what to do for a dog ear infection home remedy

What To Avoid— Home Remedies for Dog Ear Infections that Can Be. How to Make a Homemade Pet Ear Infection Remedy · Combine witch hazel (this is better than alcohol as it will not burn and cause more pain) and organic apple. How Do Dogs Get Ear Mites? Siberian husky scratching its ears on a country path during a sunset. Like fleas or worms, your dog can.

What to do for a dog ear infection home remedy -

Yeast Infections in Dogs

Written by Small Door's medical experts

Itchy, irritated skin with a distinct odor can be an indication of a yeast infection, a common skin concern for dogs. A dog will typically develop a yeast infection on the skin or in the ears. Regardless of location, a yeast infection can cause extreme discomfort and can be an indication of a more serious issue.

Dog with yeast infection scratching ear

In This Article

What are yeast infections in dogs?

A yeast infection occurs when there is an overabundance of yeast found on the body of a dog. Yeasts are budding, spore-like forms of fungi that typically live on the body without causing illness. It is only when their numbers grow that they cause issues.

Signs & symptoms of yeast infections in dogs

Yeast thrives in a moist environment, so for dogs, that can be in places such as the ears, paws, armpit, groin, and even the folds of their face in certain breeds. A veterinarian will be able to make a definitive diagnosis, but as an owner, watch for these certain signs.

  • Changes in skin color and texture. In the early stages of a yeast infection, the skin begins to turn pink or red. When dealing with chronic yeast infections, the skin may become leathery, thick, and gray or black.

  • Greasy skin. The skin can become greasy or excessively oily.

  • Scaly skin. Some dogs may develop scaling, crusting, or flakiness of the skin, similar to dandruff.

  • Head shaking and tilting. Because the ears are the most common place for a dog to develop a yeast infection, pay close attention if your dog starts exhibiting these movements.

  • Scratching and rubbing. Yeast infections are incredibly itchy, and some dogs will try and scratch the infected area or rub up against the floor, furniture, or another surface to get relief.

  • Licking. Incessant licking of the infected area is another way a dog might try and find relief.

  • Swelling and warmth. Redness and swelling are the first signs of a yeast infection, but a dog’s symptoms can progress to swelling, warmth, and pain in the infected area.

  • Odor. Another common sign of yeast infection is a distinct smell, which will likely be your first indicator that your dog has this condition. The smell has been described by dog owners to mimic a musty or cheesy scent.

  • Hair loss. For yeast infections in the ear, which can be associated with inflammation, hair loss will occur around the ears.

  • Drooling. Although extremely rare, a yeast infection can occur inside the mouth, leading to drooling, discomfort, and problems eating. These signs can also be indicators of other oral issues that can be determined by your veterinarian.

How to tell the difference between ear mites and yeast infection

Yeast infections in dogs’ ears typically result in head shaking and rubbing, itching, odor, redness, and brown discharge. Ear mites in dogs have many of the same symptoms, however, there are a few slight differences. Ear mites cause a dark discharge from the ear that can be waxy or crusty. Ear mites are also barely visible to the naked eye, extremely itchy, and very contagious to other animals. If your dog is experiencing any of these symptoms, contact your vet so they can determine whether it’s a yeast infection or ear mites and the best option for treatment.

What dog breeds are prone to yeast infections?

Although it’s possible for all dogs to contract a yeast infection, it’s more common for specific breeds. Breeds with excess skin folds, floppy ears, hair growing in the inner ear canal, and those with allergies have a higher chance of getting a yeast infection.

Susceptible breeds include:

  • Shih Tzu

  • Cocker Spaniel

  • Schnauzers

  • Golden Retrievers

  • Labrador Retrievers

  • Basset Hound

  • West Highland White Terrier

  • German Shepherd

  • Maltese

  • Dachshunds

  • Poodles

What causes yeast infections in dogs?

Yeast infections can develop for many reasons. A dog with an underactive immune system can develop yeast overgrowth and infection. An overactive immune system, meanwhile, can trigger allergic reactions, which also leads to yeast infections.

When a dog develops allergies, it can be a sign of an overactive immune system. If the allergy is severe, a veterinarian will prescribe medication to help alleviate those symptoms, although certain medications can alter the natural balance of good bacteria, and can lead to yeast overgrowth.

Allergens such as pollens, mold, dust, cigarette smoke, cleaning products, and even certain foods, especially if they’re high in sugar and carbs, can also lead to yeast infections. For some dogs, yeast problems are seasonal, and when the temperature and humidity are high, problems with yeast can occur.

Since yeast thrives in a moist environment, dogs that are bathed or in water often are prone to yeast infections in the ear. If the ear is not kept dry, water and debris can become trapped inside the ear canal. Other causes for yeast infections in a dog’s ear include wax or discharge, a trapped foreign object inside the ear, poor hygiene, hot, humid weather, and the use of products or ear drops that alter the natural environment of the ear.

Too much exercise and spending time in the hot sun (which can be dangerous for other reasons as well) can also contribute to the overgrowth of yeast.

Diagnosing yeast infection in dogs

A veterinarian can confirm a definitive diagnosis through cytology or by culturing. Hair and skin samples can be taken from around the affected area and tested under a microscope to determine a yeast infection.

If the yeast infection is believed to be inside the ear, the veterinarian will use a device called an otoscope to look inside the ear canal. A sample may also be taken from in and around the ear to be examined under a microscope. This will help further determine if the infection is caused by yeast, bacteria, or even both.

How to treat yeast infection in dogs

The first step in treatment is to identify and address the underlying cause of the yeast infection. Along with medication, at-home remedies can not only offer relief, but can also be a preventable measure.

At-home treatments can include the following:

  • Medicated baths. As long as there aren’t any secondary infections, an antifungal medicated shampoo can help to get the yeast infection under control. Wash your dog every 3-5 days for 2-12 weeks (or as long as directed by your veterinarian) for maximum effect.

  • Topical cream. If the infection is in a small area, you can apply an antifungal cream directly to the spot and cover. The medicated cream should come with specific instructions so follow carefully.

  • Clean your dog’s ears. Since the ears are one of the most common areas for a yeast infection, it’s important to keep them clear and clean. Using a dog-ear cleaning solution designed to lower pH levels, gently clean the ear with a soft tissue or cotton ball (do not put Q-tips down into the ear canal), and if necessary, apply a yeast infection cream inside the ear as directed.

  • If the infection is deeper inside the ear canal, oral medication and possibly surgery might be required; only your veterinarian can determine the course of action in this situation. Serious yeast infections inside the ear can take up to six weeks to heal.

  • Keep paws clean and dry. A dog’s sweat glands are primarily located in the paws, so it’s smart to wipe down after long or vigorous exercise. Plus, the paws come into contact with dirt frequently, especially when outside for walks or playtime, so it’s another reason to keep them clean.

  • Examine your dog’s diet. A healthy diet is key and the foundation for good health. Yeast loves sugar so avoid foods and treats loaded with refined carbohydrates like potatoes, corn, wheat, rice, honey, and high-fructose corn syrup should be cut out of your dog’s diet. You should also avoid giving your dog any table food.

Are there home remedies for yeast infections in dogs?

The only home remedy for yeast infections in dogs that has any scientific data to support it is a vinegar rinse. A vinegar rinse is able to help change the pH of the skin to make it less desirable for yeast. The proper dilution is essential to avoid irritation. You should only attempt this after speaking with your veterinarian for guidance and direction.

Is there a cure for yeast infection in dogs?

While yeast infections can be cured, some dogs are prone to recurrent infections. The best way to prevent a possible occurrence is to take care of your dog’s immune system properly. When you treat the root of the problem, you are not only taking care of the possible yeast infection but other potential skin issues that are a result of problems that originate in the digestive tract.

Are yeast infections in dogs contagious for humans or other pets?

If your dog has a yeast infection, the yeast cells cannot be transmitted to another pet even if they come in direct contact with the infected dog’s skin. What should be noted is that a yeast infection can lead to a secondary bacterial or fungus infection, which may be contagious in some cases. This holds true for humans as well; secondary infections, such as ringworm, are contagious and owners should take precaution when directly handling their dog.

What is the cost of treating yeast infection in dogs?

To treat a yeast infection in your dog, take into consideration the type of treatment needed (oral vs. topical medications), the area in which you live in (certain cities have a higher cost of living), and the type of veterinarian (general practitioner vs. veterinary dermatologist) you plan to visit. Prescription medications tend to cost more than over-the-counter medicine, while home remedies, if recommended, might be a bit lower. Also take into consideration how long and how much medicine your dog will need and whether the treatment is only for a yeast infection or whether medication is needed for an extended period to alleviate an underlying issue. These issues all play a role in determining the actual cost.

Recovery and management of yeast infection in dogs

Recovery depends on the severity of the infection. If it’s mild and caught in the early stages, it can clear up in a few days. If it’s a severe infection, it can take up to a few weeks to completely heal.

Managing a yeast infection requires continuous monitoring of your dog’s immune system. Frequent baths with antifungal shampoo and sprays will help soothe the skin, although you should check with your veterinarian before beginning any at-home treatments.

How to prevent yeast infections in dogs

Although yeast infections in dogs are mostly unpredictable, certain triggers can lead to an overgrowth of yeast. Being aware of those stressors will help keep your dog’s health under control.

A few tips to help prevent yeast infections:

  • Keep your pup indoors during extreme heat and humidity.

  • Feed a good quality food and be aware of any food allergies.

  • Keep the ears clean and healthy with regular checks.

  • Ensure your dog is completely dry, including paws and ears after a bath or swim.

  • If your dog has hair at the opening of his ears, have your groomer trim or tweeze it.

  • Use flea and tick preventatives as directed by your veterinarian.

Is there a vaccine for yeast infections in dogs?

There is no vaccine to prevent a yeast infection, but there are precautions owners can take to lower the risk of one.

Summary of yeast infections in dogs

Yeast infections are a common skin concern for dogs, causing itching and irritation. They typically occur in moist environments, like on the skin or in the ears or even the folds of their face. Often caused by allergies, yeast infections should be treated promptly, to avoid secondary infections and alleviate your dog’s discomfort. As some dogs can be prone to recurrent yeast infections, it’s important to identify the root cause and take precautions ahead of time to protect their immune system.

Источник: https://www.smalldoorvet.com/learning-center/medical/yeast-infections-in-dogs/

If your dog is tilting their head, scratching their ears, licking their paws, or having a musty odor, they might have a yeast infection.

Yeast infections are a common condition among dogs with folds or allergies. Yeast infections in dogs can cause inflammatory skin conditions in the folds between the genital region, ears, and paw pads.

This infection is quite common among dogs whose immunity has been suppressed or compromised by medications. Yeast infections can occur more often during allergy seasons, especially in dogs that have been taking antibiotics or steroids.

Golden Retriever puppy lays on the floor with their head on their paws.

Antibiotics don’t cause this infection, but being on antibiotics for a very long period can diminish the dog’s normal flora, which helps keep yeast under control.

Steroids can also affect a dog’s immunity, which can result in yeast overgrowth.

7 Ways of Managing Yeast Infections

Instead of watching your pooch struggle with discomfort, trying to scratch itchy skin, try these effective methods of managing yeast infections in dogs.

Rinse Your Dog With Apple Cider Vinegar

According to The Crazy Pet Guy, the first step to managing yeast infection is getting rid of the itch. Apple cider vinegar is the best solution for fungal infections that works with dogs, especially if your pooch loves the water. All you have to do is apply diluted apple cider vinegar directly on your dog’s coat and massage his/her whole body. 

Apple cider vinegar can help restore your pet’s healthy pH levels and stop yeast overgrowth. Remember, yeast loves wet environments, so you can immediately apply this solution after your dog has finished swimming or after bathing him. 

Stop Feeding Your Dog Yeast

Yeast is a dimorphic organism that exists in two forms in your dog’s body. It can exist as a benign single-celled organism that lives peacefully with the bacteria. Or it can sometimes grow out of control and become toxic. So the best way to stop the growth of yeast in your dog’s gut is by removing carbs and sugar from your dog’s diet.

Carbs are complex chains that are composed of sugar molecules. Therefore, when your pet consumes carbohydrates, it is broken down into sugar that feeds the yeast. So, limit dog foods that contain millet, oat, rice, peas, corn, wheat, and potatoes.

Apply Coconut Oil Mixture on the Yeasty Region

After you have stopped the itch, you can start working on your dog’s skin’s affected parts. And one of the best homemade solutions for treating the yeast infection is by massaging the affected region with a coconut oil mix at least once every week. 

Just melt about 8 oz of virgin oil into a small bottle and two drops of lemon essential oil and about ten drops of lavender oil. Shake the mixture and then apply on the affected part of your dog’s skin. This mixture can last for a few months, so you can store it in a safe place and apply it to your dog every week.

Soothe the Yeast Infected Ears

Unless the ears are in bad shape, it’s ideal to leave your dog’s ears alone. The infected ears can often show you how well you are managing the yeast infection inside the dog. But, if they are in bad shape, you can treat them using a veterinary-recommended ear cleaner.

Profile view of a Beagle side glancing at the camera.

Reduce the Amount of Heavy Metals Your Dog Consumes

Yeast has a high affinity for most heavy metals, especially mercury. These metals generate free radicals that can cause severe health problems.

Since the body cannot remove them on its own, these metals tend to accumulate over time. And a large amount of some heavy metals like mercury, lead, chromium, cadmium, and arsenic can be quite toxic to your dog.

Yeast tends to bind to heavy metals and stop them from getting into the dog’s system, which is good news. However, heavy metals are toxic to competing bacteria. The heavy metals can reduce the population of the competing bacteria resulting in the outgrowth of yeast. Therefore, if you want to stop a yeast infection in dogs, you must reduce the number of heavy metals it consumes. So you can reduce the heavy metals by doing the following:

  • Avoid feeding your dog low-quality fish oil or fish-based diets.
  • Stop giving your pet fluoridated water.
  • Feed him organic food.

Start Feeding Your Dog Supplements and Foods That Fight Yeast Infections

Since yeast is a fungus, you can kill them by giving your dog anti-fungal foods. Look for dog food and treats containing caprylic acid, Pau D-Arco, and olive leaf.

Pau D’Arco is rich in lapachol, which kills yeast. Olive leaf and caprylic acid are believed to break down the cell membrane of yeast.

Increase the Population of Other Beneficial Bacteria

The next step is increasing the population of the competing bacteria to keep the yeast in check.

You can increase the beneficial bacteria by adding probiotics in your dog’s meal. There are numerous probiotics that cannot fight yeast that lives in the dog’s gut. So, you can start by increasing their population before you introduce probiotics like Bacillus subtilus and Bacillus coagulans.

These probiotics are spore-forming and can fight yeast infections. And since probiotics cannot live in your dog’s guts for a very long time, you can also introduce prebiotics. Prebiotics can help grow the population of beneficial bacteria at a faster rate than probiotics.

