what jewish holiday was yesterday

The Jewish day begins and ends at sundown. However, many extended Jewish families gather for the holiday, and consequently some Jewish students may miss. 1of5Israeli President Isaac Herzog lights candles during the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah in Hebron's holiest site, known to Jews as the Tomb. What is Shavuot? When is Shavuot? How is Shavuot Celebrated? History behind Shavuot, the Jewish holiday commemorating the giving of the Torah on Mt. Sinai.

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Israeli president celebrates Hanukkah at West Bank site

About 1,000 Jewish settlers live in small enclaves guarded by Israeli soldiers in the city, surrounded by some 200,000 Palestinians who must cross through Israeli checkpoints to move from place to place.

There is frequent violence between the sides and the Cave of the Patriarchs, revered by Muslims ally dealer finance Jews, was the site of a massacre by a Jewish settler who killed 29 Muslim worshippers in 1994.

Herzog made no mention of the 1994 massacre but paid homage to the more than 60 Jews killed by Palestinians in Hebron during riots in 1929, what jewish holiday was yesterday that a relative had survived the fighting.

“I have no doubt that she would have been very moved by the fact that one of her descendants is lighting Hanukkah candles in the Cave of the Patriarchs as the president of the state of Israel,” he said during a ceremony marking the first night of the eight-day holiday.

Recognition of the Jewish attachment to the city “must be beyond all controversy,” he added.

The cave is believed to be the burial site of the Jewish and Muslim patriarch Abraham. It also is revered as the burial site of other Jewish patriarchs and matriarchs and is considered the second holiest site in Judaism.

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In his speech, he made a brief call for “peace between all religions” and “to denounce all forms of hatred and violence.”

But critics accused Herzog of embracing the most radical elements of Israeli society. Herzog is a former leader of Israel’s Labor party, which supports a two-state solution with the Palestinians. And his current position is meant to be apolitical and to serve as a moral compass for the nation.

Hussein Al Sheikh, a top Palestinian official, called the visit a ”political, moral and religious provocation."

Several dozen Israeli protesters gathered about a kilometer (half a mile) away from the cave, screaming “shame” as Israeli police held some of them back. Journalists and protesters were not allowed near the holy site.

“Herzog doesn’t have any shame,” said Nurit Budinsky, an Israeli activist. “He came to celebrate with these Jews who took over the city and celebrate with them a holiday of freedom. Here in Hebron there is no freedom, there are people who live in unbearable occupation.”

Breaking the Silence, a group of former Israeli combat soldiers who oppose Israel’s West Bank occupation, accused Herzog of “giving an official seal of approval to this obscene reality and the people perpetuating it.”

The Jewish residents of Hebron are among the most hard line of the roughly 700,000 Israeli settlers living in the West Bank and east Jerusalem.

Israel captured the West Bank, along with east Jerusalem and the Gaza Strip, in the 1967 Mideast war. The Palestinians claim all three areas for a future independent state. The international community overwhelmingly considers the settlements illegal. Israel withdrew from Gaza in 2005.

Aviya Glass, a resident of the neighboring settlement of Kiryat Arba, said the high-profile visit “shows us how good it is for people with such a status to come here to strengthen the settlement.”

Источник: https://www.ctpost.com/news/article/Israeli-president-celebrates-Hanukkah-at-West-16656988.php

what jewish holiday was yesterday The Spokesman-Review Newspaper what jewish holiday was yesterday The Spokesman-Review tahiry jose sisters, West Bank — Israel’s president on Sunday visited one of the most contentious spots in the occupied West Bank to celebrate the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah, sparking scuffles between Israeli security forces and protesters.

President Isaac Herzog said he was visiting the Cave of the Patriarchs in Hebron to celebrate the ancient city’s Jewish past and promote interfaith relations. But his visit to the city, known for its tiny ultranationalist Jewish settler community and difficult living conditions for Palestinians, drew widespread criticism from Palestinians and left-wing Israelis.

About 1,000 Jewish settlers live in small enclaves guarded by Israeli soldiers in the city, surrounded by some 200,000 Palestinians who must cross through Israeli checkpoints to move from place to place.

