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“Enter the Era of Elegance,” read the cover line of Harper's BAZAAR's September 1992 issue, and it was models who represented this credo. From '80s powerhouses like Linda Evangelista, Naomi Campbell, and Cindy Crawford to newcomers like Kate Moss, Alek Wek, and Jenny Shimizu, these diverse beauties superseded the close, esoteric confines, stepping off the runway and onto the global stage.

A quote from Evangelista describes their ascendancy best. "We don't wake up for less than $10,000 a day," she famously quipped in 1990. Ahead, we've rounded up the top names that made bank, attracted headlines, and fully exemplified '90s supermodels with a capital S.

1Linda Evangelista

Heralded as the ultimate chameleon, the Canadian supermodel went through the '90s changing her hairstyle and garnering headlines for doing so. From a black pixie cut to bright red bob to a platinum-blonde coif, Evangelista's looks season after season captured the attention of myriad designers, who made her the face of campaigns and the center piece of runway shows.

2Naomi Campbell

Campbell is the queen of the catwalk. So much that Beyoncé immortalized her signature strut in "Get Me Bodied," encouraging listeners to "walk across the room like Naomi Campbell." And though this English beauty received a great amount success, her rise to the top was faced with adversities. She was often the only Black model in runway lineups, campaigns, and editorial shoots—a pervasive mindset that she has fought to overturn throughout her illustrious career.

3Christy Turlington

Along with Evangelista and Campbell, Turlington rounded out what the fashion industry coined the "Holy Trinity." Born in Oakland, California, she started modeling locally in Florida. But it was not until moving to New York at 18 when her dominance at the top of the modeling world solidified. Over the years, Turlington left to get an education, graduating cum laude from NYU's Gallatin School of Independent Studies. She now focuses her efforts on Every Mother Counts, an organization that, according to its mission statement, works to "make pregnancy and childbirth safe for every mother, everywhere."

4Cindy Crawford

More than most, Crawford's renown in the '90s superseded the industry. She was—and still is—a cultural icon, starring in not just myriad fashion campaigns, but also in Pepsi commercials. Her appearance on the small screen, too, extended to hosting House of Style on MTV. With her distinct beauty mark, her face was plastered on billboards and advertisements. And now, her daughter, Kaia Gerber, is following in her famous footsteps.

5Claudia Schiffer

Discovered in a nightclub in Düsseldorf, Germany, Schiffer—with her luscious blonde locks, smoky eyes, and plump pout—was touted as the second coming of Brigitte Bardot. Karl Lagerfeld was a fan, taking her under his wing and making her the face of Chanel—a distinction she received with other labels, including Guess. She would garner cover after cover, currently holding the record in the in the Guinness Book of World Records. And along with aforementioned models, Schiffer was a member of the Big Five.

6Tatjana Patitz

In some cases, Patitz is the one who rounds up the Big Five. Born in Germany and raised in Sweden, the statuesque blonde with killer eyebrows fronted the campaigns of Chanel, Jean-Paul Gaultier, Revlon, Cartier, L'Oréal, and more. But she is perhaps best remembered for starring in the music video for George Michael's "Freedom! '90," along with Naomi Campbell, Christy Turlington, Cindy Crawford, and Linda Evangelista.

7Kate Moss

Kate Moss's entry into the fashion industry was somewhat controversial. Discovered at an airport in London at 14 years old, her waiflike figure was a contrast to the Amazonian bodies that preceded her. She was the poster child for the grunge style that pervaded a good part of the '90s—and her party-going lifestyle and string of famous relationships only heightened this reputation. Indeed, her name crossed industry barriers, becoming part of the pop culture lexicon.

8Tyra Banks

From model to media mogul, Banks's career is a string of epic highs. She conquered her first runway season at Paris Fashion Week, booked editorial shoots in all the top glossies, signed lucrative contracts with CoverGirl and Victoria's Secret, and became the first Black model to front the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue. But it was her moves outside the industry that catapulted Banks to the upper echelons of fame. She starred in a number films and television shows, recorded music albums, founded charities, and created the behemoth America's Next Top Model, which has run for 24 cycles.

9Heidi Klum

Like Banks, Klum parlayed her modeling success into other media ventures. The German beauty went from starring in campaigns for Marc Jacobs and spreads for Harper's BAZAAR to becoming the face of Victoria's Secret and appearing in films and television shows. Later on, she joined the judges table for America's Got Talent, Project Runway, and Making the Cut, which she also executive-produces. And if that isn't enough, the serial entrepreneur has an eponymous lingerie collection.

10Kimora Lee Simmons

At the tender age of 13, Simmons was signed by Karl Lagerfeld at Chanel, who regarded her as the "Face of the 21st Century." Brands like Fendi, Valentino, and Yves Saint Laurent also took notice. Then, after marrying entrepreneur Russell Simmons, she founded Baby Phat—eventually becoming the president of its parent company, Phat Farm, which amassed $265 million in profits in 2002. She also created the Kimora Lee Simmons Scholarship Fund and is involved in a number of charities.

11Carla Bruni Sarkozy

Sarkozy walked down every major designer runway, appeared in endless fashion editorials, and fronted campaign after campaign. And though she wasn't overtly politically active during her heyday as a model, the Italian native was ushered into public affairs when she married President Nicolas Sarkozy and became France's First Lady. Since her husband left office, she has been cultivating her music career, releasing a number of lauded albums.

12Amber Valletta

Raised in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Valletta swiftly turned from country bumpkin to seductress (her sizzling campaigns for Prada, Giorgio Armani, Calvin Klein, and Elizabeth Arden are proof of that). Still, her girl-next-door demeanor never went away completely, especially when she hosted MTV's House of Style with BFF Shalom Harlow, taking the reins from Cindy Crawford. She then set her sights on Hollywood, garnering a number of film and television credits on IMDb, including Hitch,What Lies Beneath, and Revenge.

13Shalom Harlow

Like fellow Canadian Linda Evangelista, Harlow has been distinguished for her catlike appearance—which designers from Isaac Mizrahi to Alexander McQueen to Marc Jacobs have all utilized on their runways and in their campaigns. And along with her frequent collaborator, Amber Valletta, she cohosted House of Style, and segued into the film industry with How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days and Vanilla Sky.

14Alek Wek

When Wek first came on the fashion scene, there were certainly top Black models—but none like her. "When I saw Alek, I inadvertently saw a reflection of myself that I could not deny," said actress Lupita Nyong’o at the Black Women in Hollywood luncheon, per Essence. "Now, I had a spring in my step because I felt more seen, more appreciated by the far away gatekeepers of beauty, but around me the preference for light skin prevailed." Indeed, the South Sudanese Brit changed standards, walking the runways of major brands and gracing ads, breaking down notions that those with fairer complexions are the only ones who appeal to the masses.

15Jenny Shimizu

Asian, five foot seven, and an out and proud lesbian, Jenny Shimizu didn't fit into any prescribed box. Still, the California native persevered in the fashion industry, becoming one of the few Asian models to walk down a major runway (Prada) and star in campaigns for Calvin Klein, Hourglass Cosmetics, and Banana Republic. She's also appeared in a film alongside Angelina Jolie (whom she reportedly dated) and was a judge on Make Me a Supermodel.

16Helena Christensen

Christensen started her career in pageants, winning the Miss Denmark in 1986 and representing the nation at the Miss Universe event that year. With this notoriety, she entered the fashion fold, appearing in runway shows and campaigns for Valentino, Prada, Chanel, and Revlon, which made her the brand spokesperson in 1992. A few years before, Christensen starred in music video for Chris Isaak's song "Wicked Game," which is deemed one of the sexiest videos of all time. Lately, she has gone behind the camera, becoming an accomplished photographer, along with becoming an advocate for climate change awareness.

17Yasmeen Ghauri

Born in Montreal to a German mother and Indian father in a Muslim household, Ghauri ignored her father's dissuasion to enter a career in fashion. Her defiance proved successful. She landed hefty contracts with Valentino, Victoria's Secret, and Christian Dior, and appeared in fashion spreads of leading glossies.

18Beverly Peele

Born in Los Angeles, Peele started modeling at 12 years old for small brands, eventually becoming a powerhouse on the runways of Comme des Garçons, Ralph Lauren, Donna Karan, and Versace. Her editorial appearances were equally impressive, gracing more than 250 covers before retiring from the fashion industry in the mid-90s.

