are avocados good or bad for you

Note: Avocados contain mono- and poly-unsaturated fats – a type of “healthy” fat, which can lower cholesterol and support heart health, if eaten in place of. The good fat boosts your levels of good HDL cholesterol while lowering the bad LDL cholesterol. You have better digestion. Half of an avocado. The avocado is the only fruit that provides a substantial amount of healthy monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). Avocados are a naturally nutrient-dense food and.

: Are avocados good or bad for you

DR JOSE RIVERA
BANK OF AMERICA IN BARSTOW CALIFORNIA
Are avocados good or bad for you
HOME REMEDIES FOR POISON OAK OR IVY
Are avocados good or bad for you

The Delicious Health Food You Can Eat -- and Drink -- at Every Meal

Avocados have been showing up everywhere the past few years -- on menus, in beauty products, and on the many lists of superfoods you should be eating, like, starting yesterday. But is this bumpy green fruit really deserving of all the hype?

In a word: YES. For starters, they're pretty, but more importantly, they’re extremely good for you. Need more reasons to love avocados? Behold:

They've got the good fat

Let's get it out of the way: Avocados are fatty, but not all fats are created equal. The vast majority of the fat in avocados is monounsaturated, which is a polysyllabic way of saying that it can decrease LDL (bad) cholesterol levels and improve new mobile homes for sale las vegas nv heart health.

Nutrient absorption never tasted this good

With avocados, it's all about the smooth, buttery texture and fresh, grassy taste. Nutritional value is just a bonus, which makes the following even more exciting: In addition to offering upwards of 20 vitamins and minerals, including vitamin E (fights free radicals and boosts the immune system) and vitamin K (important for blood clotting and bone health), avocados can help your body better absorb nutrients like beta-carotene from other foods.

They keep you young

It's doubtful that avocados will make you live forever, but studies show that these fabulous fruits (technically, berries) can make your time on Earth a little bit easier. It turns out that the antioxidants found in avocados can protect against the effects of aging, which might explain why people in LA love them so much.

They have their own festival

Most of the avocados we eat here in the United States are Hass avocados grown in California, but there are lots of varieties, including one called Bacon (no relation). If you happen to live in the Golden State, check out the annual California Avocado Festival, which has been around for 30 years and includes musical acts, an avocado auction, and the world’s largest vat of guacamole.

There are countless ways to enjoy them

Guacamole is the gateway appetizing staple that gets most people hooked, but that's just the beginning of the avocado's potential. From simple avocado toast and tasty green smoothies to satisfying salads and sandwiches, the rich, creamy flesh can be incorporated into almost anything, including dessert. People have even proposed using a halved avocado instead of a bun for a burger, and you can wash it all down with avocado beer.

Don't eat the seed (but if you're REALLY into it, you can)

First of all, if you don't know how to remove the seed in the center of the avocado, get on that. Now, a warning: Despite recent claims that we should all be eating avocado seeds, including research showcasing their nutritional value, the California Avocado Commission actually advises against consuming the seed, but mostly because there hasn't been enough research on it.

If you're particularly ambitious, you could use the seed to grow an avocado tree.

Share the love

The best news of all? You can share an avocado with your dog.

Источник: https://www.thrillist.com/health/nation/are-avocados-good-for-you-benefits-of-avocados

Avocado Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits

Some nutrition experts call the avocado a superfood. This flavorful fruit provides health benefits when you add it to your favorite dishes. But when you look at avocado nutrition, you might be surprised.

Not only are avocado calories high, but most of the calories come from fat. So should you include this fruit in a healthy, balanced diet? Many people do, but if you're watching your calorie are avocados good or bad for you fat intake, it's best to consume avocados in moderation.

Avocado Nutrition Facts

One-half of an avocado (100g) provides 160 calories, 2g of protein, 8.5g of carbohydrates, and 14.7g of fat. Avocados are an excellent source of magnesium, potassium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and vitamin K. The following nutrition information is for half of an avocado and is provided by the USDA.

  • Calories: 160
  • Fat: 14.7g
  • Sodium: 7mg
  • Carbohydrates: 8.5g
  • Fiber: 6.7g
  • Sugars: 0.7g
  • Protein: 2g
  • Magnesium: 29mg
  • Potassium: 485mg
  • Vitamin C: 10mg
  • Vitamin E: 2.1mg
  • Vitamin K: 21µg

Carbs

Most of the carbohydrates in an avocado come from fiber. A whole avocado provides about 17 grams of carbohydrate and 13.4 grams of fiber. There is very little sugar in an avocado (less than one gram) and the rest of the carbohydrate in the fruit comes from starch.

The glycemic index for avocado is estimated to be around zero, making it a low-glycemic food.

Fats

A whole avocado provides roughly 30 grams of fat, 4.2 grams of saturated fat, almost 20 grams of monounsaturated fat, and 3.6 grams of polyunsaturated fat. So, while most of the calories in an avocado come from fat, they are mostly in the form of healthier monounsaturated fat.

Monounsaturated fatty acids or MUFAs come from plant sources and may be helpful in lowering your LDL or "bad" cholesterol. For this reason, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends that you choose foods with monounsaturated fats instead of saturated fat.

Is Monounsaturated Fat Good for You?

Protein

Half an avocado provides about 2 grams of protein. While it's not a high-protein food, it can still help you meet your desired protein intake.

Vitamins and Minerals

If you consume a few slices of avocado, it won't provide substantial vitamins or minerals because the amount eaten is so small. But a whole avocado is a good source of vitamins K, E, and C.

Avocado also contains folate, riboflavin, niacin, and create a facebook business account without a personal account acid. Minerals in avocado include magnesium, potassium, copper, manganese, and magnesium. 

Calories

The number of calories in avocado will depend on its size. The avocado nutrition facts shown are for half of a medium-sized avocado, but many avocados are smaller and some can be much larger (up to are avocados good or bad for you grams or more). 

According to the USDA Nutrient Database, there are 322 calories in a larger (200 gram) avocado. In general, an average avocado ranges from 200 to 300 calories according to the Cleveland Clinic.

If you spread a thin layer of avocado are avocados good or bad for you your sandwich or add a small amount to your healthy taco, you are probably consuming roughly 30 grams or about two tablespoons of fruit. 

Summary

Avocados are high in fat, but it's the healthier monounsaturated fat. They also provide a variety of vitamins and minerals without being high in sugar.

Health Benefits

Avocados have been studied extensively, in part, because the Hass Avocado Board funds much of the research. For this reason, it can be tricky to discern whether it is avocados specifically that provide the benefit that is studied. That said, here are a few studies and what they've found.