There is frequent violence between the sides and the Cave of the Patriarchs, revered by Muslims and Jews, was the site of a massacre by a Jewish settler who killed 29 Muslim worshippers in 1994.

Herzog made no mention of the 1994 massacre but paid homage to the more than 60 Jews killed by Palestinians in Hebron during riots in 1929, noting that a relative had survived the fighting.

“I have no doubt that she would have been very moved by the fact that one of her descendants is lighting Hanukkah candles in the Cave of the Patriarchs as the president of the state of Israel,” he said during a ceremony marking the first night of the eight-day holiday.

Recognition of the Jewish attachment to the city “must be beyond all controversy,” he added.

The cave is believed to be the burial site of the Jewish and Muslim patriarch Abraham. It also is revered as the burial site of other Jewish patriarchs and matriarchs and is considered the second holiest site in Judaism.

In his speech, he made a brief call for “peace between all religions” and “to denounce all forms of hatred and violence.”

But critics accused Herzog of embracing the most radical elements of Israeli society. Herzog is a former leader of Israel’s Labor party, which supports a two-state solution with the Palestinians. And his current position is meant to be apolitical and to serve as a moral compass for the nation.

Hussein Al Sheikh, a top Palestinian official, called the visit a ”political, moral and religious provocation.”

Several dozen Israeli protesters gathered about a kilometer (half a mile) away from the cave, screaming “shame” as Israeli police held some of them back. Journalists and protesters were not allowed near the holy site.

“Herzog doesn’t have any shame,” said Nurit Budinsky, an Israeli activist. “He came to celebrate with these Jews who took over the city and celebrate with them a holiday of freedom. Here in Hebron there is no freedom, there are people who live in unbearable occupation.”

Breaking the Silence, a group of former Israeli combat soldiers who oppose Israel’s West Bank occupation, accused Herzog of “giving an official seal of approval to this obscene reality and the people perpetuating it.”

The Jewish residents of Hebron are among the most hard line of the roughly 700,000 Israeli settlers living in the West Bank and east Jerusalem.

Israel captured the West Bank, along with east Jerusalem and the Gaza Strip, in the 1967 Mideast war. The Palestinians claim all three areas for a future independent state. The international community overwhelmingly considers the settlements illegal. Israel withdrew from Gaza in 2005.

Aviya Glass, a resident of the neighboring settlement of Kiryat Arba, said the high-profile visit “shows us how good it is for people with such a status to come here to strengthen the settlement.”

Local journalism is essential.

Give directly to The Spokesman-Review's Northwest Passages community forums series -- which helps to offset the costs of several reporter and editor positions at the newspaper -- by using the easy options below. Gifts processed in this system are not tax deductible, but are predominately used to help meet the local financial requirements needed to receive national matching-grant funds.

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Источник: https://www.spokesman.com/stories/2021/nov/28/israeli-president-celebrates-hanukkah-at-west-bank/

Jewish Holidays & Celebrations – List

We gather as family and community to give thanks, offer respect, and stay connected to the ancient and modern traditions that shape Jewish life and identity. We remember, we re-enact, and we retain the light for generations to come. We also honor the moments, experiences, and values we hold in fresh, but powerful ways.

We welcome you to learn more about significant holidays and observations of the Jewish calendar. We also invite you to join us for our many celebrations throughout the year!

Still have questions? Contact our What jewish holiday was yesterday Life department.

Shabbat

The day of rest and weekly observance of God’s completion of creation.

Rosh Hashanah

The Jewish New Year—a holiday observed with festive meals and a day spent in prayer or quiet meditation.

Yom Kippur

The Jewish Day of Atonement—the most solemn day of the Jewish year. A day devoted to self–examination, and the chance to begin the New Year with a clean slate.

Sukkot

A celebration of the fall harvest, this holiday also commemorates the time when the Hebrews dwelt in the What jewish holiday was yesterday wilderness on their way to the Promised Land.

Shemini Atzeret

Literally the “8th day of assembly,” this holiday marks the end of Sukkot with an annual prayer for rain.