19Nadja Auermann

A favorite model of photographers, particularly Helmut Newton, Auermann's blonde locks and piercing blue eyes were far from sweet and innocent. Nay, her look was akin to femme fatales like Marlene Dietrich and Lauren Bacall, women who oozed sex appeal while being in complete control of their personas. And designers—from Jean Paul Gaultier to Christian Dior to Yves Saint Laurent—also took notice of these qualities, placing the German native front and center of their runway shows and ad campaigns.

20Stephanie Seymour

From covers of Harper's BAZAAR to Playboy to the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue, Seymour (perhaps more than most) was celebrated for her amazing figure. Indeed, photographer Richard Avedon said, per People, that she had the "prefect body"—a distinction that brands like Versace, Alaïa, and Victoria's Secret highlighted on their catwalks and in their campaigns. And for music fans, the California native is best remembered for starring in Guns N' Roses' video for "November Rain."

21Kristen McMenamy

Cited as an unconventional beauty, McMenamy was nonetheless celebrated for her androgyny. She thankfully didn't heed the advice of model agent Eileen Ford, who encouraged her to get plastic surgery. From labels like Chanel, Versace, and Comme des Garçons to photographers like Steven Meisel and Juergen Teller, the fashion industry embraced the Pennsylvania native's uniqueness.

Barry SamahaBarry Samaha is the style commerce editor at Esquire, where he covers all things fashion and grooming.

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Источник: https://www.harpersbazaar.com/fashion/models/g32754339/90s-supermodels/

It is something of a wonder that age, a kiss of death in the fashion industry, has yet to founder “America’s Next Top Model,” the twenty-fourth season of which strutted its way onto VH1 last week. (The second episode airs on Tuesday.) As ratings have steadily declined in the past decade, the show has entertained endless renovations to its format, switching networks, discharging beloved judges, allowing male models to compete in several seasons, and even, in a temporary and largely unpopular change inspired by the likes of “American Idol,” including viewer input in its weekly evaluations. It pressed on, too, after its inimitable matriarch, the supermodel turned mogul Tyra Banks, who launched the series in 2003, stepped away from her host position last season and was replaced by the singer and actress Rita Ora. But, for the show’s most loyal nostalgists, who have absorbed entire marathons of the series and learned every word in Banks’s outlandish lexicon—what it means to “smize” and “tooch” and “booch”—a “Top Model” without Tyra was no “Top Model” at all. Fans clamored for their original leader; Banks relented with a carefully worded volte-face. The recent première—titled “The Boss Is Back”—is devoted in large measure to reëstablishing her place at the helm of her hard-earned empire.

The miracle of Banks’s decade-and-a-half-long tenure as the host of “America’s Next Top Model” is that she has managed, season after season, to extract some semblance of wisdom from entertainment that might otherwise appear (especially in light of recent allegations of abuse in the fashion industry) merely exploitative. “Top Model” is a show about work—work that is physically demanding, sometimes demeaning, and often overtly hostile to women. Over the years, aspiring models have competed in nine-inch stilettos and on treadmill runways and between raging pillars of flame; wearing meat bikinis and garbage bags and garments made of human hair; dressed as homicide victims and cancer patients and half-nude croutons sprawled on gargantuan Greek salads; with crocodiles and cockroaches and one very difficult, very dashing tarantula. (The sheer strain of brainstorming new concepts for the competition tempted producers to snuff “Top Model” more than a decade ago.) This season, in a pledge to inclusivity, Banks has decided to lift the age limit that, since the show’s inception, had prevented aspirants older than twenty-seven from trying their chances. The new season features, in addition to a Ukrainian activist and a celibate Muslim and a Trump supporter named Liberty, a forty-two-year-old grandmother of three. “I’m about to beat the competition because I have years of experience,” she says, bent on impressing her pristine, industrious mentor.

In past seasons, Banks has presided over the proceedings with a stern, sometimes brutal maternity. When a Somali model (and victim of genital mutilation) failed to shave her armpits for a shoot, Banks admonished, “A razor’s a dollar. Retouching an armpit is like a thousand.” When a contestant criticized for her Southern accent emerged as the victor one season, Banks told her, “We’re gonna get you some voice lessons, girl!” The judges once nearly eliminated a deaf contestant who flubbed a nocturnal photo shoot in which the other contenders relied on spoken direction to pose. A biracial competitor was sent home after delivering an unpersuasively romantic commercial with a male model who had told her, before filming began, that he did not like black girls. If a model refused to photograph nude, she was ridiculed. If she had Asperger’s syndrome, she was called awkward. If she got word that a childhood friend had suddenly perished, she was still dropped into a grave, eight feet deep, to portray one of the seven deadly sins. And, if she suffered hypothermia while posing for a beauty shot in an icy pool, she was somehow chided both for failing to articulate her physical limits and for being fragile. Through it all, Banks exhorted her girls, with a signature verbal panache, to “be all you can be, not bitch all you can bitch.”

The most notorious “Top Model” moment—immortalized, with so many others, in an array of multi-purpose memes—took place in an episode aptly titled “The Girl Who Pushes Tyra Over the Edge.” Banks’s patience was tested by a contestant who seemed insufficiently devastated by the fact that she’d been eliminated. When Banks heard her laughing off the loss, she unleashed a jaw-dropping torrent of disappointment on the twenty-two-year-old woman for failing to avail herself of the opportunity of a lifetime. The host has since renounced her outburst, joining outsiders in its parody, but the incident lingers as a perfect demonstration of the show’s conflicting desires. On one hand, by eliminating models for even understandable faults, Banks seeks to impart harsh lessons about an industry known for its superficial strictures. On the other hand, she expects to connect with contestants as a sort of rarefied fairy godmother, capable of inspiring rags-to-riches stories even as she dashes who knows how many dreams. (It should be said that the show’s most successful alumnae tend to be runners-up, while its most vocal detractors are often past winners disillusioned by what their victory has failed to deliver.) In preparing her underlings for an unfair business and her audience for the generalized lessons it yields, Banks has managed to fulfill a delicate role as protector and antagonist in one. To a thirty-four-year-old contestant who talked back to the judges on last week’s première, Banks said, “You know, the interesting thing is you’re probably older than people on this panel, but now you are a child, and I am talking to you almost like a parent, like tough love. So when you come in this room, in my house, you respect my judges. You got that?”

In Banks’s world, of course, defeat is more frequent than victory. In the new season, it is Erin Green, the grandmother, who has so far embodied the show’s favorite value: resilience. Viewers winced at her early enthusiasm, knowing that, for all this season’s emphasis on inclusivity, Green had not appeared on a list of fourteen finalists that was leaked, by VH1, a month before the season’s première. Sure enough, Green was eliminated, apparently for failing to impress during a lush shoot in a garden. But, as she tearfully tugged her luggage toward the model mansion’s door, Banks materialized behind her with words of unalloyed sympathy and encouragement. “I’m so, so sorry,” she said. “I know this meant a lot to you.” And then, in a final twist, she produced Green’s photograph with a soapy proclamation: “Beauty knows no age, no size, no color,” she said, “and you deserve to be here with every single one of these girls.” In a confessional, Green echoed the same sentiment. “I put my dreams on hold because I wanted to raise a family,” she wept. “But I never stopped dreaming.” Let the cynics scoff. It was a touching moment, however forced the pose.

Источник: https://www.newyorker.com/culture/on-television/the-enduring-miracle-of-tyra-banks-on-americas-next-top-model

Télévision: Séisme: «Top Models» sera désormais diffusé le matin sur la RTS

Actualisé

Le feuilleton sera remplacé par «Plus Belle la vie» en début de soirée dès le 28 juin.

«Top Models» était diffusé en soirée sur la RTS depuis trente-trois ans!

Trois feuilletons changent d’horaire sur la RTS, et c’est historique, car cela concerne «Top Models». Dès le 28 juin, les téléspectateurs retrouveront les Forrester à 11 h 45 au lieu de 18 h du lundi au vendredi juste après «Les feux de l’amour», suivis de «Demain nous appartient» à 12 h 15, alors que «Plus Belle la vie» sera diffusé à 18 h 20. Rappelons que «Top Models» était diffusé en soirée depuis 33 ans!