Improves Diabetes Management

Avocados may provide benefits for people with diabetes. Although they have carbohydrates, their low glycemic index rating of almost zero means that they have little effect on blood sugar. The glycemic index is a scale from 1 to 100, with high numbers indicating foods that raise your blood sugar faster.

Rich in monounsaturated fats, avocados are a healthy choice for those with diabetes, especially when they replace higher-glycemic foods. Some studies have shown that avocado consumption improved glycemic control in subjects with type 2 diabetes. In addition, there is considerable evidence to suggest that high-MUFA diets can also improve metabolic health among individuals with type 2 diabetes.

Reduces Cardiovascular Disease Risk

Several studies have shown that avocado consumption may improve cholesterol levels in some people. Specifically, research has suggested that those who eat avocados have higher levels of HDL cholesterol. Higher levels of HDL cholesterol are associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease.

Prevents Cancer

A 2019 review notes that the avocado seed appears to help protect against cancer thanks to being richer in sterol compounds than the rest of the fruit. However, it is unclear whether it is safe to eat the seed. So, even avocado growers don't recommend it.

Lowers Metabolic Syndrome Risk

After looking at the results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), researchers concluded that avocado consumption was associated with lower metabolic syndrome risk. They also noted a connection between eating avocados and better overall diet quality.

Promotes Weight Loss

Though avocados are high in calories, they still may provide benefits if you are trying to lose weight. The creamy texture and savory taste that comes from (healthy) fat can help you to feel full and satisfied at mealtime. Avocados also provide fiber. Eating foods with fiber can promote satiety.

Studies have shown an association between avocado consumption and are avocados good or bad for you body weight, lower body mass index (BMI), and decreased waist circumference. A few limited studies have also found that regular consumption of avocados may be able to reduce your risk of becoming overweight.

Allergies

While avocado allergy is rare, research indicates that there may be increasing cases of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES)—a non-IgE mediated allergy that impacts the gastrointestinal tract—with avocado being one potential trigger.

People with oral allergy syndrome may also experience an allergic reaction when eating an avocado, also called pollen-food sensitivity syndrome. According to the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, oral allergy syndrome is rarely associated with symptoms beyond the oral cavity, ibc 2018 free online as hives, breathing difficulty, or anaphylaxis.

Adverse Effects

Avocados may decrease the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin). If you are taking the medication, check with your healthcare provider for a personalized recommendation.

Varieties

Many people are familiar with Hass avocados, commonly found at the grocery store. Hass avocados make up 95% of all the avocados eaten in the USA. This variety has skin with a dark, pebbly texture. But there are other varieties as well.

Other varieties include Pinkerton, Reed, Zutano, Bacon, Fuerte, and Gwen. Some of these are larger than the Hass and may have thinner brighter skin. There are 56 types of avocado that come from Florida alone.

When It’s Best

The avocado tree has a long harvest season that sometimes overlaps from one year to the next, so the fruit can be found in most grocery stores year-round. Avocado doesn't begin to ripen until it is picked from the tree.

Storage and Food Safety

When choosing an avocado, use both color and feel to find the best fruit. First, select an avocado with a dark but consistent color. Take it in the palm of your hand and gently squeeze it. If it yields slightly, it is ripe and ready to use.

In general, you can store ripe, uncut avocados in the refrigerator for 2 to 3 days. If you eat your avocado just a tablespoon at a time, use smart storage tips to keep it fresh. Many cooks add lime or lemon juice to the fruit so that they can eat just a small amount and save the rest for later.

To ripen an unripe avocado quickly, place it in a brown paper bag with an apple or banana for 2 to 3 days. You can also freeze an avocado, but it may change the texture of the fruit.

How to Prepare

The hardest part of cooking with avocado can be removing the skin. Use these tips to peel your fruit.

  • Start at the top of the avocado and slice it lengthwise from the top to the bottom, then twist it to pull the two halves apart.
  • To remove the pit, stick the knife into it and twist it out, then discard it. This should are avocados good or bad for you in two halves with the meat of the avocado unmangled.
  • Score the avocado in rows, up and down, and then side to side to make a grid. Now you can scoop out these cubes with a spoon and discard the peel.
  • Your avocado cubes are now ready to what is the per capita income of costa rica Sliced avocado is a great addition to a healthy sandwich or wrap. It provides a creamy texture and allows you to eliminate the butter or mayo. Many people also add avocado to an omelet or on the side of scrambled eggs.

    Recipes

    Healthy Are avocados good or bad for you Recipes to Try

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Bhuyan DJ, Alsherbiny MA, Perera S, et al. The odyssey of bioactive compounds in avocado (Persea americana) and their health benefits. Antioxidants (Basel). 2019;8(10). doi:10.3390/antiox8100426

  2. U.S. Department of Agriculture. FoodData Central. Avocados, raw, all commercial varieties. Published April 1, 2019.

  3. Dreher ML, Davenport AJ. Hass avocado composition and potential health effects. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2013;53(7):738-750. doi:10.1080/10408398.2011.556759

  4. Gordon B. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Choose Healthy Fats. Cibo matto caffe mansfield ma 6, 2019.

  5. Cleveland Clinic. Can You Eat Too Much Avocado?. August 7, 2018.

  6. Ma M, Saitone TL, Sexton RJ. The Hass Avocado Board’s Program to Fund Research into

    the Health and Nutrition Benefits of Consuming Avocados. 2019.

  7. American Diabetes Association. Glycemic Index and Diabetes.

  8. Park E, Edirisinghe I, Burton-Freeman B. Avocado fruit on postprandial markers of cardio-metabolic risk: A randomized controlled dose response trial in overweight and obese men and women. Nutrients. 2018;10(9):1287. doi:10.3390/nu10091287

  9. Qian F, Korat AA, Malik V, Hu FB. Metabolic effects of monounsaturated fatty acid-enriched diets compared with carbohydrate or polyunsaturated fatty acid-enriched diets in patients with type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Diabetes Care. 2016;39(8):1448-1457. doi:10.2337/dc16-0513

  10. Fulgoni VL 3rd, Dreher M, Davenport AJ. Avocado consumption is associated with better diet quality and nutrient intake, and lower metabolic syndrome risk in US adults: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2008. Nutr J. 2013;12:1. 2013 Jan 2. doi:10.1186/1475-2891-12-1

  11. Mahdy Ali K, Wonnerth A, Huber K, Wojta J. Cardiovascular disease risk reduction by raising HDL cholesterol--current therapies and future opportunities. Br J Pharmacol. 2012;167(6):1177–1194. doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.02081.x

  12. Alkhalaf M, Alansari W, Ibrahim E, ELhalwagy M. Anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities of avocado (Persea americana) fruit and seed extract. J King Saud Univers Sci. 2019;31(4):1358-62. doi:10.1016/j.jksus.2018.10.010