Simchat Torah

The day marking the end and the beginning of the annual Torah reading cycle.

Hanukkah

A festival celebrating liberation from oppression, freedom of worship, and finding light in the darkest of times.

Tu B’Shevat

The Jewish “New Year of the Trees,” celebrated with observances that connect us to our environment and the natural world.

Purim

A day celebrating the saving of the Jews from a diabolical plot of destruction, as recounted in the Book of Esther.

Passover

A festival of freedom that marks the Hebrew exodus from Egypt long ago. 

Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Memorial Day)

The day Jews all over the world mourn the loss of six million Jewish lives lost during the Holocaust.

Yom HaZikaron (Israeli Memorial Day)

A day commemorating the soldiers who have fallen fighting for Israel’s independence and defending its security.

Yom HaAtzmaut (Israeli Independence Day)

This holiday celebrates the independence of the Modern State of Israel.

Lag B’Omer

The holiday that marks the 33rd day of the 49-day “Omer” period between Passover and Shavuot.

Shavuot

The celebration of the giving of what jewish holiday was yesterday Torah to the Jewish people, also known as the Festival of First Fruits.

Tisha B’Av

An important fast day commemorating the destruction of the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem in 586 BCE and 70 CE.

Tu B’Av

A Jewish celebration of love.

Источник: https://pjcc.org/jewish-life/jewish-holidays-explained/

Israeli president celebrates Hanukkah at West Bank site

HEBRON, West Bank (AP) — Israel’s president on Sunday visited one of the most contentious spots in the occupied West Bank to celebrate the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah, sparking scuffles between Israeli security forces and protesters.

President Isaac Herzog said he was visiting the Cave of the Patriarchs in Hebron to celebrate the ancient city’s Jewish past and promote interfaith relations. But city of san jose housing department visit to the city, known for its tiny ultranationalist Jewish settler community and difficult living conditions for Palestinians, drew widespread criticism from Palestinians and left-wing Israelis.

About 1,000 Jewish settlers live in small enclaves guarded by Israeli soldiers in the city, surrounded by some 200,000 Palestinians who must cross through Israeli checkpoints to move from place to place.

There is frequent violence between the sides and the Cave of the Patriarchs, revered by Muslims and Jews, was the site of a massacre by a Jewish settler who killed 29 Muslim worshippers in 1994.

Herzog made no mention of the 1994 massacre but paid homage to the more than 60 Jews killed by Palestinians in Hebron during riots in 1929, noting that a relative had survived the fighting.

“I have no doubt that she would have been very moved by the fact where can i pay my xfinity bill near me one of her descendants is lighting Hanukkah candles in the Cave of the Patriarchs as the president of the state of Israel,” he said during a ceremony marking the first night of the eight-day holiday.

Recognition of the Jewish attachment to the city “must be beyond all controversy,” he added.

The cave is believed to be the burial site of the Jewish and Muslim patriarch Abraham. It also is revered as the burial site of other Jewish patriarchs and matriarchs and is considered the second holiest site in Judaism. freedom northwest community credit union his speech, he made a brief call for “peace between all religions” and “to denounce all forms of hatred and violence.”

But critics accused Herzog of embracing the most radical elements of Israeli society. Herzog is a former leader of Israel’s Labor party, which supports a two-state solution with the Palestinians. And his current position is meant to be apolitical and to serve as a moral compass for the nation.

Hussein Al Sheikh, a top Palestinian official, called the visit a ”political, moral and religious provocation.”

Several dozen Israeli protesters gathered about a kilometer (half a mile) away from the cave, screaming “shame” as Israeli what jewish holiday was yesterday held some of them back. Journalists and protesters were not allowed where can you find uscis online account number the holy site.

“Herzog doesn’t have any shame,” said Nurit Budinsky, an Israeli activist. “He came to celebrate with these Jews who took over the city and celebrate with them a holiday of freedom. Here in Hebron there is no freedom, there are people who live in unbearable occupation.”

