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COVID-19 Information and Resources

The city of Peoria continues to monitor pandemic metrics and guidance from health officials in determining service levels and safety protocols. The health and safety of our community remains a top priority, and changes will communicated to ensure seamless service.


Table of Contents

1. Face Covering Guidance

2. Vaccine Information

3. COVID-19 Testing

4. Resources for Peoria Residents and Businesses

 

 


October 18, 2021 - Starting Monday, October 18th, City of Peoria will encourage, but not require, the use of masks in our public buildings. As always, we will continue to monitor and further adjust our COVID mitigation practices as necessary.

Please remember to practice the same prevention habits you’ve become accustomed to:

  • If you don’t feel well, stay at home.
  • Social distancing works!  In an environment with close proximity, we encourage the use of masks.
  • Hand washing and sanitizing are proven to be effective.
  • Consider “fist bumps” in place of handshakes.

 

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The COVID-19 vaccine distribution has begun. With oversight from the Arizona Department of Health Services (AZDHS), the vaccine distribution is allocated through local and tribal health jurisdictions. In Peoria, this is being handled by Maricopa County, and their website is being updated daily with important information.

Effective March 24, 2021 all Arizona residents 16 and older are eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Read Press Release: Arizona Expands COVID-19 Vaccination Eligibility To All.

 

Schedule a Vaccine Appointment

To make a vaccine appointment, visit the Maricopa County vaccine information webpage or the AZDHS vaccine information webpage. Vaccination locations are available to all residents statewide..

If you are having trouble with the registration page, you may contact ADHS Tech Support: 602-542-1000 or email [email protected] Those without computer access or who need extra help registering may call the AZHDS Helpline at 844-542-8201.

 

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Please use the links below to find a testing location at state and county sites near you:

 

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Peoria's Community Resource Guide

This comprehensive guide from Peoria SUPPORT provides a wealth of resources for families, employment, seniors, basic needs and assistance, housing, health and welfare, and much more.

For assistance, please visit www.peoriaaz.gov/peoriaSUPPORT or call (623) 773-7250 or email [email protected]

Governor's Office Announcements

 

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Источник: https://www.peoriaaz.gov/residents/covid-19-information

Testing

While vaccines provide the best protection from COVID-19, treatment options such as Monoclonal Antibodies are available if you have had symptoms of COVID-19 for 10 days or less or have been exposed to COVID-19. If taken early, they can reduce the risk of severe disease, hospitalization, and death. Ask your doctor about Monoclonal Antibodies or call the Combat COVID Monoclonal Antibodies Call Center at 1-877-332-6585 (English) or 1-877-366-0310 (Spanish). 

Be Sure. Get Tested for COVID-19.

It has never been easier or faster to get tested. If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 or think you may have COVID-19, you should get tested.

Find My Testing PlaceVersion en Español

Fully vaccinated individuals should get tested if they:

  • Are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19. Anyone experiencing symptoms should get tested immediately.

  • Have had close contact with someone who has COVID-19, even if they are not experiencing symptoms. You should get tested within 3-5 days after exposure.

  • Are traveling internationally and returning to the United States. Fully vaccinated international travelers are required to get tested three days before travel by air into the U.S. and should also get tested 3-5 days after their trip.

Unvaccinated individuals should get tested if they: 

  • Are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19. Anyone experiencing symptoms should get tested immediately. 

  • Have come in contact with someone who has COVID-19, even if they are not experiencing symptoms. If they do not have symptoms, they should wait at least six days after their last known exposure to COVID-19 before they get tested.

  • Take part in activities that put them at higher risk for COVID-19 because they cannot physically distance as needed to avoid exposure, such as travel, attending large social or mass gatherings, or being in crowded or poorly ventilated indoor settings.

If available through an employer or another organization, unvaccinated individuals can be part of a program where they get tested regularly for COVID-19.

Frequently Asked Questions

Testing Options

With vaccines available, is testing still necessary?

Yes. With the more contagious Delta variant rapidly spreading, anyone who has symptoms of COVID or has been exposed to COVID should get tested as soon as possible. Testing helps locate virus transmission in North Carolina’s communities and allows us to take action to protect one another.

Do I need to get tested if I am fully vaccinated?

Fully vaccinated individuals should get tested if they:

  • Are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19. Anyone experiencing symptoms should get tested immediately.

  • Have had close contact with someone who has COVID-19, even if they are not experiencing symptoms. You should get tested within 3-5 days after exposure.

  • Are traveling internationally and returning to the United States. Fully vaccinated international travelers are required to get tested three days before travel by air into the U.S. and should also get tested 3-5 days after their trip.

For more information, read our frequently asked questions about vaccines.

I don’t have health insurance. Can I still get tested?

Yes. If you don't have health insurance:  

  • Call your nearest Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). If you think that you may have COVID-19, be sure to let the FQHC know that when you call for an appointment. FQHCs are community-based health care providers that receive federal funds to provide health services in communities across the state. 
  • Call your local health department if you can't be seen at an FQHC.
  • Go to CVS and select Walgreens and Walmart testing sites at no cost. 
  • Look for no-cost testing sites at ncdhhs.gov/gettested

Any North Carolina resident 18 and older can request a no-cost, at-home COVID-19 test collection kit. Parents or guardians of residents under 18 can request a test collection kit for those aged 2-17. Learn how to request a kit.

How can I find a COVID-19 test?

It has never been easier or faster to get tested. If you need a test, you can:

  • Visit a no-cost community testing event
  • Visit a nearby test site 
  • Pick up an at-home test at a local pharmacy, where available
  • Request a no-cost COVID-19 test home collection kit
  • Call a health care provider

For more information about testing options, visit ncdhhs.gov/GetTested.

What type of tests are used to diagnose COVID-19?

Two types of common tests are PCR and rapid antigen tests. COVID-19 PCR tests detect the genetic material (RNA) that is specific to COVID-19. A PCR test can detect the virus within days of infection and is generally more sensitive than a rapid antigen test, especially for people who are not experiencing COVID-19 symptoms. PCR test results can take 1-3 days as the tests are analyzed in a laboratory, but results can be done in as little as 24 hours.

COVID-19 rapid antigen tests work to detect proteins that are specific to the virus that causes COVID-19 and do not typically need to be sent to a lab to be analyzed. People with COVID-19 symptoms and a negative COVID-19 antigen test should get a PCR test to confirm the negative results.

Learn more about COVID-19 diagnostic tests from the CDC.

How do at-home tests work?

At-home COVID-19 tests are a great option for anyone who can’t make it to a testing site. Check with your local pharmacy for availability. These tests are performed by an individual at home. Instructions should be followed very carefully when taking the test. 

Anyone who receives Food and Nutritional Services (FNS) benefits or has a disability that may make it difficult to travel to a COVID-19 testing site may qualify for a no-cost, at-home COVID-19 test collection kit. Check to see if you qualify and request a kit.

What is an antibody test and is North Carolina tracking antibody tests in our testing data?

Two kinds of tests are available for COVID-19: viral tests and antibody tests. A viral test tells someone if they currently have COVID-19. It is also called a diagnostic test. An antibody test tells someone if they had the virus before. Antibody tests are not included in NCDHHS’ total test numbers.

Learn more about the types of tests available in this video from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Will testing be done at schools?

To slow the spread of COVID-19 in North Carolina and to protect teachers, staff, students, and their families, K-12 public schools can get COVID-19 tests through NCDHHS. Making it easy for our students, families, and staff to get tested helps our schools safely and confidently continue in-person learning. Testing helps us more easily detect the virus and take quick action to keep it from spreading. Learn more.

Will testing be done at workplaces?

Some employers may choose to set up screening testing as part of their efforts to protect employees.

What safety protocols are in place at testing sites?

Health and safety are a top priority at all testing sites. Staff are trained in safety protocols, have an adequate supply of protective equipment like masks and gloves, and everyone is required to practice the 3 Ws (Wear. Wait. Wash.) on site.

Are all testing sites the same?

No. We encourage everyone to call the test site before they go to learn about testing criteria, availability, hours and location. Not all health care providers provide testing on-site. Some require additional screenings or an appointment and/or referral from a health care provider. Locations may also change.

How can my community organization host a testing event?

Review NCDHHS's Partner COVID-19 Testing Toolkit, which is designed for organizations seeking to host community testing events. organizations, churches and nonprofits. The Toolkit is available in English and Spanish.

Test Results

How long does it take to receive COVID-19 test results?

Test result times vary. Some tests are point-of-care tests, meaning results may be available at the testing site in less than an hour. Other tests must be sent to a laboratory to analyze. This process may take a from a few hours to a few days once received by the lab.

When someone gets a test, they should speak with the provider or laboratory that performed the test about when and how they will receive their test results. Test results are not available by calling 2-1-1.

How do I access my test results?

How a person accesses their test results will depend on their testing location. Ask the provider or laboratory that performs their test about when and how they will receive their test results. Test results are not available by calling 2-1-1.

What do I do while I'm waiting for my test results?

It depends. If someone has symptoms or were tested because they were exposed to someone with COVID-19, they should stay home and avoid anyone in their household.

If the individual was tested but has no symptoms and no known exposure to someone with COVID-19 (for example, as part of a workplace screening program), they do not need to stay home while waiting for results unless told to do so by the employer or by public health.

Learn more about the steps to take after being tested.

I’ve been around a person who was diagnosed with COVID-19. When should I get tested?

Fully vaccinated individuals should get tested if they are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms. 

Those who are not fully vaccinated and have been exposed to COVID-19 should quarantine at home and avoid contact with other members of the household for 14 days past their last known exposure to COVID-19. They should get tested immediately if experiencing symptoms of COVID-19. If they do not have symptoms, they should wait at least six days after their last known exposure to COVID-19 before they get tested. Even if the test comes back negative, they should still quarantine for 14 days after their last known exposure to COVID-19. Find out what steps to take if the test comes back positive.  

Learn more about quarantine guidance for the general community.

What do I do if my test is negative?

If a person was tested because they have symptoms, they should stay home until they have no fever without the use of fever-reducing medicines, and they have felt well for at least 24 hours.

If they were tested because of a known contact to someone with COVID-19, they should follow the quarantine guidance (stay home and avoid contact with other members of the household) until 14 days after their last exposure. 

If they were tested for another reason and have no symptoms, they can resume their regular activities.

Learn more about the steps you should take if the test was negative.

What do I do if my test is positive?

Per CDC guidelines, if a test comes back positive and the individual had symptoms, they should stay home and isolate (avoid anyone in their household) until they can say yes to all three questions:

  • Has it been at least 10 days since they first had symptoms? AND
  • Has it been 24 hours since they last had a fever without using fever-reducing medicine? AND
  • Have their symptoms, such as coughing and shortness of breath, improved?