Finally, you can remove the heavy metals left in your dog’s guts by the dead yeast by giving them food containing chlorella and sulfur. Sulfur can bind to the heavy metals and lower the oxidative damages done by these metals in organs.

Helpful Products for Balancing Yeast In Dogs 

All featured products were chosen at the discretion of the Great Pet Care editorial team and not directly recommended or endorsed by the author of this article. Great Pet Care may make a small affiliate commission if you click through and make a purchase.

After consulting with your dog’s veterinarian to address the underlying cause of yeast overgrowth, it’s time to prevent a recurrence. While natural home remedies may suppress yeast growth, it’s best to eliminate the problem altogether. We’ve curated a list of the best products to help balance yeast in dogs. By safely and effectively keeping your dog’s yeast problem at bay, she won’t get caught in a vicious cycle of vet visits, antibiotics, and harsh medical treatments.

Best Probiotic with Fiber Supplement for Dogs

Our pick:Great Poop Probiotic with Fiber

Great Poop

Yeast can live and grow in any number of places on and in your dog’s body. When yeast gets out of control, inflammatory skin conditions can develop in a number of places including folds of skin, the genital region, ears, and paw pads. Pawing, scratching, or biting any of these areas can be one of the first signs of a yeast infection. Once your dog’s vet examines her and recommends a course of action, a multipurpose probiotic is a great way to prevent yeast infections from recurring. 

Highlights

  • Complete all-in-one formula to form a high fiber solution for gut and immune health 
  • Firmer, well-formed poops mean less straining and discomfort to defecate
  • Contains beneficial bacteria in a handy chewable form
  • Two billion powerful CFUs (colony-forming units) for proper gut balance
  • American-made without corn, soy, artificial preservatives, or flavoring 
  • 120 chicken-flavored chews per container which can last months 

Things to Consider

  • May take a few days to see desired results
  • Only available in a chewable version 

Best Dog Ear Cleaner For Multiple Symptoms

Our pick: Great Ears Multisymptom Dog Ear Cleaner

Great Ears Dog Ear Cleaner

Cleaning your dog’s ears doesn’t require any special supplies, but not all ear cleaners are created the same. Liquid ear cleaners are better at dislodging waxy junk deep in a dog’s ear so she can then shake it out. Instead of reaching for multiple ear cleaners to target ear wax, odor, and itchiness, use a safe, effective, all-in-one canine ear cleaner. Great Ears Multisymptom Dog Ear Cleaner won’t deplete the skin’s natural lipid barrier while conditioning and moisturizing the ears. Best of all, it’s safe for use on adult dogs and puppies over 12 weeks.

Highlights

  • Plant-based natural formula from coconut and palm
  • Non-irritating wash eliminates odor and waxy gunk without alcohol or sulfates
  • Convenient 8-ounce bottle lasts a long time 
  • At-home maintenance with Great Ears may decrease veterinary visits from waxy buildup
  • Highly effective for floppy-eared dogs (Spaniels, Bassets, Retrievers, Poodles, etc.)
  • Gentle formulation won’t harm a dog’s delicate ear canal
  • Made in America without MEA, DEA, or parabens
  • Light, pleasant “clean” scent 

Things to Consider

  • Dogs with excessive waxy build-up may require a second application 
  • Suggest maintenance cleaning is one to two times per week 
  • Ensure your dog’s ears do not require medical treatment before using an ear cleaner

Best Cleaning Wipes For Yeasty Dog Folds

Our pick:Pet MD Chlorhexidine Antiseptic Dog & Cat Wipes

Pet MD Chlorhexidine Wipes

Yeast loves to grow and thrive in dark, moist places on a dog’s body, such as facial folds, in between toes, underarm areas, and in the groin. Unlike liquid cleaners, Pet MD Chlorhexidine Antiseptic Dog & Cat Wipes are mess-free pre-moistened wipes. Formulated with an advanced veterinary formula of chlorhexidine and ketoconazole, fungal and bacterial infections don’t stand a chance of advancing. Keep a container on hand for travel and in between baths.

Highlights

  • Helps control the itchiness of hot spots, yeast-prone areas, and canine acne
  • Easier to use than dog shampoo 
  • May lessen the amount of itching, scratching, and licking in yeast-prone areas 
  • Advanced veterinary formula from a trusted name brand
  • Made in a regulated manufacturing facility in small batches in the USA
  • Soothing skin-friendly formula with aloe and glycerin 

Things to Consider

  • Alcohol-based solution
  • Do not allow your dog to lick the treated areas until the product dries to prevent ingestion
  • Do not use on open wounds, cuts, or raw areas
  • Wipes include a fragrance

Best Topical Cream For Inflammation Relief

Our pick:Zymox Topical Cream Inflammation Relief Hydrocortisone 1.0% for Dogs & Cats

Zymox topical cream

Zymox’s veterinarian strength formula targets canine skin irritations caused by yeast, itchiness, hot spots, dermatitis, and more. The no-sting lotion formulated with 1% hydrocortisone is formulated without harsh chemicals that may irritate a dog’s sensitive skin. No need to pre-clean or disinfect the skin thanks to Zymox’s patented LP3 Enzyme System that reacts with the yeast to form antimicrobial properties. This cream is good to keep in your dog’s first aid kit for topical infections, wounds, cuts, and yeast prevention.  

Highlights

  • Gentle enough to use every day for one to two weeks
  • Suitable for use on and in surface skin folds such as face wrinkles 
  • Available in a non-hydrocortisone formula 
  • Recommended for hot spots, wet eczema, yeasty areas, dermatitis, cuts, and wounds
  • Gently soothes and cleans the skin without burning or stinging
  • Product has a catheter tip for easy, direct application 

Things to Consider

  • Intended for external use only 
  • If the condition worsens or persists for more than seven days, seek veterinary help
  • Do not on mucous membranes
  • Do not use on animals with known or suspected sensitivity to corticosteroids such as pregnant or lactating females 

Best Daily Dog Multivitamin Supplement with Probiotic

Our pick: Daily Great All-In-One Multivitamin for Dogs

Canine yeast infections happen for a number of reasons. Increasing the beneficial bacteria in your dog’s gut may help. Great Pet’s Daily Great all-in-one multivitamin contains 5 million CFUs to help digestion. Forget having to add multiple supplements to your pup’s diet. Daily Great supports a dog’s skin, coat, and joints with vitamins and minerals. For dogs over 12 weeks of age, this 4-in-1 multivitamin gives your pooch the support she needs to live a happy, healthy life. Since many dogs aren’t fond of having a pill shoved into their throats, Daily Great is formulated in an easy-to-dispense soft chew. No more hiding pills in her food!

Highlights

  • Contains glucosamine and chondroitin for hip and joint support
  • Infused with omega 3 for healthy skin and coat
  • Loaded with vitamins and minerals in a soft, tasty chew
  • Made in America with a probiotic digestive aid
  • Tasty chicken liver flavored chew dogs love 
  • Proper balance to support a dog’s daily needs 

Things to Consider

  • Suggested to give one dose with each meal
  • Serve two chews per day for dogs 30 pounds or less, more depending on weight
  • Divide the dosing between AM and PM 

Final Thoughts

Yeast infection is a severe infection that can affect your dog’s peace. This infection can leave them biting the itch off their skin the whole day. And in severe cases, it can leave them with an ear infection that causes odors and discomfort.

So, you must start treating them as soon as you notice the symptoms of yeast infections. Make sure you consult your veterinarian to ensure you don’t confuse yeast infections with allergies.

Sponsored by The Crazy Pet Guy

About the Author

Cynthia Garcia is the editor and content creator at the Crazy Pet Guy. She’s a passionate pet rescue supporter and in her free time, she’s always looking for ways to help the community.

Источник: https://www.greatpetcare.com/dog-health/yeast-infections-in-dogs/

What Are Some Home Remedies for Ear Infections?

Ear infections can be painful. Sometimes they cause a persistent dull pain; other times a sharp burning feeling comes and goes. Most of the time, they’re not anything to worry about. Except that you’ll want the pain to cease.

Here is an overview of traditional approaches to treatment, plus everything you need to know about at-home remedies.

Common Relief Options

The most natural treatment is no treatment at all, or the “watchful waiting” approach. (1)

Doctors may go this route for mild cases of middle ear infection, also known as acute otitis media, in an attempt to allow the immune system to fight off the infection on its own without the help of antibiotics.

“Often we don't need to give antibiotics,” says Sujana S. Chandrasekhar, MD, partner at ENT and Allergy Associates in New York City. Generally, she says ear, nose, and throat doctors will watch the infection for about three days. If the symptoms remain or worsen, then it may be time for antibiotics.

Otitis media with effusion (OME) in particular tends to go away without antibiotics or other treatments. These ear infections are the result of fluid buildup in the middle ear and usually have few symptoms. (1)

Pain Relievers for Earaches

If you or your child is experiencing an infection, you’ll likely want relief from the pain — fast.

For quick relief, your doctor may also suggest reaching for an over-the-counter pain reliever, with or without the addition of antibiotics.

Acetaminophen or ibuprofen could help, though you’ll always want to check with your doctor to be sure. (1)

At-Home Remedies to Treat Ear Infections

Maybe you’re not a fan of pain relievers or antibiotics and want to limit your or your child’s exposure to them.

“Overuse of antibiotics in society in general has caused this growth of bacteria that are now resistant to many types of antibiotics, so we're trying to reel that back in [by not overly prescribing],” Dr. Chandrasekhar says.

Given that, natural, at-home options may come in handy. At least 1 in 10 people with ear pain reports having tried one or more types of alternative medicine before visiting their doctor. (2)

Keep in mind, however, that research supporting these treatments is scarce, and it’s always a good idea to consult with your doctor before trying a new treatment.

Here are six at-home options that may provide some relief:

  • A warm compress Hold a washcloth under warm water and squeeze it to release the extra water. Then, lay it over the ear that’s infected for 20 minutes or so to lessen the pain. (3) A warm water bottle held over the infected ear should also do the trick. (4) “People do the warm compresses simply to try to soothe, to try to draw out the inflammation,” Chandrasekhar says, adding that she does believe it can make people feel a little bit better.
  • Warm olive oil in the ear Chandrasekhar says there’s no proof this works but says it’s okay to try as long as the olive oil isn’t piping hot and there’s no hole in the eardrum. “It may soothe or it may not soothe,” she says. “If there's no swollen eardrum, [olive oil] may not cause any harm whatsoever.”
  • Herbal extract ear drops Drops containing allium sativum, verbascum thapsus, calendula flores, hypericum perforatum, lavender, and vitamin E in olive oil can help children suffering from a middle ear infection that requires active treatment (rather than simply waiting for the pain to diminish over time). One study found these drops to be just as effective as prescription drops. (2)
  • A solution of equal parts rubbing alcohol and vinegar Applying a couple of drops of this solution in the infected ear could help people suffering from repeat infections of swimmer’s ear (medically called otitis externa), which occurs when water gets stuck in the ear canal and bacteria grow. The rubbing alcohol helps the water in the ear evaporate, and the vinegar prevents bacteria from spreading. (5)
  • Blow-drying the ear This method can also help people who routinely suffer from swimmer’s ear (who aren’t always swimmers — simply being out on a windy and rainy day could cause the infection). Pointing a blow-dryer on low heat near the ear can help dry up any leftover moisture in the ear after being out in the elements, pool, or shower. (5)
  • The juice of an onion Several articles and YouTube videos claim that onions are the secret to curing an earache, which is advice that supposedly dates back to the 1800s. Onions contain a flavonoid called quercetin, which has anti-inflammatory properties. One method calls for heating an onion at 450 degrees F for 15 minutes. Then, once it is cool, cut the onion in half and squeeze the juice into a bowl. Put a few drops of the juice into the ear. Or, you could place the onion half directly over the infected ear. (6) Chandrasekhar says it’s “perfectly reasonable [to try it], but give yourself a time limit like, ‘Okay, if it’s still bothering me in three days I’m going to go in to see a doctor,’” she says.

Who At-Home Remedies Are Best For

Chandrasekhar warns not to try a home remedy on a child under the age of 2 because they’re at increased risk of developing complications.

“If the child is fussing when you put them down flat or trying to pull at their ear or if they're screaming when you're trying to feed them, I think bringing them in and listening to your doctor and giving them the antibiotics they need is really important,” she says.

Chandrasekhar is less concerned about older patients who aren’t experiencing other symptoms, like a fever or difficulty eating or drinking.

If none of these at-home options helps relieve pain within a couple of days, it may be time to call your doctor. It’s possible the infection will need antibiotics to heal and leaving it untreated for too long could lead to complications, which can be serious or rarely life-threatening.

Источник: https://www.everydayhealth.com/ear-infection/home-remedies/

DOG EAR INFECTION: OVERVIEW

1. Keep your dog’s ears clean. Use a gentle cleaning agent such as green tea, or a commercial product such as Halo’s Natural Herbal Ear Wash.

2. Use a pinch of boric acid to keep the dog’s ears dry and acidified.

3. Consult your holistic veterinarian in cases of severe or chronic infections; she may need to treat an underlying condition.


Chronic dog ear infections are the bane of long-eared dogs, swimming dogs, recently vaccinated puppies, old dogs, dogs with an abundance of ear wax, and dogs with allergies, thyroid imbalances, or immune system disorders. In other words, ear infections are among the most common recurring canine problems.

In conventional veterinary medicine, a dog ear infection can often be treated with oral antibiotics, topical drugs, or even surgery. The problem is that none of these treatments is a cure. Ear infections come back when the dog eats another “wrong” food, goes for another swim, experiences another buildup of excess wax, or in some other way triggers a reoccurrence.

Canine Ear Infections

Holistic veterinarian Stacey Hershman, of Nyack, New York, took an interest in dog ear infections when she became a veterinary technician in her teens. “This is a subject that isn’t covered much in vet school,” she says. “I learned about treating ear infections from the veterinarians I worked with over the years. Because they all had different techniques, I saw dozens of different treatments, and I kept track of what worked and what didn’t.”

Over the years, Dr. Hershman developed a program for keeping ears healthy and treating any problems that do arise, without the steroids and antibiotics usually dispensed by conventional practitioners. In addition, when she treats a dog with infected ears, she usually gives a homeopathic remedy to stimulate the dog’s immune system and help it fight the infection’s underlying cause.

“Ear infections are a symptom of a larger problem,” she says. “You don’t want to just treat the ear and ignore the rest of the body. You want to treat the whole patient.”

Dr. Hershman believes that many dog ear infections, especially in puppies, stem from immune system imbalances caused by vaccinosis, a reaction to vaccines. “The ill effects of vaccines,” she says, “can cause mucoid discharge in puppies. For example, it’s not uncommon for puppies to have a discharge from the eyes or to develop conjunctivitis after a distemper vaccine.”