Contacté, le service de presse explique: «Les habitudes de consommation digitales, en preview sur Play RTS, représentent une part importante de l’audience globale de «Top Models». Nous constatons donc qu’une partie du public visionne déjà le feuilleton de manière délinéarisée. De plus, le fait de rapprocher la diffusion de «Top Models» avec celle de «Les feux de l’amour» fait sens pour le public qui regarde ces deux feuilletons: il y a ainsi une plus grande proximité thématique.»

Pour ceux qui regardent Ridge, Brooke et les autres sur Play RTS, les épisodes seront disponibles encore plus tôt sur la plateforme, soit 24 h avant la diffusion sur RTS 1.

«Plus Belle la vie» pour les plus jeunes

En ce qui concerne «Plus Belle la vie», l’horaire de 18 h 20 est «plus pertinent», nous dit-on, car plus de la moitié de ses fidèles ont moins de 50 ans et la case de 18 h-23 h correspond mieux à leurs habitudes de consommation. La RTS, argumente aussi que ce feuilleton étant produit par un autre média de service public – France TV – «ce changement est en phase avec notre mandat et notre volonté de proposer une meilleure vitrine aux programmes produits par d’autres médias de service public».

Источник: https://www.lematin.ch/story/seisme-top-models-sera-desormais-diffuse-le-matin-sur-la-rts-629640739511

Why America’s Next Top Model Was Never Better Than Its First Cycle

Tonight America’s Next Top Model will crown its 22nd and final winner. It’s been 12 years, 300 contestants, countless tears, and one face merkin since Tyra Banks started her humble modeling competition on the UPN network in the summer of 2003. It was a surprise hit at the start of the reality-television boom, and since then, ANTM has skillfully repackaged itself, doubling down on its popularity with multiple “cycles” a year, produced at a relatively cheap cost. But as the show went through various iterations — the British invasion, the short season, and, most wisely, the inclusion of men — its essence never really changed. It was forever and always a show about Tyra Banks, and when you realize this incontrovertible truth, there’s only one season that transcended Tyra: the first cycle. It was a rough draft of a show, a moment before Tyra had repurposed it as a vehicle for herself and her life philosophy. It actually felt like it was about modeling, and the only time the show followed Tyra’s own advice: “Human is beautiful, perfect is boring.”

I can hear your furious tweets now. But Shandi’s affaire de coeur! But “We were all rooting for you!” But Eva’s tarantula photo! (We practiced that one in the mirror for days.) Yes, the other cycles had higher points of drama. They were better produced, more complete seasons with increasingly hysterical challenges that eventually became the show’s trademark. The first season — and I’m going to call it a season because that’s what it was then — is stunningly humble in comparison. It was rough and unwieldy; the judging panel took place in a room so cramped the camera couldn’t properly zoom back far enough to include the wall hanging of Tyra Banks behind the judges. There was no soundstage, and the challenges were remarkably straightforward: Walk down the catwalk, do a press interview, strike a pose. When the wannabe-models go to Paris, they’re penned into a small one-bedroom hotel room where there aren’t even enough beds for them. Tyra says that this is because she wanted to reflect the reality of life as a working model (a principle she would quickly discard once the show got a larger budget). And whether or not you buy her reasoning, she was right. Modeling can be deeply unglamorous, and there was something about the low production value that reflected that simple truth.

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At its best, ANTM’s first season felt like a glimpse into how fashion actually worked: infuriatingly idiosyncratic, wildly subjective, and at its core, misogynist. The judges were Janice Dickinson, the acidic, self-proclaimed first supermodel, Marie Claire editor Beau Quillian, Kimora Lee Simmons, and, of course, Tyra Banks. When they looked at photos, there wasn’t a manufactured rubric to use. They either liked it or they didn’t, and their suggestions produced a Sisyphean logic: Your foot’s gigantic, you’re too old, you need to lose weight, you’re too skinny, you look like a boy. Over time, ANTM tried to excise the inherent subjectivity of assessing physical beauty by arguing that it’s a skill that can be honed (thus the introduction of a numerical scoring system beginning in Cycle 19).

In this way, ANTM was a show that teetered between two very different kinds of reality television: the skills-based competition shows, like Top Chef, Project Runway, and The Great British Baking Show, which favored merit over personality; and those that function on a purer schadenfreude, like Dance Moms or the Real Housewives franchise. And as much as the show paid lip service to individuality, ANTM wasn’t about being the best model, but about manufacturing women in Tyra’s likeness: Strivers, women of industry, who would do anything to be like her — yank out their teeth, shave their heads, shave their teeth, or hop on one leg while laughing. Eventually, Tyra developed her own set of rules with its own argot. Smiling with your eyes — smizing — naturally filtered into our language. More followed: booty tooch (sticking your butt out), boom boom boom (a six-pack), H2T (head to toe). What was important wasn’t so much what you were doing but that you mouthed the words.

Remarkably, in season one, the women didn’t readily submit to the logic of the show. When it came down to the final four, for instance, zealous Evangelicals Robin and Shannon both refused to do a photo shoot at Buddha Bar where they would have to simulate nudity in a fake ad campaign for diamonds. They said that they believed the act would compromise their values. They said no, and surprisingly, their decisions were respected. In the future, this would simply be non-negotiable: You wouldn’t be able to say no.

Then there was Elyse, the aspiring medical student and militant atheist who regularly rolled her eyes at the entire prospect of modeling. She criticized the other contestants, mentors, and challenges — something that would be unheard of in the future — and the producers gave her the space to do so. As the fates would have it, Elyse was also the most natural model of the group, the favorite of photographers for her lithe, androgynous frame and Kewpie features. During one of the final judging panels, Tyra reminded Elyse of how she thought modeling was purely physical. Did she still think that? Elyse launched into an explanation of how lots of estrogen produces desirably “feminine” features, like a small brow ridge and fuller lips. While she didn’t disagree with Tyra, she also didn’t concede. Beauty was physical, too.

But this was never Tyra’s logic. She tried to argue modeling was more about character than it was about physicality. On her personal blog back in 2007, NPR’s Ann Powers wrote that Tyra Banks was the new Ayn Rand. “Tyra’s not just giving fashion tips; she is building an ontology. In fashion, she sees the human endeavor — the struggle to transcend one’s fate, the tension between one’s limits and one’s dreams, the demands set upon those who would live in harmony with their chosen community. It’s just so deep.” As the show wore on, Tyra Banks only became more exacting in her vision. She wasn’t just about scouting talent, but rather enforcing an ideology of hard work and individuality. Nominally, models could come in a variety of ethnicities, skin tones, and sizes, but the winners were all, for the most part, very skinny and light-complexioned. Instead of submitting to the whims of fashion, contestants would have to submit to Tyra’s ideology on how to live a successful life. When a contestant was sent home, it was because she somehow failed to live up to the potential that Tyra saw inside of her.

As the show wore on, moments of insubordination would become less common and more memorable. Even though she was arguably the strongest model in Cycle 18, Azmarie (whom you may recognize as a member of Hakeem’s crew from Empire) was eliminated because she refused to wear booty shorts that read “Booty Tooch” for a master class on how to shake your ass. Then there’s the most infamous moment of Top Model history when Tyra unleashed a tirade against Cycle 4 contestant Tiffany Richardson. Tiffany’s resistance wasn’t even brazen. Demoralized by the demands of the show, she simply didn’t want to do it anymore. And within that, Tyra saw true failure, because not trying, giving up, losing hope, was the greatest flaw of all.

The truth about America’s Next Top Model is that it’s horrifying to watch. What’s interesting about the first cycle is how that horror manifests itself in plain sight. While the contestants are in Paris, one of their challenges is to wear a piece of couture and go out to dinner and drinks with four European men. Why? So they can judge them on whether they embody the spirit of a woman who would wear haute couture. This is insane. That horror, which is so bare in the first season, only gets more disguised later on: The show became campier, more ludicrous, and vaguely surreal, like smizing until your eyes bleed in front of a fun-house mirror. Contestants put on their makeup without mirrors, they walk down the side of a building as a catwalk in the rain, they dress up as different ethnicities for a photo shoot, but the extreme appeal only distracts from the fact that at the end of the day, someone is going home because they’re just not pretty enough.  