Learn more about the steps to take after being tested.

If you have recently tested positive for COVID-19 and have had symptoms for 10 days or less, talk to your health care provider to see if monoclonal antibody therapy is an option for you or find a treatment center near you.

Per CDC guidelines, if a test comes back positive and the individual did not have symptoms, they should stay home and isolate (avoid anyone in their household) until 10 days have passed since the date of the first positive COVID-19 diagnostic test, assuming they did not develop symptoms since the positive test.

If they have tested positive for COVID-19, the local health department or another member of the COVID-19 Community Team will call to ensure they have the information and support they need, such as tips for staying at home and monitoring symptoms.

To protect family and friends and slow the spread of the virus, the COVID-19 Community Team member will also ask who they have recently been nearby. The COVID-19 Community Team will reach out to anyone who has been near the person who has tested positive to share information and support, as well as help them get tested. The team will not share their name or personal information. This information is confidential and will remain private.

Reporting Test Results

I'm fearful that I will be discriminated against if I get tested and test positive for COVID-19. Can I get tested or access my results without others knowing?

NCDHHS and the COVID-19 Community Team will not release names or other identifiable information to anyone. Personal information is strictly confidential and will be treated as the private health record it is. People who have tested positive for COVID-19 and are in isolation, and people who may have been exposed to COVID-19 and are self-monitoring, are doing the right thing and protecting their communities and loved ones. COVID-19 Community Team members will offer compassion, support via phone and texts, and help as appropriate, but never hostility or judgment.

While some people may be worried or have concerns about COVID-19, no one should be treated differently. All people should be treated with compassion and people should speak up if they hear others making statements against people in their community. It will be much harder for our state to slow the spread of COVID-19 if people are fearful about how they will be treated if they come forward for testing, support and help.

Does North Carolina track the number of people who have tested positive for COVID-19 and recovered?Are hospitals and private labs required to report all negative tests?

Yes. Pursuant to Session Law 2020-4 Section 4.10.(a), NCDHHS requires each laboratory or health care provider to report the results of all COVID-19 testing to the Department. NCDHHS is working with labs and health care providers to submit this information electronically.

Источник: https://covid19.ncdhhs.gov/about-covid-19/testing

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Walmart removes dancing cactus toy that plays song about cocaine use

Walmart has stopped selling a “toddler-friendly” musical toy after irate customers learned it was singing about cocaine use in Polish.

The “Dancing Cactus Toy,” which was selling for $25.85 on the budget retailer’s website, plays songs in English, Spanish and Polish that are designed for young children to learn, according to Canada’s CTV News.

One of the songs the dancing cactus plays is “Where Is The White Eel?” — a Polish rap song by Cypis released in 2015 that features lyrics about drug abuse and death.

“The only thing in my head / is five grams of cocaine, fly away alone / to the edge of oblivion,” is how the rap begins, according to lyrics obtained from a translation website.

The "Dancing Cactus Toy" was selling at the budget retailer for $25.85, and plays song in  English, Spanish and Polish designed for young children to learn.

“Chemparty, I wanna go skiing / To the dealer, not the Alps / Oh f – – k, I think I’ll die,” is purportedly the opening of a later verse.

A Polish woman who resides in Ontario, Canada, was mortified after buying the product for her granddaughter, only to overhear the lyrics in her native language.

“It just so happens that I am Polish and when I started to listen to the songs and I heard the words,” said Ania Tanner, speaking to CTV News. “I was in shock. I thought ‘Is this some kind of joke?'”

Polish-speaking grandmother Ania Tanner was left outraged when she heard the song.

“This toy uses swear words and talking about cocaine use,” she continued. “This is not what I ordered for my granddaughter.”

“It’s a very depressing song,” she added.

Meanwhile, another concerned customer took to Twitter to share a video of the toy cactus dancing to the explicit track.

“Bought my daughter a dancing cactus toy…that appears to be singing and dancing to a polish song about cocaine addiction???” @LisaMahapatra wrote.

Bought my daughter a dancing cactus toy…that appears to be singing and dancing to a polish song about cocaine addiction??? pic.twitter.com/43NE4ZopZk

— {{{Lisa Mahapatra}}} (@lisamahapatra) November 20, 2021

A spokesperson for Walmart, responding to the uproar, told CTV News, “These items are sold by a third-party seller on our marketplace website. We are removing the items while we look into this complaint further.”

The Post has reached out for further comment.

Meanwhile, Cypis said the Chinese manufacturer who created the toy used his rap song without permission. He is now intending to pursue legal action.

Источник: https://nypost.com/2021/11/25/walmart-removes-dancing-cactus-toy-that-plays-cocaine-song/

2019 El Paso shooting

Mass shooting in El Paso, Texas

On August 3, 2019, a mass shooting occurred at a Walmart store in El Paso, Texas, United States. A gunman shot and killed 23 people[n 1] and injured 23 others.[10] The Federal Bureau of Investigation is investigating the shooting as an act of domestic terrorism and a hate crime.[11][12] The shooting has been described as the deadliest attack on Latinos in modern American history.[13][14]

Patrick Wood Crusius, a 21-year-old from Allen, Texas, was arrested and charged with capital murder in connection with the shooting. Police believe a manifesto with white nationalist and anti-immigrant themes, posted on the online message board 8chan shortly before the attack, was written by Crusius; it cites the year's earlier Christchurch mosque shootings in New Zealand and the far-right conspiracy theory known as the Great Replacement as inspiration for the attack.

Incident[edit]

The shooting occurred at a Walmart Supercenter near the Cielo Vista Mall on the east side of El Paso. The gunman walked into the store carrying what is believed to be a WASR-10 rifle,[15] a semi-automatic civilian version of the AK-47, and opened fire just before 10:40 a.m.[16]

The store manager witnessed the gunman begin firing in the parking lot prior to entering the crowded store. He issued a "Code Brown", designating an active shooter, to his employees, who began helping customers evacuate or hide.[17][18] Many customers and employees fled to other stores in the adjacent mall, hid under tables,[19] or in shipping containers located behind the building.[20]

First responders began to arrive within six minutes of the initial 9-1-1 call.[6] The El Paso Police Department, Texas Rangers and paramedics responded to the scene along with the FBI and the ATF.[12][21]

After the shooting, the suspect, Patrick Wood Crusius, drove to the intersection of Sunmount and Viscount, where he identified himself as the shooter and surrendered to Texas Rangers[22] and an El Paso motorcycle officer.[23]

Victims[edit]

The shooting has been described as the deadliest anti-Latino attack in recent U.S. history,[13][14][24][25] resulting in 23 deaths and 23 injuries. One victim died the day after the event, another victim died two days after,[26] and a third died eight months later on April 26, 2020.[9] Among the dead were thirteen Americans, eight Mexicans and one German.[27] The names, ages, and citizenships of 22 of the dead were released by the El Paso Police Department on August 5. Seventeen were 56 or older, two were in their 40s, two in their 20s, one was 36, and one was 15.[28]

Thirteen victims were taken to the University Medical Center of El Paso,[12] and another eleven to the Del Sol Medical Center.[29] Two children, ages 2 and 9, were transferred to El Paso Children's Hospital after their conditions were stabilized.[30] The Del Sol Medical Center patients were between 35 and 82 years old.[12]

Suspect[edit]

Patrick Wood Crusius (born July 27, 1998) was arrested shortly after the shooting and charged with capital murder.[30][31][32] A 21-year-old white male,[33][34][35] he was last known to have lived in his family's home in Allen, Texas, in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex,[12][29][36] approximately 650 miles (1,050 km) from El Paso.[37] He graduated in 2017 from Plano Senior High School, and was enrolled at Collin College from 2017 until spring 2019.[37]

Police said he bought the gun used in the attack legally, but provided no details about the purchase.[38] During his first interrogation, he told detectives he had targeted Mexicans, according to an arrest warrant affidavit.[39][40][41][42][34]

Manifesto[edit]

The El Paso police chief, Greg Allen, said that they are "reasonably confident"[43] that a manifesto, titled The Inconvenient Truth, was posted by the suspect on the online message board 8chan shortly before the shooting.[30] It identifies the type of weapon used in the attack; the suspect's name was revealed in a separate document in the post.[44] Site moderators quickly removed the original post, though users continued sharing copies.[44] Claiming to have been inspired by the Christchurch mosque shootings in New Zealand that killed 51 people earlier the same year,[45] the author expresses support for the perpetrator of the Christchurch shootings[33][46][47] and bemoans grievances[48][49] such as environmental degradation,[5][50][46] "cultural and ethnic replacement",[47][51] and a "Hispanic invasion".[2][49][52]

The anti-Hispanic, anti-immigrant manifesto promotes the white nationalist and far-right conspiracy theory called the Great Replacement,[2][33] often attributed to the French writer Renaud Camus.[45] While the document uses language about immigrants similar to that used by U.S. president Donald Trump,[n 2] such as referring to a migrant "invasion",[2][49][56] it states that the author's beliefs predate Trump's presidency, and that Trump should not be blamed for the attack.[41][50][52] The author's "racially extremist views", according to The New York Times, could be used to prosecute the shooting as a hate crime or domestic terrorism.[12]

The manifesto states that Democrats would soon control the United States partly due to an increasing Hispanic population,[50] an idea that had gained acceptance for years on right-wing radio shows.[33] Criticizing both the Democratic Party and Republican Party[50] for allowing corporations to "import foreign workers",[51] the author describes the shooting as an "incentive" for Hispanics to leave the country, which would "remove the threat" of a Hispanic voting bloc.[50] While primarily focused on ethnic and racial grievances,[5] the document also expresses fears of automation's effects on employment and blames corporations for overusing natural resources.[50]

Legal proceedings[edit]

The arrest warrant affidavit says Crusius waived his Miranda rights, confessed to detectives that he was the shooter, and admitted that he targeted "Mexicans" during the attack.[39][40][22]

There are multiple investigations and jurisdictions involved with the case. FBI officials in El Paso served multiple warrants in the Dallas area and interviewed acquaintances of Crusius in Dallas and San Antonio.[57]

State charges[edit]

Crusius was indicted on capital murder charges by a Texas grand jury on September 12, 2019. He pleaded not guilty to capital murder charges at his arraignment on October 10, 2019 at the El Paso County Courthouse.[35] Mark Stevens, a San Antonio criminal defense attorney, was appointed by the state court to represent Crusius, along with defense attorney Joe Spencer.[58][59] On April 28, 2020, prosecutors announced they would be seeking a new capital murder charge following the recent death of a twenty-third victim after he spent nine months in the hospital.[60]