Once a dog develops an ear infection, conventional treatment can make the problem worse. “Dogs are routinely given cocktail drugs, which are combinations of antibiotics, antifungal drugs, cortisone, or other ingredients,” she explains.

“After a while, you’ll go through 10 tubes, and your dog will develop a resistance. Then you’ll have to go to more powerful drugs to treat the recurring infection. In conventional veterinary medicine, chronic ear infections are considered normal. Dog owners are told they’re a fact of life, they’re never cured, they just keep coming back, and the best you can do is ‘manage’ them. My goal is to cure, not to manage.”

Dr. Hershman’s treatment for infected ears is not a cure by itself, but it’s a remedy that isn’t harmful, and it gives you an important kick-start in treating ears holistically. “That’s the approach that leads to a cure,” she says.

Note: If your dog develops an ear infection for the first time, or if his condition seems especially severe or painful, take him to see your holistic veterinarian, to rule out a tumor, polyp, or something else that requires veterinary attention.

Maintenance Ear Cleaning

Dr. Hershman’s healthy ears program starts with maintenance cleaning with ordinary cotton balls and cotton swabs. “This makes a lot of people nervous,” she says, “but the canine ear canal isn’t straight like the canal in our ears. Assuming you’re reasonably gentle, you can’t puncture the ear drum or do any structural damage.”

Moisten the ear with green tea brewed as for drinking and cooled to room temperature, or use an acidic ear cleanser that does not contain alcohol. Dr. Hershman likes green tea for its mildness and its acidifying, antibacterial properties, but she also recommends peach-scented DermaPet MalAcetic Otic Ear Cleanser or Halo Natural Herbal Ear Wash.

“Don’t pour the cleanser into the dog’s ear,” she warns, “or it will just wash debris down and sit on the ear drum, irritating it.” Instead, she says, lift the dog’s ear flap while holding a moistened cotton ball between your thumb and index finger. Push the cotton down the opening behind the tragus (the horizontal ridge you see when you lift the ear flap) and scoop upward. Use a few dry cotton balls to clean out normal waxy buildup.

Next, push a Q-tip into the vertical ear canal until it stops, then scoop upward while rubbing it against the walls of the vertical canal. Repeat several times, rubbing on different sides of the vertical canal. Depending on how much debris is present in each ear, you can moisten one or several cotton balls and use two or more Q-tips.

“You don’t want to push so hard that you cause pain,” she says, “but for maintenance cleaning using gentle pressure, it’s impossible to harm the eardrum. I refer to the external ear canal as an L-shaped tunnel, and I tell owners to think of the vertical canal as a cone of cartilage. People are always amazed at how deep the dog’s ear canal can go. I often have them hold the end of the Q-tip while I demonstrate cleaning so they feel confident about doing it correctly without hurting their dogs.”

If excessive discharge requires the use of five or more Q-tips, or if the discharge is thick, black, or malodorous, Dr. Hershman recommends an ear flush.

Dogster.com offers another protocol for cleaning your dog’s ears here.

Washing Out Debris from Your Dog’s Ears

Dr. Hershman realized that when an ear is not inflamed and not painful but full of debris or tarry exudates from a yeast or bacterial infection, flushing the ear makes sense. “If you don’t flush it out but keep applying medication on top of the debris,” she says, “you’re never going to cure the problem. But I also learned that flushing the ear is an art. You can’t simply fill the ear with otic solution and expect it to flow out by itself, taking all the debris with it. Because the dog’s ear canal forms a right angle, you just can’t get the liquid out unless you suction it gently with a bulb syringe or some kind of tube with a syringe attached.”

Flushing the ears, says Dr. Hershman, is one of the most important techniques you can learn for keeping your dog’s ears healthy. “They don’t teach this in veterinary school,” she says. “It’s something people learn by experience.”

When should the ears not be flushed? “If they’re painful, ulcerated, or bleeding,” she says, “or if there’s slimy, slippery pus in the ear or a glutenous, yeasty, golden yellow discharge. In any of these cases, flushing is not recommended. But if the ears are not inflamed and are simply waxy or filled with tarry exudates, flushing works well.”

The procedure begins with a mild, natural, unscented liquid soap from the health food store. Place a few drops of full-strength soap in the ear, then thoroughly massage the base of the ear. The soap is a surfactant, and it breaks up debris that’s stuck to the sides of the ear canal. From a bowl of water that’s slightly warmer than body temperature, fill a rubber bulb syringe or ear syringe, the kind sold in pharmacies for use with children or adults. Place the point of the syringe deep down in the soap-treated ear, then slowly squeeze the syringe so it releases a gentle stream of water.

“By the first or second application,” says Dr. Hershman, “you should see all kinds of debris flowing out. It’s like a waterfall. At the end of each application, hold the syringe in place so it sucks remaining water and debris up out of the ear canal. Then empty the syringe before filling it again.”

For seriously debris-filled ears, Dr. Hershman repeats the procedure three or four times, then she lets the dog shake his head before drying the ear with cotton balls and Q-tips. “I look for blood or debris,” she says, “and I check inside with the otoscope. If there’s still a lot of debris, I put more soap in, do a more vigorous massage, and flush it a few more times.

“An ear flush can be traumatic if the ear is inflamed,” she warns, “and occasionally there will be an ulcer or sore that you don’t know is there and it will bleed. That’s why you have to be careful about how you do this. You have to be vigorous but not aggressive. You don’t want to make the ear more inflamed, painful, or damaged than it was to begin with.”

After flushing the ear, Dr. Hershman applies calendula gel, a homeopathic remedy. “I put a large dab in each ear and ask the owner to do that once or twice a day for the next three days. The gel is water-soluble and very soothing. Calendula helps relieve itching and it stimulates the growth of new cells, so it speeds tissue repair.”

If the discharge in the dog’s ear is yeasty or obviously infected, Dr. Hershman skips the ear flush, instead using the following treatment.

Treating Dog Ear Infections

Careful treatment is required for infected ears and ears that are full of debris that resists even an ear flush. But what approach works best?

When Dr. Hershman began her veterinary practice, she met many dogs who wouldn’t let anyone touch their ears. “I knew that nothing I’d learned in vet school was going to help them,” she says, “so I thought back to all the treatments I’d seen over the years. The one that seemed most effective was a combination of boric acid and a thick, old-fashioned ointment that looks like pink toothpaste. I couldn’t remember its name, but I never forgot how it smelled – really peculiar, like burnt embers.”

The ointment was Pellitol, and as soon as she tracked it down, Dr. Hershman developed her own protocol for using it in combination with boric acid. Through groomers she had learned the importance of ear powders. “Like those powders,” she says, “boric acid dries and acidifies the ear. Yeast and bacteria are opportunistic organisms that die in a dry, acidic environment. They thrive where it’s moist, dark, and alkaline.”

Experimenting first with her own dogs and dogs at the animal shelter where she volunteered, she placed two or three pinches of boric acid powder in each infected ear unless it was ulcerated, bleeding, or painful. “Being acidic,” she explains, “boric acid might irritate open wounds. In that case, I would use the Pellitol alone. Otherwise, a pinch or two of boric acid is an effective preliminary treatment.”

Boric acid is toxic; note warnings on the label. It should not be inhaled, swallowed, or placed in the eye. Shielding the face is important and usually requires a helper, someone who can hold the dog’s head steady while protecting the eyes, nose, and mouth.

“I put the boric acid in and use my finger to work it deep into the ear canal,” she says. “If the dog has a very narrow ear canal, I gently work it down with a Q-tip.”

Next, she attaches the Pellitol applicator to the tube and squeezes the pasty ointment into the ear canal, applying enough pressure as she withdraws the tube to completely fill the canal. “I massage the ear,” she says, “especially around the base, then leave it undisturbed for an entire week. I learned this by trial and error. The Pellitol dries up within a day or two, but if you leave it undisturbed for an entire week, it removes whatever exudates are in the ear, whether they’re sticky, tarry, yeasty, or slimy pus. It just attaches to whatever’s there, dries it up, and everything falls out together.”

Pellitol ointment contains zinc oxide, calamine, bismuth subgalante, bismuth subnitrate, resorcinol, echinacea fluid extract, and juniper tar. “Zinc oxide,” says Dr. Hershman, “is a drying agent; calamine helps with itching and inflammation; bismuth is soothing and has antibacterial properties; resorcinol is used to treat dermatitis and other skin conditions; echinacea is antiviral and antibacterial; and juniper tar, like all tree resins, fights infection and makes the ointment very sticky. Once applied, it stays in place until it dries and flakes off, taking the ear’s debris with it.”

After a week, the ear should be much improved. “That’s when I use cotton balls or Q-tips to remove whatever’s left,” says Dr. Hershman. “I love this treatment because it works well, it doesn’t traumatize the ear, and it doesn’t antidote homeopathy.”

If Pellitol has an adverse side effect, it’s the product’s stickiness. “I tell people to protect their furniture for a day or two,” says Hershman. “The ointment will stick to anything it touches, and when you fill the ear, it can stick to the outside of the ear or the dog’s face. That excess will dry and fall off. You can remove it with vegetable oil, but leave the inside of the ear flap alone.”

Sometimes a second treatment is needed, and sometimes Dr. Hershman flushes the ear to complete the therapy.

While dog owners can successfully treat many ear problems with the foregoing program by themselves, don’t hesitate to bring your dog to your holistic veterinarian if he exhibits severe pain or discomfort, or if the ear problems recur. There may be an underlying issue that your holistic veterinarian can identify and treat.

Also, there have been cases in which the alternatives described here don’t work. If this happens, conventional treatment might be needed to defeat the bacteria infecting the dog’s ear. Dr. Hershman’s cleaning and flushing program can be used afterward for preventive maintenance.

A NOTE ON PELLITOL: Since this article was originally published, Pellitol stopped being manufactured under that name. The same product is still sold, but have your veterinarian contact your pharmacy to make sure you are getting the right product.

Ear Mites

Not every ear infection is an infection; sometimes it’s an infestation. Ear mites are tiny parasites that suck blood and fill the ear with waste matter that looks like black coffee grounds. The problem is most common in dogs from pet shops, puppy mills, shelters, or breeders with unclean environments.

Ear mites are species-specific, meaning that feline ear mites prefer cats’ ears and canine ear mites prefer dogs’ ears. Their bites ulcerate the ear canal, often leading to secondary infections.

How can you tell if your dog has ear mites? The definitive test is by microscopic examination, but Dr. Hershman describes two simple home tests. “Smear some ear debris on a white paper towel and wet it with hydrogen peroxide,” she says. “If it creates a brownish red stain when you smear it, you’re looking at digested blood from mites. In addition, most animals with ear mites have a positive ‘thump test.’ They vigorously thump a hind leg when you clean their ears because of intense itching.”

Ear mites are usually treated with pesticides, but there’s a safer, easier way. Simply put a few drops of mineral oil in each ear once or twice a week for a month.

Mineral oil has a terrible reputation in holistic health circles because it’s a petrochemical that blocks pores and interferes with the skin’s ability to breathe. But when it comes to fighting ear mites, these characteristics are a virtue. Mineral oil smothers and starves ear mites. Reapplying the oil twice per week prevents the growth of new generations.

Note: Herbal ear oils containing olive oil or other vegetable oils can be less effective in the treatment of ear mites, either because they contain nutrients that feed the tiny parasites or because they are not heavy enough to smother them.

For best results, use an eyedropper to apply mineral oil to the inside of the ear. Then use a cotton ball saturated with mineral oil to wipe inside the ear flap. Massage the entire ear to be sure the mineral oil is well distributed. Before each subsequent application, remove debris from the ear with cotton balls and Q-tips.

If mites have caused a secondary infection, follow the mineral oil treatment with Pellitol ointment and leave it undisturbed for several days.

Veterinary Help for Chronic Ear Problems

If you are unsure of your ability to clean or treat your dog’s ears, you can ask your holistic veterinarian to help you; with a little practice, you should be able to prevent ear problems and help your dog maintain a clean, dry, healthy ear on your own.

“These are simple, old-fashioned remedies,” says Dr. Hershman. “There is nothing high-tech about them. But after 30 years of treating ear infections, I’m convinced more than ever that they are the best way to treat canine ear infections.”

CJ Puotinen is the author of  The Encyclopedia of Natural Pet Care and Natural Remedies for Dogs and Cats, both of which are available from DogWise. She has also authored several books about human health including Natural Relief from Aches and Pains.

Источник: https://www.whole-dog-journal.com/care/ear-care/chronic-ear-infections-in-canines/

How to Treat a Dog's Ear Infection When You Can't See a Vet

My retrievers had ear infections that I effectively resolved at home. I hope this article will help your dogs as well.

The Dreaded Ear Infection

I was pretty lucky with my previous dogs because they never had any issues with their ears. This all changed when I got my Golden Retriever, Marvin, and my Labrador Retriever, Cooper. They both have those cute, floppy ears. Little did I know that having floppy ears predisposes them to ear infections. The floppy ear doesn't allow air to circulate, so moisture increases and, therefore, bacterial and yeast infections are common.

When I saw Marvin and Cooper excessively scratching their heads and discovered that there was odor and black wax in their ear canal, I realized I couldn't get them to the vet. I decided to go online to research home remedies.

Necessary Precautions for Pet Owners

There are times when a vet visit is wise and prudent. Sometimes ear pain is not due to fungal, viral, or bacterial infections. A trip to the vet would be wise if you have any doubts. Otherwise, the products below are great to have at your disposal and they really are cost-saving. Many people have spent hundreds of dollars trying to treat chronic ear infections in their animals. The solutions I mention below worked for me and my dogs and saved me tons of money.

Warning

The below information is not a substitute for professional veterinary advice. In some countries and states in the U.S., it is illegal to treat your dog at home or forgo proper diagnosis, treatment, and prescription from a veterinarian. Failing to do so could cause acute or chronic and irreversible health issues in your dog.

zymox

1. Zymox: Great At-Home Treatment for Ear Infections in Dogs

Zymox is made for acute and chronic inflammation of the external ear caused by bacterial, viral, and yeast infections. It contains antibacterial, anti-fungal, and antiviral agents. This is an antibiotic-free treatment. Zymox comes either with or without 1% hydrocortisone. You can choose whether you need the cortisone to address the dog's discomfort.

Instructions

  • Always read the instructions on the product label before proceeding.
  • No need to clean the ear before treatment; in fact, it is discouraged.
  • Use it once a day for seven days (or up to 14 days if the infection is chronic).

How Long Does It Take to Work?

Using only this solution, Cooper's ear was almost back to its normal pink color within three days! He was no longer scratching or shaking his head and the black gunk was almost gone. I was really impressed with this product.