Breaking the Silence, a group of former Israeli combat soldiers who oppose Israel’s West Bank occupation, accused Herzog of “giving an official seal of approval icici net banking login online this obscene reality and the people perpetuating it.”

The Jewish residents of Hebron are among the most hard line of the roughly 700,000 Israeli settlers what jewish holiday was yesterday in the West Bank and east Jerusalem.

Israel captured the West Bank, along with east Jerusalem and the Gaza Strip, in the 1967 Mideast war. The Palestinians claim all three areas for a future independent state. The international community overwhelmingly considers the settlements illegal. Israel withdrew from Gaza in 2005.

Aviya Glass, a resident of the neighboring settlement of Kiryat Arba, said the high-profile visit “shows us how good it is for people with such a status to come here to strengthen the settlement.”

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Источник: https://www.fourstateshomepage.com/news/israeli-president-celebrates-hanukkah-at-west-bank-site/

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26 Kislev 5782

This is a virtual event

Join Rabbi Josh Weinberg in conversation with NIF CEO Daniel Sokatch about his new book, "Can We Talk About Israel?: A Guide for the Curious, Confused, and Conflicted." Daniel is an expert who understands both sides of one of the world's most complex, controversial topics.

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Temple Sinai’s Virtual Afternoon Chanukkah Celebration

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Jewish Holidays & Celebrations – List

We gather as family and community to give thanks, offer respect, and stay connected to the ancient and modern traditions that shape Jewish life and identity. We remember, we re-enact, and we retain the light for generations to come. We also honor the moments, experiences, and values we hold in fresh, but powerful ways.

We welcome you to learn more about significant holidays and observations of the Jewish calendar. We also invite you to join us for our many celebrations throughout the year!

Still have questions? Contact our Jewish Life department.

Shabbat

The day of rest and weekly observance of God’s completion of creation.

Rosh Hashanah

The Jewish New Year—a holiday observed with festive meals and a day spent in prayer or quiet meditation.

Yom Kippur

The Jewish Day of Atonement—the most solemn day of the Jewish year. A day devoted to self–examination, and the chance to begin the New Year with a clean slate.

Sukkot

A celebration of the fall harvest, this holiday also commemorates the time when the Hebrews dwelt in the Sinai wilderness on their way to the Promised Land.

Shemini Atzeret

Literally the “8th day of assembly,” this holiday marks the end of Sukkot with an annual prayer for rain.

Simchat Torah

The day marking the end and the beginning of the annual Torah reading cycle.

Hanukkah

A festival celebrating liberation from oppression, freedom of worship, and finding light in the darkest of times.

Tu B’Shevat

The Jewish “New Year of the Trees,” celebrated with observances that connect us to our environment and the natural world.

Purim

A day celebrating the saving of the Jews from a diabolical plot of destruction, as recounted in the Book of Esther.

Passover

A festival of freedom that marks the Hebrew exodus from Egypt long ago. 

Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Memorial Day)

The day Jews all over the world mourn the loss of six million Jewish lives lost during the Holocaust.

Yom HaZikaron (Israeli Memorial Day)

A day commemorating the soldiers who have fallen fighting for Israel’s independence and defending its security.

Yom HaAtzmaut (Israeli Independence Day)

This holiday celebrates the independence of the Modern State of Israel.

Lag B’Omer

The holiday that marks the 33rd day of the 49-day “Omer” period between Passover and Shavuot.

Shavuot

The celebration of the giving of the Torah to the Jewish people, also known as the Festival of First Fruits.

Tisha B’Av

An important fast day commemorating the destruction of the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem in 586 BCE and 70 CE.

Tu B’Av

A Jewish celebration of love.

Источник: https://pjcc.org/jewish-life/jewish-holidays-explained/

Is September 21 2021 Part Of A Jewish Celebration?

The following is a collection of holidays, commemorations, observations and celebrations for the Jewish community during Tuesday, 2021-09-21. For more information on the equivalence of dates in the Hebrew calendar and other calendars, please see Hebrew Calendar 5781.