Federal charges[edit]

On February 6, 2020, Crusius was charged with 90 federal charges: 22 counts of committing a hate crime resulting in death, 22 counts of use of a firearm to commit murder, 23 counts of a hate crime involving an attempt to kill, and 23 counts of use of a firearm during a crime.[13][61] Federal prosecutors of the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Western District of Texas are seeking the death penalty,[57] but the final decision on whether a federal capital sentence will be sought will be made by the Attorney General of the United States.[62]

Crusius waived his federal bond hearing on February 12, 2020 during his first federal court appearance.[63] A trial in federal court is expected before the trial in state court.[62] On July 23, 2020, Crusius entered a plea of not-guilty to federal charges.[64] He also waived his arraignment on those charges.[65]

Defense motion[edit]

On July 14, 2020, the court accepted a motion by the defense team in which they cited mitigating factors, citing Crusius' alleged lifelong neurological and mental disabilities, which they described as "severe". The defense added that he was treated with anti-psychotic medication and that he was in a "psychotic state" when arrested.[66]

In August 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Texas, the trials were delayed for at least a year.[67] In the case of state court trial, it might be two or three years away, according to a defense attorney, not only due to the COVID-19 pandemic but also for the massive amount of evidence in the case, and added that as long as the prosecutors seek the death penalty, the case will remain open for years.[67]

Aftermath[edit]

Memorial for the shooting victims

Funerals and vigils[edit]

Several funeral homes in El Paso and Ciudad Juárez announced they would provide funeral services for free to the families of the victims as a sign of solidarity for their community.[68] Ciudad Juárez's Rotary International chapter organized a vigil in Ciudad Juárez. They gathered at a park and lit candles and shone cellphone lights in El Paso's direction as a sign of solidarity.[69]

Antonio Basco declared his wife's funeral on August 16 to be open to anyone who wished to attend.[70] Hundreds of people from El Paso and other parts of the country attended, and flowers were sent from around the world.[70][71]

El Paso musician Khalid held a benefit concert for his home city on September 1, featuring several high-profile artists and introduced by fellow El Paso native and former US Representative Beto O'Rourke.[72]

Tributes[edit]

One week after the shooting, a citizen from Ciudad Juárez, Jorge Luis Martínez Chávez, ran a total of 22 miles, a mile for each of the people killed in the Walmart shooting (one additional victim died months later), starting at the Zaragoza bridge in Juárez, Mexico, and finishing at the Walmart memorial in El Paso where the attack was perpetrated.[73]

Walmart's reaction[edit]

Monument built in the parking lot of the Walmart

Two days after the shooting, a Walmart corporate employee sent a memorandum to Walmart's entire e-commerce division, which includes thousands of employees, urging a "sick-out" strike to force the corporation to stop selling guns.[74] Walmart later sent out a memo instructing workers to remove signs and displays that "contain violent themes or aggressive behavior"[75] and pledged $400,000 for funds that were aimed at helping the victims of the mass shooting.[76] On September 3, 2019, the company announced it would stop selling ammunition for handguns and assault rifles[77] in the United States, as well as ask customers not to openly carry firearms into their stores.[77][78]

Reactions[edit]

Terrorism experts, including Peter R. Neumann, cited the Great Replacement conspiracy theory as a common factor among several similar attacks.[48] The Southern Poverty Law Center's Hatewatch blog linked the shooting with the earlier Christchurch mosque shootings and the Poway synagogue shooting, citing the similar white nationalist contents of the respective attackers' manifestos.[79]Jonathan Greenblatt, chief executive of the Anti-Defamation league, said that the shooting, as part of a series of similar attacks, indicated a "global threat" of white supremacy.[2] NATO secretary-general Jens Stoltenberg urged countries to work together to prevent "lone wolf" attackers who find inspiration in one another's actions.[80][81] Others, including the writer Daniel Okrent, disputed the "lone wolf" idea, pointing to the ways in which technology allows those with similar violent ideologies to congregate online.[45]

Several commentators attributed both the El Paso and Christchurch shootings to an ideology of eco-fascism.[82][83][84]The Washington Post described the El Paso and Christchurch shootings as examples of an eco-fascist trend among white supremacists.[5] Writing in GQ, Luke Darby referred to the "distinctly environmental theme" of Crusius' alleged manifesto.[85]Jeet Heer in The Nation described the manifesto as being based in "Malthusian fascism", a worldview in which different races vie against one another in the face of environmental crises such as global warming.[86] Mainstream environmentalists, including the executive director of the Sierra Club, denounced the attacker's alleged white-supremacist motivations.[5]

United States[edit]

President Donald Trump condemned the shooting as "hateful" and an "act of cowardice" later that day.[90] He promised that his administration would provide "total support".[91][92] In a later statement, Trump announced after the shootings in El Paso and in Dayton, Ohio, that all US flags, both domestic and abroad, would be flown at half-staff until sunset on August 8.[93] In a speech from the White House on August 5, Trump said: "In one voice, our nation must condemn racism, bigotry and white supremacy. These sinister ideologies must be defeated. Hate has no place in America."[94] On August 7, Trump said he was "concerned about the rise of any group of hate", whether it was "white supremacy, whether it’s any other kind of supremacy, whether it's antifa".[95]

Within two days of the shooting, #WhiteSupremacistInChief reached the number one trend on Twitter[96] as critics pointed out that statements in the suspect's alleged manifesto mirrored comments Trump had made in the past, including references to illegal immigration as an "invasion" and telling an unspecified group of "‘Progressive’ Democrat Congresswomen, who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe" to "go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came".[56] Media outlets also highlighted an incident in May 2019 where an audience member at a campaign rally suggested shooting illegal migrants crossing the border, to which Trump responded with a joke,[96] saying, "only in the Panhandle you can get away with that".[54][55][56]

Former president Barack Obama broke his self-imposed vow of silence on the new president's leadership to release the statement, "We should soundly reject language coming out of the mouths of any of our leaders that feeds a climate of fear and hatred or normalizes racist sentiments," which has widely been interpreted as a criticism of Trump's specific rhetoric.[97] Trump's remark that violent video games contributed to such mass shootings, a view echoed by other politicians such as House Minority Leader of the United States House of RepresentativesKevin McCarthy and Texas Lt. Governor Dan Patrick, drew criticism from the video game industry, as past studies have found that no link exists between shootings and video games, and accused the government of using the medium as a scapegoat.[98][99][100][101]

U.S. Representative Veronica Escobar, who represents El Paso in Congress, brought a town hall meeting in the city to an early close following the shooting.[102][103] Escobar later said there was also a hate epidemic, with domestic terrorism resulting from the dehumanization of others.[104] Texas Senator Ted Cruz issued a written statement deploring "this unspeakable evil."[105]Beto O’Rourke, a native of El Paso who represented the city in Congress from 2013 to 2019, said he was "incredibly saddened" but that "The [El Paso] community is going to stay together. Everyone's resolved to make sure this doesn't continue to happen in this country."[106] Texas Governor Greg Abbott called the shooting "a heinous and senseless act of violence".[91] Texas Senator John Cornyn said that gun violence would not be solved by focusing on law-abiding citizens.[107] Texas Lt. Governor Dan Patrick said violent video games were partly to blame.[98]

Members of the Democratic Party[51] criticized Trump's anti-immigrant rhetoric in the wake of the shooting, including congresswoman Escobar[108] and 2020 presidential candidates[55] O'Rourke,[55]Cory Booker,[56] and Joe Biden[51]. Other 2020 candidates called for political action to eliminate gun violence, including Booker,[103]Pete Buttigieg,[109]Bernie Sanders,[110]Elizabeth Warren,[110] and Andrew Yang.[111] The incident also caused many celebrities and media figures to debate gun rights within the United States, with some condemning the perceived inaction of many political figures in stopping the large number of mass shootings in the country.[112] That same evening, Moms Demand Action, which had a convention that weekend in Washington, DC, led a march and vigil outside the White House in support of gun control in the United States and the ban of assault weapons.[113]

The day after the shooting, some prominent Republicans, including Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush, also spoke of the need to combat white-supremacist terrorism.[55][114][115] Texas senator Ted Cruz decried the shooting as a "heinous act of terrorism and white supremacy".[115][116][117] On Twitter, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein classified the attack as "white terrorism".[43][114][118] Many Latinos interviewed by The New York Times said they felt disturbed at becoming targets of white-nationalist violence.[119]

Dan Stein, the president of the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR), issued a statement on Twitter denouncing the shooting, with no mention of Crusius' alleged manifesto. The group regularly makes similar anti-immigration arguments to those contained in the document, prompting worries of political fallout from the shooting among FAIR and similar groups, according to David Nakamura in The Washington Post.[51] Both Stein and Mark Krikorian of the Center for Immigration Studies, which also advocates restrictions on immigration, dismissed any connections between Crusius' ideology and their own.[51]

In response to the shooting, some 8chan users claimed that the shooter was "our guy". The purported manifesto of the shooter, after being deleted, was re-uploaded by some users, while others commented that it showed "zero effort", or claimed that it was fake.[44] Following the attack, Cloudflare terminated its website security service for 8chan, commenting that "8chan has repeatedly proven itself to be a cesspool of hate".[120][121] The site later went dark after its server rental provider Voxility discontinued its service.[122]

Trump visited El Paso and Dayton on August 7. The president and first lady also met with the mayors of El Paso[123] and Dayton.[124] In El Paso, protesters showed up at the site of the shooting, some claiming that Trump's attitude and statements had led to the shooting;[125][126] Two days before the visit, congresswoman Escobar said that Trump was "not welcome" in the city and declined an invitation to meet with him.[108][127][128] The White House published photos and a video of Trump's trip; in some photos, Trump was pictured smiling and giving thumbs up gestures, while the video was focused on Trump shaking hands and posing for photos.[129][130] Trump said that he had an "amazing day" of visits, praising the "love, the respect for" him as president.[131]

Mexico[edit]

News report from Notimexabout the shooting and memorials

Mexican presidentAndrés Manuel López Obrador extended his condolences to the families of the victims, both Americans and Mexicans.[132] López Obrador also criticized the "indiscriminate use of weapons" in the United States.[133] The Mexican Secretariat of Foreign Affairs (SRE) identified the eight Mexican citizens killed, and the seven Mexican citizens wounded, in the attack.[134][132] The Mexican victims killed in the attack came from Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua City, and Torreón, Coahuila.[135] One of the victims, identified only as ″Rosa,″ who had also offered to testify, was deported on January 30, 2021 because of a minor traffic violation.[136]