The Cons

  • I cannot buy this product locally and must order it over the internet. I believe some vets carry this product now, but it would be much cheaper to get this product elsewhere.
  • The product leaves a bit of an oily residue, so the hair on the doggie's ear will look dirty. This would also be the case if you were using an antibiotic solution.

The Pros

  • It's effective.
  • It is not a prescription, so you don't need to pay prescription prices.
  • The best part for me (besides not having to drag my dog to the vet) is the money I am saving. This sure beats the cost of antibiotics.

Does It Really Work?

Yes! When my lab, Cooper, got another one of his ear infections, I used Zymox. He had been in extreme discomfort, and his ear was scarlet red and had a bad odor. I regret not taking pictures of it before and after the treatment because the difference was remarkable.

2. ACV Homemade Ear Cleanser for Dogs

There are many commercial dog ear cleaners that you can buy at the pet store, but you can also just use apple cider vinegar (ACV).

Safety Note: Always make sure there are no open wounds in your dog's ear and that the eardrum is intact before proceeding with using diluted vinegar as this could cause pain and damage to the ear.

Instructions

  1. Dilute one part ACV to one part distilled water.
  2. Place it in a clean squeeze bottle.
  3. Gently pour it into the dog's ear.
  4. Massage the ear after the fluid is in and gently wipe off any excess solution.

Your dog will shake its head and the solution will come flying out. Be prepared!

Read More From Pethelpful

The Symptoms of Dog Ear Infections

scratching of the affected area

redness and swelling

excessive head shaking or tilting

yellow, brown, or bloody discharge

itchiness

hearing loss

odor

scaly skin

loss of balance

black ear wax

rubbing the ear on floor or furniture

pain when opening the mouth or reluctance to chew

What Causes Ear Infections in Dogs?

There are numerous reasons why a dog might get an ear infection, and these reasons fall under three broad categories: lifestyle, allergies, and genetics.

  • Lifestyle: Dogs that are frequently exposed to water are more prone to developing ear infections. If the ear is not dried after swimming and bathing, the trapped moisture can foster bacteria and lead to yeast growth.
  • Allergies: Sometimes there are underlying causes that are not so noticeable. Your dog could be allergic to environmental factors such as pollens, grass, or dust mites, or he/she may be allergic to food. Most food-allergic dogs are allergic to the primary protein source in their food (fish, beef, chicken, or soy).
  • Genetics: Dogs with floppy ears are more prone to ear infections because their ear flap restricts air flow and creates a dark and moist environment that is a breeding ground for yeast and bacteria. Likewise, breeds with hairy ears are more likely to be affected because the hair in their ear canal traps moisture and debris. Additionally, dogs that are born with or later develop thyroid or endocrine disorders, autoimmune diseases (pemphigus), or meningitis could be affected.

How to Prevent Dog Ear Infections

After doing research about treating ear infections in dogs, I realized that I should have been preventing them from occurring in the first place with weekly cleanings. The following tips will go a long way in keeping infections at bay:

  • Dry your dog's ears thoroughly after a swim or a bath.
  • If your dog has excessive hair around or inside the ear canal, it can be removed by a professional groomer or at the vet's office.
  • Regularly clean your dog's ear with a dog-safe cleaning solution. Soak a cotton ball with the solution and wipe around the inside of the ear. You can also rest the soaked cotton ball in the ear canal and massage the ear with the ear flap covering it. Remove the cotton ball and let your dog shake his or her head. Remember to dry the ear afterward.

3. "Zim Family Cockers" Ear Cleaner Recipe

My research also brought me to the Zim Family Cockers website. Here they have a tried-and-true ear-cleaning solution that was originally given to them by the former secretary of the Cocker Spaniel Club of San Diego county. It is important to note that this "recipe" has not been advised by a veterinarian; only a veterinarian can diagnose, prognose, prescribe, and treat.

The Zims have used this on their Cocker Spaniels' ears and have had great success. Of course, always proceed with caution:

Warnings

  • Boric acid can be toxic to dogs if inhaled, ingested, and not used appropriately.
  • Rubbing alcohol (isopropyl) AND white vinegar can be extremely painful if applied to an open wound, damaged tissue, or into an inflamed ear canal or one with a ruptured eardrum.
  • Betadine cannot be used on wounds and should not be used in full-strength; it is cytoxic.

Lastly, as repeated before, this can only be used if the eardrum is intact; otherwise, a dog can be at serious risk of injury and/or at risk of going deaf.

Nothing should be inserted into a dog's ear if the eardrum is ruptured or if there are any open wounds, sores, scratches, or punctures.

Ingredients

  • Rubbing alcohol (isopropyl).
  • Boric acid powder. I found this in a pharmacy. A prescription is not needed, but they sometimes keep it behind the counter, so try asking the pharmacist.
  • White vinegar.
  • Betadine antiseptic solution.
  • A bottle with an applicator at the end (these can be found in beauty supply stores).

How I Made the "Zim Family Cockers" Recipe

Note: Consider wearing personal protective equipment to avoid contact with boric acid powder and to avoid staining.

  1. I poured 6 oz. (180 mL) of rubbing alcohol directly into a bottle.
  2. I added 1 ½ tsp. (7.5 mL) of boric acid powder. I shook the bottle well. (Note: If boric acid gets on skin or clothing, wash immediately.)
  3. I added 2 oz. (60 mL) of white vinegar and shook the bottle.
  4. Lastly, I added 1 tsp. (5 mL) of Betadine solution and shook the bottle again.
  5. I warmed the solution slightly as some dogs don't like cold liquids in their ear.

Results

I used this solution and it nipped the ear infection in the bud in just a few days. I really was impressed with this. Thanks to Zim Family Cockers, I found a terrific remedy. As good as the homemade solution was, however, I did find it a bit messy (the betadine solution stains).

How I Got Rid of My Dog's Ear Infection

Procedure

Step 1

I wiped the ear with a cotton bud to remove loose wax, dirt, and/or gunk.

Step 2

I poured in enough solution to fill the infected ear. It helped me to have someone hold the dog during this.

Step 3

After putting the solution in, I massaged the ear until I could hear a swishing sound. Note: Betadine stains, so I made sure to do it in an appropriate location.

Step 4

I used a cotton ball to clean out the ear and soak up the excess solution. My dog shook his head and fluid came out.

Step 5

I used the solution daily until the symptoms cleared. I did it once a week and then once every two weeks.

Sources

  1. WebMD, "Ear Infections in Dogs: Symptoms and Treatment."
  2. Cesar's Way, "Ear Infections in Dogs: Symptoms, Causes and Treatments."
  3. AKC, Dog Ear Infections: "Symptoms, Causes, Treatment, and Prevention."
  4. VetStreet, "Chronic Otitis/Chronic Ear Infection in Dogs."

This article is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge. It is not meant to substitute for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, prescription, or formal and individualized advice from a veterinary medical professional. Animals exhibiting signs and symptoms of distress should be seen by a veterinarian immediately.

Questions & Answers

Question: Should I clean my dog's ears when using Zymox to treat an ear infection?

Answer: You should not clean the ears prior if using Zymox. Let me know if you have any other questions

Comments

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on January 27, 2019:

Judy, This same company makes a topical cream for skin infections. I have never used it but I'm impressed with this company so I personally would give it a try. Try doing a search. I know they sell it on Amazon and u can check the reviews too. Let me know how it goes... Leslie

Judy on January 27, 2019:

I have used this for my dog's ear infection from swimmers ear & floppy ears, is the most effective product I have used. My dog got a bacterial skin infection from the lake this past fall. She has had 4 rounds of anti biotics and countless shampooing with anti-bacterial shampoo. Bacteria skin infection still comes back. Do you think this would work on her skin?

Angie on October 26, 2018:

Thank you for such informative information on home remedies for dog's ears, it is most helpful. :)

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on October 15, 2018:

Hi Lisa~ Thanks for your feedback. Curious as to why you think the enzyme is bad treatment for the dogs? it is recommended by my vet and has worked wonderfully for us for years. What are the huggies doing when you wipe the body down? What is the purpose? I am always open to new ideas. :) I am glad you found something that works and thanks for sharing!

Marcy, So sorry I didn't get back to you right away! I think since your pups ear is swollen it would be best to take him to the vet. I know it is hard because my puppy is terrified of the vet as well. Because we don't know for sure what the issue is we need a qualified vet to diagnose. Let me know what you find out!!

Lisa on October 15, 2018:

Hello,

I have found something that works for my cat, and may work for dogs. Was going to market my finding, but it is too complicated. So, for the love of pets, I will just put it out there. My cat suffered with chronic ear issues for over 10 years. So, out of desperation and because her prescription meds had side effects and quit working, I tried everything...and I mean everything. I even tried some on myself and wow..the enzyme stuff is awful. So it is human tested :-). Because I have fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue, I have to do things quick. I do them in two minute increments, which is how long this takes. Step one: wipe the pets ear with a Huggies wipe. Step two: wipe pets body with a Huggies wipe. Step three: Brush pet with a good brush (I use the Furminator)). Step four: wipe body again with Huggies wipe to get excess fur/hair. Step five: Squirt two squirts of Bactine on your finger, and apply gently to pets ear. Step six: Give pet a treat. My precious kitty, who I love more than words can say, has had zero ear issues since I began this process, over two years ago. Oh, the bactine has an antiseptic and a pain reducer (a good amount of lidocaine, which numbs the area and prevents pain and scratching). I hope this works for you too.

Marcy weekley on October 09, 2018:

My dog has a swollen ear and she whines alot and she tilts her head to the side because her ear hurts her and we already put peroxide in her ear but she didn't like it, we are dreading in taking her to the vet cause she hates the vet doctor

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on August 28, 2018:

Very true. But some people have limited income. Others are in areas where a vet is not available. These solutions that have been discussed work well. Am going to add. Vets have recommended these treatments themselves

Ash on August 28, 2018:

Just bring your dog to the vet. That's what they are trained for.

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on July 29, 2018:

Hi Michelle. Depends on the dog. Some hate the feel of the fluid in their ears. It shouldn't be too long tho. Keep me posted!

Michellelee0706 on July 28, 2018:

I put some solution in my dogs ear bevause she has an infection and she is scratching and shaking her head a lot. How long does this last after cleaning ear ? It's been about 1/2 hour

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on June 04, 2018:

Ana, I have never had a problem with the zymox running into the eyes. It's thicker and I only put it into the canal. U don't need a ton.I think some are thinner tho nothing should go into eyes. Even some natural ingredients are unsafe. I definitely would not try the solution I mentioned in the article with the betadine. I wish u luck finding something

Ana Bachman on June 04, 2018:

I am also looking for a treatment that does not contain anything that will make the dog go blind as the one treatment sold to me by the vet stated this on the bottle. I have a difficult time holding my dog as both my husband and myself hold her and she gets the medicine all over and close to getting it in her eyes. So I am looking for something natural that doesn't have any side effects like possible blindness.

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on May 25, 2018:

Sorry that didn't work for u. I have been using zymox for ten years and love it. My vet recommends it. I'm not sure which solution u used but if there is any doubt about what ur dog has then go to a vet. Perhaps ur dog was allergic to the ingredients? Weirder things have happened. Glad it all worked out for u. I still highly recommend either of these treatments listed

L on May 25, 2018:

I tried this solution a year ago and it was horrible. My dog was rubbing her ears on the carpet in an almost desperate state. It was obvious she was in pain! I made the recipe exactly as directed from another website. This is a cruel remedy to a dogs infected ear. Go to the vet (as I did) and get a more humane ear solution. Gentizol works great for infection and TrizUltra works to keep the ear dry and clean.

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on May 13, 2018:

Best of luck with Opie! He sounds adorable. Never used the cider vinegar just the methods I described here. Zymox is my go to with mine. Have a great day and keep me posted on Opie

caroleen on May 11, 2018:

Im gonna try the cider vinegar mix, our poor boy opie is a rescue that I kept, he had a verry bad ear infection from day 1 yeast infection was so bad when we first got him, he had blood in his pee even..vet gave me 2 rounds of calflex it seemed to work for the blood in pee, but 5 years latter we still fight the ear infections and lots of money 100's I don't really have, he is a 80 # Staffordshire pitbull but no one ever told him, sweet boy loves everyone and everything he meets. the chipmonk takes advantage of this, bully's him bad lol, Opie had bad skin suspected allergys so now I give him beneful grain free dog food it has helped and im sure he was over vaccinated also, I read the zymox was real good,I got some but cant find it at the moment..Im glad I found this sight, as I have cat's dog's and birds, I did animal rescue when I lived in Fl, but had to move to Mi U P to care for my elderly mother, so lots of changes including my fl vet who knew I rescued and discounted my visits and med's..

looking forword to sharing and learning.

Thank you !

m on May 11, 2018:

Thank you for the advice!

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on May 11, 2018:

Yes I know the stain. My dogs head a lot of gunk from yeast infection and had same thing. Never have used the red bottle so can't give an opinion there. U certainly can give it a try? I have used zymox ear cleaner and that stain from the infection eventually came off. I honestly can't remember how long it took but they didn't have it terribly long

M on May 10, 2018:

Thanks, I've tried ear wipes, but they're not strong enough to get it all off and I don't want to keep rubbing her ears and irritate them more. The stain is like glue. They look super dirty (just around the outside of the ears, not inside). I've only been using Zymox with 1% hydrocortisone. I'm thinking about getting Pet King Brands Zymox Plus (biofilm reducing, the red bottle). Do you think that by biofilm they're talking about this filmy dirt? Or do you think I should try another type of zymox on her?

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on May 10, 2018:

I just used straight water but didn’t until I knew the infection was gone. The zymox is put into a dirty ear so pulls all that gunk out. It’s not unusual to have to clean the ear after done. I also have used regular ear cleaner . That helps clean it too.

M on May 10, 2018:

The fur on the tips of my dog's ears looks really dirty and filmy from frequent use of Zymox. Any advice for cleaning it out?

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on April 22, 2018:

I am so glad it helped!!! Nothing worse than an ear infection. I appreciate your feedback :)

JrHd on April 18, 2018:

I’ve spent a lot of money and nothing would fix my dogs ear infection. I bought the ingredients to mix up the solution and by the 3rd day his ear was clean and back to normal. THANK YOU! My dog thanks you. I use once a week now as a preventative. Floppy ears and tropical climates can wreak havoc on their ears. But this works wonders. I recommend it 110%

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on January 25, 2018:

Hi Liza, glad I could help. I do have a suggestion for urinary tract infections. Dmannose. It not only works in human but dogs and cats as well. If you go into Amazon and search dmannose for dogs it should show a bunch of products. It also will give u doses depending on the size of the dog. Hope it helps. Stay in touch L

Liza on January 24, 2018:

You rock!!!! Thank you so much for sharing!!!!! We spent $300 per visit and they want a new visit with every ear infection it's crazy ... the vet said the breed is prone to ear and urinary tract infections ... Gee why not just give us something for it ... It's recurring and they are prone to it ... How many times must you confirm with a swab for $300 ... Then meds in top of that ... It's really hard on a fixed income. Thank you!!!! Can't thank you enough!!!! By the way if you have any other tips and tricks especially for licking privates due to remember and irritation in the area and urinary tract infections I would REALLY appreciate that too

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on January 13, 2018:

Amy, is there any black gunk in them? Ears will get itchy and red if it is fungal. I would try some of the suggestions in the article. Zymox comes with hydrocortisone which helps with the discomfort.. Let me know if it helps

L

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on October 28, 2017:

Jan, How do you know the problem is the dog's ears? When mine had issues I saw scratching of the ears, shaking of the head, redness, black gunk etc. They were not lethargic or not want food. Maybe you need a vet diagnosis? She is in my thoughts and please keep me posted. I hope she heals quickly!!