  13. California Avocado Commission. Is it safe to eat the avocado seed? Published Mar 30, 2016.

  14. Zhu L, Huang Y, Edirisinghe I, Park E, Burton-Freeman B. Using solano county population avocado to test the satiety effects of a fat-fiber combination in place of carbohydrate energy are avocados good or bad for you a breakfast meal in overweight and obese men and women: a randomized clinical trial. Nutrients. 2019;11(5). doi:10.3390/nu11050952

  15. Heskey C, Oda K, Sabaté J. Avocado intake, and longitudinal weight and body mass index changes in an adult cohort.Nutrients. 2019;11(3):691. doi:10.3390/nu11030691

  16. Khalsa K, Rosloff D, Sundquist B, Jarvinen-Seppo K, Pasha M. Increase in FPIES cases seen in an upstate New York University-based allergy practice. J Allergy Clin Immunology. 2017;139(2):Supp AB54. doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2016.12.127

  17. American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. Why does fruit make my throat swell and itch?.

  18. Norwood D, Parke C, Rappa L. A comprehensive review of potential warfarin-fruit interactions. J Pharm Practice. 2014;28(6):561-71. doi:10.1177/0897190014544823

  19. Colorado Integrated Food Safety Center of Excellence. Avocados.

Additional Reading
  • Avocados: delicious and nutritious. American Diabetes Association. Web. 2016.
Источник: https://www.verywellfit.com/calories-in-an-avocado-3495640
Photo by bd.weld

What is metabolic syndrome, you ask? It's basically a term to describe a handful of health issues including high blood glucose, hypertension, and obesity that can lead to higher risk of diabetes and heart disease—both of which are among the leading causes of death. So yeah, you don't want any part of that stuff. And Iranian researchers who just published their findings in Phytotherapy Research say incorporating avocado in your diet on a daily basis can help fight those aspects of metabolic syndrome.

editedBuckwheatQueen_MeyerLemonAvocadoToast
Meyer Lemon Avocado Toast

How to Tell if an Avocado is Bad

Image titled Tell if an Avocado is Bad Step 1

{"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/d\/d9\/Tell-if-an-Avocado-is-Bad-Step-1-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Tell-if-an-Avocado-is-Bad-Step-1-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/d\/d9\/Tell-if-an-Avocado-is-Bad-Step-1-Version-4.jpg\/aid10353646-v4-728px-Tell-if-an-Avocado-is-Bad-Step-1-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":259,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":410,"licensing":"<div class=\"mw-parser-output\"><p>\u00a9 2021 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is <b>not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.<br>\n<\/p><p><br \/>\n<\/p><\/div>"}

Источник: https://www.wikihow.com/Tell-if-an-Avocado-is-Bad

With their smooth, creamy texture, and huge degree of versatility, avocados have become an increasingly trendy fruit (yes, fruit!) — and for good reason. They're well known for their healthy fats, but avocados also have a ton of fiber. In fact, avocados are packed with often-overlooked nutrients. Read on for more reasons why you should add this Instagram-friendly superfood to your plate more often.

Nutrition Stats

Serving Size: 1/2 avocado

  • 114 calories
  • 6g carbohydrates
  • 1g protein
  • 10.5g total fat (16% DV)
  • 1g saturated fat
  • 5g fiber
  • 0g sugar
  • 345mg potassium (10% DV)
  • 20mg magnesium (5% DV)
  • 6mg vitamin C (10% DV)
  • 0.2mg vitamin B6 (10% DV)

Health Benefits of Avocados

All of the unsaturated fats, fiber, and phytochemicals (biologically active components of plants) in avocados work a lot of magic. Eating them can:

  • Lower LDL cholesterol: Avocados themselves contain no cholesterol and the unsaturated fats they do have may help get "bad" cholesterol in check. According to the Hass Avocado Board, avocados are also the richest known fruit source of phytosterols, important cholesterol-lowering compounds.
  • Boost your heart health: The fats and fiber may help lower your risk of cardiovascular disease.
  • Promote eye, skin, and bone health: Phytochemicals like carotenoids and phytosterols reduce oxidative and inflammatory stress.
  • Promote nutrient absorption: The unsaturated fat in avocados helps increase the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins A, D, K, and E, while the vitamin C helps your body absorb iron and Vitamin D.
  • Improve digestion: Fiber in are avocados good or bad for you helps keep you fuller longer, but avocados are also a good source of a fruit fiber called pectin, which supports a healthy gut.
  • Manage weight and glucose:One small study (supported by the Hass Avocado Board) found that when people replaced carbohydrates with avocado, they felt more satisfied after eating and had better glucose control.

Now that you've got the deets, here are the top questions nutritionists get about avocados, answered:

Are avocados fattening?

Avocados are rich in mono- and poly-unsaturated fats — the healthy kinds that actually reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke. Clinical trials have consistently found that eating avocado can lower your LDL cholesterol and improve lipid and lipoprotein profiles. Just keep in mind that avocados aren’t calorie-free so if you’re trying to lose weight, you might not want to add guacamole to everything.

Getty Images

Will avocados make you gain weight?

Studies have shown that moderate consumption of avocados and other healthy fats can actually promote weight loss through its effect on satiety. The water content and dietary fiber help you feel full, meaning you're less likely to overeat throughout the rest of the day. Try integrating them into a DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) or Mediterranean-style eating plan if you're looking to lose or maintain weight.

How much can I eat and what should I eat them with?

As with most foods, it's important not to go overboard. We recommend keeping serving sizes to 1/4 to 1/2 an avocado per meal or snack, and having no more than one whole avocado per day. But think beyond are avocados good or bad for you toast — there are unique ways to eat them, too! Use avocados to add variety to your meal routine with one of these recipes:

  • Put avocado in your salad to make it more filling
  • Substitute it for mayo in tuna or egg salad sandwiches
  • Make "creamy" pasta sauces (such as avocado pesto)
  • Indulge in avocado chocolate mousse or spicy chocolate muffins
  • Freeze slices and then blend into an avocado smoothie
  • Spice up your backyard barbecue by grilling avocados
  • Mix up an avocado piña colada without adding sugar
  • Serve avocado dip as an alternative to guacamole

Should you eat the pit?

You may have heard that you should eat the seed of an avocado because it contains beneficial antioxidants and fiber. However, the California Avocado Commission does not recommend eating the pit. While preliminary studies have shown that the avocado seed does contain various phytochemicals, studies have only looked at their functional properties in rats, in vitro, or topically. No studies have examined the effects (or safety) of eating the entire pit for humans.

What's the best way to pit, peel, slice and store avocados?