Javier Corral Jurado, the governor of the Mexican state of Chihuahua, offered his assistance to Texas governor Greg Abbott and El Paso mayor Dee Margo, and said that Chihuahua authorities were ready to assist in any capacity if needed by the U.S. government.[137] The Chihuahua government also directed Chihuahua residents and Mexican citizens affected by the attack to Mexico's Executive Committee for Victims (Spanish: Comisión Ejecutiva de Atención a Víctimas), and set up a phone line for Mexican citizens who needed assistance.[138] The Mexican Consulate in El Paso provided consular assistance to Mexican nationals affected by the attack,[139] and sent personnel to visit Mexican victims treated at the hospitals. The SRE confirmed that the consul Mauricio Ibarra Ponce de León would coordinate with El Paso and Ciudad Juárez officials.[140]

On August 4, Mexican Secretary of Foreign AffairsMarcelo Ebrard announced that Mexico would issue a formal charge against the suspect for terrorism against Mexican nationals should Mexico's Attorney General's Office (FGR) support it, and possibly request his extradition from the U.S. to Mexico to face those charges.[133][141] If the suspect is charged with terrorism, it would be the first time in history that Mexico issues a criminal charge of this nature for a crime committed in the U.S. In addition, it would guarantee Mexico access to information about the case.[142][143] Ebrard also stated that the Mexican government would remain in contact with the victims' families throughout the investigation and trial, and that they would press charges against the individual(s) or firm who sold the weapons to the suspect.[144] Former Mexican president Felipe Calderón offered his condolences on Twitter, and also directed a message against Trump. He said that notwithstanding if the attack was confirmed to be a hate crime or not, that Trump should stop his "hate speech" and "stigmatization".[145]

International[edit]

UN Secretary-General António Guterres condemned "in the strongest terms the terrorist attack against Latinos on Saturday in the Texas city of El Paso" and called for everyone to work together to combat violence born of hate, racism and xenophobia. Recently the UN launched an action plan to "fight against discourses that incite hatred".[146]

The incident was mentioned by Pope Francis during a speech in St. Peter's Square on August 4, in which he condemned attacks on defenseless people and said he was spiritually close to the victims, the wounded, and the families affected by the attacks that had "bloodied Texas, California, and Ohio". The Gilroy Garlic Festival shooting happened in California around a week before the El Paso shooting, while the 2019 Dayton shooting occurred in Ohio less than 24 hours after.[147]

Uruguay and Venezuela issued travel warnings to avoid certain cities in America, including Baltimore, Detroit, Albuquerque, Cleveland, Memphis, and Oakland, citing "proliferation of acts of violence" and "growing indiscriminate violence, mostly for hate crimes, including racism and discrimination". Both countries warned their citizens to avoid any place with large crowds, including shopping malls, festivals, and "any kind of cultural or sporting events".[148]Japan issued a similar travel warning, advising its citizens to pay attention to the potential for gunfire "everywhere" in the U.S., which they described as a "gun society".[149] President Trump threatened undefined retaliation against countries and organizations that issue travel warnings on the United States because of gun violence.[150]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^Twenty of the victims died on the day of the shooting, two others died in the following days, and the 23rd victim died on April 26, 2020.[6][7][8][9]
  2. ^
    • "The document parrots some of President Donald Trump’s divisive rhetoric about immigration, but the writer said his views predate Trump’s rise"[41]
    • "The manifesto’s author said their anger toward immigrants predates Donald Trump’s presidency, but the language used bears much similarity with the president’s vocabulary."[53]
    • "[S]ome of the language included in the document parroted Trump’s own words, characterizing Hispanic migrants as invaders taking American jobs and arguing to 'send them back'."[52]
    • "Portions of the 2,300-word essay, titled 'The Inconvenient Truth', closely mirror Trump's rhetoric, as well as the language of the white nationalist movement, including a warning about the 'Hispanic invasion of Texas'."[54]
    • "But if Mr. Trump did not originally inspire the gunman, he has brought into the mainstream polarizing ideas and people once consigned to the fringes of American society [...] Mr. Crusius described legal and illegal immigrants as 'invaders' who are flooding into the United States, a term Mr. Trump has frequently employed to argue for a border wall."[55]

References[edit]

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    • Wilbur, Del Quentin (August 11, 2019). "FBI struggles to confront right-wing terrorism". Los Angeles Times.
    • Friedman, Uri (August 4, 2019). "How Many Attacks Will It Take Until the White-Supremacist Threat Is Taken Seriously?". The Atlantic.
  2. ^ abcdefgEligon, John (August 7, 2019). "The El Paso Screed, and the Racist Doctrine Behind It". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331.
  3. ^ abMaxouris, Christina; et al. (August 5, 2019). "El Paso vigils bring together a city in mourning after mass shooting". CNN.
  4. ^Aguilera, Jasmine (August 3, 2020). "One Year After Mass Shooting, El Paso Residents Grapple With White Supremacy: 'It Was There the Whole Time'". Time.
  5. ^ abcdeAchenbach, Joel (August 18, 2019). "Two mass killings a world apart share a common theme: 'ecofascism'". The Washington Post.
  6. ^ abLaw, Tara; Bates, Josiah (August 9, 2019). "El Paso Shooting Suspect Told Police He Was Targeting 'Mexicans.' Here's What to Know About the Case". Time.
  7. ^"Death toll in El Paso shooting rises to 22 as investigators put together timeline of accused shooter's movements". CBS News. August 5, 2019.
  8. ^Aguilar, Julián (August 5, 2019). "Death toll in El Paso shooting climbs to 22". The Texas Tribune.
  9. ^ ab"El Paso Shooting Victim Dies Months Later, Death Toll Now 23". The Seattle Times. Associated Press. April 26, 2020. Retrieved April 26, 2020.
  10. ^Lin, Nina (August 5, 2019). "22 Dead, 24 Injured in El Paso Shooting: Texas Officials". WRC-TV/NBC News. Retrieved September 16, 2019.
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  31. ^Li, David K. (August 4, 2019). "El Paso shooting being treated as domestic terrorism; police say suspect is cooperating". NBC News. Retrieved August 7, 2019.
  32. ^"Suspect in El Paso Walmart shooting charged with Capital Murder". WRIC. August 4, 2019.
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  35. ^ abRomo, Vanessa (October 10, 2019). "El Paso Walmart Shooting Suspect Pleads Not Guilty". NPR.
  36. ^Murdock, Russo, Sebastian, Amy (August 4, 2019). "20 Dead In Texas Walmart Mass Shooting". HuffPost. Retrieved August 4, 2019.
  37. ^ abTanya Eiserer, El Paso shooter was anti-social loner, former classmate says, WFAA ( August 4, 2019).
  38. ^Cardona, Claire Z.work=Dallas News (August 10, 2019). "What we know about the El Paso massacre suspect and his ties to North Texas". Retrieved August 4, 2019.
  39. ^ abMoore, Robert; Berman, Mark (August 9, 2019). "El Paso suspect said he was targeting 'Mexicans,' told officers he was the shooter, police say". The Washington Post. Retrieved August 10, 2019.
  40. ^ abBogel-Burroughs, Nicholas (August 9, 2019). "'I'm the Shooter': El Paso Suspect Confessed to Targeting Mexicans, Police Say". The New York Times.
  41. ^ abcAttanasio, Cedar; Bleiberg, Jake; Weber, Paul J. (August 9, 2019). "El Paso gunman confessed: 'I'm the shooter,' was targeting Mexicans". PBS NewsHour. Associated Press.
  42. ^Leon, Melissa (August 10, 2019). "El Paso shooting suspect said he was targeting Mexicans and told police, 'I'm the shooter': report". Fox News. Retrieved August 10, 2019.
  43. ^ abCollins, Ben (August 3, 2019). "Investigators 'reasonably confident' Texas suspect left anti-immigrant screed, tipped off before attack". NBC News. Retrieved August 4, 2019.
  44. ^ abcEvans, Robert (August 4, 2019). "The El Paso Shooting and the Gamification of Terror". Bellingcat. Retrieved August 4, 2019.
  45. ^ abcFisher, Marc (August 5, 2019). "A weekend of mass murder reflects how American violence goes viral". The Washington Post.
  46. ^ abEmbury-Dennis, Tom (August 4, 2019). "El Paso shooting suspect 'espoused racist tropes and voiced support for Christchurch mosque gunman'". The Independent.
  47. ^ abDearden, Lizzie (August 24, 2019). "Revered as a saint by online extremists, how the Christchurch shooter inspired copycat terrorists around the world". The Independent.
  48. ^ abNoack, Rick (August 6, 2019). "Christchurch endures as extremist touchstone, as investigators probe suspected El Paso manifesto". The Washington Post.
  49. ^ abcDarby, Luke (August 5, 2019). "How the 'Great Replacement' conspiracy theory has inspired white supremacist killers". The Telegraph. London.
  50. ^ abcdefAbutaleb, Yasmeen (August 4, 2019). "What's inside the hate-filled manifesto linked to the alleged El Paso shooter". The Washington Post. Retrieved August 5, 2019.
  51. ^ abcdefNakamura, David (August 10, 2019). "'It had nothing to do with us': Restrictionist groups distance themselves from accused El Paso shooter, who shared similar views on immigrants". The Washington Post.
  52. ^ abcBiesecker, Michael; Dunklin, Reese; Kunzelman, Michael (August 4, 2019). "El Paso suspect appears to have posted anti-immigrant screed". Associated Press.
  53. ^Aratani, Lauren (August 5, 2019). "'Invasion' and 'fake news': El Paso manifesto echoes Trump language". The Guardian.
  54. ^ abRucker, Philip (August 4, 2019). "'How do you stop these people?': Trump's anti-immigrant rhetoric looms over El Paso massacre". The Washington Post.
  55. ^ abcdeBaker, Peter; Shear, Michael D. (August 4, 2019). "El Paso Shooting Suspect's Manifesto Echoes Trump's Language". The New York Times. Retrieved August 5, 2019.
  56. ^ abcdKing, Laura (August 5, 2019). "A cultural reckoning over a president's language as critics tie shooting to hateful rhetoric". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved August 5, 2019.
  57. ^ abGarcia, Uriel J.; Montes, Aaron. "El Paso Walmart shooting suspect made court appearance Sunday, records show". azcentral. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  58. ^Garcia, Uriel J. "San Antonio lawyer will represent suspected domestic terrorist in El Paso shooting". El Paso Times. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  59. ^Zavala, Elizabeth (August 5, 2019). "San Antonio defense lawyer appointed to defend suspect in El Paso massacre". San Antonio Express-News. Retrieved September 5, 2019.
  60. ^"Accused El Paso Walmart shooter faces new capital murder charge". KDBC-TV. April 28, 2020. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  61. ^"Man accused of killing 22 in El Paso indicted on murder charges". Al Jazeera. September 12, 2019. Retrieved September 12, 2019.
  62. ^ abAaron Martinez, El Paso Walmart mass shooter cases inch closer to trial despite COVID-19 pandemic, El Paso Times (May 18, 2020).
  63. ^"Accused El Paso mass shooter charged with 90 counts of federal hate crimes". Reuters. February 7, 2020. Retrieved February 12, 2020.
  64. ^Parker, Jim (July 23, 2020). "Crusius pleads 'not guilty' to fed charges; prosecutor says trial delay would be 'miscarriage of justice'". KVIA. ABC7. Retrieved July 25, 2020.
  65. ^KTSM Staff (July 23, 2020). "El Paso Walmart shooting suspect pleads not guilty to new federal charges". Border Report. Retrieved July 25, 2020.
  66. ^Razek, Raja; Silverman, Hollie (July 14, 2020). "El Paso Walmart shooter has mental disabilities and was in a psychotic state after the shooting, defense counsel says". CNN. Retrieved July 14, 2020.
  67. ^ abMartinez, Aaron (August 22, 2020). "Federal trial in Walmart mass shooting at least a year away, even longer in state court". El Paso Times. Retrieved March 24, 2021.
  68. ^Vargas, Alejandro (August 3, 2019). "Se ofrecen más funerarias a ofrecer servicios gratuitos a víctimas de masacre". El Diario de Juárez (in Spanish).
  69. ^Vargas, Alejandro (August 3, 2019). "Con vigilia juarenses se solidarizan con víctimas de tiroteo". El Diario de Juárez (in Spanish).
  70. ^ abHeld, Amy. "El Paso Shooting: Hundreds Of Strangers Come To Mourn With Widower At Wife's Funeral". NPR.org. Retrieved August 17, 2019.
  71. ^Kaur, Harmeet; Vera, Amir (August 17, 2019). "A husband worried few would attend an El Paso shooting victim's service. 700 strangers showed up". CNN. Retrieved August 17, 2019.
  72. ^Acosta, Dave (September 2, 2019). "Khalid, 7,000-plus 'friends' join together for 'A Night for Suncity' benefit concert". El Paso Times. Retrieved October 4, 2021.
  73. ^Martinez, Luis (August 24, 2019). "Corre 22 millas para honrar a las víctimas de tiroteo". El Diario de Juárez (in Spanish).
  74. ^Peterson, Hayley (August 6, 2019). "Walmart corporate employee sends mass email urging workers to go on strike until the company stops selling guns". Business Insider.
  75. ^Tyko, Kelly (August 8, 2019). "Walmart removing violent video game displays, signs from stores but still selling guns". USA Today. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  76. ^"Walmart donates $400,000 as part of 'thoughtful' response to El Paso shooting". El Paso, Texas: KVIA-TV. August 8, 2019. Archived from the original on August 9, 2019.
  77. ^ abCorkery, Michael (September 3, 2019). "Walmart to Limit Ammunition Sales and Discourage 'Open Carry' of Guns in Stores". The New York Times.
  78. ^D'Innocenzio, Anne (September 3, 2019). "Walmart to stop selling handgun ammunition following mass shootings". PBS NewsHour. Associated Press.
  79. ^Hayden, Michael E. (August 4, 2019). "White Nationalists Praise El Paso Attack and Mock the Dead". Hatewatch. Southern Poverty Law Center.
  80. ^"Lone wolf attackers inspire each other, NATO chief says". Reuters. August 6, 2019.
  81. ^Mead, Thomaas (August 4, 2019). "On visit to Christchurch mosque, Secretary General of NATO warns lone wolf attackers 'use each other for inspiration'". 1 News. Auckland, NZ: TVNZ.
  82. ^Owen, Tess (August 6, 2019). "Eco-Fascism: the Racist Theory That Inspired the El Paso and Christchurch Shooters". Vice.
  83. ^Lennard, Natasha (August 5, 2019). "The El Paso Shooter Embraced Eco-Fascism. We Can't Let the Far Right Co-Opt the Environmental Struggle". The Intercept.
  84. ^Kaufman, Alexander C. "The El Paso manifesto: Where racism and eco-fascism meet". Mother Jones. August 5, 2019.
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  86. ^
Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2019_El_Paso_shooting