Jan on October 28, 2017:

I have not left my 3 yr old Rotwiler in 3 days. Tara enthuasim to play drasticaly changed. She became extremely lethargic, dazed & unresponsive food & water. I read the article about using Miconazole 7 with Hydrocortisone for treating dogs ear infections. Not being able to sleep, I went to Walmart came home with the products. I pray she will be more responsive soon. I will post her out come. Thank you for sharing much meeded information.

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on October 05, 2017:

I bought my boric acid at rite aid pharmacy. Did u ask the people at the drug store. They may be able to help. Not sure about the boric acid for roaches. I'm not familiar with that. When u do finally get ur zymox make sure u don't clean the dogs eat prior to use. It's works better in a dirty ear.

L

Laura on October 05, 2017:

I have ordered the Zymox to try, however, I wanted to try the home remedy to give my dog some relief until the Zymox arrives. Having a hard time finding the boric acid, any suggestions? All I can find is boric acid use for killing roaches and I am assuming this would not be the correct thing to buy?

MsMoneypenny on September 10, 2017:

My dog has had itchy smelly ears for months- I have tried numerous remedies with very little to show for it. Vet used mix of alcohol/boric acid/gentian violet but it irritated them and made it that much harder for me to put anything in. I bought Zymox finally and like that I only have to put it in once a day (that in itself is challenging) He was drooling on the same side as the Ear that is worse and was also regurgitating some last week. I feel terrible about my failed past efforts. I definitely need to address whatever he may be allergic to (he also licks his feet)

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on September 09, 2017:

Brenda~ You may want to take a trip to the vet. The fact she won't walk and is whimpering there may be more going on. I wouldn't let too much time go by. You don't want her in pain

Brenda on September 09, 2017:

My bf put too much peroxide in my chuiuhi's ear on accident. This was last night today she won't walk if u pick her up she whimpers like it's hurting her

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on August 14, 2017:

Jay bird, thanks for the comment. I do think pet stores are starting to carry it though it is cheaper online(isn't everything?)

Jaybird on August 12, 2017:

Yes my vet prescribed this... wonderful and worked very fast! I've seen it for sale at my local pet supplies plus store also!

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on June 11, 2017:

No I didn't immediately use an ear cleaner after zymox. I waited about a week after and then cleaned my dog's ear once a week to prevent any further infection. I don't think it would hurt your cats to use the zymox. I have only used it on my dogs but it has enzymes that are useful to both cats and dogs. FYI. Zymox also makes an ear cleaner that is great to use once the ear is looking better to keep it infection free. Keep me posted and let me know how things go . L

mistyshade on June 11, 2017:

My cat had an ear infection which I had been trying to clean his ears but he would not let me leave the cleaner in long enough to do an effective cleaning by shaking his head too soon. I ended up going to the vet. He said it was bacteria, they cleaned his ears and a lot of black looking debris came out and told me to wait a couple of hours before putting in the drops. Gave me some drops that treat both bacterial and fungal infections. A week of drops I was told to re clean both ears.( I tried as stated above.) Went back to vet for a recheck and was told that one ear looked good and the other was still inflamed and he had me look through the scope to see it. Vet said he would give me a stronger drop. I asked if I should use it in both ears he said that it would be ok. Another week of drops another attempted cleaning. Back to the vet. He said inflammation was gone but the one ear still had a lot of debris. He did not give any further instructions. So I had the zymox on hand and decided to try it. I also bought an otoscope so I could (attempt) to look into the ear better. I noticed one of my other cats had a build up too in one ear. Both cats are being treated so I am hoping this will help. Doesn't look like any inflammation is going on. So hope it's ok to use this to help break down the excess build up. Did you use an ear cleaner after you were done with the solution to wash out any remaining debris that might be left behind?

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on May 13, 2017:

Steve, I see an improvement in about two to three days depending on how bad the infection is I use it for two weeks if it is a bad infection. Some infections are a bit more stubborn. If you see improvement don't stop using it but continue for a bit longer or the infection will come back. Let me know how it works for you. Leslie

steve on May 11, 2017:

I have a collie/sheperd mix.she's 15 yrs old and recenly went blind she was going in circles constantly running into things and her head tilted took her to the vet and he said ear infection he sent home 3 days of two shots and antbiotics.she started improving then after the shots she got bad again.if i get the zymox how long does it take before showing improvement?we had since she was a pup and we want to baby her with comfort.

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on May 05, 2017:

Des.. that is something you need to call your vet about. They may be able to answer that quickly for you. Since I am not a vet and do not know exactly what is going on with your dogs ear, I really cannot comment or give advice.

Des on May 04, 2017:

My dog has crusty earwax pus looking gook in his ear. Can i use my ear drops i got from my doctor for an ear infection?

Paul V on April 10, 2017:

Zymox is not available here in the philippines?

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on April 05, 2017:

Susanne. Boric acid is low toxicity. When it is not mixed with anything, if it gets on your skin it may cause a slight irritation. Thus the heads up in the article to wash if that happens. Boric acid has a history of being used as an antiseptic agent. It is very useful and when mixed with other items really helps.

Susanne on April 04, 2017:

I absolutely hate seeing articles that say, "put this in your dog or on your dog but if it gets on your skin WASH IT OFF IMMEDIATELY!"

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on March 08, 2017:

Kim- the product works better if the ear has not been cleaned. However if the dog is pretty uncomfortable I'd use it as soon as possible with the understanding that I will probably have to use it a bit longer due to the fact it works better in an uncleaned ear. I'd hate to have the dog wait and be in a lot of discomfort.

L

Kim on March 08, 2017:

Thanks for answering my question :). Just one more question.....how long should you wait to use the zymox otic if you have cleaned the dog ears?

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on March 08, 2017:

Kim~ Yes I try then to prevent the infections. Ear cleaners used weekly are great! Sometimes if I think that is not enough I use the zymox one time weekly to maintain. I really love it! Best of luck and don't clean the ear prior to using it. If it is a bad infection you may have to use it at least a week maybe longer.

L

Kim on March 07, 2017:

Love that i came arcross this article!!! I'm going to be buying it for my dogs ear infections. After the ear infection seems to be gone do you use this as a preventative for future infections as well? If so how often do you use it for your dog's ears?

Zedlick on March 01, 2017:

Never put alcohol in a dog's ear

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on February 21, 2017:

Camille. You put enough solution to fill the canal. Be aware betadine will stain so maybe applying it in a tub? Also once it is in, fold the ear over and kind of rub it in. I also want to add you do not want to use this solution if your dog has any cuts etc in the ear. Isopropyl alcohol will sting if any cuts. The alcohol is first, then the boric acid( if it gets on your skin wash it off) . Mix well. Add the vinegar shake again and last the betadine. If you warm the mixture( like putting the container in warm water kind of like warming a baby bottle) , the dog may not object as much. Cold solution they don't like so much. Hope this helps and best of luck!

Camille on February 21, 2017:

Hi I want to try the home remedy on my dog, but I'm not clear on how many drops I should put in the ear.

Tali on February 04, 2017:

My dog has yeast in her ears and on her body now. She is a one year old Lhasa Apso. We have been dealing with this since she was 9 weeks old. The vet prescribed ointment in the beginning, which helped a little, but didn't cure it. What we have discovered is she has an allergy to something in her food, because we cured the yeast, only to have it come back immediately when she ate the old food for two days. So this is how we cured it: bathed dog in dish soap to remove the oil the yeast feeds on, sprayed straight white vinegar on the yeast spots, once a day for three days, then let everything dry out for four days, then sprayed again one last time. She hated having her ears sprayed, and wasn't crazy about having vinegar rubbed on her face, so expect some resistance. We switched her food to Pure Balance 95%, so she is eating a single ingredient food with vitamins and minerals added, but nothing else. By the third day of treatment her face was no longer red and weeping, her body was no longer red with the crusty yellow wet hair, and her ears went from black to pink and sweet smelling for the first time since we got her. I would say though, if the dog has open wounds, to dilute the vinegar, but she didn't have any because we are so on top of it after having dealt with it for so long. Also, make sure to get the soap into the ears and rinse until the suds are gone, seems counter productive, but the yeast will live longer if you don't eliminate the food source, which is your dogs natural skin oil. The vinegar doesn't stain anything, but it will make your dog smell like a salad...compared to the stink of yeast though its a huge improvement!

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on January 26, 2017:

Lisa..The twice monthly cleaning solution is great to try to prevent infections but once an infection is there then it does nothing. I don't think zymox has any alcohol.As I said my one dog's ears were bright red and irritated and the zymox helped a lot. Since you have a bottle double-check but I feel pretty confident in saying it won't sting the dog. It's just better and more effective using it in a dirty ear. Don't be afraid to use it for more than a week since the ear is looking rough. Let me know how it goes...L

Lisa on January 26, 2017:

Thanks for the response Leslie. She has the black looking stuff but she's scratched/rubbed her ear so much that now it's very red and irritated. I have a bottle of Zymox but was hesitant to use it for fear that it would cause the ear to itch/burn even more. The stuff from the vet is a twice monthly cleanser but it doesn't help with the itching or discharge.

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on January 26, 2017:

What did your vet give the dog? I know some meds cannot be used together or close to one another. The ear is not to be cleaned before zymox use either. My one dog had bright red ears and I used the zymox with hydrocortisone in it. It did not bother him and was a life savior for us. I definitely would not use the homemade solution I discussed in this article because it has alcohol and burns. Did the vet diagnose a bacterial or Yeast infection?

Lisa on January 26, 2017:

Is it OK to use zymox on ears that are dry & raw looking or will it burn? The stuff the vet gave us for ear infections doesn't seem to help.

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on January 20, 2017:

John...zymox Otic. Let me know if it helps!

Take care ..L

John D on January 19, 2017:

I'm dealing with the same issue and trying to avoid the vet visit if possible. Can you tell me if the product was zymox or zymox otic?

Thanks!

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on January 12, 2017:

Travis. Do the ears look dry? Does your dog Have allergies? The itching can be from that. food allergies? My one dog is so allergic he can only eat foods without grains. His skin and itching was a mess but he's good now. If not allergies then ha ve you considered using an ear cleaner? I'm not talking about for an infection but for keeping the ear healthy. That may help the itching as well. There are a ton of cleaners out there. Zymox makes one as well. I use my cleaner as a maintenance to keep the dogs ear healthy. Otherwise my dog tends to slip back to an ear that isn't healthy. I use the ear cleaner once a week. Not sure about the baby oil. I haven't really known zymox to dry out the ear.

Travis on January 12, 2017:

Baby oil perhaps?

Travis on January 12, 2017:

The zymox might have dried out my pupps ears since he healed from the minor infection now he scratches at them every night and morning and sometimes at random. they look very clean and its been over two months since I went thru two bottles of zymox. At times they look a little pink. He doesnt seem to be in much pain as through the day he plays and is normal except when he lays around sometimes scratching and at night.I was thinking of some kind of drops that add moisture?

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on January 07, 2017:

Thanks Connie for your feedback. Never had an issue with the alcohol. Of course if I had seen pus, blood etc I would have known it wasn't a typical yeast infection and perhaps is more serious such as a busted eardrum. . Both methods above have worked wonders for my dogs ( and I have had too many to mention). Do appreciate your tips and great information for the eyes as well.

Connie Paris on January 07, 2017:

You mentioned not to use these concoctions if the eardrum is damaged; You can't know that unless you look deep into the ear with an otoscope. Putting rubbing alcohol in an ear is never a good idea, it wreaks havoc on sensitive, inflamed tissue! Here on the farm, we use "Today", an OTC mastitis medication available at feed stores and online. FYI we also use neosporin (without cortisone) for eye issues. Load it into a 1cc syringe (without needle to apply). It's $5 for a large tube compared to $30 for a tiny tube of Rx eye meds. Worth a try before going to the vet. BTW I was a vet tech for 30 years.

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on December 30, 2016:

Angie. I'm not sure what you mean about the hair falling out? Is it all over the body? That is something a vet can answer. The black in the ear is usually a yeast infection. You can try any of the suggestions above for that. They usually help. Any other questions you need to call your vet. Best of luck

Angie on December 30, 2016:

Hi my name is angie i have a 4yr old poddle and he has a ear infection he keeps scracthing hes ear all the time and now he got like a black wax coming out i keep cleaning every day but is no working he has a really bad ordor coming out and his hair is falling what you recomment please help me?

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on December 20, 2016:

Ashley.. the black stuff is a yeast infection. Dogs with floppy ears, where air does not circulate, are more prone to them, especially if the ear is warm and moist. Dogs that swim can get these infections a lot. My golden lays on one side of his head all the time so that one ear gets funky with yeast. It's a battle always.. I constantly need to use the remedies above to keep the infections away...best of luck!

Ashley on December 19, 2016:

My dad has a change in demeanor and he's kinda looking grumpy and his ears have that bad odor she's about four year olds pit I got from the shelter six months or more and I clean his ears constantly and I get that black stuff anybody have an opinion of what it could be causing this

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on December 13, 2016:

You are welcome! I spent tons of money too and most of the time I kept going back because my dog still had an infection. I hate seeing my poor pup miserable.

3 Dog owner on December 13, 2016:

This has saved me literally a thousand dollars over the life of knowing about it. Getting the boric acid can be tricky, but worth the effort. Every time I dig out the bottle, I think 'just saved another 200 bucks'. The first version I found was alcohol, boric acid and gentian violet, Thank you!

Jenn on December 13, 2016:

Travis, you may want to try some ear mite treatment for your dog, since he seems to only scratch in the nighttime and early am, mite activity is supposedly at it's highest at night. Just a thought. Good luck to you and your dog!

John on December 09, 2016:

Thank you for replying. This website and info has been a big help for our chocolate lab. Thank you!!

Travis on December 02, 2016:

Ok Thanks!

Leslie (author) from State College Pa on December 02, 2016:

Travis.. skipping a day or two probably didn't help. Some of those yeast infections are stubborn. I see no harm in using the one without hydrocortisone. The manufacturer does suggest using the product a bit longer for stubborn infections.