  • Sukkot starts:

    [judaism][yom-tov][Shalosh-Regalim] Sukkot, or sometimes written as Succot, is a biblical Jewish holiday celebrated on the 15th day of the month of Tishrei. It is one of the three biblically mandated festivals Shalosh regalim on which Hebrews were commanded to make a pilgrimage to the Temple in Jerusalem. Sukkot is intended as a reminiscence of the type of fragile dwellings in which the Israelites dwelt during their 40 years of travel in the desert after the Exodus from slavery in Egypt.

Notes:

[judaism] In Judaism, this day begins at sundown on the evening before.

[yom-tov] This day is yom tov, so it has similar obligations and restrictions to Shabbat in the sense that normal work (melacha) is forbidden.

[Shalosh-Regalim] Pilgrimage to the Temple in Jerusalem.

Content last updated on 2016-08-23T15:26:00Z
Источник: https://www.vercalendario.info/en/event/jewish-celebrations-21-september-2021.html

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

HEBRON, West Bank — Israel’s president on Sunday visited one of the most contentious spots in the occupied West Bank to celebrate the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah, sparking scuffles between Israeli security forces and protesters.

President Isaac Herzog said he was visiting the Cave of the Patriarchs in Hebron to celebrate the ancient city’s Jewish past and promote interfaith relations. But his visit to the city, known for its tiny ultranationalist Jewish settler community and difficult living conditions for Palestinians, drew widespread criticism from Palestinians and left-wing Israelis.

About 1,000 Jewish settlers live in small enclaves guarded by Israeli soldiers in the city, surrounded by some 200,000 Palestinians who must cross through Israeli checkpoints to move from place to place.

There is frequent violence between the sides and the Cave of the Patriarchs, revered by Muslims and Jews, was the site of a massacre by a Jewish settler who killed 29 Muslim worshippers in 1994.

Herzog made no mention of the 1994 massacre but paid homage to the more than 60 Jews killed by Palestinians in Hebron during riots in 1929, noting that a relative had survived the fighting.

“I have no doubt that she would have been very moved by the fact that one of her descendants is lighting Hanukkah candles in the Cave of the Patriarchs as the president of the state of Israel,” he said during a ceremony marking the first night of the eight-day holiday.

Recognition of the Jewish attachment to the city “must be beyond all controversy,” he added.

The cave is believed to be the burial site of the Jewish and Muslim patriarch Abraham. It also is revered as the burial site of other Jewish patriarchs and matriarchs and is considered the second holiest site in Judaism.

In his speech, he made a brief call for “peace between all religions” and “to denounce all forms of hatred and violence.”

But critics accused Herzog of embracing the most radical elements of Israeli society. Herzog is a former leader of Israel’s Labor party, which supports a two-state solution with the Palestinians. And his current position is meant to be apolitical and to serve as a moral compass for the nation.

Hussein Al Sheikh, a top Palestinian official, called the visit a ”political, moral and religious provocation.”

Several dozen Israeli protesters gathered about a kilometer (half a mile) away from the cave, screaming “shame” as Israeli police held some of them back. Journalists and protesters were not allowed near the holy site.

“Herzog doesn’t have any shame,” said Nurit Budinsky, an Israeli activist. “He came to celebrate with these Jews who took over the city and celebrate with them a holiday of freedom. Here in Hebron there is no freedom, there are people who live in unbearable occupation.”

Breaking the Silence, a group of former Israeli combat soldiers who oppose Israel’s West Bank occupation, accused Herzog of “giving an official seal of approval to this obscene reality and the people perpetuating it.”

The Jewish residents of Hebron are among the most hard line of the roughly 700,000 Israeli settlers living in the West Bank and east Jerusalem.

Israel captured the West Bank, along with east Jerusalem and the Gaza Strip, in the 1967 Mideast war. The Palestinians claim all three areas for a future independent state. The international community overwhelmingly considers the settlements illegal. Israel withdrew from Gaza in 2005.

Aviya Glass, a resident of the neighboring settlement of Kiryat Arba, said the high-profile visit “shows us how good it is for people with such a status to come here to strengthen the settlement.”

Local journalism is essential.