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Walmart will not be offering the annual layaway option this year for the 2021 holiday season.

The information was confirmed by Walmart customer service on Sept. 21, 2021. No stores in the U.S. will be offering layaway according to the employee. In addition, the layaway section of the Walmart website has been removed.

In past years, Walmart offered the layaway program from late August through mid-December. Customers could put items on hold with a small deposit, and then make regular payments until the total was paid off. At that point, the products could be picked up from the store. There was no interest charged on the products.

“We’ve learned a lot in the past year as our customers’ needs and shopping habits have changed. Last holiday season, we removed seasonal layaway from most of our stores with the exception of select jewelry items at select stores, and based on what we learned, we are confident that our payment options provide the right solutions for our customers,” the store said in a statement shared by Fox8 in Cleveland.

This year, the company walmart customer service spanish offering a monthly "buy now, pay later" finance payment option through Affirm.

The Walmart website calls it an "alternative to layaway" that allows you to purchase the item immediately and then pay it off from 3 to 24 months. But it is important to note that, unlike layaway, there is a finance charge with Affirm. The APR rate will be between 10% and 30% for most items, depending upon your credit. There are some promotional 0% APR items available as well.

Categories that are eligible for Affirm include: Electronics, Video Games, Toys, Home, Arts & Crafts, Musical Instruments, Home Improvement, Auto, Sports & Outdoors, Tools, Baby, Jewelry and Apparel.

Affirm does not charge late fees, prepayment fees, annual fees, or service fees to open or close your Affirm account.

See the details on the Walmart website.

Walmart Sale

Walmart has a new Savings Spotlight Sale including clothing, Chromebooks, tablets, toys, video games, vacuums, cookware sets and more.

See all the sales at Walmart.com HERE.

Walmart+ Membership Program

Walmart has launched a the Walmart+ membership program offering unlimited free delivery from stores, fuel discounts, Scan & Go shopping and more.

Walmart+ costs $98 a year or $12.95 a month.

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More On This

Источник: https://www.wral.com/walmart-is-not-offering-layaway-for-the-2021-holiday-season/19888104/

COVID-19 Information and Resources

The city of Peoria continues to monitor pandemic metrics and guidance from health officials in determining service levels and safety protocols. The health and safety of our community remains a top priority, and changes will communicated to ensure seamless service.


Table of Contents

1. Face Covering Guidance

2. Vaccine Information

3. COVID-19 Testing

4. Resources for Peoria Residents and Businesses

 

 


October 18, 2021 - Starting Monday, October 18th, City of Peoria will encourage, but not require, the use of masks in our public buildings. As always, we will continue to monitor and further adjust our COVID mitigation practices as necessary.

Please remember to practice the same prevention habits you’ve become accustomed to:

  • If you don’t feel well, stay at home.
  • Social distancing works!  In an environment with close proximity, we encourage the use of masks.
  • Hand washing and sanitizing are proven to be effective.
  • Consider “fist bumps” in place of handshakes.

 

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The COVID-19 vaccine distribution has begun. With oversight from the Arizona Department of Health Services (AZDHS), the vaccine distribution is allocated through local and tribal health jurisdictions. In Peoria, this is being handled by Maricopa County, and their website is being updated daily with important information.

Effective March 24, 2021 all Arizona residents 16 and older are eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Read Press Release: Arizona Expands COVID-19 Vaccination Eligibility To All.

 

Schedule a Vaccine Appointment

To make a vaccine appointment, visit the Maricopa County vaccine information webpage or the AZDHS vaccine information webpage. Vaccination locations are available to all residents statewide.

If you are having trouble with the registration page, you may contact ADHS Tech Support: 602-542-1000 or email [email protected] Those without computer access or who need extra help registering may call the AZHDS Helpline at 844-542-8201.

 

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Please use the links below to find a testing location at state and county sites near you:

 

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Peoria's Community Resource Guide

This comprehensive guide from Peoria SUPPORT provides a wealth of resources for families, employment, seniors, basic needs and assistance, housing, health and welfare, and much more.

For assistance, please visit www.peoriaaz.gov/peoriaSUPPORT or call (623) 773-7250 or email [email protected]

Governor's Office Announcements

 

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Источник: https://www.peoriaaz.gov/residents/covid-19-information

Testing

While vaccines provide the best protection from COVID-19, treatment options such as Monoclonal Antibodies are available if you have had symptoms of COVID-19 for 10 days or less or have been exposed to COVID-19. If taken early, they can reduce the risk of severe disease, hospitalization, and death. Ask your doctor about Monoclonal Antibodies or call the Combat COVID Monoclonal Antibodies Call Center at 1-877-332-6585 (English) or 1-877-366-0310 (Spanish). 

Be Sure. Get Tested for COVID-19.

It has never been easier or faster to get tested. If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 or think you may have COVID-19, you should get tested.

Find My Testing PlaceVersion en Español

Fully vaccinated individuals should get tested if they:

  • Are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19. Anyone experiencing symptoms should get tested immediately.

  • Have had close contact with someone who has COVID-19, even if they are not experiencing symptoms. You should get tested within 3-5 days after exposure.

  • Are traveling internationally and returning to the United States. Fully walmart customer service spanish international travelers are required to get tested three days before travel by air into the U.S. and should also get tested 3-5 days after their trip.

Unvaccinated individuals should get tested if they: 

  • Are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19. Anyone experiencing symptoms should get tested immediately. 

  • Have come in contact with someone who has COVID-19, even if they are not experiencing symptoms. If they do not have symptoms, they should wait at least six days after their last known exposure to COVID-19 before they get tested.

  • Take part in activities that put them at higher risk for COVID-19 because they cannot physically distance as needed to avoid exposure, such as travel, attending large social or mass gatherings, or being in crowded or poorly ventilated indoor settings.

If available through an employer or another organization, unvaccinated individuals can be part of a program where they get tested regularly for COVID-19.

Frequently Asked Questions

Testing Options

With vaccines available, is testing still necessary?

Yes. With the more contagious Delta variant rapidly spreading, anyone who has symptoms of COVID or has been exposed to COVID should get tested as soon as possible. Testing helps locate virus transmission in North Carolina’s communities and allows us to take action to protect one another.

Do I need to get tested if I am fully vaccinated?

Fully vaccinated individuals should get tested if they:

  • Are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19. Anyone experiencing symptoms should get tested immediately.