Watch the video below for detailed real-life instructions — or follow these steps:

  1. With a paring knife, cut avocado from top to bottom and around the pit, then twist halves to separate.
  2. Hold the half with the pit in it tightly with a kitchen towel and strike the pit with the blade of a chef's knife.
  3. Twist the blade and pull it away to release the pit from the fruit.
  4. Use the thumb and forefinger that are holding the knife to carefully push the pit off the knife.
  5. To create slices or chunks, use a paring knife to cut through the avocado, but not through the peel, then use a spoon to scoop out the slices.
  6. If you're only using half right now, prevent browning on the other half by brushing it with lime juice, then pressing plastic wrap onto the surface

additional reporting by Jaclyn London, MS, RD, CDN

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto are avocados good or bad for you page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Источник: https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/health/diet-nutrition/a47998/avocado-nutrition/

Are avocados good or bad for you -

Avocado Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits

Some nutrition experts call the avocado a superfood. This flavorful fruit provides health benefits when you add it to your favorite dishes. But when you look at avocado nutrition, you might be surprised.

Not only are avocado calories high, but most of the calories come from fat. So should you include this fruit in a healthy, balanced diet? Many people do, but if you're watching your calorie and fat intake, it's best to consume avocados in moderation.

Avocado Nutrition Facts

One-half of an avocado (100g) provides 160 calories, 2g of protein, 8.5g of carbohydrates, and 14.7g of fat. Avocados are an excellent source of magnesium, potassium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and vitamin K. The following nutrition information is for half of an avocado and is provided by the USDA.

  • Calories: 160
  • Fat: 14.7g
  • Sodium: 7mg
  • Carbohydrates: 8.5g
  • Fiber: 6.7g
  • Sugars: 0.7g
  • Protein: 2g
  • Magnesium: 29mg
  • Potassium: 485mg
  • Vitamin C: 10mg
  • Vitamin E: 2.1mg
  • Vitamin K: 21µg

Carbs

Most of the carbohydrates in an avocado come from fiber. A whole avocado provides about 17 grams of carbohydrate and 13.4 grams of fiber. There is very little sugar in an avocado (less than one gram) and the rest of the carbohydrate in the fruit comes from starch.

The glycemic index for avocado is estimated to be around zero, making it a low-glycemic food.

Fats

A whole avocado provides roughly 30 grams of fat, 4.2 grams of saturated fat, almost 20 grams of monounsaturated fat, and 3.6 grams of polyunsaturated fat. So, while most of the calories in an avocado come from fat, they are mostly in the form of healthier monounsaturated fat.

Monounsaturated fatty acids or MUFAs come from plant sources and may be helpful in lowering your LDL or "bad" cholesterol. For this reason, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends that you choose foods with monounsaturated fats instead of saturated fat.

Is Monounsaturated Fat Good for You?

Protein

Half an avocado provides about 2 grams of protein. While it's not a high-protein food, it can still help you meet your desired protein intake.

Vitamins and Minerals

If you consume a few slices of avocado, it won't provide substantial vitamins or minerals because the amount eaten is so small. But a whole avocado is a good source of vitamins K, E, and C.

Avocado also contains folate, riboflavin, niacin, and pantothenic acid. Minerals in avocado include magnesium, potassium, copper, manganese, and magnesium. 

Calories

The number of calories in avocado will depend on its size. The avocado nutrition facts shown are for half of a medium-sized avocado, but many avocados are smaller and some can be much larger (up to 300 grams or more). 

According to the USDA Nutrient Database, there are 322 calories in a larger (200 gram) avocado. In general, an average avocado ranges from 200 to 300 calories according to the Cleveland Clinic.

If you spread a thin layer of avocado on your sandwich or add a small amount to your healthy taco, you are probably consuming roughly 30 grams or about two tablespoons of fruit. 

Summary

Avocados are high in fat, but it's the healthier monounsaturated fat. They also provide a variety of vitamins and minerals without being high in sugar.

Health Benefits

Avocados have been studied extensively, in part, because the Hass Avocado Board funds much of the research. For this reason, it can be tricky to discern whether it is avocados specifically that provide the benefit that is studied. That said, here are a few studies and what they've found.

Improves Diabetes Management

Avocados may provide benefits for people with diabetes. Although they have carbohydrates, their low glycemic index rating of almost zero means that they have little effect on blood sugar. The glycemic index is a scale from 1 to 100, with high numbers indicating foods that raise your blood sugar faster.

Rich in monounsaturated fats, avocados are a healthy choice for those with diabetes, especially when they replace higher-glycemic foods. Some studies have shown that avocado consumption improved glycemic control in subjects with type 2 diabetes. In addition, there is considerable evidence to suggest that high-MUFA diets can also improve metabolic health among individuals with type 2 diabetes.

Reduces Cardiovascular Disease Risk

Several studies have shown that avocado consumption may improve cholesterol levels in some people. Specifically, research has suggested that those who eat avocados have higher levels of HDL cholesterol. Higher levels of HDL cholesterol are associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease.

Prevents Cancer

A 2019 review notes that the avocado seed appears to help protect against cancer thanks to being richer in sterol compounds than the rest of the fruit. However, it is unclear whether it is safe to eat the seed. So, even avocado growers don't recommend it.

Lowers Metabolic Syndrome Risk

After looking at the results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), researchers concluded that avocado consumption was associated with lower metabolic syndrome risk. They also noted a connection between eating avocados and better overall diet quality.

Promotes Weight Loss

Though avocados are high in calories, they still may provide benefits if you are trying to lose weight. The creamy texture and savory taste that comes from (healthy) fat can help you to feel full and satisfied at mealtime. Avocados also provide fiber. Eating foods with fiber can promote satiety.

Studies have shown an association between avocado consumption and lower body weight, lower body mass index (BMI), and decreased waist circumference. A few limited studies have also found that regular consumption of avocados may be able to reduce your risk of becoming overweight.

Allergies

While avocado allergy is rare, research indicates that there may be increasing cases of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES)—a non-IgE mediated allergy that impacts the gastrointestinal tract—with avocado being one potential trigger.

People with oral allergy syndrome may also experience an allergic reaction when eating an avocado, also called pollen-food sensitivity syndrome. According to the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, oral allergy syndrome is rarely associated with symptoms beyond the oral cavity, such as hives, breathing difficulty, or anaphylaxis.

Adverse Effects

Avocados may decrease the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin). If you are taking the medication, check with your healthcare provider for a personalized recommendation.

Varieties

Many people are familiar with Hass avocados, commonly found at the grocery store. Hass avocados make up 95% of all the avocados eaten in the USA. This variety has skin with a dark, pebbly texture. But there are other varieties as well.

Other varieties include Pinkerton, Reed, Zutano, Bacon, Fuerte, and Gwen. Some of these are larger than the Hass and may have thinner brighter skin. There are 56 types of avocado that come from Florida alone.