What was important about season one was it had a self-critical voice in Elyse, and, to a certain extent, Robin and Shannon; it was the only season where the contestants didn’t readily buy into the project. They voiced their opinions. They had reservations. They said no. By the end, though, ANTM set the template for the following 21 cycles by choosing the girl who wanted it the most: Adrianne Curry. When you watch the first season, it is impossible not to love her. She was the awkward tomboy with a thick Chicago accent whose mother got scammed by modeling agencies promising to help her daughter’s career. When her mom comes to visit her, she tells her that she’s going to earn that money they lost. Adrianne was the best contestant, even though she wasn’t the best model.

In the finale, you could see the gears turning: Tyra was deciding what this show was about. Would it be about the daily grind of the modeling industry — about its whims, egos, and drudgery? Or would it be about the American Dream of pulling yourself up by your four-inch heels? “You were the biggest transformation,” Tyra told Adrianne when she anointed her the winner. And Adrianne tearfully told the camera, “I’m going to have a good life now. My family’s going to have a good life now. A lot is going to change.”

Why ANTM Was Never Better Than Its First CycleИсточник: https://www.vulture.com/2015/12/americas-next-top-model-first-cycle-was-the-best.html

America’s Next Top Model: Best Episode Of Each Season 1 Through 10, According to IMDb

Over the last two decades, America's Next Top Model has given viewers 24 seasons packed full of iconic pop culture moments. Each cycle brought a new crop of would-be top models who would do anything to earn the title. Along the way, there were tears, tantrums, and plenty of dramatic makeovers. All of these ingredients created some unforgettable moments (and some controversial ones too).

RELATED: America's Next Top Model's 5 Most Problematic & Dangerous Photo Shoots

While each episode delivered high fashion, groundbreaking photoshoots, and plenty of drama, some stand out above the rest as fan favorites. Viewers have rated the top episodes of each season on IMDb. With classic moments including disastrous makeovers and unfair eliminations, some episodes in seasons 1-10 stand above the rest.

10 "The Girl Who Becomes America's Next Top Model" (S1, E9) - 7.5

ANTM first hit screens in 2003 and became an instant success. With the big buzz around this new reality show, it's no surprise the first and last episodes are the highest-rated for season 1. However, the finale narrowly beats the premiere for the spot as the highest-rated episode of the first season.

The finale saw Elyse Sewell, Shannon Stewart, and Adrianne Curry face the final hurdles to becoming America's Next Top Model. The show amped up the drama by calling Shannon first when it was time to eliminate a contestant, leaving good friends Adrianne and Elyse in the bottom two. Ultimately, Adrianne was selected to stay by the judges. After facing off with Shannon on a runway that featured peak noughties Baby Phat fashions, Adrianne went on to become the first-ever contestant crowned America's Next Top Model.

9 "The Girl Who Is America's Next Top Model" (S2, E11) - 7.3

The finale is the highest-rated episode for season 2, beating out episodes that featured an allergic reaction, a cheating scandal, and the contestants' heated interrogation from Janice Dickinson. But even with such a packed season, the finale remains a fan favorite.

RELATED: America's Next Top Model's First 10 Seasons, Ranked According To IMDb

The final episode delivered a dramatic moment when contestant Yoanna House cut her own hair moments before a beauty shoot. Despite the impromptu makeover, Yoanna was able to pull it out of the bag and became America's Next Top Model, beating competitors Mercedes Scelba-Shorte and Shandi Sullivan.

8 "The Girl Who Everyone Thinks Is A Backstabber" (S3, E3) - 6.8

ANTM's makeover episodes have earned a place in the pop culture Hall of Fame. As a result, the makeover episodes often stand out in each cycle. In season 3, the episode featuring the contestant's dramatic makeovers is the highest-rated according to IMDb.

In the episode, Tyra and Jay Manuel accompany the hopefuls to an upscale New York salon for the makeovers. While some were pleased with their new looks, contestants Jennipher Frost and Ann Markley were left in tears. The stylists cut off almost two feet of Jennipher's hair, and Ann was less than happy about being given the mid-aughts chunky highlights look.

7 "The Girl Who Walks On Water" (S4, E13) - 6.9

Season 4, episode 13 saw the three remaining girls performing in a CoverGirl commercial in Cape Town before the final elimination of the series. The final two girls, Kahlen Rondot and Naima Mora, had the judges torn. Some favored Kahlen's high fashion, while others felt Naima's commercial appeal made her a better candidate for the title of America's Next Top Model.

RELATED: 5 America's Next Top Model Winners That Shouldn't Have Won (& 5 That Definitely Deserved It)

In the end, Naima's commercial look won out as she aced all of the final challenges. The episode saw her crowned America's Next Top Model.

6 "The Girl Who Gets A Boob Job" (S5, E5) - 6.7

This iconic ANTM episode featured British supermodel Twiggy, which is one of the reasons it's the highest-rated episode of season 5. However, the deciding factor is the drama that ensued from a controversial challenge where the contestants were forced to point out each other's biggest physical flaws. The girls then had to take part in photoshoots that accentuated these features.

The episode also featured another controversial moment when contestant Nik Pace had to do the photoshoot challenge nude. While not the first nude shoot on the show, Nik was singled out this time around because the judges didn't like her dress.

5 "The Girls Go To Phuket" (S6, E12) - 7.0

Another integral part of every season of ANTM is the exotic destination the girls are flown to. In season 6, the final four girls are taken to Thailand where they travel by tuk-tuk to meet Thai designers for 'go-sees'. The episode delivers an ANTM first when none of the four girls win the go-see challenge after getting held up in traffic, causing all of them to be late.

The episode also sees a shocking twist when the eventual winner, Danielle Evans, finds herself in the bottom two for the very first time.

4 "The Girl Who Marks Her Territory" (S7, E1) - 7.0

The first season to be aired on The CW, season 7 featured more twists and turns as the competition evolved and expanded. The fan-favorite episode is the first in the cycle, where 33 hopefuls compete in challenges to make it into the final 13.

The episode sees some of the series' most interesting challenges. After whittling the competitors down to 21, the girls had to compete in a nude photoshoot, and, after the final 13 was selected, model stereotypes were the subject for the final one.

3 "The Girl Who Won't Stop Talking: Part 1" (S8, E1) - 7.2

The season 8 premiere was split into two episodes, with the first half being the top-rated episode of the cycle according to IMDb. More ambitious would-be models are thrown into the intensive ANTM boot camp where drama ensues, including a familiar face in the form of Jaslene. Rejected from the previous season at the initial boot camp stage, Jaslene Gonzalez returns and manages to impress the judges the second time around.

RELATED: America's Next Top Model's 10 Most Unfair Eliminations, According to Reddit

The season premiere also saw a new reward challenge with a charity focus - the girls were asked to pick out an outfit from Goodwill that reflected their personal style before they were auctioned off to raise money.

2 "The Girls Go Cruisin'" (S9, E1) - 7.2

Another season premiere that captured hearts. The opening episode of Cycle 9 features another grueling boot camp for the contestants, this time on a Caribbean cruise instead of the usual Los Angeles setting. The cruise theme carries the episode, with the contestants asked to model in life jackets to secure their place on the show.

The girls are then narrowed down to the final 13 so the real competition can begin.

1 "If You Can't Make It Here, You Can't Make It Anywhere" (S10, E7) - 7.0

Episode 7 of season 10 is one of two in the cycle to receive an IMDb rating of 7.0, but what makes this episode stand out is the conflict between two sets of contestants and the infamous go-sees challenge that became a staple of ANTM.

In the episode, tensions rise between Lauren and Fatima over a cup of coffee, and the judges question whether Dominque and Whitney's dislike for each other is getting in the way of the competition. It's an action-packed episode full of the Top Model drama viewers came to know and love, so it's clear why it's one of the top-rated for the series.

NEXT: America's Next Top Model & 9 Best Fashion Reality TV Shows, Ranked By IMDb

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Источник: https://screenrant.com/americas-next-top-model-best-episode-season-1-10/

1/24

Ann Ward, Cycle 15

Now, I have a lot of favorites—you'll read more about them in the near future—but Ann stands out for me. This gangly, nervy, six-foot-two self-described "not normal" person (and now Tumblr mainstay) glowed with charisma in spite of—or, really because of—her physical awkwardness. Also, she set an America's Next Top Model record for most consecutive Best Photos. Ann, if you're taking applications for America's Next Top Best Friend (thank you, Jade), I would like to apply.

