the magical land of Oz. Exactly how long was she there?

When Dorothy wakes up in her bedroom after being knocked unconscious during the cyclone, Uncle Henry tells Professor Marvel, "She got quite a bump on the head. We kind of thought there for a minute she was gonna leave us." Upon hearing this, Dorothy replies, "But I did leave you, Uncle Henry. That's just the trouble!" She continues, exclaiming, "And I tried to get back for days and days!" 

Apparently, time works differently in Oz. While Dorothy might have spent "days and days" trying to find her way back home, it seems that only a few hours have passed in Kansas. After all, Auntie Em, Uncle Henry, Professor Marvel, and Dorothy's farmhand friends are dressed in the same clothes they were wearing before the cyclone hit.

The Wizard of Oz's Wicked Witch of the West must not bathe

When the Wicked Witch of the West uses her flying broomstick to set fire to the Scarecrow toward the end of the film, Dorothy acts fast, grabbing a bucket of rainwater and tossing it on her friend to extinguish the flames. However, a bit of water also splashes the Wicked Witch's face, causing her to melt.

As she's melting, the witch screeches, "What a world, what a world! Who would have thought a good little girl like you could destroy my beautiful wickedness?"

Maybe we're overthinking the logistics here, but, as adults rewatching The Wizard of Oz, we think a better question best food to get in nyc be, "Who would have thought a little bit of water could kill the Wicked Witch of the West?" If such a small splash was able to cause a full-on, literal meltdown, are we to believe that the Wicked Witch never washed her hands, took a bath, or got caught in an unexpected rainstorm? Was she even able to drink water? We're willing to suspend our disbelief for a lot of things, but we'd love an explanation here.

Dorothy's dress in the Wizard of Oz has pockets!

If you're a woman, you're all too familiar with the struggle of trying to find clothing with actual pockets. As Tanya Basu explained in a piece for The Atlantic, "Women's slacks, dresses, and blazers often have no pockets, or worse, 'fake' pockets that serve no utilitarian purpose besides sartorially leading the wearer on to believe they have a handy wardrobe aide, until it's too late."

The pocket problem is a real and pressing issue for us women — so, when we do come across a cute dress with pockets, we want to shout our excitement from the rooftops. With that in mind, imagine our excitement upon spotting a pocket on Dorothy's famous blue and white gingham dress. 

Blink and you'll miss it, but Dorothy can be seen pulling a handkerchief from the discreet pocket while trying to comfort the crying Cowardly Lion during their first encounter. According to NBC News, this secret pocket was sewn into a seam so that actress Judy Garland would have a convenient place to keep her cigarettes.

Who does Glinda the Good Witch represent in The Wizard of Oz?

Glinda the Good Witch is a major player in The Wizard of Oz. She's the one who puts the ruby slippers on Dorothy's feet when the Kansas girl first arrives in Oz, the one who wakes Dorothy and the Cowardly Lion from their poppy-induced sleep, and the one who ultimately helps Dorothy get back to Auntie Em and Uncle Henry by reminding her there's no place like home.

However, Glinda doesn't appear to have a real-life counterpart, unlike the other main characters Dorothy meets in Oz. The Wicked Witch of the West, for example, is the Oz equivalent of Almira Gulch, while who was the wicked witch of the west Scarecrow, Tin Man, and Cowardly Lion are all representative of Dorothy's farmhand friends. Even Professor Marvel is part of Dorothy's technicolor dream as none other than the Wizard of Oz himself.

It would make sense for the Good Witch of the North to have been inspired by a real person from Dorothy's hum-drum, sepia-tone world. However, if there is a Glinda-like character in Dorothy's real life, she's never shown on screen. 

Is the Wizard of Oz supposed to be like a politician?

While rewatching The Wizard of Oz, you'll likely find it difficult to ignore the film's political symbolism. A glaring example of this comes when the Wizard of Oz attempts to abandon his promise to help Dorothy and her pals, prompting Toto to pull back the curtain to expose the so-called wizard for who he truly is.

"Oh, you're a very bad man," Dorothy says upon realizing the great and powerful Wizard of Oz is actually not a wizard at all. "No, my dear, I'm a very good man," the wannabe wizard replies. "I'm just a very bad wizard."

You don't have to know a lot about politics to know that many politicians never fully make good on the promises they make to voters. Of course, this doesn't necessarily mean said politicians are bad people; however, it could mean they're simply not cut out for leadership positions within the world of politics. Considering the Wizard of Oz ultimately proves himself to be a generous, kindhearted man, it's safe to say he's far from a stereotypical, morally corrupt politician type. However, as he said himself, he's still a very bad wizard.

The Wizard of Oz's Glinda the Good Witch is a bit of a drama queen

Rewatching The Wizard of Oz as adults has us thinking that Glinda the Good Witch might not be as altruistic of a character as we were made to believe as children. 

For starters, the fact that Glinda allows Dorothy to repeatedly put herself and her pals in harm's way while trying to find her way back to Kansas — all while wearing a pair of teleportation devices on her feet — is incredibly bewildering. When the Scarecrow asks Glinda why she didn't tell Dorothy that she'd possessed the power to get back to Kansas all along, the Good Witch of the North responds, "Because she wouldn't have believed me. She had to learn it for herself." 