When It’s Best

The avocado tree has a long harvest season that sometimes overlaps from one year to the next, so the fruit can be found in most grocery stores year-round. Avocado doesn't begin to ripen until it is picked from the tree.

Storage and Food Safety

When choosing an avocado, use both color and feel to find the best fruit. First, select an avocado with a dark but consistent color. Take it in the palm of your hand and gently squeeze it. If it yields slightly, it is ripe and ready to use.

In general, you can store ripe, uncut avocados in the refrigerator for 2 to 3 days. If you eat your avocado just a tablespoon at a time, use smart storage tips to keep it fresh. Many cooks add lime or lemon juice to the fruit so that they can eat just a small amount and save the rest for later.

To ripen an unripe avocado quickly, place it in a brown paper bag with an apple or banana for 2 to 3 days. You can also freeze an avocado, but it may change the texture of the fruit.

How to Prepare

The hardest part of cooking with avocado can be removing the skin. Use these tips to peel your fruit.

  • Start at the top of the avocado and slice it lengthwise from the top to the bottom, then twist it to pull the two halves apart.
  • To remove the pit, stick the knife into it and twist it out, then discard it. This should result in two halves with the meat of the avocado unmangled.
  • Score the avocado in rows, up and down, and then side to side to make a grid. Now you can scoop out these cubes with a spoon and discard the peel.
  • Your avocado cubes are now ready to use.

Sliced avocado is a great addition to a healthy sandwich or wrap. It provides a creamy texture and allows you to eliminate the butter or mayo. Many people also add avocado to an omelet or on the side of scrambled eggs.

Recipes

Healthy Avocado Recipes to Try

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Bhuyan DJ, Alsherbiny MA, Perera S, et al. The odyssey of bioactive compounds in avocado (Persea americana) and their health benefits. Antioxidants (Basel). 2019;8(10). doi:10.3390/antiox8100426

  2. U.S. Department of Agriculture. FoodData Central. Avocados, raw, all commercial varieties. Published April 1, 2019.

  3. Dreher ML, Davenport AJ. Hass avocado composition and potential health effects. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2013;53(7):738-750. doi:10.1080/10408398.2011.556759

  4. Gordon B. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Choose Healthy Fats. August 6, 2019.

  5. Cleveland Clinic. Can You Eat Too Much Avocado?. August 7, 2018.

  6. Ma M, Saitone TL, Sexton RJ. The Hass Avocado Board’s Program to Fund Research into

    the Health and Nutrition Benefits of Consuming Avocados. 2019.

  7. American Diabetes Association. Glycemic Index and Diabetes.

  8. Park E, Edirisinghe I, Burton-Freeman B. Avocado fruit on postprandial markers of cardio-metabolic risk: A randomized controlled dose response trial in overweight and obese men and women. Nutrients. 2018;10(9):1287. doi:10.3390/nu10091287

  9. Qian F, Korat AA, Malik V, Hu FB. Metabolic effects of monounsaturated fatty acid-enriched diets compared with carbohydrate or polyunsaturated fatty acid-enriched diets in patients with type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Diabetes Care. 2016;39(8):1448-1457. doi:10.2337/dc16-0513

  10. Fulgoni VL 3rd, Dreher M, Davenport AJ. Avocado consumption is associated with better diet quality and nutrient intake, and lower metabolic syndrome risk in US adults: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2008. Nutr J. 2013;12:1. 2013 Jan 2. doi:10.1186/1475-2891-12-1

  11. Mahdy Ali K, Wonnerth A, Huber K, Wojta J. Cardiovascular disease risk reduction by raising HDL cholesterol--current therapies and future opportunities. Br J Pharmacol. 2012;167(6):1177–1194. doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.02081.x

  12. Alkhalaf M, Alansari W, Ibrahim E, ELhalwagy M. Anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities of avocado (Persea americana) fruit and seed extract. J King Saud Univers Sci. 2019;31(4):1358-62. doi:10.1016/j.jksus.2018.10.010

  13. California Avocado Commission. Is it safe to eat the avocado seed? Published Mar 30, 2016.

  14. Zhu L, Huang Y, Edirisinghe I, Park E, Burton-Freeman B. Using the avocado to test the satiety effects of a fat-fiber combination in place of carbohydrate energy in a breakfast meal in overweight and obese men and women: a randomized clinical trial. Nutrients. 2019;11(5). doi:10.3390/nu11050952

  15. Heskey C, Oda K, Sabaté J. Avocado intake, and longitudinal weight and body mass index changes in an adult cohort.Nutrients. 2019;11(3):691. doi:10.3390/nu11030691

  16. Khalsa K, Rosloff D, Sundquist B, Jarvinen-Seppo K, Pasha M. Increase in FPIES cases seen in an upstate New York University-based allergy practice. J Allergy Clin Immunology. 2017;139(2):Supp AB54. doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2016.12.127

  17. American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. Why does fruit make my throat swell and itch?.

  18. Norwood D, Parke C, Rappa L. A comprehensive review of potential warfarin-fruit interactions. J Pharm Practice. 2014;28(6):561-71. doi:10.1177/0897190014544823

  19. Colorado Integrated Food Safety Center of Excellence. Avocados.

Additional Reading
  • Avocados: delicious and nutritious. American Diabetes Association. Web. 2016.
Источник: https://www.verywellfit.com/calories-in-an-avocado-3495640

Whether you prefer spreading it on toast, tossing it onto a salad, slicing it on an Instagram-worthy sandwich, or mashing it up into guacamole, there's no denying that avocado has become a bona fide culinary craze in recent years. And even though avocado does boast so-called "healthy" fats, it is possible to have too much of a good thing. So, what exactly happens when you eat too much avocado? Well, experts say that consistently overdoing it could potentially negate some of the benefits of eating too much avocado over the long term.

"The fat in avocado is primarily monounsaturated, which lowers 'bad' LDL cholesterol, and may increase 'good' HDL cholesterol, reducing the risk of heart disease," says Andres Ayesta, a registered dietitian and founder of Vive Nutrition. "It's also a powerhouse source of nutrients, with high levels of vitamin K, folate, potassium, and many B vitamins."

According to the National Institutes of Health, monounsaturated fats also contain vitamin E, which helps to support your vision as well as a healthy immune system. The American Heart Association notes that by lowering your LDL cholesterol, these fats can also reduce your risk of stroke.

Let's get one thing clear. Fat is not something to be feared—and in fact, is an essential substance that protects your organs, gives you energy, and helps your body better absorb certain vitamins. That said, Ayesta says one medium avocado contains 240 calories and 24 grams of fat—which is pretty eye-opening when you consider that the daily recommended intake for fat is about 44 to 77 grams if you eat 2,000 calories a day.