2/24

Mercedes Scelba-Shorte, Cycle 2

This woman was robbed! Robbed, I tell you! Did you see her photo with silver wire wrapped around her head? Mercedes was a sensational model, the dictionary definition of "endearing," and bravely shared her struggles with lupus with the whole world. To be fair, Mercedes was in the most competitive top three in Top Model history, in my humble opinion, but this girl deserved it all.

3/24

Khrystyana Kazakova, Cycle 24

Khrystyana was just so damn nice. The playful, bubbly Russian-born model helped make Cycle 24 a return to form after three shockingly poor, over-the-top seasons. No matter how cynical viewers were, watching Khrystyana brought up genuine feelings of affection and a desire for her to succeed. (Once, I thought I was sharing an Uber Pool with her, but it turned out to be my overactive imagination.)

4/24

Cory Wade Hindorff, Cycle 20

Yes, there were several shockingly poor seasons that fueled Tyra's quitting, being replaced, and then returning. But allow me to present one of the only bright spots of those years: Cory, a man whose makeover left him entirely bald, like a gorgeous, chisel-jawed alien, and who still made it work. Even though he was constantly told he wasn't masculine enough during judging (God, those were dark days for Top Model), Cory stayed true to his edgy, androgynous style, and remains the only reason those seasons were worth airing.

5/24

Shandi Sullivan, Cycle 2

Sometimes, at night, I can still hear the wailing of Shandi from Cycle 2 during that sincerely horrible moment when she tells her boyfriend she cheated. That's what she's most known for, but it's not why she's on this list. Watching an initially scared-looking Shandi grow in confidence through the season, all the way up to the point where she sobs that it's the first time she's ever felt beautiful, was one of the most moving trajectories of the entire series.

6/24

Analeigh Tipton, Cycle 11

Only one contestant on America's Next Top Model ever truly crossed the bridge from reality star to celebrity—the real "wow, she was on that show?" kind of celebrity—and that's Analeigh Tipton. Remember the adorable babysitter in Crazy, Stupid, Love, and the lead in the short-lived but not awful Manhattan Love Story? Yeah, that was Analeigh. Also, before she was a contestant and then a bona fide actress, she was a competitive skater. Girl knows what she's doing.

7/24

Jade Cole, Cycle 6

The iconic bad-girl-with-a-heart behind the catchphrase, "This is not America's Next Top Best Friend," Jade was unforgettable. Even though she went on the record post-ANTM to say that she felt she'd been "misrepresented" and "exploited," there was strength in Jade's ability to not be the sweet, modest girl. I loved Jade because she said exactly what she thought—sure, she talked about the perfect planes of her face a lot, but wouldn't you if you had those cheekbones?—and because she was impossible to tear your eyes from. Jade was shattering stereotypes about beauty and ego (that you can own them! that you can be proud of them!) long before it was okay to do so on mainstream television.

8/24

Angelea Preston, Cycles 14 and 17

The greatest injustice in Top Model history is that Angelea did not win Cycle 17. For legal reasons, we will never know exactly why Angelea's crown was taken from her after she technically won the All-Star cycle—the episode was never aired, although rumors fly to this day—but I'm not over it. Angelea was the standout model and personality of two whole cycles, and what did she get for it? Absolutely nothing. #JusticeForAngelea

9/24

Eva Marcille, Cycle 3

Like I could ever leave Eva The Diva off this list. Now a successful TV personality (yes, that was her on The Real Housewives of Atlanta and The Young and the Restless), the self-described "little tomboy" and winner of the third cycle was even name-dropped in a Missy Elliot song, which is how you know you've made it.

10/24

Adrianne Curry, Cycle 1

You have to give Adrianne props for being the only person in Top Model history to frustrate Tyra so much that the show literally scrubbed all references to her in following seasons. The model went on record about what she says were promises broken by the ANTM producers, and, well, that was it—they never spoke her name again. Not once. Ever. In 23 cycles. It's pretty impressive, if you think about it.

11/24

Dani Evans, Cycle 6

Despite relentless criticism week after week for her thick accent and front-tooth gap, Dani (then Danielle) still beat out everybody else to claim the Cycle 6 crown. Also, remember when she was so sick, she was meant to be in the hospital, but showed up to a photoshoot instead and looked completely beautiful atop an elephant? When I'm sick, I can barely even make it to the kitchen.

12/24

Rio Summers, Cycle 24

Another standout of Cycle 24, a.k.a. the only reason I still feel inclined to call myself a Top Model fan, Rio was a "villain" that you couldn't help but fall in love with. Rio didn't need to be liked. Rio didn't care if people disagreed with her. Rio was just Rio. and I was here for it. Side note: I spend a lot of time wondering whether I can pull off her fishtail brow. (The answer is no. No, I can't.)

13/24

Alisha White, Cycle 18

Now, you may notice that there are a handful of ANTM: British Invasion contestants in this list, but I assure you that this is not favoritism, even though I happen to be British (a stunning coincidence!). Alisha, one of the Brits who "invaded" ANTM in Cycle 18 (they were invited, but sure), is one of my favorites to ever grace the series. I mean, who could forget her turn as a music video star in the ill-thought-out "We'll Mash You Up"?

14/24

Shei Phan, Cycle 21

Shei was another bright spot of the dark period between cycles 21 and 23—quite literally, a bright spot, because Tyra dyed the right side of her head (and only that side) platinum blonde. Shei has since decided that she doesn't want to model and is now an artist, and also unfortunately was jailed briefly for jumping over a subway turnstile in New York. Oh, well.

15/24

Sophie Sumner, Cycle 18

While we're talking about overlooked Brits during the Invasion cycle, I'd like to bring to your attention Sophie Sumner, who beat out Laura to take the crown. Even though Tyra dyed Sophie's hair the color of cotton candy and forced her to sing the aforementioned "We'll Mash You Up," Sophie still came out on top, even when competing against those pesky Americans. (Fun fact: She's friends with Emma Watson!)

16/24

Will Jardell, Cycle 21

Okay, yes, I've said a lot of things about cycles 21 through to 23 that I can't take back, but I cannot regret watching them because they brought me Will Jardell. Will, a 6''5 stunner with the whitest teeth you ever did see, was the adorable runner-up in cycle 21, and then became one-half of the Backpacking Boyfriends, whose website says they've been documenting their travels since 2014. "There are hundreds of other countries to visit and [Will] cannot wait to experience them all with James by his side," reads said website, and if you'll excuse me, I'll be in a corner crying because Will's happiness is all I've ever wanted.

17/24

Amanda and Michelle Babin, Cycle 7

Yes, Amanda and Michelle were two wildly different people, but you know as well as I do that they will go down in ANTM history as The Twins—Michelle edgy but nonchalant, Amanda a weaker model but with The Fire to Succeed (I'm quoting Tyra). It was all very Shakespearean! I can't remember who won the season, but I'll never forget The Twins!

18/24

Michelle Deighton, Cycle 4

You may remember Michelle as the Model With The Flesh-Eating Virus (which was actually a run-of-the-mill and not at all contagious skin condition), but I think she deserved more. Even though Tyra dyed her hair a loud shade of blonde and forced her to pose in a coffin (and don't even get me started on the blackface shoot in the fourth cycle), Michelle powered through, flesh-eating disease or not. (Not, as it turned out.)

19/24

Raina Hein, Cycle 14

Sadly, nobody has ever asked me to judge an episode of Top Model (Tyra: I'm available!), but if they had, I would have told Raina she was the single best contestant on the series, and then I would have told her to run. Raina got a lot of flak on the show ("Oh my lanta!"), but she's a living, breathing ray of sunshine, and have you seen her eyebrows? How could she not win? How? Oh, my lanta, indeed.

20/24

Allison Harvard, Cycles 12 and 17

Allison was the only model to escape Tyra's ill-fated All Stars season with her dignity intact. Initially known (before her Top Model fame) on 4chan as Creepy Chan, thanks to some pretty creepy photos that became memes, Allison made even the tackiest challenges look classy—remember when Tyra made her sing a song about her deceased father and include the line, "Pot Ledom, it's Top Model spelled backwards"?—and handled her two runner-up spots with grace.

21/24

Bianca Golden, Cycles 9 and 17

Now, if someone shaved all my hair off, I would look like an egg, but Bianca managed to pull it off. Known for her bold personality, Bianca divided viewers—was she a bully, or was she just straight-talking?—but she was rightly named an All-Star for Cycle 17. Things went downhill a little when she was arrested for her part in a fight after filming, but she's now a teacher in New York City, and has been dubbed a "teacher bae" by ~the kids~.