Considering Dorothy believed everything else Glinda said upon her arrival in Oz, we're almost certain she would have trusted that clicking the ruby slippers together would get her back to Auntie Em and Uncle Henry. Maybe we're reading too far into things, but it seems to us that Glinda is just a sucker for some good old-fashioned manufactured drama.

Источник: https://www.thelist.com/169627/the-wizard-of-oz-things-only-adults-notice-in-the-classic-movie/

The Wizard of Oz Invented the ‘Good Witch’

Culture

Eighty years ago, MGM’s sparkly pink rendering of Glinda expanded American pop culture’s definition of free-flying women.

By Pam Grossman

Whenever I introduce myself as a witch who writes about witches, the conversation often turns to The Wizard of Oz, and when it does, I’m always tempted to focus on the movie’s verdant villain. Many fans delight in the Wicked Witch of the West’s deranged cackle and her lust for power and ruby pumps. Even when she meets her demise at Dorothy’s hands, she goes down in style, seething: “Who would have thought a good little girl like you could destroy my beautiful wickedness?” The filmmaker John Waters (Pink Flamingos, Hairspray) has said, “That line inspired my life. I sometimes say it to myself before I go to sleep, like a prayer.”

Still, on the 80th anniversary of the movie that made the Wicked Witch famous, I find myself more drawn to her pastel counterpart, Glinda the Good Witch of the North. She was arguably the first American pop-culture figure to prove that, despite their reputation for diabolical antics, witches could be benevolent beings. Though there had been two silent-film adaptations of the Oz story before MGM’s The Wizard of Oz came out in August 1939, the typical moviegoer would have been most familiar with screen witches who were creepy old crones or black-frocked fairy-tale monstresses out to get wide-eyed ingenues. In all her rosy-pink goodness, Glinda was literally and figuratively a witch of a different color and an unlikely feminist force.

It can be easy at first to dismiss the Good Witch as frivolous when compared with her nemesis. “Of the two Https www victoriassecret com bras, good and bad, can there be anyone who’d choose to spend five minutes with Glinda?” Salman Rushdie once asked in The New Yorker, calling her “a silly pain in the neck.” It’s true that there’s a cartoonish high femininity to Glinda: her butterfly-bedazzled pageant gown, her honeyed singing. And then there’s the way her character affirms old-fashioned ideas about the value of beauty: “Only bad witches are ugly,” Glinda tells Dorothy upon their meeting. In Oz, prettiness and virtue are conflated, and Glinda is the fairest of them all.

Billie Burke, the 54-year-old actor who played Glinda, also prized beauty, and some of her opinions on the matter come across as retrograde today. “To be a woman, it seems to me, is a responsibility which means giving, understanding, bearing, and loving. To begin with, these things require being as attractive as possible,” she declares in her 1959 autobiography, With Powder on My Nose. But she thought the wise and gracious Glinda was a departure from the (in her words) “skitter-wits” and “spoony ladies with bird-foolish voices” that she was known for playing. She came to consider Glinda her favorite role, though she’d insist on referring to the character as a “good fairy” rather than a “good witch,” thereby distancing herself from the very word that the film sought to redefine for the better.

As Burke recognized, there’s more to Glinda than her saccharine trappings. When the Wicked Witch threatens her, she responds with a laugh: “Oh, rubbish! You have no power here. Be gone, before somebody drops a house on you too.” Glinda later asks Dorothy whether she has a broomstick for flying to the Emerald City. “Well, then, you’ll have to walk,” the Good Witch replies when Dorothy says no. Glinda then sends the child to brave the wilds of Oz with nothing more than a canine companion and some flashy footwear. Beneath Glinda’s tulle outfit is a spine of steel—and a belief that a young woman like Dorothy could grow one and become independent too.


Delving into the provenance of Glinda’s character reveals a lineage of thinkers who saw the witch as a symbol of female autonomy. Though witches have most often been treated throughout history as evil both in fiction and in real life, sentiments began to change in the 19th century as anticlerical, individualist values took hold across Europe. It was during this time that historians and writers including Jules Michelet and Charles Godfrey Leland wrote books that romanticized witches, often reframing witch-hunt victims as women who’d been wrongfully vilified because of their exceptional physical and mystical capabilities. Per Michelet’s best-selling book, La Sorcière of 1862: “By the fineness of her intuitions, the cunning of her wiles—often fantastic, often beneficent—she is a Witch, and casts spells, at least and lowest lulls pain to sleep and softens the blow of calamity.”

The ideas of Michelet and like-minded writers influenced Matilda Joslyn Gage, an American suffragist, abolitionist, and theosophist. She posited that women were accused as witches in the early modern era because the Church found their intellect threatening. “The witch was in reality the profoundest thinker, the most advanced scientist of those ages,” she writes in her feminist treatise of 1893, Woman, Church, and State. Her vision of so-called witches being brilliant luminaries apparently inspired her son-in-law, L. Frank Baum, to incorporate that notion into his children’s-book series about the fantastical land of Oz. (Some writers have surmised that “Glinda” is a play on Gage’s name.)