With that in mind, you might want to reconsider your portions—because these are just some of the side effects you may experience by eating too much avocado. Here's what you should know, and for more healthy tips, be sure to check out our list of The 7 Healthiest Foods to Eat Right Now.

soft boiled egg avocado toast

According to Ayesta, avocado can be a super easy food to overeat because it has a high energy density, meaning that it has a high number of calories in a very small portion.

"Since avocados are a great source of nutrients and healthy fats, there are definitely worse foods to overeat," he explains. "However, as with any food, eating avocados in excess will lead to weight gain. If eating large amounts of avocado in a day results in taking in more calories than an individual burns, the excess energy will be stored as fat. More than the recommended amounts of fats in a day does not add any additional nutritional benefit, even if these are considered 'good' fats."

Whether or not you gain weight will depend on just how frequently you're eating too much avocado, how much fat you're consuming from other foods, and your physical activity level, among other factors. The bottom line, though, is that if you're not burning off those extra calories from fat, your body is going to hang onto it. So, if you're aiming to maintain or lose weight, it may be wise to measure out a portion of avocado so you don't accidentally overload on it. Shena Jaramillo, MS, RD, advises sticking to about 2 ounce-servings, or about 1/4 to 1/3 of a cup.

Here's What Happens to Your Body When You Eat an Avocado.

Avocado toast seeds

Another issue with loading on the avocado? It can be almost too satiating. When too high of a percentage of your calorie intake comes from fat, you're probably neglecting other key nutrients.

"The fat content may displace other nutrients in the meal because you might not feel as hungry to complete your full meal," explains Jaramillo.

In other words, due to the high fat and fiber content in avocado, you may not want to eat other foods—meaning you'll then miss out on the additional nutrients they have to offer.

"Variety is key," says Ayesta. "It's best to have a balance of protein, carbs, and fats at each meal to reach the acceptable ranges for each macronutrient and get all the micronutrients you need in a day."

Speaking of nutrients, This Is Why You Should Get Nutrients From Food, Not Supplements.

avocado healthy fat for healthy smoothie in blender

Just because you aren't allergic to avocados doesn't mean it won't cause an adverse reaction. Avocados contain small-chain carbohydrates called polyols that can have a laxative-like effect when consumed in large quantities. And if you have an avocado intolerance or sensitivity to these natural sugars, you may also experience bloating, gas, or an upset stomach up to 48 hours after eating it.

avocado egg salad toast

"Avocados are a significant source of fiber, with a single avocado providing about half of the daily recommended fiber intake," explains Jaramillo. "While fiber is incredibly important for health (and most Americans aren't getting enough), having too much at one meal can lead to bloating, abdominal pain, and constipation, especially if you're not used to a high fiber diet."

Overloading on fiber can be especially problematic for those with irritable bowel syndrome or other gastrointestinal disorders.

Woman slicing avocado

Although the majority of the fat in an avocado is the monounsaturated kind, this fruit does contain about 3.2 grams of saturated fat per 1-cup serving. That means that roughly 15% of the fat in avocados is saturated. This is worth noting given that consuming too much saturated fat can increase your risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and high cholesterol.

"Saturated fat has been shown to increase inflammation in the arteries after a single meal and lead to heart disease over time," says Ayesta. "However, this isn't a big concern unless you're eating multiple avocados each day."

The bottom line is that the fat provided by avocados is significantly healthier than the kind you'll find in processed or fried foods—but that doesn't mean you're off the hook in terms of minding your portion sizes.

"As with any food choice, it's important to look at avocado intake within the context of someone's overall diet," says Ayesta. "Although the FDA suggests a serving size of 1/3 of a medium avocado, this can't be used as a standard rule that applies to everyone. Someone who needs more calories in a day (based on greater body size, more lean muscle, more physical activity, etc.) will naturally require more fat in a day."

The Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range (AMDR) is a suggested percentage of an individual's daily calories that should come from carbohydrates, fats, and protein. According to Ayesta, that range is 20 to 35% for fat. For example, someone who eats 2,500 calories a day needs 56 to 97 grams of fat daily—whereas someone who only requires 1,600 calories a day should stick to 36 to 62 grams of fat daily. Ideally, though, you also want to be nourishing your body with other healthy fat sources as well in order to reap the widest range of benefits.

"I'd recommend 1/3 to 1/2 an avocado daily, to leave room for fat from other sources, such as nuts, fatty fish, and olive oil," says Ayesta.

And don't forget to space out your fat intake throughout the day, too—Ayesta says this strategy can increase satiety and promote the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K.

Now that you know how much avocado is good to actually have on a daily basis, here are 18 Things You Had No Idea You Could Do with Avocados.

Rebecca Strong

Rebecca Strong is a Boston-based freelance health, wellness, and lifestyle writer who has contributed to INSIDER, HuffPost, Bustle, Elite Daily, POPSUGAR, StyleCaster, and AskMen. Read more

Источник: https://www.eatthis.com/side-effects-eating-too-much-avocado/

What Do Avocados Do to Your Cholesterol?

Can guacamole lower your cholesterol as well as other whole-food fat sources like nuts, or is that just spin by the avocado industry? 

“Avocados are the richest known fruit source of phytosterols,” the cholesterol-lowering nutrients found in plant foods, brags a review sponsored by the HASS Avocado Board. The operative word, though, is fruit. 

Yes, avocados contain more phytosterols compared to other fruit, but phytosterols are fat-soluble substances. Most other fruits hardly have any fat in them at all, so avocados will obviously come out on top compared to other fruit. What if you compare phytosterol content of avocados to nuts and seeds, though? One avocado has about 100 milligrams of phytosterols. On the same scale, sesame seeds and tahini have 400 milligrams; pistachios, pumpkin seeds, and sunflower seeds have about 300; almonds, almond butter, flaxseeds, and macadamia nuts have around 200; and even chocolate has about twice as many phytosterols as avocados, as you can see at 0:51 in my video Are Avocados Good for Your Cholesterol

Even though nuts and seeds have the highest levels of phytosterols overall, the studies that have been done on lowering “bad” LDL cholesterol with phytosterols have used supplements starting with 600 milligrams and going up into the thousands. So, yes, you can lower LDL cholesterol by about 8 percent with a dose of phytosterols around 2,100 milligrams, but that would be 20 avocados a day, as you can see at 1:17 in my video. And 2,100 milligrams of phytosterols would also be a lot of nuts, but you can get an 8 percent drop in LDL by just eating a palmful of nuts, just a single ounce a day, as you can see at 1:36 in my video. So, phytosterols aren’t the only components of nuts responsible for driving down cholesterol. Nuts must have other components, perhaps fiber or other phytonutrients, that contribute to their cholesterol-lowering effects. Might avocados have such components, too? You don’t know until…you put it to the test. 