John, no sorry I have no definite answer for shelf life. I can't imagine it wouldn't be similar to products that were used to make it. Had my solution for quite a while and it seemed to Continue to work. Sorry I can't be more helpful..

Travis on December 01, 2016:

Hi I used the Zymox with 1.0 cortizone a good while back about a month ago and it seems it cleared it up about 99%. All the pink color went away and he started feeling much better after the first couple of days (His was minor). It seemed to be cured but then I noticed at night and sometimes in a.m. he would scratch his ears but not for long and then that was it then he seemed to be fine. He's been doing it ever since every single night or in the morning sometimes both but just for about 30 seconds then he stops and goes to sleep. He seems fine all day..Do you think its good idea to use the Zymox without hydrocortizone this time . Last time I used it for about a week but I may have skipped a day or two at the end. after I noticed him scratching at night a little I conitnued with Zymox till the bottle is just about empty. Not sure if I should order another but with out the Hydrocortizone ? where to find ? Bought my last bottle from amazon. Thanks

John on December 01, 2016:

We made up the home remedy solution but the proportions make a much larger amount than needed. Do you have any sense of shelf life for the betadine, boric acid, vinegar, alcohol solution? Thanks.

sheppiemom3 on November 27, 2016:

Источник: https://pethelpful.com

Home Remedies: Suffering from swimmer’s ear

a woman swimming laps in a poolSwimmer's ear is an infection in the outer ear canal, which runs from your eardrum to the outside of your head. It's often brought on by water that remains in your ear after swimming, creating a moist environment that aids bacterial growth.

Putting fingers, cotton swabs or other objects in your ears also can lead to swimmer's ear by damaging the thin layer of skin lining your ear canal.

Swimmer's ear is also known as otitis externa. The most common cause of this infection is bacteria invading the skin inside your ear canal. Usually you can treat swimmer's ear with eardrops. Prompt treatment can help prevent complications and more-serious infections.

  • Keep your ears dry. Dry your ears thoroughly after exposure to moisture from swimming or bathing. Dry only your outer ear, wiping it slowly and gently with a soft towel or cloth. Tip your head to the side to help water drain from your ear canal. You can dry your ears with a blow dryer if you chase bank hours near me it on the lowest setting and hold it at least a foot (about 0.3 meters) away from the what to do for a dog ear infection home remedy preventive treatment. If you know you don't have a punctured eardrum, you can use homemade preventive eardrops before and after swimming. A mixture of 1 part white vinegar to 1 part rubbing alcohol may help promote drying and prevent the growth of bacteria and fungi that can cause swimmer's ear. Pour 1 teaspoon (about 5 milliliters) of the solution into each ear and let it drain back out. Similar over-the-counter solutions may be available at your drugstore.
  • Swim wisely. Watch for signs alerting swimmers to high bacterial counts and don't swim on those days.
  • Avoid putting foreign objects in your ear. Never attempt to scratch an itch or dig out earwax with items such as a cotton swab, paper clip or hairpin. Using these items can pack material deeper into your ear canal, irritate the thin skin inside your ear or break the skin.
  • Protect your ears from irritants. Put cotton balls in your ears while applying products such as hair sprays and hair dyes.
  • Use caution after an ear infection or surgery. If you've recently had an ear infection or ear surgery, talk to your doctor before you go swimming.

Outer ear infection Redness john f kennedy presidential library and museum the ear canal, draining fluids and discharge of pus are signs of swimmer's ear (otitis externa). Untreated, the infection can spread to nearby tissue and bone.

Symptoms

Swimmer's ear symptoms are usually mild at first, but they may get worse if your infection isn't treated or spreads. Doctors often classify swimmer's ear according to mild, moderate and advanced stages of progression.

Mild signs and symptoms

  • Itching in your ear canal
  • Slight redness inside your ear
  • Mild discomfort that's made worse by pulling on your outer ear (pinna, or auricle) or pushing on the little "bump" (tragus) in front of your ear
  • Some drainage of clear, odorless fluid

 Moderate progression

  • More intense itching
  • Increasing pain
  • More extensive redness in your ear
  • Excessive fluid drainage
  • Discharge of pus
  • Feeling of fullness inside your ear and partial blockage of your ear canal by swelling, fluid and debris
  • Decreased or muffled hearing

Advanced progression

  • Severe pain that may radiate to your face, neck or side of your head
  • Complete blockage of your ear canal
  • Redness or swelling of your outer ear
  • Swelling in the lymph nodes in your neck
  • Fever

When to see a doctor

Contact your doctor if you're experiencing any signs or symptoms of swimmer's ear, even if they're mild. Visit the emergency room if you have severe pain or fever.

Источник: https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/home-remedies-suffering-from-swimmers-ear/

Most dogs with aches and pain in their ear are diagnosed with an ear infection from either a yeast or bacterial microorganism. While an ongoing condition should be treated at the vet, the majority of minor ear infections can be treated naturally at home

Here at Dope Dog we care about a man’s best friend and want to provide information on DIY treatments to get rid of ear infections. 

Common Types of Dog Ear Infections

Because a dog’s ear is more vertical that humans, the ears can trap fluid, ear mites, bacteria, or yeast easily. There are three common dog ear infections that often have other symptoms that will help your vet determine how to best treat the infection.

Otitis Interna

Otitis interna is characterized by inflammation of the inner ear. It goes away on its own 50% of the time, but sometimes it can cause hearing loss if left untreated. Half the time, otitius interna is caused by fever

Otitis Media

This is the inflammation of the middle ear that makes up 50% of ear problems. These infections happen when the ear’s eustachian tube becomes swollen or blocked and traps fluid in the middle ear. The majority of dogs don’t need treatment, but they can be painful. 

Otitis Externa

This is inflammation of the outer part of the ear, often caused by exposure to water or allergies. Other symptoms include: 

  • Headshaking
  • Swelling
  • Scratching
  • Odor
  • Discharge
  • Scaly skin

Otis externa is probably the most common dog ear infection and can be fairly painful and itchy for your dog. To help with the pain and inflammation, you may want to consider a CBD oil product that can help reduce inflammation and pain.

What are Symptoms of Dog Ear Infections?

Infection is painful and uncomfortable, which can make it noticeable. Some of the common symptoms include:

  • Smelly ears
  • Waxy discharge
  • Rubbing of ears
  • Scratching the ears and shaking
  • Irritation
  • Red skin inside the ear flap
  • Head tilting towards the side of the infection

Some chronic cases might cause hearing loss, imbalance, and walking in circles. Therefore the first step in the treatment of the infection is to understand the holistic view of the problem. There are over counter drugs such as vaccines and pesticides, but that may not adequately treat the dog because of the wrong dosage and prescriptions. 

It is essential to understand the underlying cause behind a dog ear infection because that is the clue to the proper treatment regime. 

Causes of Dog Ear Infections

With that in mind, here are some causes of ear issues:

Weakened Immune System

Dogs with weakened immune systems are susceptible to developing an infection. If you think your dog might be sick, check for:

These could be signs of bigger health concerns, many of which can lead to ear infections. 

Excessive Ear Cleaning

Some pet owners may excessively clean the ears with constant rubbing, and they are unaware that this can cause inflammation and skin irritation. While under-cleaning can lead to a build-up of bacteria, excessively cleaning your dog’s ears can actually strip their ears of healthy wax, leading to irritation. 

The length of time it takes for a dog’s ears to get dirty enough to warrant a cleaning depends on: 

  • The shape and size of their ears 
  • The dog’s breed 
  • Activity level

Dogs who play in dirt or water will need their ears cleaned more often. 

Lifestyle

Exposing your dog to a more natural lifestyle is a way to prevent them from developing an ear infection. Here are some of the lifestyle choices that can prevent a dog from contracting infection:

  • Avoid exposure to chemicals and pesticides in the environment.
  • Be cautious with pharmaceutical drugs. 
  • Feed the dog with a raw diet, whole foods, or dog food with healthy ingredients.

Diet

A bad diet can contribute to ear infections because it introduces various microorganisms to the dog’s body, which develops large colonies in the guts leading to inflammation. As time goes by, the yeast or bacteria can manifest in your dog's ears.

A lot of dog owners looking to keep their companion healthier turn to home-cooked meals. This includes: 

  • Lean chicken and turkey
  • Steamed vegetables
  • Eggs
  • Organic peanut butter

Would you like to feed your dog home-cooked meals? Here’s some more information about dog-friendly diets

Related Link: Foods Your Dogs Should Never Eat

Homeopathic Treatments and Remedies for Dog Ear Infections

Before you can treat your dog’s ear infection, you need to determine whether they have a yeast ear infection or bacterial microbial ear infection. To diagnose the ear infection, you should talk to your vet.

Treating Yeast Ear Infection

If your dog has a mild yeast ear infection, you can try these homeopathic remedies for dog ear infections:

Using Distilled Water and Vinegar

The first step is to create a mixture that contains a diluted solution of distilled water and apple cider vinegar at a 1:1 ratio. Dip a cotton ball in the mixture, and use it to clean the ear. 

However, if it is a bacterial infection, don’t use this method because vinegar will sting the dog, making him uncomfortable. It’s critical to identify the cause of the infection before treating it at home or you may cause more pain for your dog.

Using Coconut Oil for Dog Ear Infection

 Coconut oil for dog ear infection


The coconut oil mixture is also appropriate when treating yeast infections. It involves making a solution of coconut oil and garlic cloves by simmering it and giving it approximately 15 minutes to cool. 

Use a dropper and squeeze two to three drops in the ear while massaging it for 3 minutes. Dip a cotton swab in the mixture and swab the inner part of the ear. Coconut oil contains antifungal properties that can clear the yeast infection, and it's available in any local food store.

Want a natural solution for inflammation and pain? Shop Dope Dog CBD Calming Dog Treats to manage your dog’s ear infection pain.

Related Link: 6 Facts Your Vet Wished You Knew About Keeping Your Dog Healthy

Natural Remedies for Bacterial and Mite Infections

If your dog has a mild bacterial or microbial ear infection, you can try these homeopathic remedies for dog ear infections:

Using Basic Ear Cleaner

Use lukewarm water and hydrogen peroxide to prepare a solution then squeeze four to five drops in the affected ear while massaging the base of the ear to loosen the ear wax, cleaning it with a cotton ball. 

Alternatively, plantain tincture can be appropriate because it is a natural antibiotic, especially if you don't prefer using hydrogen peroxide. All of these products are available at local drugstores and pharmacies, and it works well on bacteria and tinted moisturizer vs bb cream vs cc cream infection.

Use Calendula Oil to Remove Mites or Bacteria

Removing the bacteria or mites is simple because all you need is a glass jar of calendula flowers filled with olive oil. Leave this jar for a couple of days for the oil to absorb the calendula then use a liquid dropper to squeeze five drops of this mixture on the affected area. 

Wait for approximately one minute then clean the cotton swab. Calendula is very reliable when it comes to bacterial infection, and it works great on the removal of mites, which could have been a possible cause of the infection.

Use Boric Acid

Boric acid is best used on damp ears after the dog has taken a bath or swim. Wet ears make the dog susceptible to developing ear infections, so it is essential to use boric acid to massage the base of the ear

It is also vital to know that this substance is poisonous, and it should not come into contact with the nose or mouth, so be cautious when using it.

If you happen to notice foreign objects in the dog’s ears, try to remove it using your fingers or tweezers. Alternatively, homeopathic silica can also help to extract it.

Prevention of Ear Infections

Before you think of any treatment methods, you should start by focusing on preventive measures. You can swab the ear canal once a month using olive oil to remove the build-up of wax, which could have led to infections.

Additionally, your dog groomer should not pluck the inner ear hair because, by doing so, leaves small open sores, which can result in bacterial infection.

It is essential to feed the dog with hypoallergenic dog food to prevent skin irritation or allergic reactions. Finally, if the infection doesn't clear up with natural treatment, it is essential to consult your veterinarian for other underlying causes.

Bottom Line

Don’t stress yourself with expensive medication yet; it's best to try something natural and affordable such as home remedies that can be useful in curing your four-legged companion's ear infection. 

Here at Dope Dog, there is nothing we care about more than your dog’s health. Read our story here and find out what our products can do to help treat common ailments. Dope Dog’s CBD treats, shampoos, and oils can help calm your dog while providing added nutrients to boost their immune system.

Related Link: Giving Your Dog a Flea Bath: The Ultimate Guide

Источник: https://dope.dog/blogs/dog-health-wellness/natural-cures-for-ear-infections-in-dogs

Yeast Infections in Dogs

Written by Small Door's medical experts

Itchy, irritated skin with a distinct odor can be an indication of a yeast infection, a common skin concern for dogs. A dog will typically develop a yeast infection on the skin or in the ears. Regardless of location, a yeast infection can cause extreme discomfort and can be an indication of a more serious issue.

Dog with yeast infection scratching ear

In This Article

What are yeast infections in dogs?

A yeast infection occurs when there is an overabundance of yeast found on the body of a dog. Yeasts are budding, spore-like forms of fungi that typically live on the body without causing illness. It is only when their numbers grow that they cause issues.

Signs & symptoms of yeast infections in dogs

Yeast thrives in a moist environment, so for dogs, that can be in places such as the ears, paws, armpit, groin, and even the folds of their face in certain breeds. A veterinarian will be able to make a definitive diagnosis, but as an owner, watch for these certain signs.

  • Changes in skin color and texture. In the early stages of a yeast infection, the skin begins to turn pink or red. When dealing with chronic yeast infections, the skin may become leathery, thick, and gray or black.

  • Greasy skin. The skin can become greasy or excessively oily.

  • Scaly skin. Some dogs may develop scaling, crusting, or flakiness of the skin, similar to dandruff.

  • Head shaking and tilting. Because the ears are the most common place for a dog to develop a yeast infection, pay close attention if your dog starts exhibiting these movements.

  • Scratching and rubbing. Yeast infections are incredibly itchy, and some dogs will try and scratch the infected area or rub up against the floor, furniture, or another surface to get relief.

  • Licking. Incessant licking of the infected area is another way a dog might try and find relief.

  • Swelling and warmth. Redness and swelling are the first signs of what to do for a dog ear infection home remedy yeast infection, but a dog’s symptoms can progress to swelling, warmth, and pain in what to do for a dog ear infection home remedy infected area.

  • Odor. Another common sign of yeast infection is a distinct smell, which will likely be your first indicator that your dog has this condition. The smell has been described by dog owners to mimic a musty or cheesy scent.

  • Hair loss. For yeast infections in the ear, which can be associated with inflammation, hair loss will occur around the ears.

  • Drooling. Although extremely rare, a yeast infection can occur inside the mouth, leading to drooling, discomfort, and problems eating. These signs can also be indicators of other oral issues that can be determined by your veterinarian.