Like Gage, Baum was a proponent of equal rights for women, and he wrote several pro-suffrage editorials in the South Dakota newspaper he owned briefly, the Aberdeen Saturday Pioneer. Although his book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, published in 1900, is titled after a man, it is fundamentally a female-centric story: a tale about a girl’s journey through a land governed by four magical women. There are actually two good witches in Baum’s original version: Glinda is the witch of the South, not who was the wicked witch of the west North, in his telling, and she doesn’t appear until the second-to-last chapter. The book states that she is not only “kind to everyone,” but also “the most powerful of all the Witches.”

On closer examination, the airy Technicolor Glinda is an exemplar of female leadership in keeping with Baum’s vision. She is, after all, a ruler, and it’s her decisions that drive much of the film’s plot. A maternal Merlin of a sort, Glinda is both who was the wicked witch of the west generous guide and a firm teacher. She assists Dorothy in key moments, giving her the ruby slippers and changing the weather to wake her out of a poppy-induced stupor. But she doesn’t let the young heroine take the easy way out. At the end of the film, she explains that she chose not to tell Dorothy that the girl had the power to heel-click herself home from the get-go, so that Dorothy could “learn it for herself.” Glinda knows Dorothy will awaken to her full potential and become self-sufficient only by facing each hex and hoax head-on. This cinematic Glinda is not only a sorceress then, but also a sage. It’s clear why Oprah Winfrey chose to be styled as the Oz sovereign for the Harper’s Bazaar 2015 Icons issue, declaring, “Glinda is a spiritual goddess.” The Good Witch may float in a bubble, but she has plenty of gravitas.

Glinda’s arrival on-screen blazed an iridescent trail for the aspirational witch characters that followed. It also opened the door for a new type of narrative featuring the witch as a protagonist, and not just as a villain or sparkly sidekick. Though the specific conflicts that these lead witches face vary from script to script, each must negotiate her relationship to the power she has—and whether her magic is seen as an asset or a threat is often a reflection of the sexual politics of her time. Veronica Lake’s Jennifer in I Married a Witch (1942) and Kim Novak’s Gillian Holroyd in Bell, Book and Candle (1958) are charming, glamorous women who use witchcraft to manipulate the men they fancy. But they have to relinquish their gifts in exchange for true love, prioritizing conjugal bliss over conjuration. Elizabeth Montgomery’s Samantha Stephens, of the 1960s show Bewitched, must constantly choose between her desire to be a “normal” housewife to please her husband and her own need to use her (super)natural abilities—a tension that many second-wave feminists would have recognized.

The witches of ’90s films such as Practical Magic and The Craft deploy vengeance spells against their male abusers. These occult guerrilla girls manifested in the movies during a decade when sexual harassment came to the fore of public discussion, partly because of the riot grrrl movement and Anita Hill’s testimony at the Clarence Thomas hearing. And the enchanting champions of the Harry Potter films and the Netflix series Chilling Adventures of Sabrina display a cautiously hopeful outlook about the intersection of magic and social justice. The Potter films and original books can be read as an allegory about the fight against prejudice. Sabrina has plotlines that center black and queer characters, which is especially fitting when one considers that witchcraft has been historically linked to marginalized groups. Such fictional covens reflect not only the diversity of TV audiences, but also the broad range of contemporary witchcraft practitioners who draw from non-Europeantraditions. It’s notable that in HarryPotter and Sabrina, 21st-century witches get to keep their powers and use them to save the world. Slowly but surely, as feminism has evolved and expanded, the pop-culture witch has shape-shifted along with it.

Today many people—including me—proudly describe themselves as witches. Sometimes the label is chosen to signify one’s engagement in some form of modern witchcraft; just as often, it’s used as a way to express opposition to patriarchal constraints. But no matter the connotation, Glinda helped pave that yellow brick road for us, amplifying the notion that a witch is someone we can root for or, better yet, be.

Источник: https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2019/08/80-years-ago-wizard-oz-invented-good-witch-glinda/596749/

The Wicked Witch of the West was originally supposed to be a beautiful yet villainous figure. In the words of Wizard of Oz producer Mervyn LeRoy, she would be "repulsive in deeds and manner, but she won't be too hideous to look at. I don't want her to scare children away from the theater."

LeRoy originally cast Gale Sondergaard as the Witch. Sondergaard tested for the role with makeup and glamorous gowns, but LeRoy changed his mind. He tried to have Sondergaard look unattractive, but eventually, the pair agreed that playing an "ugly" witch could ruin her image. 

Hamilton tested for the part instead, picking out "the oldest, crummiest-looking clothes I could find, some dirty things that sort of hung on me like a Mother Hubbard. And then a little shawl."

According to Hamilton, "There was no witch's hat, and I really looked more like an old hag. And I cackled and screamed and said a few lines from the script." She was hired in October 1938.

Источник: https://www.ranker.com/list/wicked-witch-margaret-hamilton-career/melissa-sartore
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