  • Have had close contact with someone who has COVID-19, even if they are not experiencing symptoms. You should get tested within 3-5 days after exposure.

  • Are traveling internationally and returning to the United States. Fully vaccinated international travelers are required to get tested three days before travel by air into the U.S. and should also get tested 3-5 days after their trip.

For more information, read our frequently asked questions about vaccines.

I don’t have health insurance. Can I still get tested?

Yes. If you don't have health insurance:  

  • Call your nearest Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). If you think that you may have COVID-19, be sure to let the FQHC know that when you call for an appointment. FQHCs are community-based health care providers that receive federal funds to provide health services in communities across the state. 
  • Call your local health department if you can't be seen at an FQHC.
  • Go to CVS and select Walgreens and Walmart testing sites at no cost. 
  • Look for no-cost testing sites at ncdhhs.gov/gettested

Any North Carolina resident 18 and older can request a no-cost, at-home COVID-19 test collection kit. Parents or guardians of residents under 18 can request a test collection kit for those aged 2-17. Learn how to request a kit.

How can I find a COVID-19 test?

It has never been easier or faster to get tested. If you need a test, you can:

  • Visit a no-cost community testing event
  • Visit a nearby test site 
  • Pick up an at-home test at a local pharmacy, where available
  • Request a no-cost COVID-19 test home collection kit
  • Call a health care provider

For more information about testing options, visit ncdhhs.gov/GetTested.

What type of tests are used to diagnose COVID-19?

Two types of common tests are PCR and rapid antigen tests. COVID-19 PCR tests detect the genetic material (RNA) that is specific to COVID-19. A PCR test can detect the virus within days of infection and is generally more sensitive than a rapid antigen test, especially for people who walmart customer service spanish not experiencing COVID-19 symptoms. PCR test results can take 1-3 days as the tests are analyzed in a laboratory, but results can be done in as little as 24 hours.

COVID-19 rapid antigen tests work to detect proteins that are specific to the virus that causes COVID-19 and do not typically need to be sent to a lab to be analyzed. People with COVID-19 symptoms and a negative COVID-19 antigen test should get a PCR test to confirm the negative results.

Learn more about COVID-19 diagnostic tests from the CDC.

How do at-home tests work?

At-home COVID-19 tests are a great option for anyone who can’t make it to a testing site. Check with your local pharmacy for availability. These tests are performed by an individual at home. Instructions should be followed very carefully when ally lyons the test. 

Anyone who receives Food and Nutritional Services (FNS) benefits or has a disability that may make it difficult to travel to a COVID-19 testing site may qualify for a no-cost, at-home COVID-19 test collection kit. Check to see if you qualify and request a kit.

What is an antibody test and is North Carolina tracking antibody tests in our testing data?

Two kinds of tests are available for COVID-19: viral tests and antibody tests. A viral test tells someone if they currently have COVID-19. It is also called a diagnostic test. An antibody test tells someone if they had the virus before. Antibody tests are not included in NCDHHS’ total test numbers.

Learn more about the types of tests available in this video from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Will testing be done at schools?

To slow the spread of COVID-19 in North Carolina and to protect teachers, staff, students, and their families, K-12 public schools can get COVID-19 tests through NCDHHS. Making it easy for our students, families, and staff to get tested helps our schools safely and confidently continue in-person learning. Testing helps us more easily detect the virus and take quick action to keep it from spreading. Learn more.

Will testing be done at workplaces?

Some employers may choose to set up screening testing as part of their efforts to protect employees.

What safety protocols are in place at testing sites?

Health and safety are a top priority at all testing sites. Staff are trained in safety protocols, have an adequate supply of protective equipment like masks and gloves, and everyone is required to practice the 3 Ws (Wear. Wait. Wash.) on site.

Are all testing sites the same?

No. We encourage everyone to call the test site before they go to learn about testing criteria, availability, hours and location. Not all health care providers provide testing on-site. Some require additional screenings or an appointment and/or referral from a health care provider. Locations may also change.

How can my community organization host a testing event?

Review NCDHHS's Partner COVID-19 Testing Toolkit, which is designed for organizations seeking to host community testing events. organizations, churches and nonprofits. The Toolkit is available in English and Spanish.

Test Results

How long does it take to receive COVID-19 test results?

Test result times vary. Some tests are point-of-care tests, meaning results may be available at the testing site in less than an hour. Other tests must be sent to a laboratory to analyze. This process may take a from a few hours to a few days once received by the lab.

When someone gets a test, they should speak with the provider or laboratory that performed the test about when and how they will receive their test results. Test results are not available by calling 2-1-1.

How do I access my test results?

How a person accesses their test results will depend on their testing location. Ask the provider or laboratory that performs their test about when and how they will receive their test results. Test results are not available by calling 2-1-1.

What do I do while I'm waiting for my test results?

It depends. If someone has symptoms or were tested because they were exposed to someone with COVID-19, they should stay home and avoid anyone in their household.

If the individual was tested miss peregrines home for peculiar children movie has no symptoms and no known exposure to someone with COVID-19 (for example, as part of a workplace screening program), they do not need to stay home while waiting for results unless told to do so by the employer or by public health.

Learn more about the steps to take after being tested.

I’ve been around a person who was diagnosed with COVID-19. When should I get tested?

Fully vaccinated individuals should get tested if they are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms. 

Those who are not fully vaccinated and have been exposed to COVID-19 should quarantine at home and avoid contact with other members of the household for 14 days past their last known exposure to COVID-19. They should get tested immediately if experiencing symptoms of COVID-19. If they do not have symptoms, they should wait at least six days after their last known exposure to COVID-19 before they get tested. Even if the test comes back negative, they should still quarantine for 14 days after their last known exposure to COVID-19. Find out what steps to take if the test comes back positive.  

Learn more about quarantine guidance for the general what rating is peoples trust insurance company do I do if my test is negative?

If a person was tested because they have symptoms, they should stay home until they have no fever without the use of fever-reducing medicines, and they have felt well for at least 24 hours.

If they were tested because of a known contact to someone with COVID-19, they should follow the quarantine guidance (stay home and avoid contact with other members of the take me to the nearest park until 14 days after their last exposure. 

If they were tested for another reason and have no symptoms, they can resume their regular activities.

Learn more about the steps you should take if the test was negative.

What do I do if my test is positive?

Per CDC guidelines, if a test comes back positive and the individual had symptoms, they should stay home and isolate (avoid anyone in their household) until they can say yes to all three questions:

  • Has it been at least 10 days since they first had symptoms? AND
  • Has it been 24 hours since they last had a fever without using fever-reducing medicine? AND
  • Have their symptoms, such as coughing and shortness of breath, improved?

Learn more about the steps to take after being tested.

If you have recently tested positive for COVID-19 and have had symptoms for 10 days or less, talk to your health care provider to see if monoclonal antibody therapy is an option for you or find a treatment center near you.

Per CDC guidelines, if a test comes back positive and the individual did not have symptoms, they should stay home and isolate (avoid anyone in their household) until 10 days have passed since the date of the first positive COVID-19 diagnostic test, assuming they did not develop symptoms since the positive test.

If they have tested positive for COVID-19, the local health department or another member of the COVID-19 Community Team will call to ensure they have the information and support they need, such as tips for staying at home and monitoring symptoms.

To protect family and friends and slow the spread of the virus, the COVID-19 Community Team member will also ask who they have recently been nearby. The COVID-19 Community Team will reach out to anyone who has been near the person who has tested positive to share information and support, as well as help them get tested. The team will not share their name or personal information. This information is confidential and will remain private.

Reporting Test Results

I'm fearful that I will be discriminated against if I get tested and test positive for COVID-19. Can I get tested or access my results without others knowing?

NCDHHS and the COVID-19 Community Team will not release names or other identifiable information to anyone. Personal information is strictly confidential and will be treated as the private health record it is. People who have tested positive for COVID-19 and are in isolation, and people who may have been exposed to COVID-19 and are self-monitoring, are doing the right thing and protecting their communities and loved ones. COVID-19 Community Team members will offer compassion, support via phone and texts, and help as appropriate, but never hostility or judgment.

While some people may be worried or have concerns about COVID-19, no one should be treated differently. All people should be treated with compassion and people should speak up if they hear others making statements against people in their community. It will be much harder for our state to slow the spread of COVID-19 if people are fearful about how they will be treated if they come forward for testing, support and help.

Does North Carolina track the number of people who have tested positive for COVID-19 and recovered?Are hospitals and private labs required to report all negative tests?

Yes. Pursuant to Session Law 2020-4 Section 4.10.(a), NCDHHS requires each laboratory or health care provider to report the results of all COVID-19 testing to the Department. NCDHHS is working with labs and health care providers to submit this information electronically.

Источник: https://covid19.ncdhhs.gov/about-covid-19/testing

Get $20 this season

Must be 18 or older to purchase a Walmart MoneyCard. Activation requires online access and identity verification (including SSN) to open an account. Mobile or email verification and mobile app are required to access all features.

See Account Agreement for fees, terms and conditions.

1Cash Back: Cash back, up to $75 per year, is credited to card balance at end of reward year and is subject to successful activation and other eligibility requirements. Redeem rewards using our website or app. You will earn cash back of three percent (3%) on qualifying purchases made at Walmart.com and in the Walmart app using your card or your card number, two percent (2.00%) at Walmart fuel stations, and one percent (1%) on qualifying purchases at Walmart stores in the United States (less returns and credits) posted to your Card during each reward year. Grocery delivery and pickup purchases made on Walmart.com or the Walmart app earn 1%. For the purposes of cash back rewards, a "reward year" is twelve (12) monthly periods in which you have paid your monthly fee or had it waived. See account agreement for details.​

2Opt-in required. $15 fee may apply to each eligible purchase transaction that brings your account negative. Balance must be brought to at least $0 within 24 hours of authorization of the first transaction that overdraws your account to avoid the fee. We require immediate payment of each overdraft and overdraft fee. Overdrafts paid at our discretion, and we do not guarantee that we will authorize and pay any transaction. Learn more about overdraft protection.

3Direct Deposit: Early availability of direct deposit depends on timing of payroll's payment instructions and fraud prevention restrictions may apply. As such, the availability or timing of early direct deposit may vary from pay period to pay period. Make sure the name and social security number on file with your employer or benefits provider matches what's on your Walmart MoneyCard account exactly. We will not be able to deposit your payment if we are unable to match recipients.

4High yield savings account interest is paid annually on each enrollment anniversary based on the average daily balance of the prior 365 days, up to a maximum balance of $1,000, if the account is in good standing and has a positive balance. 2.00% Annual Percentage Yield may change at any time before or after account is opened. Annual Percentage Yields are accurate as of 7/23/21.