22/24

Cassandra Jean, Cycle 5

Cassandra did not deserve what happened to her on Top Model, i.e. being abruptly cut from the show after refusing to cut her hair not once, but twice (she was a pageant queen! Give her a break, Tyra!). Fortunately, her hair grew back out, and she even landed a guest spot on One Tree Hill as a Sophia Bush lookalike.

23/24

Annaliese Dayes, Cycle 18

Okay, yes, I've included yet another British contestant from the British Invasion cycle, but Annaliese belongs on this list. Cycle 18 was around the time the model bootcamp took a turn towards Branding, and Annaliese was a walking, talking, glowing brand. (She was an okay model, too, but that girl was born to present The Great British Bake Off.) A special shoutout goes to her appearance in "We'll Mash You Up."

24/24

Tiffany Richardson, Cycle 4

Surely you didn't think that I would leave Tiffany Richardson off this list? Thanks to Tyra's cycle four outburst ("WE WERE ALL ROOTING FOR YOU"), a completely unwarranted screech of anguish aimed, for some reason, at Tiffany, Tiffany is Top Model. She's the star of the most iconic moment in Top Model history. She belongs in the Hall of Fame of reality TV history. You've probably used the GIF at least once. Tiffany, we all owe you.

•••

For more celebrity news, beauty and fashion advice, savvy political commentary, and fascinating features, sign up for the Marie Claire newsletter.

SUBSCRIBE HERE

Источник: https://www.marieclaire.com/culture/g25575616/americas-next-top-model-best-contestants/

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Télévision: Séisme: «Top Models» sera désormais diffusé le matin sur la RTS

Actualisé

Le feuilleton sera remplacé par «Plus Belle la vie» en début de soirée dès le 28 juin.

«Top Models» était diffusé en soirée sur la RTS depuis trente-trois ans!

Trois feuilletons changent d’horaire sur la RTS, et c’est historique, car cela concerne «Top Models». Dès le 28 juin, les téléspectateurs retrouveront les Forrester à 11 h 45 au lieu de 18 h du lundi au vendredi juste après «Les feux de l’amour», suivis de «Demain nous appartient» à 12 h 15, alors que «Plus Belle la vie» sera diffusé à 18 h 20. Rappelons que «Top Models» était diffusé en soirée depuis 33 ans!

Contacté, le service de presse explique: «Les habitudes de consommation digitales, en preview sur Play RTS, représentent une part importante de l’audience globale de «Top Models». Nous constatons donc qu’une partie du public visionne déjà le feuilleton de manière délinéarisée. De plus, le fait de rapprocher la diffusion de «Top Models» avec celle de «Les feux de l’amour» fait sens pour le public qui regarde ces deux feuilletons: il y a ainsi une plus grande proximité thématique.»

Pour ceux qui regardent Ridge, Brooke et les autres sur Play RTS, les épisodes seront disponibles encore plus tôt sur la plateforme, soit 24 h avant la diffusion sur RTS 1.

«Plus Belle la vie» pour les plus jeunes

En ce qui concerne «Plus Belle la vie», l’horaire de 18 h 20 est «plus pertinent», nous dit-on, car plus de la moitié de ses fidèles ont moins de 50 ans et la case de 18 h-23 h correspond mieux à leurs habitudes de consommation. La RTS, argumente aussi que ce feuilleton étant produit par un autre média de service public – France TV – «ce changement est en phase avec notre mandat et notre volonté de proposer une meilleure vitrine aux programmes produits par d’autres médias de service public».

Источник: https://www.lematin.ch/story/seisme-top-models-sera-desormais-diffuse-le-matin-sur-la-rts-629640739511

1/24

Ann Ward, Cycle 15

Now, I have a lot of favorites—you'll read more about them in the near future—but Ann stands out for me. This gangly, nervy, six-foot-two self-described "not normal" person (and now Tumblr mainstay) glowed with charisma in spite of—or, really because of—her physical awkwardness. Also, she set an America's Next Top Model record for most consecutive Best Photos. Ann, if you're taking applications for America's Next Top Best Friend (thank you, Jade), I would like to apply.

2/24

Mercedes Scelba-Shorte, Cycle 2

This woman was robbed! Robbed, I tell you! Did you see her photo with silver wire wrapped around her head? Mercedes was a sensational model, the dictionary definition of "endearing," and bravely shared her struggles with lupus with the whole world. To be fair, Mercedes was in the most competitive top three in Top Model history, in my humble opinion, but this girl deserved it all.

3/24

Khrystyana Kazakova, Cycle 24

Khrystyana was just so damn nice. The playful, bubbly Russian-born model helped make Cycle 24 a return to form after three shockingly poor, over-the-top seasons. No matter how cynical viewers were, watching Khrystyana brought up genuine feelings of affection and a desire for her to succeed. (Once, I thought I was sharing an Uber Pool with her, but it turned out to be my overactive imagination.)

4/24

Cory Wade Hindorff, Cycle 20

Yes, there were several shockingly poor seasons that fueled Tyra's quitting, being replaced, and then returning. But allow me to present one of the only bright spots of those years: Cory, a man whose makeover left him entirely bald, like a gorgeous, chisel-jawed alien, and who still made it work. Even though he was constantly told he wasn't masculine enough during judging (God, those were dark days for Top Model), Cory stayed true to his edgy, androgynous style, and remains the only reason those seasons were worth airing.

5/24

Shandi Sullivan, Cycle 2

Sometimes, at night, I can still hear the wailing of Shandi from Cycle 2 during that sincerely horrible moment when she tells her boyfriend she cheated. That's what she's most known for, but it's not why she's on this list. Watching an initially scared-looking Shandi grow in confidence through the season, all the way up to the point where she sobs that it's the first time she's ever felt beautiful, was one of the most moving trajectories of the entire series.

6/24

Analeigh Tipton, Cycle 11

Only one contestant on America's Next Top Model ever truly crossed the bridge from reality star to celebrity—the real "wow, she was on that show?" kind of celebrity—and that's Analeigh Tipton. Remember the adorable babysitter in Crazy, Stupid, Love, and the lead in the short-lived but not awful Manhattan Love Story? Yeah, that was Analeigh. Also, before she was a contestant and then a bona fide actress, she was a competitive skater. Girl knows what she's doing.

7/24

Jade Cole, Cycle 6

The iconic bad-girl-with-a-heart behind the catchphrase, "This is not America's Next Top Best Friend," Jade was unforgettable. Even though she went on the record post-ANTM to say that she felt she'd been "misrepresented" and "exploited," there was strength in Jade's ability to not be the sweet, modest girl. I loved Jade because she said exactly what she thought—sure, she talked about the perfect planes of her face a lot, but wouldn't you if you had those cheekbones?—and because she was impossible to tear your eyes from. Jade was shattering stereotypes about beauty and ego (that you can own them! that you can be proud of them!) long before it was okay to do so on mainstream television.

8/24

Angelea Preston, Cycles 14 and 17

The greatest injustice in Top Model history is that Angelea did not win Cycle 17. For legal reasons, we will never know exactly why Angelea's crown was taken from her after she technically won the All-Star cycle—the episode was never aired, although rumors fly to this day—but I'm not over it. Angelea was the standout model and personality of two whole cycles, and what did she get for it? Absolutely nothing. #JusticeForAngelea

9/24

Eva Marcille, Cycle 3

Like I could ever leave Eva The Diva off this list. Now a successful TV personality (yes, that was her on The Real Housewives of Atlanta and The Young and the Restless), the self-described "little tomboy" and winner of the third cycle was even name-dropped in a Missy Elliot song, which is how you know you've made it.

10/24

Adrianne Curry, Cycle 1

You have to give Adrianne props for being the only person in Top Model history to frustrate Tyra so much that the show literally scrubbed all references to her in following seasons. The model went on record about what she says were promises broken by the ANTM producers, and, well, that was it—they never spoke her name again. Not once. Ever. In 23 cycles. It's pretty impressive, if you think about it.

11/24

Dani Evans, Cycle 6

Despite relentless criticism week after week for her thick accent and front-tooth gap, Dani (then Danielle) still beat out everybody else to claim the Cycle 6 crown. Also, remember when she was so sick, she was meant to be in the hospital, but showed up to a photoshoot instead and looked completely beautiful atop an elephant? When I'm sick, I can barely even make it to the kitchen.