 As you can see at 2:10 in my video, there are studies dating back more than a half century that appear to show that if you add an avocado to people’s daily diets, their cholesterol drops. When you remove the daily avocados, however, their cholesterol goes back up, and then it drops down again when you add the avocados back in. The data are pretty convincing—until you see how the study was done. The researchers didn’t just add an avocado. They swapped out animal fat. No wonder their cholesterol went down! Rather than a study about cholesterol and avocados, it may have just as well been about cholesterol and being on or off lard—and nearly all the studies on cholesterol and avocados are like this. 

What happened when researchers performed a meta-analysis of ten studies involving hundreds of people? When they put them all together and looked at the results, what did they find? It appears that adding avocados led to a significant drop in cholesterol and triglycerides—an average of about a 17-point drop in bad LDL cholesterol. But, nearly all of the studies were substitution studies, where saturated fat was removed from people’s diets and avocados were substituted in. If you cut down on saturated animal fat, your cholesterol will drop regardless. You can tell this review was not funded by the avocado industry because the researchers point this out, saying that “it is important to note that substituting avocados for saturated dietary fats as opposed to adding avocado to an already established baseline diet poses the greatest benefit.” Simply adding avocado may confer no benefits to cholesterol at all. 

So, yes, the avocado industry is right in saying that avocados are “a healthy substitute for butter / margarine, cheese, cream cheese,” but that’s a pretty low bar. 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

  • Compared with all other fruits, avocados contain more phytosterols, the cholesterol-lowering nutrient found in plant foods, but phytosterols are fat-soluble and most fruits are very low in fat, so it isn’t surprising that avocados top the chart.
  • When comparing phytosterol content of avocados, chocolate, nuts, and seeds, to scale, nuts and seeds have the highest levels overall and even chocolate has roughly twice the phytosterols as avocados.
  • So-called bad LDL cholesterol may be lowered with doses of phytosterols equivalent to around 20 avocados or a single ounce of nuts (around a palmful) a day.
  • Most studies showing that cholesterol drops when a daily avocado is consumed and rises again when avocados aren’t eaten before falling once more when they’re resumed did not only add avocado to the subjects’ diets, but they swapped out animal fat, so it’s no wonder cholesterol went down with avocado consumption.
  • Removing saturated fat from the diet and substituting in avocados may lead to a significant drop in cholesterol and triglycerides, but simply adding avocado without also reducing saturated animal fat intake does not appear to result in any benefits to cholesterol.

What about adding avocado to a plant-based diet? Would there be any benefit then? Learn more:  

Why do we care about cholesterol? See, for example:  

What should we shoot for? See Flashback Friday: Optimal Cholesterol Level.

To learn more about cholesterol-lowering foods, check out The Best Food for High Cholesteroland The Benefits of Kale and Cabbage for Cholesterol.  

In addition to adding cholesterol-lowering foods, we also need to reduce our intake of cholesterol-raising foods. See:  


In health,

Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live presentations:

Discuss


Michael Greger M.D., FACLM

Michael Greger M.D. FACLM

Michael Greger, M.D. FACLM, is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous "meat defamation" trial.

FacebookTwitterYouTubeInstagramPinterest


Источник: https://nutritionfacts.org/2021/08/03/what-do-avocados-do-to-your-cholesterol/

With their smooth, creamy texture, and huge degree of versatility, avocados have become an increasingly trendy fruit (yes, fruit!) — and for good reason. They're well known for their healthy fats, but avocados also have a ton of fiber. In fact, avocados are packed with often-overlooked nutrients. Read on for more reasons why you should add this Instagram-friendly superfood to your plate more often.

Nutrition Stats

Serving Size: 1/2 avocado

  • 114 calories
  • 6g carbohydrates
  • 1g protein
  • 10.5g total fat (16% DV)
  • 1g saturated fat
  • 5g fiber
  • 0g sugar
  • 345mg potassium (10% DV)
  • 20mg magnesium (5% DV)
  • 6mg vitamin C (10% DV)
  • 0.2mg vitamin B6 (10% DV)

Health Benefits of Avocados

All of the unsaturated fats, fiber, and phytochemicals (biologically active components of plants) in avocados work a lot of magic. Eating them can:

  • Lower LDL cholesterol: Avocados themselves contain no cholesterol and the unsaturated fats they do have may help get "bad" cholesterol in check. According to the Hass Avocado Board, avocados are also the richest known fruit source of phytosterols, important cholesterol-lowering compounds.
  • Boost your heart health: The fats and fiber may help lower your risk of cardiovascular disease.
  • Promote eye, skin, and bone health: Phytochemicals like carotenoids and phytosterols reduce oxidative and inflammatory stress.
  • Promote nutrient absorption: The unsaturated fat in avocados helps increase the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins A, D, K, and E, while the vitamin C helps your body absorb iron and Vitamin D.
  • Improve digestion: Fiber in general helps keep you fuller longer, but avocados are also a good source of a fruit fiber called pectin, which supports a healthy gut.
  • Manage weight and glucose:One small study (supported by the Hass Avocado Board) found that when people replaced carbohydrates with avocado, they felt more satisfied after eating and had better glucose control.

Now that you've got the deets, here are the top questions nutritionists get about avocados, answered:

Are avocados fattening?

Avocados are rich in mono- and poly-unsaturated fats — the healthy kinds that actually reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke. Clinical trials have consistently found that eating avocado can lower your LDL cholesterol and improve lipid and lipoprotein profiles. Just keep in mind that avocados aren’t calorie-free so if you’re trying to lose weight, you might not want to add guacamole to everything.

Getty Images

Will avocados make you gain weight?

Studies have shown that moderate consumption of avocados and other healthy fats can actually promote weight loss through its effect on satiety. The water content and dietary fiber help you feel full, meaning you're less likely to overeat throughout the rest of the day. Try integrating them into a DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) or Mediterranean-style eating plan if you're looking to lose or maintain weight.

How much can I eat and what should I eat them with?

As with most foods, it's important not to go overboard. We recommend keeping serving sizes to 1/4 to 1/2 an avocado per meal or snack, and having no more than one whole avocado per day. But think beyond avocado toast — there are unique ways to eat them, too! Use avocados to add variety to your meal routine with one of these recipes:

  • Put avocado in your salad to make it more filling
  • Substitute it for mayo in tuna or egg salad sandwiches
  • Make "creamy" pasta sauces (such as avocado pesto)
  • Indulge in avocado chocolate mousse or spicy chocolate muffins
  • Freeze slices and then blend into an avocado smoothie
  • Spice up your backyard barbecue by grilling avocados
  • Mix up an avocado piña colada without adding sugar
  • Serve avocado dip as an alternative to guacamole

Should you eat the pit?