5Family Accounts: Activated, personalized card required. Other fees apply to the additional account. Family members age 13 years and over are eligible. Limit 4 cards per account. See Deposit Account Agreement for details.

Источник: https://www.walmartmoneycard.com/

2019 El Paso shooting

Mass shooting in El Paso, Texas

On August 3, 2019, a mass shooting occurred at a Walmart store in El Paso, Texas, United States. A gunman shot and killed 23 people[n 1] and injured 23 others.[10] The Federal Bureau of Investigation is investigating the shooting as an act of domestic terrorism and a hate crime.[11][12] The shooting has been described as the deadliest attack on Latinos in modern American history.[13][14]

Patrick Wood Crusius, a 21-year-old from Allen, Texas, was arrested and charged with capital murder in connection with the shooting. Police believe a manifesto with white nationalist and anti-immigrant themes, posted on the online message board 8chan shortly before the attack, was written by Crusius; it cites the year's earlier Christchurch mosque shootings in New Zealand and the far-right conspiracy theory known as the Great Replacement as inspiration for the attack.

Incident[edit]

The shooting occurred at a Walmart Supercenter near the Cielo Vista Mall on the east side of El Paso. The gunman walked into the store carrying what is believed to be a WASR-10 rifle,[15] a semi-automatic civilian version of the AK-47, and opened fire just before 10:40 a.m.[16]

The store manager witnessed the gunman begin firing hey google is the post office open today the parking lot prior to entering the crowded store. He issued a "Code Brown", designating an active shooter, to his employees, who began helping customers evacuate or hide.[17][18] Many customers and employees fled to other stores in the adjacent mall, hid under tables,[19] or in shipping containers located behind the building.[20]

First responders began to arrive within six minutes of the initial 9-1-1 call.[6] The El Paso Police Department, Texas Rangers and paramedics responded to the scene along with the FBI and the ATF.[12][21]

After the shooting, the suspect, Patrick Wood Crusius, drove to the intersection of Sunmount and Viscount, where he identified himself as the shooter and surrendered to Texas Rangers[22] and an El Paso motorcycle officer.[23]

Victims[edit]

The shooting has been described as the deadliest anti-Latino attack in recent U.S. history,[13][14][24][25] resulting in 23 deaths and 23 injuries. One victim died the day after the event, another victim died two days after,[26] and a third died eight months later on April 26, 2020.[9] Among the dead were thirteen Americans, eight Mexicans and one German.[27] The names, ages, and citizenships of 22 of the dead were released by the El Paso Police Department on August 5. Seventeen were 56 or older, two were in their 40s, two in their 20s, one was 36, and one was 15.[28]

Thirteen victims were taken to the University Medical Center of El Paso,[12] and another eleven to the Del Sol Medical Center.[29] Two children, ages 2 and 9, were transferred to El Paso Children's Hospital after their conditions were stabilized.[30] The Del Sol Medical Center patients were between 35 and 82 years old.[12]

Suspect[edit]

Patrick Wood Crusius (born July 27, 1998) was arrested shortly after the shooting and charged with capital murder.[30][31][32] A 21-year-old white male,[33][34][35] he was last known to have lived in his family's home in Allen, Texas, in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex,[12][29][36] approximately 650 miles (1,050 km) from El Paso.[37] He graduated in 2017 from Plano Senior High School, and was enrolled at Collin College from 2017 until spring 2019.[37]

Police said he bought the gun used in the attack legally, but provided no details about the purchase.[38] During his first interrogation, he told detectives he had targeted Mexicans, according to an arrest warrant affidavit.[39][40][41][42][34]

Manifesto[edit]

The El Paso police chief, Greg Allen, said that they are "reasonably confident"[43] that a manifesto, titled The Inconvenient Truth, was posted by the suspect on the online message board 8chan jeffrey dahmer f is for family before the shooting.[30] It identifies the type of weapon used in the attack; the suspect's name was revealed in a separate document in the post.[44] Site moderators quickly removed the original post, though users continued sharing copies.[44] Claiming to have been inspired by the Christchurch mosque shootings in New Zealand that killed 51 people earlier the same year,[45] the author expresses support for the perpetrator of the Christchurch shootings[33][46][47] and bemoans grievances[48][49] such as environmental degradation,[5][50][46] "cultural and ethnic replacement",[47][51] and a "Hispanic invasion".[2][49][52]

The anti-Hispanic, anti-immigrant manifesto promotes the white nationalist and far-right conspiracy theory called the Great Replacement,[2][33] often attributed to the French writer Renaud Camus.[45] While the document uses language about immigrants similar to that used by U.S. president Donald Trump,[n 2] such as referring to a migrant "invasion",[2][49][56] it states that the author's beliefs predate Trump's presidency, and that Trump should not be blamed for the attack.[41][50][52] The author's "racially extremist views", according to The New York Times, could be used to prosecute the shooting as a hate crime or domestic terrorism.[12]

The manifesto states that Democrats would soon control the United States partly due to an increasing Hispanic population,[50] an idea that had gained acceptance for walmart customer service spanish on right-wing radio shows.[33] Criticizing both the Democratic Party and Republican Party[50] for allowing corporations to "import foreign workers",[51] the author describes the shooting as an "incentive" for Hispanics to leave the country, which would "remove the threat" of a Hispanic voting bloc.[50] While primarily focused on ethnic and racial grievances,[5] the document also expresses fears of automation's effects on employment and blames corporations for overusing natural resources.[50]

Legal proceedings[edit]

The arrest warrant affidavit says Crusius waived his Miranda rights, confessed to detectives that he was the shooter, and admitted that he targeted "Mexicans" during the attack.[39][40][22]

There are multiple investigations and jurisdictions involved with the case. FBI officials in El Paso served multiple warrants in the Dallas area and interviewed acquaintances of Crusius in Dallas and San Antonio.[57]

State charges[edit]

Crusius was indicted on capital murder charges by a Texas grand jury on September 12, 2019. He pleaded not guilty to capital murder charges at his arraignment on October 10, 2019 at the El Paso County Courthouse.[35] Mark Stevens, a San Antonio criminal defense attorney, was appointed by the state court to represent Crusius, along with defense attorney Joe Spencer.[58][59] On April 28, 2020, prosecutors announced they would be seeking a new capital murder charge following the recent death of a twenty-third victim after he spent nine months in the hospital.[60]

Federal charges[edit]

On February 6, 2020, Crusius was charged with 90 federal charges: 22 counts of committing a hate crime resulting in death, 22 counts of use of a firearm to commit murder, 23 counts of a hate crime involving an attempt to kill, and 23 counts of use of a firearm during a crime.[13][61] Federal prosecutors of the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Western District of Texas are seeking the death penalty,[57] but the final decision on whether a federal capital sentence will be sought will be made by the Attorney General of the United States.[62]

Crusius waived his federal bond hearing on February 12, 2020 during his first federal court appearance.[63] A trial in federal court is expected before the trial in state court.[62] On July 23, 2020, Crusius entered a plea of not-guilty to federal charges.[64] He also waived his arraignment on those charges.[65]

Defense motion[edit]

On July 14, 2020, the court accepted a motion by the defense team in which they cited mitigating factors, citing Crusius' alleged lifelong neurological and mental disabilities, which they described as "severe". The defense added that he was treated with anti-psychotic medication walmart customer service spanish that he was in a "psychotic state" when arrested.[66]

In August 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Texas, the trials were delayed for at least a year.[67] In the case of state court trial, it might be two or three years away, according to a defense attorney, not only due to the COVID-19 pandemic but also for the massive amount of evidence in the case, and added that as long as the prosecutors seek the death penalty, the case will remain open for years.[67]

Aftermath[edit]

Memorial for the shooting victims

Funerals and vigils[edit]

Several funeral homes in El Paso and Ciudad Juárez announced they would provide funeral services for free to the families of the victims as a sign of solidarity for their community.[68] Ciudad Juárez's Rotary International chapter organized a vigil in Ciudad Juárez. They gathered at a park and lit candles and shone cellphone lights in El Paso's direction as a sign of solidarity.[69]

Antonio Basco declared his wife's funeral on August 16 to be open to anyone who wished to attend.[70] Hundreds of people from El Paso and other parts of the country attended, and flowers were sent from around the world.[70][71]

El Paso musician Khalid held a benefit concert for his home city on September 1, featuring several high-profile artists and introduced by fellow El Paso native and former US Representative Beto O'Rourke.[72]

Tributes[edit]

One week after the shooting, a citizen from Ciudad Juárez, Jorge Luis Martínez Chávez, ran a total of 22 miles, a mile for each of the people killed in the Walmart shooting (one additional victim died months later), starting at the Zaragoza bridge in Juárez, Mexico, and finishing at the Walmart memorial in El Paso where the attack was perpetrated.[73]

Walmart's reaction[edit]

Monument built in the parking lot of the Walmart

Two days after the shooting, a Walmart corporate employee sent a memorandum to Walmart's entire e-commerce division, which includes thousands of employees, urging a "sick-out" strike to force the corporation to stop selling guns.[74] Walmart later sent out a memo instructing workers to remove signs and displays that "contain violent themes or aggressive behavior"[75] and pledged $400,000 for funds that were aimed at helping the victims of the mass shooting.[76] On September 3, 2019, the company announced it would stop selling ammunition for handguns and assault rifles[77] in the United States, as well as ask customers not to openly carry firearms into their stores.[77][78]

Reactions[edit]

Terrorism experts, including Peter R. Neumann, cited the Great Replacement conspiracy theory as a common factor among several similar attacks.[48] The Southern Poverty Law Center's Hatewatch blog linked the shooting with the earlier Christchurch mosque shootings and the Poway synagogue shooting, citing the similar white nationalist contents of the respective attackers' manifestos.[79]Jonathan Greenblatt, chief executive of the Anti-Defamation league, said that the shooting, as part of a series of similar attacks, indicated a "global threat" of white supremacy.[2] NATO secretary-general Jens Stoltenberg urged countries to work together to prevent "lone wolf" attackers who find inspiration in one another's actions.[80][81] Others, including the writer Daniel Okrent, disputed the "lone wolf" idea, pointing to the ways in which technology allows those with similar violent ideologies to congregate online.[45]

Several commentators attributed both the El Paso and Christchurch shootings to an ideology of eco-fascism.[82][83][84]The Washington Post described the El Paso and Christchurch shootings as examples of an eco-fascist trend among white supremacists.[5] Writing in GQ, Luke Darby referred to the "distinctly environmental theme" of Crusius' alleged manifesto.[85]Jeet Heer in The Nation described the manifesto as being based in "Malthusian fascism", a worldview in which different races vie against one another in the face of environmental crises such as global warming.[86] Mainstream environmentalists, including the executive director of the Sierra Club, denounced the attacker's alleged white-supremacist motivations.[5]