How to tell the difference between ear mites and yeast infection

Yeast infections in dogs’ ears typically result in head shaking and rubbing, itching, odor, redness, and brown discharge. Ear mites in dogs have many of the same symptoms, however, there are a few slight differences. Ear mites cause a dark discharge from the ear that can be waxy or crusty. Ear mites are also barely visible to the naked eye, extremely itchy, and very contagious to other animals. If your dog is experiencing any of these symptoms, contact your vet so they can determine whether it’s a yeast infection or ear mites and the best option for treatment.

What dog breeds are prone to yeast infections?

Although it’s possible for all dogs to contract a yeast infection, it’s more common for specific breeds. Breeds with excess skin folds, floppy ears, hair growing in the inner ear canal, and those with allergies have a higher chance of getting a yeast infection.

Susceptible breeds include:

  • Shih Tzu

  • Cocker Spaniel

  • Schnauzers

  • Golden Retrievers

  • Labrador Retrievers

  • Basset Hound

  • West Highland White Terrier

  • German Shepherd

  • Maltese

  • Dachshunds

  • Poodles

What causes yeast infections in dogs?

Yeast infections can develop for many reasons. Best stock trading programs online dog with an underactive immune system can develop yeast overgrowth and infection. An overactive immune system, meanwhile, can trigger allergic reactions, which also leads to yeast infections.

When a dog develops allergies, it can be a sign of an overactive immune system. If the allergy is severe, a veterinarian will prescribe medication to help alleviate those symptoms, although certain medications can alter the natural balance of good bacteria, and can lead to yeast overgrowth.

Allergens such as pollens, mold, dust, cigarette smoke, cleaning products, and even certain foods, especially if they’re high in sugar and carbs, can also lead to yeast infections. For some dogs, yeast problems are seasonal, and when the temperature and humidity are high, problems with yeast can occur.

Since yeast thrives in a moist environment, dogs that are bathed or in water often are prone to yeast infections in the ear. If the ear is not kept dry, water and debris can become trapped inside the ear canal. Other causes for yeast infections in a dog’s ear include wax or discharge, a trapped foreign object inside the ear, poor hygiene, hot, humid weather, and the use of products or ear drops that alter the natural environment of the ear.

Too much exercise and spending time in the hot sun (which can be dangerous for other reasons as well) can also contribute to the overgrowth of yeast.

Diagnosing yeast infection in dogs

A veterinarian can confirm a definitive diagnosis through cytology or by culturing. Hair and skin samples can be taken from around the affected area and tested under a microscope to determine a yeast infection.

If the yeast infection is believed to be inside the ear, the veterinarian will use a device called an otoscope to look inside the ear canal. A sample may also be taken from in and around the ear to be examined under a microscope. This will help further determine if the infection is caused by yeast, bacteria, or even both.

How to treat yeast infection in dogs

The first step in treatment is to identify and address the underlying cause of the yeast infection. Along with medication, at-home remedies can not only offer relief, but can also be a preventable measure.

At-home treatments can include the following:

  • Medicated baths. As long as there aren’t any secondary infections, an antifungal medicated shampoo can help to get the yeast infection under control. Wash your dog every 3-5 days for 2-12 weeks (or as long as directed by your veterinarian) for maximum effect.

  • Topical cream. If the infection is in a small area, you can apply an antifungal cream directly to the spot and cover. The medicated cream should come with specific instructions so follow carefully.

  • Clean your dog’s ears. Since the ears are one of the most common areas for a yeast infection, it’s important to keep them clear and clean. Using a dog-ear cleaning solution designed to lower pH levels, gently clean the ear with a soft tissue or cotton ball (do not put Q-tips down into the ear canal), and if necessary, apply a yeast infection cream inside the ear as directed.

  • If the infection is deeper inside the ear canal, oral medication and possibly surgery might be required; only your veterinarian can determine the course of action in this situation. Serious yeast infections inside the ear can take up to six weeks to heal.

  • Keep paws clean and dry. A dog’s sweat glands are primarily located in the paws, so it’s smart to wipe down after long or vigorous exercise. Plus, the paws come into contact with dirt frequently, especially when outside for walks or playtime, so it’s another reason to keep them clean.

  • Examine your dog’s diet. A healthy diet is key and the foundation for good health. Yeast loves sugar so avoid foods and treats loaded with refined carbohydrates like potatoes, corn, wheat, rice, honey, and high-fructose corn syrup should be cut out of your dog’s diet. You should also avoid giving your dog any table food.

Are there home remedies for yeast infections in dogs?

The what to do for a dog ear infection home remedy home remedy for yeast infections in dogs that has any scientific data to support it is a vinegar rinse. A vinegar rinse is able to help change the pH of the skin to make it less desirable for yeast. The proper dilution is essential to avoid irritation. You should only attempt this after speaking with your veterinarian for guidance and direction.

Is there a cure for yeast infection in dogs?

While yeast infections can be cured, some dogs are prone to recurrent infections. The best way to prevent a possible occurrence is to take care of your dog’s immune system properly. When you treat the root of the problem, you are not only taking care of the possible yeast infection but other potential skin issues that are a result of problems that originate in the digestive tract.

Are yeast infections in dogs contagious for humans or other pets?

If your dog has a yeast infection, the yeast cells cannot be transmitted to another pet even if they come in direct contact with the infected dog’s skin. What should be noted is that a yeast infection can lead to a secondary bacterial or fungus infection, which may be contagious in some cases. This holds true for humans as well; secondary infections, such as ringworm, are contagious and owners should take precaution when directly handling their dog.

What is the cost of treating yeast infection in dogs?

To treat what to do for a dog ear infection home remedy yeast infection in your dog, take into consideration the type of treatment needed (oral vs. topical medications), the area in which you live in (certain cities have a higher cost of living), and the type of veterinarian (general practitioner vs. veterinary dermatologist) you plan to visit. Prescription medications tend to cost more than over-the-counter medicine, while home remedies, if recommended, might be a bit lower. Also take into consideration how long and how much medicine your dog will need and whether the treatment is only for a yeast infection or whether medication is needed for an extended period to alleviate an underlying issue. These issues all play a role in determining the actual cost.

Recovery and management of yeast infection in dogs

Recovery depends on the severity of the infection. If it’s mild and caught in the early stages, it can clear up in a few days. If it’s a severe infection, it can take up to a few weeks to completely heal.

Managing a yeast infection requires continuous monitoring of your dog’s immune system. Frequent baths with antifungal shampoo and sprays will help soothe the skin, although you should check with your veterinarian before beginning any at-home treatments.

How to prevent yeast infections in dogs

Although yeast infections in dogs are mostly unpredictable, certain triggers can lead to an overgrowth of yeast. Being aware of those stressors will help keep your dog’s health under control.

A few tips to help prevent yeast infections:

  • Keep your pup indoors during extreme heat and humidity.

  • Feed a good quality food and be aware of any food allergies.

  • Keep the ears clean and healthy with regular checks.

  • Ensure your dog is completely dry, including paws and ears after a bath or swim.

  • If your dog has hair at the opening of his ears, have your groomer trim or tweeze it.

  • Use flea and tick preventatives as directed by your veterinarian.

Is there a vaccine for yeast infections in dogs?

There is no vaccine to prevent a yeast infection, but there are precautions what to do for a dog ear infection home remedy can take to lower the risk of one.

Summary of yeast infections in dogs

Yeast infections are a common skin concern for dogs, causing itching and irritation. They typically occur in moist environments, like on the skin or in the ears or even the folds of their face. Often caused by allergies, yeast infections should be treated promptly, to avoid secondary infections and alleviate your dog’s discomfort. As some dogs can be prone to recurrent yeast infections, it’s important to identify the root cause and take precautions ahead of time to protect their immune system.

Источник: https://www.smalldoorvet.com/learning-center/medical/yeast-infections-in-dogs/

How to Clean Your Dog’s Ears in 3 Easy Steps

Regular ear cleanings are essential for managing chronic, allergic-based inflammation known as otitis and keeping infections at bay. Before you start, though, paying tmobile bill late sure to evaluate your dog’s ears for odor, discharge, pain, or redness. If any of these symptoms are present, put down the cotton ball and contact us for an appointment instead.

In order to achieve an effective ear cleaning, you must have control of your pet. For some dogs, it will be necessary to have someone hold him to free both of your hands for the cleaning. If your pet is uncooperative, you may need to hold his head and muzzle gently but firmly. You may find that backing him up into a corner of the room is helpful.

We also recommend that you pair each cleaning with something pleasant, like treats or playtime, so that this is not a dreaded chore for you or a fearful experience for what to do for a dog ear infection home remedy pet.

You will need a gentle veterinary ear cleaning solution and gauze squares or cotton balls (no cotton swabs!). We do not recommend the use of alcohol or hydrogen peroxide to clean your dog’s ears. These products can cause inflammation to the ear canal and further exacerbate infections. Your veterinarian can provide recommendations on the best products to use.

To clean your dog's ears effectively, you will need a gentle veterinary ear cleaning solution and gauze squares or cotton balls (no cotton swabs!).Step 1

Hold the earflap with one hand. Pour a generous amount of the recommended cleaning solution directly into the ear canal. Massage the base of the ear canal until you hear a sloshing noise. This means you have put in enough solution. You may allow your dog to shake his head, but use caution not to get fluid in your eyes. Your dog will often shake out much of the debris.

Step 2

Using the cotton balls or gauze squares, absorb the excess solution from the ear. Placing your index finger behind the absorbent material, you may wipe as deep as you can reach into the ear canal. This will not injure the ear.

Step 3

Repeat the previous steps until the cotton balls or gauze squares come out clean.

Regular ear cleanings are essential for managing chronic, allergic-based inflammation known as otitis and keeping infections at bay.Congrats—you’re done!

Have questions about cleaning your dog’s ears at home or prefer to have a professional handle it? Contact us or schedule an appointment anytime!

Источник: https://www.lombardvet.com/services/dogs/blog/how-clean-your-dog%E2%80%99s-ears-3-easy-steps

DOG EAR INFECTION: OVERVIEW

1. Keep your dog’s ears clean. Use a gentle cleaning agent such as green tea, or a commercial product such as Halo’s Natural Herbal Ear Wash.

2. Use a pinch of boric acid to keep the dog’s ears dry and acidified.

3. Consult your holistic veterinarian in cases of severe or chronic infections; she may need to treat an underlying condition.


Chronic dog ear infections are the bane of long-eared dogs, swimming dogs, recently vaccinated puppies, old dogs, dogs with an abundance of ear wax, and dogs with allergies, thyroid imbalances, or immune system disorders. In other words, ear infections are among the most common recurring canine problems.

In conventional veterinary medicine, a dog ear infection can often be treated with oral antibiotics, topical drugs, or even surgery. The problem is that none of these treatments is a cure. Ear infections come back when the dog eats another “wrong” food, goes for another swim, experiences another buildup of excess wax, or in some other way triggers a reoccurrence.

Canine Ear Infections

Holistic veterinarian Stacey Hershman, of Nyack, New York, took an interest in dog ear infections when she became a veterinary technician in her teens. “This is a subject that isn’t covered much in vet school,” she says. “I learned about treating ear infections from the veterinarians I worked with over the years. Because they all had different techniques, I saw dozens of different treatments, and I kept track of what worked and what didn’t.”

Over the years, Dr. Hershman developed a program for keeping ears healthy and treating any problems that do arise, without the steroids and antibiotics usually dispensed by conventional practitioners. In addition, when she treats a dog with infected ears, she usually gives a homeopathic remedy to stimulate the dog’s immune system and help it fight the infection’s underlying cause.

“Ear infections are a symptom of a larger problem,” she says. “You don’t want to just treat the ear and ignore the rest of the body. You want to treat the whole patient.”

Dr. Hershman believes that many dog ear infections, especially in puppies, stem from immune what to do for a dog ear infection home remedy imbalances caused by vaccinosis, a reaction to vaccines. “The ill effects of vaccines,” she says, “can cause mucoid discharge in puppies. For example, it’s not uncommon for puppies to have a discharge from the eyes or to develop conjunctivitis after a distemper vaccine.”

Once a dog develops an ear infection, conventional treatment can make the problem worse. “Dogs are routinely given cocktail drugs, which are combinations of antibiotics, antifungal drugs, cortisone, or other ingredients,” she explains.

“After a while, you’ll go through 10 tubes, and your dog will develop a resistance. Then you’ll have to go to more powerful drugs to treat the recurring infection. In conventional veterinary medicine, chronic ear infections are considered normal. Dog owners are told they’re a fact of life, they’re never cured, they just keep coming back, and the best you can do is ‘manage’ them. My goal is to cure, not to manage.”

Dr. Hershman’s treatment for infected ears is not a cure by itself, but it’s a remedy that isn’t harmful, and it gives you an important kick-start in treating ears holistically. “That’s the approach that leads to a cure,” she says.

Note: If your dog develops an ear infection for the first time, or if his condition seems especially severe or painful, take him to see your holistic veterinarian, to rule out a tumor, polyp, or something else that requires veterinary attention.

Maintenance Ear Cleaning

Dr. Hershman’s healthy ears program starts with maintenance cleaning with ordinary cotton balls and cotton swabs. “This makes a lot of people nervous,” she says, “but the canine ear canal isn’t straight like the canal in our ears. Assuming you’re reasonably gentle, you can’t puncture the ear drum or do any structural damage.”

Moisten the ear with green tea brewed as for drinking and cooled to room temperature, or use an acidic ear cleanser that does not contain alcohol. Dr. Hershman likes green tea for its mildness and its acidifying, antibacterial properties, but she also recommends peach-scented DermaPet MalAcetic Otic Ear Cleanser or Halo Natural Herbal Ear Wash.

“Don’t pour the cleanser into the dog’s ear,” she warns, “or it will just wash debris down and sit on the ear drum, irritating it.” Instead, she says, lift the dog’s ear flap while holding a moistened cotton ball between your thumb and index finger. Push the cotton down the opening behind the tragus (the horizontal ridge you see when you lift the ear flap) and scoop upward. Use a few dry cotton balls to clean out normal waxy buildup.

Next, push a Q-tip into the vertical ear canal until it stops, then scoop upward while rubbing it against the walls of the vertical canal. Repeat several times, rubbing on different sides of the vertical canal. Depending on how much debris is present in each ear, you can moisten one or several cotton balls and use two or more Q-tips.

“You don’t want to push so hard that you cause pain,” she says, “but for maintenance cleaning using gentle pressure, it’s impossible to harm the eardrum. I refer to the external ear canal as an L-shaped tunnel, and I tell owners to think of the vertical canal as a cone of cartilage. People are always amazed at how deep the dog’s ear canal can go. I often have them hold the end of the Q-tip while I demonstrate cleaning so they feel confident about doing it correctly without hurting their dogs.”