Give directly to The Spokesman-Review's Northwest Passages community forums series -- which helps to offset the costs of several reporter and editor positions at the newspaper -- by using the easy options below. Gifts processed in this system are not tax deductible, but are predominately used to help meet the local financial requirements needed to receive national matching-grant funds.

Active Person

Subscribe to the Coronavirus newsletter

Get the day’s latest Coronavirus news delivered to your inbox by subscribing to our newsletter.

Sign up


Источник: https://www.spokesman.com/stories/2021/nov/28/israeli-president-celebrates-hanukkah-at-west-bank/

4 Things to Know About Yom Kippur

Yom Kippur is a Jewish holiday that is marked by its solemnity and a day to begin the new year with a fresh start.

Yom Kippur, which begins on Sept. 18 this year, is one of the most important religious days in Judaism. (Though it might not seem that way based on U.S. popular culture, Hanukkah is actually one of the least important.) The holiday is inseparable from its 25-hour fast, which also prohibits drinking water — even the water used for brushing one’s teeth.

Here’s what you should know about Yom Kippur and what it means for those observing.

What is Yom Kippur?

Yom Kippur is a Jewish holiday that translates to “Day of Atonement” in English. It follows Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, by a little more than a week — and the two are known as the “Jewish high holidays” or “high holy days.”

Rosh Hashanah, which began on Sept. 9 this year, marks the beginning of the Hebrew calendar — currently in the year 5779 — and is considered a time for joy and celebration. When Yom Kippur takes place shortly thereafter, it is supposed to be a time for observing Jews to repent for their sins and heal their souls for the new year.

Yom Kippur is the “holiest day of the year” for Jews, according to Chabad, a worldwide Orthodox Jewish movement.

When is Yom Kippur?

Yom Kippur begins at sundown on Tuesday, Sept. 18, and ends at sundown on Wednesday, Sept. 19.

The fast lasts for 25 hours, rather than the typical 24 of a full day. The 25-hour observance on Yom Kippur allows a cushion of time for the subjectivity of “nightfall” as a moment in time, Chabad says. Those familiar with the Jewish faith may know that Shabbat, or the sabbath, lasts for 25 hours, too.

Why do Jewish people fast on Yom Kippur?

Yom Kippur is characterized by a 25-hour fast. The timing of this fast differs from fasting during the Muslim month of Ramadan, when food can be consumed after sundown each night and before sunrise each day.

For Yom Kippur, which only occurs for one day, the fast is observed from sundown to sundown. By extending the holiday for an extra hour, those observing can be sure that the fast aligns properly with the date.

The fast occurs as part of the somber mood of the day of repentance. However, as with all Jewish holidays marked by a fast (there are six in total), those with medical conditions are not expected to put themselves in danger by fasting. “The same Torah which commands us to fast on Yom Kippur tells us that guarding our health is far more important than fasting on this holy day,” Chabad says.

What should you say to someone observing Yom Kippur?

On Yom Kippur, it is customary to say “have an easy fast,” rather than something jovial like “happy holidays.” Those observing often say “yom tov” in Hebrew or “good yuntif” in Yiddish, both of which are a wish to “have a good holy day.”

But if you say “happy holidays,” don’t worry — the holiday will become happy later that evening with a meal to break the fast after sundown. The “break-fast,” not to be confused with its homonym “breakfast,” is the traditional meal following a fast. (Being the first meal of the day, a daily breakfast serves the same purpose.)

Jews from all over the world break their fasts after Yom Kippur with their own traditional fare, but some customary foods served at a break-fast meal include dairy products and light foods, so as not to shock the system after 25 hours with no sustenance.

More Must-Read Stories From TIME

Write to Rachel E. Greenspan at [email protected]

Источник: https://time.com/5379021/yom-kippur-facts-2018/

26 Kislev 5782

This is a virtual event

Join us for an afternoon break and celebrate Chanukkah together. Sing along with our community to your favourite Chanukkah melodies led by Cantor Charles Osborne. Then, mark the third night of Chanukkah and light your chanukkiyot with Rabbi Jordan Shaner.

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