12/24

Rio Summers, Cycle 24

Another standout of Cycle 24, a.k.a. the only reason I still feel inclined to call myself a Top Model fan, Rio was a "villain" that you couldn't help but fall in love with. Rio didn't need to be liked. Rio didn't care if people disagreed with her. Rio was just Rio. and I was here for it. Side note: I spend a lot of time wondering whether I can pull off her fishtail brow. (The answer is no. No, I can't.)

13/24

Alisha White, Cycle 18

Now, you may notice that there are a handful of ANTM: British Invasion contestants in this list, but I assure you that this is not favoritism, even though I happen to be British (a stunning coincidence!). Alisha, one of the Brits who "invaded" ANTM in Cycle 18 (they were invited, but sure), is one of my favorites to ever grace the series. I mean, who could forget her turn as a music video star in the ill-thought-out "We'll Mash You Up"?

14/24

Shei Phan, Cycle 21

Shei was another bright spot of the dark period between cycles 21 and 23—quite literally, a bright spot, because Tyra dyed the right side of her head (and only that side) platinum blonde. Shei has since decided that she doesn't want to model and is now an artist, and also unfortunately was jailed briefly for jumping over a subway turnstile in New York. Oh, well.

15/24

Sophie Sumner, Cycle 18

While we're talking about overlooked Brits during the Invasion cycle, I'd like to bring to your attention Sophie Sumner, who beat out Laura to take the crown. Even though Tyra dyed Sophie's hair the color of cotton candy and forced her to sing the aforementioned "We'll Mash You Up," Sophie still came out on top, even when competing against those pesky Americans. (Fun fact: She's friends with Emma Watson!)

16/24

Will Jardell, Cycle 21

Okay, yes, I've said a lot of things about cycles 21 through to 23 that I can't take back, but I cannot regret watching them because they brought me Will Jardell. Will, a 6''5 stunner with the whitest teeth you ever did see, was the adorable runner-up in cycle 21, and then became one-half of the Backpacking Boyfriends, whose website says they've been documenting their travels since 2014. "There are hundreds of other countries to visit and [Will] cannot wait to experience them all with James by his side," reads said website, and if you'll excuse me, I'll be in a corner crying because Will's happiness is all I've ever wanted.

17/24

Amanda and Michelle Babin, Cycle 7

Yes, Amanda and Michelle were two wildly different people, but you know as well as I do that they will go down in ANTM history as The Twins—Michelle edgy but nonchalant, Amanda a weaker model but with The Fire to Succeed (I'm quoting Tyra). It was all very Shakespearean! I can't remember who won the season, but I'll never forget The Twins!

18/24

Michelle Deighton, Cycle 4

You may remember Michelle as the Model With The Flesh-Eating Virus (which was actually a run-of-the-mill and not at all contagious skin condition), but I think she deserved more. Even though Tyra dyed her hair a loud shade of blonde and forced her to pose in a coffin (and don't even get me started on the blackface shoot in the fourth cycle), Michelle powered through, flesh-eating disease or not. (Not, as it turned out.)

19/24

Raina Hein, Cycle 14

Sadly, nobody has ever asked me to judge an episode of Top Model (Tyra: I'm available!), but if they had, I would have told Raina she was the single best contestant on the series, and then I would have told her to run. Raina got a lot of flak on the show ("Oh my lanta!"), but she's a living, breathing ray of sunshine, and have you seen her eyebrows? How could she not win? How? Oh, my lanta, indeed.

20/24

Allison Harvard, Cycles 12 and 17

Allison was the only model to escape Tyra's ill-fated All Stars season with her dignity intact. Initially known (before her Top Model fame) on 4chan as Creepy Chan, thanks to some pretty creepy photos that became memes, Allison made even the tackiest challenges look classy—remember when Tyra made her sing a song about her deceased father and include the line, "Pot Ledom, it's Top Model spelled backwards"?—and handled her two runner-up spots with grace.

21/24

Bianca Golden, Cycles 9 and 17

Now, if someone shaved all my hair off, I would look like an egg, but Bianca managed to pull it off. Known for her bold personality, Bianca divided viewers—was she a bully, or was she just straight-talking?—but she was rightly named an All-Star for Cycle 17. Things went downhill a little when she was arrested for her part in a fight after filming, but she's now a teacher in New York City, and has been dubbed a "teacher bae" by ~the kids~.

22/24

Cassandra Jean, Cycle 5

Cassandra did not deserve what happened to her on Top Model, i.e. being abruptly cut from the show after refusing to cut her hair not once, but twice (she was a pageant queen! Give her a break, Tyra!). Fortunately, her hair grew back out, and she even landed a guest spot on One Tree Hill as a Sophia Bush lookalike.

23/24

Annaliese Dayes, Cycle 18

Okay, yes, I've included yet another British contestant from the British Invasion cycle, but Annaliese belongs on this list. Cycle 18 was around the time the model bootcamp took a turn towards Branding, and Annaliese was a walking, talking, glowing brand. (She was an okay model, too, but that girl was born to present The Great British Bake Off.) A special shoutout goes to her appearance in "We'll Mash You Up."

24/24

Tiffany Richardson, Cycle 4

Surely you didn't think that I would leave Tiffany Richardson off this list? Thanks to Tyra's cycle four outburst ("WE WERE ALL ROOTING FOR YOU"), a completely unwarranted screech of anguish aimed, for some reason, at Tiffany, Tiffany is Top Model. She's the star of the most iconic moment in Top Model history. She belongs in the Hall of Fame of reality TV history. You've probably used the GIF at least once. Tiffany, we all owe you.

•••

For more celebrity news, beauty and fashion advice, savvy political commentary, and fascinating features, sign up for the Marie Claire newsletter.

SUBSCRIBE HERE

Источник: https://www.marieclaire.com/culture/g25575616/americas-next-top-model-best-contestants/

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Источник: https://www.lamborghini.com/en-en/models

How ditching Twiggy and joining Twitter ruined America’s Next Top Model

Catfights, explosive eliminations, buzzcuts and beard weaves: these were just some of the things that made America’s Next Top Model great. Guaranteeing viewers a drama-fuelled hour of mindless trash, ANTM was the ultimate escape from real-world troubles, a show in which a group of women were forced to “smize” (to smile with your eyes, non-ANTM watchers) aggressively and walk on catwalks that definitely didn’t pass health and safety checks (think zorbing in high heels) in order to win a contract with a modelling agency. Its cartoonish contestants (The Pageant Girl, The Goth, The Girl That Nobody Likes), plus presenter Tyra Banks, ensured viewers a constant stream of tantrums and tears.

This couldn’t be sustained for ever, however. ANTM had two drastic phases of decline – one of which began in season 18, when it messed with the formula with the so-called “British Invasion”. It saw the arrival of seven members from the far inferior UK spin-off, competing against seven American contestants. The failure of the British models to live up to their US counterparts was encapsulated in episode one when the American models go skinny-dipping, sending the British girls into a meek meltdown, not knowing where to look. It detracted from the brash, explicit American humour that often makes reality TV worth tuning in for. This is not a show you watch in order to chuckle at passive-aggressive comments and clever quips. Its appeal lies in the screaming matches and salacious gossip propagated by its attention-seeking contestants.

Many fans had hoped that this season was a blip, but things only got worse as the producers attempted to win back lost viewers (US ratings slumped to 1.34 million from a high of 6.4 million) by altering the voting process. In a bid to appeal to an audience fixated on their phones, viewers were now able to participate in the judging by rating each model based on their social media presence. Not only were contestants forced to pose semi-nude with a swarm of bees for a jewellery shoot, now they had to make sure their filter was right in order to dazzle online. The previous judges, who included model Twiggy and fashion photographer Nigel Barker, were replaced by PR experts and Twitter personalities, whose decisions, along with the public vote, would dictate who would leave each week. High-end spreads for Vogue were suddenly swapped for online challenges.

These changes quickly transformed the show from a semi-serious modelling competition into an Instagram popularity contest, a gear-shift that felt like a cheap grab for the zeitgeist. Allowing the public to decide who stayed and who left had disastrous consequences, putting too much focus on likability, a trait missing from some of the show’s best, most memorable (and sometimes meanest) contestants.