If excessive discharge requires the use of five or more Q-tips, or if the discharge is thick, black, or malodorous, Dr. Hershman recommends an ear flush.

Dogster.com offers another protocol for cleaning your dog’s ears here.

Washing Out Debris from Your Dog’s Ears

Dr. Hershman realized that when an ear is not inflamed and not painful but full of debris or tarry exudates from a yeast or bacterial infection, flushing the ear makes sense. “If you don’t flush it out but keep applying medication on top of the debris,” she says, “you’re never going to cure the problem. But I also learned that flushing the ear is an art. You can’t simply fill the ear with otic solution and expect it to flow out by itself, taking all the debris with it. Because the dog’s ear canal forms a right angle, you just can’t get the liquid out unless you suction it gently with a bulb syringe or some kind of tube with a syringe attached.”

Flushing the ears, says Dr. Hershman, what to do for a dog ear infection home remedy one of the most important techniques you can learn for keeping your dog’s ears healthy. “They don’t teach this in veterinary school,” she says. “It’s something people learn by experience.”

When should the ears not be flushed? “If they’re painful, ulcerated, or bleeding,” she says, “or if there’s slimy, slippery pus in the ear or a glutenous, yeasty, golden yellow discharge. In any of these cases, flushing is not recommended. But if the ears are not inflamed and are simply waxy or filled with tarry exudates, flushing works well.”

The procedure begins with a mild, natural, unscented liquid soap from the health food store. Place a few drops of full-strength soap in the ear, then thoroughly massage the base of the ear. The soap is a surfactant, and it breaks up debris that’s stuck to the sides of the ear canal. From a bowl of water that’s slightly warmer than body temperature, fill a rubber bulb syringe or ear syringe, the kind sold in pharmacies for use with children or adults. Place the point of the syringe deep down in the soap-treated ear, then slowly squeeze the syringe so it releases a gentle stream of water.

“By the first or second application,” says Dr. Hershman, “you should see all kinds of debris flowing out. It’s like a waterfall. At the end of each application, hold the syringe in place so it sucks remaining water and debris up out of the ear canal. Then empty the syringe before filling it again.”

For seriously debris-filled ears, Dr. Hershman repeats the procedure three or four times, then she lets the dog shake his head before drying the ear with cotton balls and Q-tips. “I look for blood or debris,” she says, “and I check inside with the otoscope. If there’s still a lot of debris, I put more soap in, do a more vigorous massage, and flush it a few more times.

“An ear flush can be traumatic if the ear is inflamed,” she warns, “and occasionally there will be an ulcer or sore that you don’t know is there and it will bleed. That’s why you have to be careful about how you do this. You have to be vigorous but not aggressive. You don’t want to make the ear more inflamed, painful, or damaged than it was to begin with.”

After flushing the ear, Dr. Hershman applies calendula gel, a homeopathic remedy. “I put a large dab in each ear and ask the owner to do that once or twice a day for the next three days. The gel is water-soluble and very soothing. Calendula helps relieve itching and it stimulates the growth of new cells, so it speeds tissue repair.”

If the discharge in the dog’s ear is yeasty or obviously infected, Dr. Hershman skips the ear flush, instead using the following treatment.

Treating Dog Ear Infections

Careful treatment is required for infected ears and ears that are full of debris that resists even an ear flush. But what approach works best?

When Dr. Hershman began her veterinary practice, she met many dogs who wouldn’t let anyone touch their ears. “I knew that nothing I’d learned in vet school was going to help them,” she says, “so I thought back to all the treatments I’d seen over the years. The one that seemed most effective was a combination of boric acid and a thick, old-fashioned ointment that looks like pink toothpaste. I couldn’t remember its name, but I never forgot how it smelled – really peculiar, like burnt embers.”

The ointment was Pellitol, and as soon as she tracked it down, Dr. Hershman developed her own protocol for using it in combination with boric acid. Through groomers she had learned the importance of ear powders. “Like those powders,” she says, “boric acid dries and acidifies the ear. Yeast and bacteria are opportunistic organisms that die in a dry, acidic environment. They thrive where it’s moist, dark, and alkaline.”

Experimenting first with her own dogs and dogs at the animal shelter where she volunteered, she placed two or three pinches of boric acid powder in each infected ear unless it was ulcerated, bleeding, or painful. “Being acidic,” she explains, “boric acid might irritate open wounds. In that case, I would use the Pellitol alone. Otherwise, a pinch or two of boric acid is an effective preliminary treatment.”

Boric acid is toxic; note warnings on the label. It should not be inhaled, swallowed, or placed in the eye. Shielding the face is important and usually requires a helper, someone who can hold the dog’s head steady while protecting the eyes, nose, and mouth.

“I put the boric acid in and use my finger to work it deep into the ear canal,” she says. “If the dog has a very narrow ear canal, I gently work it down with a Q-tip.”

Next, she attaches the Pellitol applicator to the tube and squeezes the pasty ointment into the ear canal, applying enough pressure as she withdraws the tube to completely fill the canal. “I massage the ear,” she says, “especially around the base, then leave it undisturbed for an entire week. I learned this by trial and error. The Pellitol dries up within a day or two, but if you leave it undisturbed for an entire week, it removes whatever exudates are in the ear, whether they’re sticky, tarry, yeasty, or slimy pus. It just attaches to whatever’s there, dries it up, and everything falls out together.”

Pellitol ointment contains zinc oxide, calamine, bismuth subgalante, bismuth subnitrate, resorcinol, echinacea fluid extract, and juniper tar. “Zinc oxide,” says Dr. Hershman, “is a drying agent; calamine helps with itching and inflammation; bismuth is soothing and has antibacterial properties; resorcinol is used to treat dermatitis and other skin conditions; echinacea is antiviral and antibacterial; and juniper tar, like all tree resins, fights infection and makes the ointment very sticky. Once applied, it stays in place until it dries and flakes off, taking the ear’s debris with it.”

After a week, the ear should be much improved. “That’s when I use cotton balls or Q-tips to remove whatever’s left,” says Dr. Hershman. “I love this treatment because it works well, it doesn’t traumatize the ear, and it doesn’t antidote homeopathy.”

If Pellitol has an adverse side effect, it’s the product’s stickiness. “I tell people to protect their furniture for a day or two,” says Hershman. “The ointment will stick to anything it touches, and when you fill the ear, it can stick to the outside of the ear or the dog’s face. That excess will dry and fall off. You can remove it with vegetable oil, but leave the inside of the ear flap alone.”

Sometimes a second treatment is needed, and sometimes Dr. Hershman flushes the ear to complete the therapy.

While dog owners can successfully treat many ear problems with the foregoing program by themselves, don’t hesitate to bring your dog to your holistic veterinarian if he exhibits severe pain or discomfort, or if the ear problems recur. There may be an underlying issue that your holistic veterinarian can identify and treat.

Also, there have been cases in which the alternatives described here don’t work. If this happens, conventional treatment might be needed to defeat the bacteria infecting the dog’s ear. Dr. Hershman’s cleaning and flushing program can be used afterward for preventive maintenance.

A NOTE ON PELLITOL: Since this article was originally published, Pellitol stopped being manufactured under that name. The same product is still sold, but have your veterinarian contact your pharmacy to make sure you are getting the right product.

Ear Mites

Not every ear infection is an infection; sometimes it’s an infestation. Ear mites are tiny parasites that suck blood and fill the ear with waste matter that looks like black coffee grounds. The problem is most common in dogs from pet shops, puppy mills, shelters, or breeders with unclean environments.

Ear mites are species-specific, meaning that feline ear mites prefer cats’ ears and canine ear mites prefer dogs’ ears. Their bites ulcerate the ear canal, often leading to secondary infections.

How can you tell if your dog has ear mites? The definitive test is by microscopic examination, but Dr. Hershman describes two simple home tests. “Smear some ear debris on a white paper towel and wet it with hydrogen peroxide,” she says. “If it creates a brownish red stain when you smear it, you’re looking at digested blood from mites. In addition, most animals with ear mites have a positive ‘thump test.’ They vigorously thump a hind leg when you clean their ears because of intense itching.”

Ear mites are usually treated with pesticides, but there’s a safer, easier way. Simply put a few drops of mineral oil in each ear once or twice a week for a month.

Mineral oil has a terrible reputation in holistic health circles because it’s a petrochemical that blocks pores and interferes with the skin’s ability to breathe. But when it comes to fighting ear mites, these characteristics are a virtue. Mineral oil smothers and starves ear mites. Reapplying the oil twice per week prevents the growth of new generations.

Note: Herbal ear oils containing olive oil or other vegetable oils can be less effective in www capital one banking treatment of ear mites, either because they contain nutrients that feed the tiny parasites or because they are not heavy enough to smother them.

For best results, use an eyedropper to apply mineral oil to the inside of the ear. Then use a cotton ball saturated with mineral oil to wipe inside the ear flap. Massage the entire ear to be sure the mineral oil is well distributed. Before each subsequent application, remove debris from the ear with cotton balls and Q-tips.

If mites have caused a secondary infection, follow the mineral oil treatment with Pellitol ointment and leave it undisturbed for several days.

Veterinary Help for Chronic Ear Problems

If you are unsure of your ability to clean or treat your dog’s ears, you can ask your holistic veterinarian to help you; with a little practice, you should be able to prevent ear problems and help your dog maintain a clean, dry, healthy ear on your own.

“These are simple, old-fashioned remedies,” says Dr. Hershman. “There is nothing high-tech about them. But after 30 years of treating ear infections, I’m convinced more than ever that they are the best way to treat canine ear infections.”

CJ Puotinen is the author of  The Encyclopedia of Natural Pet Care and Natural Remedies for Dogs and Cats, both of which are available from DogWise. She has also authored several books about human health including Natural Relief from Aches and Pains.

Источник: https://www.whole-dog-journal.com/care/ear-care/chronic-ear-infections-in-canines/

What Are Some Home Remedies for Ear Infections?

Ear infections can be painful. Sometimes they cause a persistent dull pain; other times a sharp burning feeling comes and goes. Most of the time, they’re not anything to worry about. Except that you’ll want the pain to cease.

Here is an overview of traditional approaches to treatment, plus everything you need to know about at-home remedies.

Common Relief Options

The most natural treatment is no treatment at all, or the “watchful waiting” approach. (1)

Doctors may go this route for mild cases of middle ear infection, also known as acute otitis media, in an attempt to allow the immune system to fight off the infection on its own without the help of antibiotics.

“Often we don't need to give antibiotics,” says Sujana S. Chandrasekhar, MD, partner at ENT and Allergy Associates in New York City. Generally, she says ear, nose, and throat doctors will watch the infection for about three days. If the symptoms remain or worsen, then it may be time for antibiotics.

Otitis media with effusion (OME) in particular tends to go away without antibiotics or other treatments. These ear infections are the result of fluid buildup in the middle ear and usually have few symptoms. (1)

Pain Relievers for Earaches

If you or your child is experiencing an infection, you’ll likely want relief from the pain — fast.

For quick relief, your doctor may also suggest reaching for an over-the-counter pain reliever, with or without the addition of antibiotics.

Acetaminophen or ibuprofen could help, though you’ll always want to check with your doctor to be sure. (1)

At-Home Remedies to Treat Ear Infections

Maybe you’re not a fan of pain relievers or antibiotics and want to limit your or your child’s exposure to them.

“Overuse of antibiotics in society in general has caused this growth of bacteria that are now resistant to many types of antibiotics, so we're trying to reel that back in [by not overly prescribing],” Dr. Chandrasekhar says.

Given that, natural, at-home options may come in handy. At least 1 in 10 people with ear pain reports having tried one or more types of alternative medicine before visiting their doctor. (2)

Keep in mind, however, that research supporting these treatments is scarce, and it’s always a good idea to consult with your doctor before trying a new treatment.

Here are six at-home options that may provide some relief:

  • A warm compress Hold a washcloth under warm water and squeeze it to release the extra water. Then, lay it over the ear that’s infected for 20 minutes or so to lessen the pain. (3) A warm water bottle held over the infected ear should also do the trick. (4) “People do the warm compresses simply to try to soothe, to try to draw out the inflammation,” Chandrasekhar says, adding that she does believe it can make people feel a little bit better.
  • Warm olive oil in the ear Chandrasekhar says there’s no proof this works but says it’s okay to try as long as the olive oil isn’t piping hot and there’s no hole in the eardrum. “It may soothe or it may not soothe,” she says. “If there's no swollen eardrum, [olive oil] may not cause any harm whatsoever.”
  • Herbal extract ear drops Drops containing allium sativum, verbascum thapsus, calendula flores, hypericum perforatum, lavender, and vitamin E in olive oil can help children suffering from a middle ear infection that requires active treatment (rather than simply waiting for the pain to diminish over time). One study found these drops to be just as effective as prescription drops. (2)
  • A solution of equal parts rubbing alcohol and vinegar Applying a couple of drops of this solution in the infected ear could help people suffering from repeat infections of swimmer’s ear (medically called otitis externa), which occurs when water gets stuck in the ear canal and bacteria grow. The rubbing alcohol helps the water in the ear evaporate, and the vinegar prevents bacteria from spreading. (5)
  • Blow-drying the ear This method can also help people who routinely suffer from swimmer’s ear (who aren’t always swimmers — simply being out on a windy and rainy day could cause the infection). Pointing a blow-dryer on low heat near the ear can help dry up any leftover moisture in the ear after being out in the elements, pool, or shower. (5)
  • The juice of an onion Several articles and YouTube videos claim that onions are the secret to curing an earache, which is advice that supposedly dates back to the 1800s. Onions contain a flavonoid called quercetin, which has anti-inflammatory properties. One method calls for heating an onion at 450 degrees F for 15 minutes. Then, once it is cool, cut the onion in half and squeeze the juice into a bowl. Put a few drops of the juice into the ear. Or, you could place the onion half directly over the infected ear. (6) Chandrasekhar says it’s “perfectly reasonable [to try it], but give yourself a time limit like, ‘Okay, if it’s still bothering me in three days I’m going to go in to see a doctor,’” she says.

Who At-Home Remedies Are Best For

Chandrasekhar warns not to try a home remedy on a child under the age of 2 because they’re at increased risk of developing complications.

“If the child is fussing when you put them down flat or trying to pull at their ear or if they're screaming when you're trying to feed them, I think bringing them in and listening to your doctor and giving them the antibiotics they need is really important,” she says.

Chandrasekhar is less concerned about older patients who aren’t experiencing other symptoms, like a fever or difficulty eating or drinking.

If none of these at-home options helps relieve pain within a couple of days, it may be time to call your doctor. It’s possible the infection will need antibiotics to heal and leaving it untreated for too long could lead to complications, which can be serious or rarely life-threatening.

Источник: https://www.everydayhealth.com/ear-infection/home-remedies/
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