United States[edit]

President Donald Trump condemned the shooting as "hateful" and an "act of cowardice" later that day.[90] He promised that his administration would provide "total support".[91][92] In a later statement, Trump announced after the shootings in El Paso and in Dayton, Ohio, that all US flags, both domestic and abroad, would be flown at half-staff until sunset on August 8.[93] In a speech from the White House on August 5, Trump said: "In one voice, our nation must condemn racism, bigotry and white supremacy. These sinister ideologies must be defeated. Hate has no place in America."[94] On August 7, Trump said he was "concerned about the rise of any group of hate", whether it was "white supremacy, whether it’s any other kind of supremacy, whether it's antifa".[95]

Within two days of the shooting, #WhiteSupremacistInChief reached the number one trend on Twitter[96] as critics pointed out that statements in the suspect's alleged manifesto mirrored comments Trump had made in the past, including references to illegal immigration as an "invasion" and telling an unspecified group of "‘Progressive’ Democrat Congresswomen, who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe" to "go back and help fix pnc investments managed account totally broken and crime infested places from which they came".[56] Media outlets also highlighted an incident in May 2019 where an audience member at a campaign rally suggested shooting illegal migrants crossing the border, walmart customer service spanish which Trump responded with a joke,[96] saying, "only in the Panhandle you can get away with that".[54][55][56]

Former president Barack Obama broke his self-imposed vow of silence on the new president's leadership to release the statement, "We should soundly reject language coming out of the mouths of any of our leaders that feeds a climate of fear and hatred or normalizes racist sentiments," which has widely been interpreted as a criticism of Trump's specific rhetoric.[97] Trump's remark that violent video games contributed to such mass shootings, a view echoed by other politicians such as House Minority Leader of the United States House of RepresentativesKevin McCarthy and Texas Lt. Governor Dan Patrick, drew criticism from the video game industry, as past studies have found that no link exists between shootings and video games, and accused the government of using the medium as a scapegoat.[98][99][100][101]

U.S. Representative Veronica Escobar, who represents El Paso in Congress, brought a town hall meeting in the city to an early close following the shooting.[102][103] Escobar later said there was also a hate epidemic, with domestic terrorism resulting from the dehumanization of others.[104] Texas Senator Ted Cruz issued a written statement deploring "this unspeakable evil."[105]Beto O’Rourke, a native of El Paso who represented the city in Congress from 2013 to 2019, said he was "incredibly saddened" but that "The [El Paso] community is going to stay together. Everyone's resolved to make sure this doesn't continue to happen in this country."[106] Texas Governor Greg Abbott called the shooting "a heinous and senseless act of violence".[91] Texas Senator John Cornyn said that gun violence would not be solved by focusing on law-abiding citizens.[107] Texas Lt. Governor Dan Patrick said violent video games were partly to blame.[98]

Members of the Democratic Party[51] criticized Trump's anti-immigrant rhetoric in the wake of the shooting, including congresswoman Escobar[108] and 2020 presidential candidates[55] O'Rourke,[55]Cory Booker,[56] and Joe Biden[51]. Other 2020 candidates called for political action to eliminate gun violence, including Booker,[103]Pete Buttigieg,[109]Bernie Sanders,[110]Elizabeth Warren,[110] and Walmart customer service spanish Yang.[111] The incident also caused many celebrities and media figures to debate gun rights within the United States, with some condemning the perceived inaction of many political figures in stopping the large number of mass shootings in the country.[112] That same evening, Moms Demand Action, which had a convention that weekend in Washington, DC, led a march and vigil outside the White House in support of gun control in the United States and the ban of assault weapons.[113]

The day after the shooting, some prominent Republicans, including Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush, also spoke of the need to combat white-supremacist terrorism.[55][114][115] Texas senator Ted Cruz decried the shooting as a "heinous act of terrorism and white supremacy".[115][116][117] On Twitter, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein classified the attack as "white terrorism".[43][114][118] Many Latinos interviewed by The New York Times said they felt disturbed at becoming targets of white-nationalist violence.[119]

Dan Stein, the president of the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR), issued a statement on Twitter denouncing the shooting, with no mention of Crusius' alleged manifesto. The group regularly makes similar anti-immigration arguments to those contained in the document, prompting worries of political fallout from the shooting among FAIR and similar groups, according to David Nakamura in The Washington Post.[51] Both Stein and Mark Krikorian of the Center for Immigration Studies, which also advocates restrictions on immigration, dismissed any connections between Crusius' ideology and their own.[51]

In response to the shooting, some 8chan users claimed that the shooter was "our guy". The purported manifesto of the shooter, after being deleted, was re-uploaded by some users, while others commented that it showed "zero effort", or claimed that it was fake.[44] Following the attack, Cloudflare terminated its website security service for 8chan, commenting that "8chan has repeatedly proven itself to be a cesspool of hate".[120][121] The site later went dark after its server rental provider Voxility discontinued its service.[122]

Trump visited El Paso and Dayton on August 7. The president and first lady also met with the mayors of El Paso[123] and Dayton.[124] In El Paso, protesters showed up at the site of the shooting, some claiming that Trump's attitude and statements had led to the shooting;[125][126] Two days before the visit, congresswoman Escobar said that Trump was "not welcome" in the city and declined an invitation to meet with him.[108][127][128] The White House published photos and a video of Trump's trip; in some photos, Trump was pictured smiling and giving thumbs up gestures, while the video was focused on Trump shaking hands and posing for photos.[129][130] Trump said that he had an "amazing day" of visits, praising the "love, the respect for" him as president.[131]

Mexico[edit]

News report from Notimexabout the shooting and memorials

Mexican presidentAndrés Manuel López Obrador extended his condolences to the families of the victims, both Americans and Mexicans.[132] López Obrador also criticized the "indiscriminate use of weapons" in the United States.[133] The Mexican Secretariat of Foreign Affairs (SRE) identified the eight Mexican citizens killed, and the seven Mexican citizens wounded, in the attack.[134][132] The Mexican victims killed in the attack came from Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua City, and Torreón, Coahuila.[135] One of the victims, identified only as ″Rosa,″ who had also offered to testify, was deported on January 30, 2021 because of a minor traffic violation.[136]

Javier Corral Jurado, the governor of the Mexican state of Chihuahua, offered his assistance to Texas governor Greg Abbott and El Paso mayor Dee Margo, and said that Chihuahua authorities were ready to assist in any capacity if needed by the U.S. government.[137] The Chihuahua government also directed Chihuahua residents and Mexican citizens affected by the attack to Mexico's Executive Committee for Victims (Spanish: Comisión Ejecutiva de Atención a Víctimas), and set up a phone line for Mexican citizens who needed assistance.[138] The Mexican Consulate in El Paso provided consular assistance to Mexican nationals affected by the attack,[139] and sent personnel to visit Mexican victims treated at the hospitals. The SRE confirmed that the consul Mauricio Ibarra Ponce de León would coordinate with El Paso and Ciudad Juárez officials.[140]

On August 4, Mexican Secretary of Foreign AffairsMarcelo Ebrard announced that Mexico would issue a formal charge against the suspect for terrorism against Mexican nationals should Mexico's Attorney General's Office (FGR) support it, and possibly request his extradition from the U.S. to Mexico to face those charges.[133][141] If the suspect is charged with baby 1st birthday party ideas, it would be the first time in history that Mexico issues a criminal charge of this nature for a crime committed in the U.S. In addition, it would guarantee Mexico access to information about the case.[142][143] Ebrard also stated that the Mexican government would remain in contact with the victims' families throughout the investigation and trial, and that they would press charges against the individual(s) or firm who sold the weapons to the suspect.[144] Former Mexican president Felipe Calderón offered his condolences on Twitter, and also directed a message against Trump. He said that notwithstanding if the attack was confirmed to be a hate crime or not, that Trump should stop his "hate speech" and "stigmatization".[145]

International[edit]

UN Secretary-General António Guterres condemned "in the strongest terms the terrorist attack against Latinos on Saturday in the Texas city of El Paso" and called for everyone to work together to combat violence born of hate, racism and xenophobia. Recently the UN launched an action plan to "fight against discourses that incite hatred".[146]

The incident was mentioned by Pope Francis during a speech in St. Peter's Square on August 4, in which he condemned attacks on defenseless people and said he was spiritually close to the victims, the wounded, and the families affected by the attacks that had "bloodied Texas, California, and Ohio". The Gilroy Garlic Festival shooting happened in California around a week before the El Paso shooting, while the 2019 Dayton shooting occurred in Ohio less than 24 hours after.[147]

Uruguay and Venezuela issued travel warnings to avoid certain cities in America, including Baltimore, Detroit, Albuquerque, Cleveland, Memphis, and Oakland, citing "proliferation of acts of violence" and "growing indiscriminate violence, mostly for hate crimes, including racism and discrimination". Both countries warned their citizens to avoid any place with large crowds, including shopping malls, festivals, and "any kind of cultural or sporting events".[148]Japan issued a similar travel warning, advising its citizens to pay attention to the potential for gunfire "everywhere" in the U.S., which they described as a "gun society".[149] President Trump threatened undefined retaliation against countries and organizations that issue travel warnings on the United States because of gun violence.[150]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^Twenty of the victims died on the day of the shooting, two others died in the following days, and the 23rd victim died on April 26, 2020.[6][7][8][9]
  2. ^
    • "The document parrots some of President Donald Trump’s divisive rhetoric about immigration, but the writer said his views predate Trump’s rise"[41]
    • "The manifesto’s author said their anger toward immigrants predates Donald Trump’s presidency, but the language used bears much similarity with the president’s vocabulary."[53]
    • "[S]ome of the language included in the document parroted Trump’s own words, characterizing Hispanic migrants as invaders taking American jobs and arguing to 'send them back'."[52]
    • "Portions of the 2,300-word essay, titled 'The Inconvenient Truth', closely mirror Trump's rhetoric, as well as the language of the white nationalist movement, including a warning about the 'Hispanic invasion of Texas'."[54]
    • "But if Mr. Trump did not originally inspire the gunman, he has brought into the mainstream polarizing ideas and people once consigned to the fringes of American society [.] Mr. Crusius described legal and illegal immigrants as 'invaders' who are flooding into the United States, a term Mr. Trump has frequently employed to argue for a border wall."[55]

References[edit]

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Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2019_El_Paso_shooting
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