With its vacuous new format, the show struts towards its 25th season in 2020, leaving me no choice but to say: America’s Next Top Model, pack your bags – you’re no longer in the running towards becoming America’s Next Top Reality Show.

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2020/jan/06/jump-the-shark-americas-next-top-model

Why America’s Next Top Model Was Never Better Than Its First Cycle

Tonight America’s Next Top Model will crown its 22nd and final winner. It’s been 12 years, 300 contestants, countless tears, and one face merkin since Tyra Banks started her humble modeling competition on the UPN network in the summer of 2003. It was a surprise hit at the start of the reality-television boom, and since then, ANTM has skillfully repackaged itself, doubling down on its popularity with multiple “cycles” a year, produced at a relatively cheap cost. But as the show went through various iterations — the British invasion, the short season, and, most wisely, the inclusion of men — its essence never really changed. It was forever and always a show about Tyra Banks, and when you realize this incontrovertible truth, there’s only one season that transcended Tyra: the first cycle. It was a rough draft of a show, a moment before Tyra had repurposed it as a vehicle for herself and her life philosophy. It actually felt like it was about modeling, and the only time the show followed Tyra’s own advice: “Human is beautiful, perfect is boring.”

I can hear your furious tweets now. But Shandi’s affaire de coeur! But “We were all rooting for you!” But Eva’s tarantula photo! (We practiced that one in the mirror for days.) Yes, the other cycles had higher points of drama. They were better produced, more complete seasons with increasingly hysterical challenges that eventually became the show’s trademark. The first season — and I’m going to call it a season because that’s what it was then — is stunningly humble in comparison. It was rough and unwieldy; the judging panel took place in a room so cramped the camera couldn’t properly zoom back far enough to include the wall hanging of Tyra Banks behind the judges. There was no soundstage, and the challenges were remarkably straightforward: Walk down the catwalk, do a press interview, strike a pose. When the wannabe-models go to Paris, they’re penned into a small one-bedroom hotel room where there aren’t even enough beds for them. Tyra says that this is because she wanted to reflect the reality of life as a working model (a principle she would quickly discard once the show got a larger budget). And whether or not you buy her reasoning, she was right. Modeling can be deeply unglamorous, and there was something about the low production value that reflected that simple truth.

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At its best, ANTM’s first season felt like a glimpse into how fashion actually worked: infuriatingly idiosyncratic, wildly subjective, and at its core, misogynist. The judges were Janice Dickinson, the acidic, self-proclaimed first supermodel, Marie Claire editor Beau Quillian, Kimora Lee Simmons, and, of course, Tyra Banks. When they looked at photos, there wasn’t a manufactured rubric to use. They either liked it or they didn’t, and their suggestions produced a Sisyphean logic: Your foot’s gigantic, you’re too old, you need to lose weight, you’re too skinny, you look like a boy. Over time, ANTM tried to excise the inherent subjectivity of assessing physical beauty by arguing that it’s a skill that can be honed (thus the introduction of a numerical scoring system beginning in Cycle 19).

In this way, ANTM was a show that teetered between two very different kinds of reality television: the skills-based competition shows, like Top Chef, Project Runway, and The Great British Baking Show, which favored merit over personality; and those that function on a purer schadenfreude, like Dance Moms or the Real Housewives franchise. And as much as the show paid lip service to individuality, ANTM wasn’t about being the best model, but about manufacturing women in Tyra’s likeness: Strivers, women of industry, who would do anything to be like her — yank out their teeth, shave their heads, shave their teeth, or hop on one leg while laughing. Eventually, Tyra developed her own set of rules with its own argot. Smiling with your eyes — smizing — naturally filtered into our language. More followed: booty tooch (sticking your butt out), boom boom boom (a six-pack), H2T (head to toe). What was important wasn’t so much what you were doing but that you mouthed the words.

Remarkably, in season one, the women didn’t readily submit to the logic of the show. When it came down to the final four, for instance, zealous Evangelicals Robin and Shannon both refused to do a photo shoot at Buddha Bar where they would have to simulate nudity in a fake ad campaign for diamonds. They said that they believed the act would compromise their values. They said no, and surprisingly, their decisions were respected. In the future, this would simply be non-negotiable: You wouldn’t be able to say no.

Then there was Elyse, the aspiring medical student and militant atheist who regularly rolled her eyes at the entire prospect of modeling. She criticized the other contestants, mentors, and challenges — something that would be unheard of in the future — and the producers gave her the space to do so. As the fates would have it, Elyse was also the most natural model of the group, the favorite of photographers for her lithe, androgynous frame and Kewpie features. During one of the final judging panels, Tyra reminded Elyse of how she thought modeling was purely physical. Did she still think that? Elyse launched into an explanation of how lots of estrogen produces desirably “feminine” features, like a small brow ridge and fuller lips. While she didn’t disagree with Tyra, she also didn’t concede. Beauty was physical, too.

But this was never Tyra’s logic. She tried to argue modeling was more about character than it was about physicality. On her personal blog back in 2007, NPR’s Ann Powers wrote that Tyra Banks was the new Ayn Rand. “Tyra’s not just giving fashion tips; she is building an ontology. In fashion, she sees the human endeavor — the struggle to transcend one’s fate, the tension between one’s limits and one’s dreams, the demands set upon those who would live in harmony with their chosen community. It’s just so deep.” As the show wore on, Tyra Banks only became more exacting in her vision. She wasn’t just about scouting talent, but rather enforcing an ideology of hard work and individuality. Nominally, models could come in a variety of ethnicities, skin tones, and sizes, but the winners were all, for the most part, very skinny and light-complexioned. Instead of submitting to the whims of fashion, contestants would have to submit to Tyra’s ideology on how to live a successful life. When a contestant was sent home, it was because she somehow failed to live up to the potential that Tyra saw inside of her.

As the show wore on, moments of insubordination would become less common and more memorable. Even though she was arguably the strongest model in Cycle 18, Azmarie (whom you may recognize as a member of Hakeem’s crew from Empire) was eliminated because she refused to wear booty shorts that read “Booty Tooch” for a master class on how to shake your ass. Then there’s the most infamous moment of Top Model history when Tyra unleashed a tirade against Cycle 4 contestant Tiffany Richardson. Tiffany’s resistance wasn’t even brazen. Demoralized by the demands of the show, she simply didn’t want to do it anymore. And within that, Tyra saw true failure, because not trying, giving up, losing hope, was the greatest flaw of all.

The truth about America’s Next Top Model is that it’s horrifying to watch. What’s interesting about the first cycle is how that horror manifests itself in plain sight. While the contestants are in Paris, one of their challenges is to wear a piece of couture and go out to dinner and drinks with four European men. Why? So they can judge them on whether they embody the spirit of a woman who would wear haute couture. This is insane. That horror, which is so bare in the first season, only gets more disguised later on: The show became campier, more ludicrous, and vaguely surreal, like smizing until your eyes bleed in front of a fun-house mirror. Contestants put on their makeup without mirrors, they walk down the side of a building as a catwalk in the rain, they dress up as different ethnicities for a photo shoot, but the extreme appeal only distracts from the fact that at the end of the day, someone is going home because they’re just not pretty enough.  

What was important about season one was it had a self-critical voice in Elyse, and, to a certain extent, Robin and Shannon; it was the only season where the contestants didn’t readily buy into the project. They voiced their opinions. They had reservations. They said no. By the end, though, ANTM set the template for the following 21 cycles by choosing the girl who wanted it the most: Adrianne Curry. When you watch the first season, it is impossible not to love her. She was the awkward tomboy with a thick Chicago accent whose mother got scammed by modeling agencies promising to help her daughter’s career. When her mom comes to visit her, she tells her that she’s going to earn that money they lost. Adrianne was the best contestant, even though she wasn’t the best model.

In the finale, you could see the gears turning: Tyra was deciding what this show was about. Would it be about the daily grind of the modeling industry — about its whims, egos, and drudgery? Or would it be about the American Dream of pulling yourself up by your four-inch heels? “You were the biggest transformation,” Tyra told Adrianne when she anointed her the winner. And Adrianne tearfully told the camera, “I’m going to have a good life now. My family’s going to have a good life now. A lot is going to change.”

Why ANTM Was Never Better Than Its First CycleИсточник: https://www.vulture.com/2015/12/americas-next-top-model-first-cycle-was-the-best.html

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