You may have heard that you should eat the seed of an avocado because it contains beneficial antioxidants and fiber. However, the California Avocado Commission does not recommend eating the pit. While preliminary studies have shown that the avocado seed does contain various phytochemicals, studies have only looked at their functional properties in rats, in vitro, or topically. No studies have examined the effects (or safety) of eating the entire pit for humans.

What's the best way to pit, peel, slice and store avocados?

Watch the video below for detailed real-life instructions — or follow these steps:

  1. With a paring knife, cut avocado from top to bottom and around the pit, then twist halves to separate.
  2. Hold the half with the pit in it tightly with a kitchen towel and strike the pit with the blade of a chef's knife.
  3. Twist the blade and pull it away to release the pit from the fruit.
  4. Use the thumb and forefinger that are holding the knife to carefully push the pit off the knife.
  5. To create slices or chunks, use a paring knife to cut through the avocado, but not through the peel, then use a spoon to scoop out the slices.
  6. If you're only using half right now, prevent browning on the other half by brushing it with lime juice, then pressing plastic wrap onto the surface

additional reporting by Jaclyn London, MS, RD, CDN

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Источник: https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/health/diet-nutrition/a47998/avocado-nutrition/

Eating Avocados Might Help You Live Longer

Do we or do we not walk around all day looking for any excuse to eat more guacamole? That can't just be me, so I'm going to play the odds here and say that this new bit of research is some pretty amazing news for everyone: Eating avocado every day is a great way to prevent metabolic syndrome. An awfully delicious one, too.

editedAvocadoTunaTapas_bd.weld
Avocado Tuna Tapas

1

According to the researchers, bad cholesterol can refer to both oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and small, dense LDL particles.

In a randomized, controlled feeding study, the researchers found that eating one avocado a day was associated with lower levels of LDL (specifically small, dense LDL particles) and oxidized LDL in adults with overweight or obesity.

"We were able to show that when people incorporated one avocado a day into their diet, they had fewer small, dense LDL particles than before the diet," said Penny Kris-Etherton, distinguished professor of nutrition, who added that small, dense LDL particles are particularly harmful for promoting plaque buildup in the arteries. "Consequently, people should consider adding avocados to their diet in a healthy way, like on whole-wheat toast or as a veggie dip."

Specifically, the study found that avocados helped reduce LDL particles that had been oxidized. Similar to the way oxygen can damage food -- like a cut apple turning brown -- the researchers said oxidation is also bad for the human body.

"A lot of research points to oxidation being the basis for conditions like cancer and heart disease," Kris-Etherton said. "We know that when LDL particles become oxidized, that starts a chain reaction that can promote atherosclerosis, which is the build-up of plaque in the artery wall. Oxidation is not good, so if you can help protect the body through the foods that you eat, that could be very beneficial."

While previous research demonstrated that avocados could help lower LDL cholesterol, Kris-Etherton and her colleagues were curious about whether avocados could also help lower oxidized LDL particles.

The researchers recruited 45 adult participants with overweight or obesity for the study. All participants followed a two-week "run-in" diet at the beginning of the study. This diet mimicked an average American diet and allowed all participants to begin the study on similar nutritional "footing."

Next, each participant completed five weeks of three different treatment diets in a randomized order. Diets included a low-fat diet, a moderate-fat diet, and a moderate-fat diet that included one avocado a day. The moderate-fat diet without avocados were supplemented with extra healthy fats to match the amount of monounsaturated fatty acids that would be obtained from the avocados.

After five weeks on the avocado diet, participants had significantly lower levels of oxidized LDL cholesterol than before the study began or after completing the low- and moderate-fat diets. Participants also had higher levels of lutein, an antioxidant, after the avocado diet.

Kris-Etherton said there was specifically a reduction in small, dense LDL cholesterol particles that had become oxidized.

"When you think about bad cholesterol, it comes packaged in LDL particles, which vary in size," Kris-Etherton said. "All LDL is bad, but small, dense LDL is particularly bad. A key finding was that people on the avocado diet had fewer oxidized LDL particles. They also had more lutein, which may be the bioactive that's protecting the LDL from being oxidized."

The researchers added that because the moderate-fat diet without avocados included the same monounsaturated fatty acids found in avocados, it is likely that the fruit has additional bioactives that contributed to the benefits of the avocado diet.

Kris-Etherton said that while the results of the study -- published in the Journal of Nutrition -- are promising, there is still more research to be done.

"Nutrition research on avocados is a relatively new area of study, so I think we're at the tip of the iceberg for learning about their health benefits," Kris-Etherton said. "Avocados are really high in healthy fats, carotenoids -- which are important for eye health -- and other nutrients. They are such a nutrient-dense package, and I think we're just beginning to learn about how they can improve health."

make a difference: sponsored opportunity


Story Source:

Materials provided by Penn State. Original written by Katie Bohn. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Li Wang, Ling Tao, Lei Hao, Todd H Stanley, Kuan-Hsun Huang, Joshua D Lambert, Penny M Kris-Etherton. A Moderate-Fat Diet with One Avocado per Day Increases Plasma Antioxidants and Decreases the Oxidation of Small, Dense LDL in Adults with Overweight and Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Trial. The Journal of Nutrition, 2019; DOI: 10.1093/jn/nxz231

Cite This Page:

Penn State. "One avocado a day helps lower 'bad' cholesterol for heart healthy benefits." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 October 2019. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191028104136.htm>.

Penn State. (2019, October 28). One avocado a day helps lower 'bad' cholesterol for heart healthy benefits. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2021 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191028104136.htm

Penn State. "One avocado a day helps lower 'bad' cholesterol for heart healthy benefits." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191028104136.htm (accessed November 28, 2021).


Источник: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191028104136.htm

When You Eat Too Much Avocado, This Is What Happens

Avocados are a healthy, nutrient-dense superfood linked to a number of important health benefits. Packed full of fiber and nutrients, avocados can help improve digestion, lower cholesterol, and reduce the risk of heart disease. But can you have too much of a good thing? Like any food, it's best to eat avocados in moderation (via Health).

Although avocados are rich in vitamins, fiber, and healthy fats, they're also high in calories. One avocado can contain 250 to 320 calories, depending on the size. That's 10 to 20% of your daily recommended calorie intake. Avocados also contain more than 20 grams of fat. While avocados are full of monounsaturated fats, which are considered healthy fats, you still don't want to overdo it. The daily recommended fat intake is 44 to 77 grams per day, and consuming too much fat can contribute to weight gain. That being said, eating a third of an avocado or even a whole one every day is perfectly healthy and safe.

Источник: https://www.healthdigest.com/396447/when-you-eat-too-much-avocado-this-is-what-happens/

0 Replies to “Are avocados good or bad for you”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *