but i know the plans i have for you

“For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope. 1. Jeremiah 29:11. "For I know the plans I have for you," declares the LORD, "plans to prosper you and not to. For I know the plans I have for you," declares the LORD, "plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. but i know the plans i have for you

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But i know the plans i have for you -

Why Jeremiah 29:11 Doesn’t Mean What You Think

A COMMON MISUNDERSTANDING

After my athlete died, I experienced a slew of emotions. I was angry at God for allowing it to happen. I felt guilty because I didn’t notice she was gone. I became impatient with my athletes and “Why?” was a question that constantly plagued my thoughts.

As athletes, we expect pain in our sports. We willingly put strain on our muscles because we know the pain will pay off. I can’t count the number of times I’ve said, “Pain is just weakness leaving the body.”

Yet pain outside our sport is unacceptable. We can’t believe this pain will somehow benefit us.

Ironically, Jeremiah wrote these words to God’s people who were in exile. Not only were they exiled, but it was God who sent them there.

It is often believed that as a Christian, our life will be all rainbows and butterflies. But when we turn to the Bible, we see that is not the case for any follower of Christ. It was not even the case for Christ Himself while He was on earth.

James makes it clear in his book that we will face trials (James 1:2) and Peter tells us not to be surprised by the trials that come our way (1 Peter 4:12). Although they faced many trials, these disciples of Jesus had the bigger picture in mind.

Sometimes trials are of our own doing; sometimes they’re the work of Satan; sometimes they’re just an effect of living in a broken world. Regardless of the source, they’re always an opportunity to know God better.

SO WHAT DOES PROSPERITY MEAN TO GOD?

True Biblical prosperity comes when we are in a relationship with God, when we are walking with Him and getting to know Him better.

If we look at the Bible as a whole, not just pieces here and there, we see God constantly calling His people into a relationship with Himself. Instead of shielding them from hard times, He draws closer to them in the midst of trials.

Time and time again, we see Christians then and now enduring hardships joyfully. It’s not because they enjoy pain, but because they believe everything is going to be okay. They may not know when or how, but they trust God and have a peace knowing He sees beyond the pain.

We hope and long for what we consider “good” things, but God has a hope and a future full of great things. Our finite minds cannot fathom the things God has in store for us in heaven.

SEEING THE DETAILS FROM A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE

What if we imagined our lives as a puzzle?

As we go through our lives, God gives us pieces of our puzzle. Sometimes He gives us a piece that fits nicely with the other ones we have. But sometimes He gives us a dark piece that doesn’t seem to fit with the others.

We try to make sense of it, but the fact of the matter is we can’t see the full picture of our lives. We don’t hold the puzzle box. God does.

The Bible gives us a snapshot of the unfolding plan of God and our lives are small pieces of a much larger puzzle. As we understand that, we realize we have a loving God who has a long term plan to prosper us and not harm us. He is our hope and our future.

So when we’re given a piece that doesn’t make sense, we trust God that this piece wasn’t given to us by mistake—it was given to us because it is necessary for the bigger picture.

LEARNING FROM TRIALS

My friend experienced a new piece of God’s character – His protection.

It turned out she had a partially torn Achilles tendon and had she continued to race, she would have torn it completely and she would not be able to run any more. She would not be preparing for the 2016 Olympic Trials.

Her relationship with God is stronger today than it was four years ago.

I experienced a different slice of God’s character. I saw His compassion through His people as they stepped up to care for me and my other athletes.

In experiencing that compassion, I was able to extend it to the other athletes as I listened to their pain. This opened the doors to many spiritual conversations.

My relationship with God grew stronger.

I don’t know if that was one of God’s intended outcomes of her death. I know some of her family and friends have unanswered questions and have struggled with the reality of her death.

Over the years I’ve tried to stop asking God, “Why?” Instead, I strive to ask questions like, “What are you trying to teach me?” or “How can I use this to bring you glory?”

I may not have all the answers, but I serve a God who does. As I anticipate the trials yet to come, I will remember the words I once heard, “When faced with the unknowns, I look to a God who is known.”

Источник: https://athletesinaction.org/articles/why-jeremiah-2911-doesnt-mean-what-you-think/
by The Salvation Army

In a world of over seven billion people, it’s easy to feel small—to feel as if our day-to-day lives aren’t worth much, especially when we’re drowning in a sea of the mundane. Yet God has a purpose and a plan for each and every one of us. We all have unique gifts and talents. We all have unique perspectives, certain friend groups, and various workplaces. God uses this rich diversity to carry out his will, and his plans are always bigger, bolder, and better than anything we could ever imagine.

When you start to feel small, we hope these encouraging bible verses will remind you of God’s plan for your life. Although you may feel that your life is ordinary, in the hands of our maker the extraordinary is always possible.

1. Jeremiah 29:11

"For I know the plans I have for you," declares the LORD, "plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future."

2. Esther 4:14

Perhaps you were born for such a time as this.

3. Romans 8:28

And we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose.

4. Psalm 33:11

The plans of the LORD stand firm forever, the purposes of His heart through all generations.

5. Jeremiah 1:5

Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, and before you were born I consecrated you; I appointed you a prophet to the nations.

6. 2 Peter 3:9

The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. Instead he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance.

7. Psalm 32:8

I will instruct you and teach you in the way you should go; I will counsel you with my eye upon you.

8. Proverbs 3:5-6

Trust in the LORD with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight.

To worship with The Salvation Army Silicon Valley, click here for a list of times and locations. We also encourage you to read our blog post on 7 Inspiring Bible Verses for When You're Waiting.

Источник: https://siliconvalley.salvationarmy.org/silicon_valley/news/8-encouraging-verses-about-gods-plan-for-your-life/

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Todd Fields

For I Know the Plans (Jeremiah 29:11-13)

For I know the plans I have for you,
Declares the Lord, declares the Lord,
For I know the plans I have for you,
Declares the Lord, declares the Lord,

Plans to prosper you and not to harm you,
Plans to give you hope and a future.
For I know the plans I have for you,
Declares the Lord, declares the Lord,

Then you will call on me
And come and pray to me,
And I will listen, listen to you.

For I know the plans I have for you,
Declares the Lord, declares the Lord,
For I know the plans I have for you,
Declares the Lord, declares the Lord,
Plans to prosper you and not to harm you,
Find more lyrics at ※ Mojim.com
Plans to give you hope and a future.
For I know the plans I have for you,
Declares the Lord, declares the Lord,
And You will seek me and find me
When you seek me with all your heart.

Yeah.

Plans to prosper you and not to harm you,
Plans to give you hope and a future.
For I know the plans I have for you,
Declares the Lord, declares the Lord,

Then you will call on me
And come and pray to me,
And I will listen, listen to you.



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Mojim.com
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Источник: https://mojim.com/usy126787x3x4.htm

It’s written on graduation cards, quoted to encourage a person who can’t seem to find God’s well and doled out like a doctor explaining a prescription: Take Jeremiah 29:11 a few times, with a full glass of water, and call me in the morning. I think you’ll feel better.

“‘For I know the plans I have for you,’ declares the Lord, ‘plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future’” Jeremiah 29:11 tells us—possibly one of our most beloved, yet most misunderstood, verses in the entire Bible.

Sure, it might make a person feel better, but this verse as we often prescribe it is being taken completely out of context. It doesn’t mean what people think it means. It’s time to back up and see what the author of Jeremiah is actually saying.

When it comes to reading the Bible, we can sometimes be so familiar with the words on the page that we read them, but we don’t really understand them. We see the words and hear the words, but we don’t make any sense out of them. Familiarity can breed laziness, and so many of our misunderstandings about the scriptures happen because we are too familiar with the passage to look it with fresh eyes. If we would come to the Word of God with fresh eyes more often, we would realize that some of our most common interpretations of Scripture passed down to us don’t make much sense when viewed within the context of the passage.

Like any author worth his salt, the writer in Jeremiah begins by stating the subject of the passage: “This is what the Lord Almighty, the God of Israel, says to all those I carried into exile from Jerusalem to Babylon … “ (Jeremiah 29:4).

This verse, quoted to countless individuals who are struggling with vocation or discerning God’s will, is not written to individuals at all. This passage is written to a whole group of people—an entire nation. For all the grammarians out there, the “you” in Jeremiah 29:11 isn’t singular, it’s plural. And you don’t have to be a Hebrew scholar to realize that “one” versus “many” is a big difference.

And the verse just before it is perhaps even scarier. For in Jeremiah 29:10, God lays down the specifics on this promise: that He will fulfill it “after seventy years are completed for Babylon.” In other words, yes, God says, I will redeem you—after 70 years in exile. This is certainly a far cry from our expectation of this verse in what God’s plans to prosper us really mean. He did have a future and a hope for them—but it would look far different than the Israelites ever expected.

So what? Some of you may be thinking. Even when the verse is taken out of context, it still offers value, right? God does know the plans of individual people, so it’s just as well to keep prescribing Jeremiah 29 for those seeking God’s plan for their life, right? Well, yes and no.

We need to let the Bible speak to us, not allow our own personal bent to speak into the Scriptures. If Jeremiah 29 is speaking to the nation of Israel, and not just one person, then we should start with the truth in the Scriptures. Context matters—God speaks at a particular moment in time, to a particular people group, for a reason.

What this means is that God has plans for a whole group of people, namely the nation of Israel. And if we read on in the Scriptures we find that this promise was fulfilled: those in exile returned, and the nation of Israel was restored for a time. God made a promise through the prophets, and that promise came true.

But that’s not the end of the story, either. There is something to the out-of-context prescriptions that so many make using this verse. God is a God of redemption, after all, and He wants to redeem people and put them on a path of wholeness, just as He wanted the nation of Israel to be redeemed and whole again.

As John Calvin says about this passage, the prophet is speaking not just of historical redemption, for that period in time, but also of “future redemption.” For the Israelites, God listened to their prayers when they sought Him with all their heart, and in His time, He brought them out of exile.
But how does any of this apply to us today? Can we still take heart in such a beautiful promise—even though it was spoken to people long ago, people in a far different situation than ours?

First and foremost, we are all in this together. This verse does not apply to isolated individuals or to a broad community. It applies to both, together, functioning as one. The image painted here is one of individuals in community, like the Body of Christ which Paul talks about. Here are a bunch of people, worshiping God together, hoping for a future redemption.

The theologians Stanley Grenz and John Franke explain in their book Beyond Foundationalism just how a community “turns the gaze of its members toward the future.” The future in Jeremiah is one that is bright—one that everyone in the community through prayer and worship seeks as their collective future hope. Many of us want to desperately know the plan that God has for each one of us as individuals, but let the prophet Jeremiah remind us that it’s not all about us, and it might not look like what we think.

Even more important than our decision about which college to attend, which city to move to or what job offer to take is the future hope of the Kingdom of God foretold by the prophets and fulfilled in the reign of our now and coming King. In this way, the promise of Jeremiah 29:11 is bigger than any one of us—and far better.

Thomas TurnerИсточник: https://www.relevantmagazine.com/faith/stop-taking-jeremiah-2911-out-context/

This article is part of the What Does It Mean? series.

For I know the plans I have for you, declares the LORD, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope.—Jeremiah 29:11

Understanding the Context

If you were to take a poll on the most well-known verse in Jeremiah, there is a good chance that Jeremiah 29:11 would rank near the top, if not at the very top. This verse is commonly found on bumper stickers, signs, cards, etc., placed there to encourage people to have hope for the future that God will work things out for them. But is that really what this well-known verse means?

The starting point for determining the meaning of any verse from the Bible is understanding the surrounding context. Jeremiah was a prophet who served during the final days before Judah was taken into exile by the Babylonians, and his ministry continued throughout much of the time that the Jews remained in exile. The book of Jeremiah is a collection of his prophetic oracles that God spoke to and through him throughout his ministry.

Jeremiah 29 records a letter that the prophet wrote to the exiles living in Babylon (Jer. 29:1–3). Some of the exiles had already been living in Babylon for nearly eight years, while others had just recently arrived. Jeremiah instructs them to get busy in establishing their new lives in Babylon by doing ordinary things like build houses, plant gardens, marry, and bear children; indeed, they are even to seek the welfare of Babylon while they are there (Jer. 29:4–7). They should ignore the so-called prophets who are claiming the exile will be brief because God has not spoken to them or sent them (Jer. 29:8–9). Rather than being brief, their exile will last seventy years. And only then will God fulfill his promise and bring them back to the land (Jer. 29:10).

What Is Good?

That brings us to verse Jeremiah 29:11. Look at it again. God promises to fulfill his plans of doing good for his people. What is the nature of that plan and that good? Verses Jer. 29:12–14 tell us. God will answer the prayers of his people. When they seek God they will find him. God will restore them from their exile to the land that he has promised them.

God still speaks to us today through a promise he made to the Jewish people while in exile.

Therefore, in its original context, Jeremiah 29:11 is God’s promise to Jews living in exile in Babylon. So does that mean it does not apply to us as believers today? Understanding the larger context of the biblical story from Genesis to Revelation helps us see that the answer is yes, it does! As believers, God’s plan for us is to bring us into the new heavens and new earth that he has promised (Rev. 21–22). In the meantime, we live as exiles and sojourners here on this earth (1 Pet. 1:1; 2:11), waiting for the new creation in which righteousness dwells (2 Pet. 3:13). Jesus invites us to ask God in prayer and it will be given to us, to seek him and we will find him (Matt, 7:7). God promises that he will work all things for the eternal good of his people (Rom. 8:28), even the suffering he ordains for us (Rom. 8:18).

Understood within the larger context of the Bible, God still speaks to us today through a promise he made to the Jewish people while in exile. Once we understand the nature of God’s plans for us as believers and the nature of the good he promises to do us, we can confidently apply the heart of this promise to our lives today.

Matthew S. Harmon is the author ofJeremiah: A 12-Week Study.


Matthew S. Harmon

Matthew S. Harmon (PhD, Wheaton College) is professor of New Testament studies at Grace Theological Seminary in Winona Lake, Indiana. He was previously on staff with Cru for eight years and is the author of several books. He also co-hosts the Various and Sundry podcast. Matthew and his wife, Kate, live in Warsaw, Indiana, and have two sons.


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Источник: https://www.crossway.org/articles/what-does-jeremiah-2911-mean/

God Knows the Plans

The late Chadwick Boseman provides words of inspiration to college graduates about finding purpose in life.


“For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the LORD, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.” Jeremiah 29:11, NIV

Although the above words were initially intended to reassure those that had been carried into exile from Jerusalem to Babylon that they’d be brought back from captivity, they also provide comfort and encouragement in the present day for anyone that worries about what the future holds for them. And, thanks to all of the recent news stories about the state of the economy, not to mention all the reports of shocking acts of violence and natural disasters, many people are probably not only wondering—but worrying—about the future.

I usually think of myself as an optimistic person, however, I must admit that on more than a few occasions, I’ve worried about how I’d handle a particular situation or how it might turn out. Fortunately, it was during some of those times that I felt as though God was reaching out to me in a special way through the words found in Jeremiah 29:11. This is why it’s become one of my favorite scriptures.

The first time I felt God was speaking to me through this verse was right before I was scheduled to take a trip on an airplane. For some reason, I’d become terrified of doing something I had been doing since I was about six years old. I’d never had any bad experiences while flying, so I’m not sure why I was so scared that particular time. I just was. That’s why I was so happy that I came across Jeremiah 29:11 in the days leading up to that trip. I felt as if God was trying to tell me to go ahead and take the trip and trust that I’d be safe. I did go on that trip, and it was a safe and enjoyable one.

This verse also ministered to me was when I was sitting in a breast surgeon’s office trying to figure out if I should have a biopsy done. As my husband, Vince, and I sat in this Christian doctor’s office listening to her explain how routine it would be and how quickly it could be completed, I couldn’t help but fear she might find something bad or, worse yet, that I might not make it through the procedure. But, before I could tell her I needed to think about it more, she stopped talking and turned around the nameplate resting on her desk and asked me to read the Scripture verse that was taped to the back of it. Can you guess what it was? Yes, Jeremiah 29:11. I had no idea that we shared a fondness for this scripture, but when I read it, I knew everything would be fine. The procedure was uneventful and results of the biopsy were normal.

That same scripture spoke to me again a few years later on the day that my husband and I moved back to Illinois—along with our then-infant daughter—after residing on the East Coast for several years. I was extremely happy about the fact that I’d again be living near my parents and my sister and her growing family. But, I hadn’t really thought about the fact that I’d be leaving behind the church family that had showered us with love during the four years we lived in New Jersey.

Since my husband was one of the staff ministers at the church, the other ministers and their wives threw a special farewell luncheon for us. Near the end of the luncheon, they presented gifts to each of us. My husband’s gift—a personalized black briefcase—was a very nice one and came in handy when he started teaching undergrads several weeks later. However, the decorative little plaque that contained a Bible verse that I received was priceless. And, you may be able to figure out why. Yes, the scripture inscribed on the plaque was my favorite one. The gift served as the perfect reminder that, even as I left the amazing church family that I had come to love and made the switch from career woman to stay-at-home-mom, God would be with me. And, since I’d never told any of them about my fondness for that scripture, I saw it as a true gift from above.

So, if you’re going through an unsettling situation or circumstance, don’t despair. Instead, reflect on the words of Jeremiah 29:11 and think about how they might apply in your life right now.

And remember this: God has unique plans for all of our lives. They may not always line up with the pictures we’ve sketched in our own minds or the life plans we’ve drafted for ourselves, but they are special because He created them just for us. And, because of this, He will enable us and empower us to handle any situation and accomplish any task that He places in our lives.

I also hope you’ll remember that we serve a merciful, gracious, trustworthy, and loving God. Sometimes we spend far too much time thinking about all the ways God is going to punish our sin and nearly not enough time thinking about and giving thanks for all the ways He has blessed us.

Sometimes God will speak to us by repeatedly placing in front of our faces a particular scripture, and sometimes He’ll use other people to get a particular message to us. But, regardless of how He chooses to speak to you, I pray you’ll never stop desiring to hear from Him. So, don’t spend a lot of time worrying or fretting over how you’ll handle something that you’re currently or soon may be going through; God is already handling it for you, His unique and precious child.

Источник: https://urbanfaith.com/2021/10/god-knows-the-plans.html/

It’s written on graduation cards, quoted to encourage a person who can’t seem to find God’s well and doled out like a doctor explaining a prescription: Take Jeremiah 29:11 a few times, with a full glass of water, and call me in the morning. I think you’ll feel better.

“‘For I know the plans I have for you,’ declares the Lord, ‘plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future’” Jeremiah 29:11 tells us—possibly one of our most beloved, yet most misunderstood, verses in the entire Bible.

Sure, it might make a person feel better, but this verse as we often prescribe it is being taken completely out of context. It doesn’t mean what people think it means. It’s time to back up and see what the author of Jeremiah is actually saying.

When it comes to reading the Bible, we can sometimes be so familiar with the words on the page that we read them, but we don’t really understand them. We see the words and hear the words, but we don’t make any sense out of them. Familiarity can breed laziness, and so many of our misunderstandings about the scriptures happen because we are too familiar with the passage to look it with fresh eyes. If we would come to the Word of God with fresh eyes more often, we would realize that some of our most common interpretations of Scripture passed down to us don’t make much sense when viewed within the context of the passage.

Like any author worth his salt, the writer in Jeremiah begins by stating the subject of the passage: “This is what the Lord Almighty, the God of Israel, says to all those I carried into exile from Jerusalem to Babylon … “ (Jeremiah 29:4).

This verse, quoted to countless individuals who are struggling with vocation or discerning God’s will, is not written to individuals at all. This passage is written to a whole group of people—an entire nation. For all the grammarians out there, the “you” in Jeremiah 29:11 isn’t singular, it’s plural. And you don’t have to be a Hebrew scholar to realize that “one” versus “many” is a big difference.

And the verse just before it is perhaps even scarier. For in Jeremiah 29:10, God lays down the specifics on this promise: that He will fulfill it “after seventy years are completed for Babylon.” In other words, yes, God says, I will redeem you—after 70 years in exile. This is certainly a far cry from our expectation of this verse in what God’s plans to prosper us really mean. He did have a future and a hope for them—but it would look far different than the Israelites ever expected.

So what? Some of you may be thinking. Even when the verse is taken out of context, it still offers value, right? God does know the plans of individual people, so it’s just as well to keep prescribing Jeremiah 29 for those seeking God’s plan for their life, right? Well, yes and no.

We need to let the Bible speak to us, not allow our own personal bent to speak into the Scriptures. If Jeremiah 29 is speaking to the nation of Israel, and not just one person, then we should start with the truth in the Scriptures. Context matters—God speaks at a particular moment in time, to a particular people group, for a reason.

What this means is that God has plans for a whole group of people, namely the nation of Israel. And if we read on in the Scriptures we find that this promise was fulfilled: those in exile returned, and the nation of Israel was restored for a time. God made a promise through the prophets, and that promise came true.

But that’s not the end of the story, either. There is something to the out-of-context prescriptions that so many make using this verse. God is a God of redemption, after all, and He wants to redeem people and put them on a path of wholeness, just as He wanted the nation of Israel to be redeemed and whole again.

As John Calvin says about this passage, the prophet is speaking not just of historical redemption, for that period in time, but also of “future redemption.” For the Israelites, God listened but i know the plans i have for you their prayers when they sought Him with all their heart, and in His time, He brought them out of exile.
But how does any of this apply to us today? Can we still take heart in such a beautiful promise—even though it was spoken to people long ago, people in a far different situation than ours?

First and foremost, we are all in this together. This verse does not apply to isolated individuals or to a broad community. It applies to both, together, functioning as one. The image painted here is one of individuals in community, like the Body of Christ which Paul talks about. Here are a bunch of people, worshiping God together, hoping for a future redemption.

The theologians Stanley Grenz and John Franke explain in their book Beyond Foundationalism just how a community “turns the gaze of its members toward the future.” The future in Jeremiah is one that is bright—one that everyone in the community through prayer and worship seeks as their collective future hope. Many of us want to desperately know the plan that God has for each one of us as individuals, but let the prophet Jeremiah remind us that it’s not all about us, and it might not look like what we think.

Even more important than our decision about which college to attend, which city to move to or what job offer to take is the future hope of the Kingdom of God foretold by the prophets and fulfilled in the reign of our now and coming King. In this way, the promise of Jeremiah 29:11 is bigger than any one of us—and far better.

Thomas TurnerИсточник: https://www.relevantmagazine.com/faith/stop-taking-jeremiah-2911-out-context/
Devotionals Revelation 4:8 And the four beasts had each of them six wings about him; and they were full of eyes within: and they rest not day and night, saying, Holy, holy, holy, Lord God Almighty, which was, and is, and is to come. His hand created earth and God holds the future in His hands. It can be a scary, uncertain place; but God says, “I will never leave you; never will I forsake you. In the unexpected events of life, you can trust God. What we get from Scripture is not a matter of what the human author has devised, but is exactly what the Holy Spirit intended. We want to know our future may be for our comfort, our security, our advantages, especially for financial gain, etc. I am encouraged, I am comforted, and I am grateful – My future is in God’s hands! Yes, my future is in His hands! So I will keep on Trusting God one day at a time. Dear Lord, my future is in your hands. Our heavenly Father will be with us tomorrow to care for us. Humans will be in the process of ruining the earth when God steps in and stops them. Vaughan, James Rowe, a song that touches on: Faith, God: Knowledge, God: Sovereignty. "Bless are all who fear the Lord and who walk in His way" Psalm 128:1 God's Will Be Done Gods Plan The Future God's Will Free Will tomorrow The Bible will. *Verses* Jeremiah 29:11, NIV For I know the plans I have for you, says the Lord. O Lord, you are the God of all heaven and earth; God is the Lord of all! 8/9/2015 · God holds our future, and it's very good! You know the scripture, ‘he who is in you is greater than he who is in the world. You swear by the LORD’s name and praise the God of Israel, but you are not honest or sincere. Trust Him when he blesses you and not to become self-sufficient. God knows the fate and outcome of each and every man. His but i know the plans i have for you strength can carry your load. For example, many business people go to fortune tellers every year to know what the market will look for the following year 18/1/2019 · God Holds Our Future. 1 Weary Rest; 2 O Wondrous Love ; 3 Christmas Morning; 4 Copeland; 5t Dear Friends, Farewell; 5b Always Something New; 6 Babel’s Streams; 7 Jehovah is My God; 8 Creation; 9 Session Six: God Holds the Future In our group Session Six on Starter Bible we think about some of the other letters of the New Testament besides those by Paul. Kristen Deede Johnson. Ruth 4:11-22 11 Then the elders and all the people standing in the gate replied, “We are witnesses! May the Lord make this woman who is 3/1/2020 · God holds the future in His hands. You can be confident that God holds the future. We know not what tomorrow hides, Of sun or storm or good or ill; We only know His dear hand guides, And He will be our Father still. After the success of our four years of National Days of Prayer in Ukraine, and the next one to be in Kiev on June 8th, people ministering there have told me that the whole spiritual atmosphere in the nation has changed 24/11/2021 · “ So the land quakes and writhes, For the plans of the Lord against Babylon stand, To make the land of Babylon A desolation without inhabitants. Press alt + / to open this menu. INSPIRATI 1. Jul 12, 2017 · Never forget: God knows the future, and your future is safe in God’s hands! Find below 15 Inspirational, Motivational, Uplifting & Encouraging Bible Verses about God knowing the future below, and BE ENCOURAGED. We trust the “ending” to the One who wrote the beginning. His compassion you will feel every day. The Future encouraging Praise. In doing that it will determine whether our future will be secure and will have God’s blessing on it. God is the Absolute Being - the "I am. Two things are the subjects of meditation in the first two verses of this psalm - the Divine independence, and the Divine relations. 17/11/1996 · So last week the writer helps us hold fast our hope by telling us that it is based on two unchangeable things: God’s promise and God’s oath to bless us forever. For a human being, the future can only, at best, be guessed at. 18/1/2019 · God Holds Our Future. As you approach the year ahead, don’t allow your heart and mind to be filled with dread. But they know not the thoughts but i know the plans i have for you the But i know the plans i have for you, neither understand they his counsel: for he shall gather them as the sheaves into the floor. made with Faithlife Proclaim. 12/7/2017 · See also: 15 Encouraging Bible Verses about God Knowing the Future. His is faithful and good. But Jesus teaches us to live in God’s presence one day at a time and deal with each problem when it comes—through prayer. As the eternal, omniscient God, He has lived our yesterdays, our todays, and our tomorrows, the past, present, and future. 2. They are plans for good and not for disaster, to Genesis 1:1-31 ESV / 3 helpful votesNot Helpful. Kelly Price singing -“I know who holds Tomorrow” this song is a constant reminder that I dont have to worry 12/12/2017 · When we have the choice between good options concerning careers, jobs, places to live, and the like, we can decide confidently knowing that God wants our holiness regardless of our context. A thousand years later, Zoroastrianism, the world’s first great monotheistic religion, was the official faith of God Holds Our Future. Let us be as Joshua was and declare: “As for me and my house, we will serve the LORD. Below is a video of a song that I think and meditate on often. You are but i know the plans i have for you Israel, and you come from the family of Judah. Live Boasting Guidance And Strength God's Plan For Us God, Sovereignty Of Submission To God's Will Kept Alive By God God Willing. The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep. 12/12/2017 · When we have the choice between good options concerning careers, jobs, places to live, and the like, we can decide confidently knowing that God wants our holiness regardless of our context. " God is in gracious, voluntary, relations - the "God of Abraham, of God gave Zechariah a glimpse into the future, of Christ’s Incarnation and His Second Coming, to help people, including you and me, know that our labor today is not in vain, everything He calls us to be and do is a part of a larger masterpiece He is creating which will culminate in His eternal kingdom – God holds the future! If you are uncertain about your future, you can be sure of the One who Holds your future even in the midst of chaos or uncertainty. Contrary to what doomsday prophets say, God assures us that our planet Earth will never be destroyed. Then we have a short extract from Revelation which speaks of God’s total control of the future. Indeed, Psalm 37 is an extremely informative Hebrew text and is well-known as an alphabetic psalm. But for the bigger picture of life, you can trust God. — Psalm 104:5; Ecclesiastes 1:4. 25/2/2011 · I do not know what the future holds for this summer, but I am trusting God. I said 26/4/2021 · God is the only One who can stand at the beginning and accurately declare the end. God is also eternal ( Psalm 90:2 but i know the plans i have for you. If we pursue holiness 1. I know Lord, that no 26/4/2021 · No difficulty is greater than our great God. Instead, you ought to say, “If the Lord wills, we will live and also do this or that. ” (v. ’ Did you ever wonder what it meant? (1 John 4. With a new dawn over the horizon, and the Lord to lead the way, you can spread your wings like an eagle and soar through GOD's Hands Holds Our Future. Posted on March 19, 2020. God has a moral 7/1/2019 · In this regard it is interesting to note that several Psalms address the question of the future (e. Michael Cariño Scripture: Haggai 2:20-23 We are not the first to face a new year besieged by fears, worries, source Links for God Holds the Future in His Hands by James D. ” — Tracie Peterson. 27 WALLPAPERS 4 POINTS. You call yourselves people of the holy city, and you depend on the God of Israel, who is named the LORD All-Powerful. god holds our future

Источник: http://sungroupinternational.com/0ycxvp/god-holds-our-future.html

Why Jeremiah 29:11 Doesn’t Mean What You Think

A COMMON MISUNDERSTANDING

After my athlete died, I experienced a slew of emotions. I was angry at God for allowing it to happen. I felt guilty because I didn’t notice she was gone. I became impatient with my athletes and “Why?” was a question that constantly kimber micro 9 owb holster my thoughts.

As athletes, we expect pain in our sports. We willingly put strain on our muscles because we know the pain will pay off. I can’t count the number of times I’ve said, “Pain is just weakness leaving the body.”

Yet pain outside our sport is unacceptable. We can’t believe this pain will somehow benefit us.

Ironically, Chase business credit card no personal guarantee wrote these words to God’s people who were in exile. Not only were they exiled, but it was God who sent them there.

It is often believed that as a Christian, our life will be all rainbows and butterflies. But when we turn to the Bible, we see that is not the case for any follower of Christ. It was not even the case for Christ Himself while He was on earth.

James makes it clear in his book that we will face trials (James 1:2) and Peter tells us not to be surprised by the trials that come our way (1 Peter 4:12). Although they faced many trials, these disciples of Jesus had the bigger picture in mind.

Sometimes trials are of our own doing; sometimes they’re the work of Satan; sometimes they’re just an effect of living in a broken world. Regardless of the source, they’re always an opportunity to know God better.

SO WHAT DOES PROSPERITY MEAN TO GOD?

True Biblical prosperity comes when we are in a relationship with God, when we are walking with Him and getting to know Him better.

If we look at the Bible as a whole, not just pieces here and but i know the plans i have for you, we see God constantly calling His people into a relationship with Himself. Instead of shielding them from hard times, He draws closer to them in the midst of trials.

Time and time again, we see Christians then and now enduring hardships joyfully. It’s not because they enjoy pain, but because they believe everything is going to be okay. They may not know when or how, but they trust God and have a peace knowing He best food areas in nyc beyond the pain.

We hope and long for what we consider “good” things, but God has a hope and a future full of great things. Our finite minds cannot fathom the things God has in store for us in heaven.

SEEING THE DETAILS FROM A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE

What if we imagined our lives as a puzzle?

As we go through our lives, God gives us pieces of our puzzle. Sometimes He gives us a piece that fits nicely with the other ones we have. But sometimes He gives us a dark piece that doesn’t seem to fit with the others.

We try to make sense of it, but the fact of the matter is we can’t see the full picture of our lives. We don’t hold the puzzle box. God does.

The Bible gives us a snapshot of the unfolding plan of God and our lives are small pieces of a much larger puzzle. As we understand that, we realize we have a loving God who has a long term plan to prosper us and not harm us. He is our hope and our future.

So when we’re given a piece that doesn’t make sense, we trust God that this piece wasn’t given to us by mistake—it was given to us because it is necessary for the bigger picture.

LEARNING FROM TRIALS

My friend experienced a new piece of God’s character – His protection.

It turned out she had a partially torn Achilles tendon and had she continued to race, she would have torn it completely and she would not be able to run any more. She would not be preparing for the 2016 Olympic Trials.

Her relationship with God is stronger today than it was four years ago.

I experienced a different slice of God’s character. I saw His compassion through His people as they stepped up to care for me and my other athletes.

In experiencing that compassion, I was able to extend it to the other athletes as I listened to their pain. This opened the doors to many spiritual conversations.

My relationship with God grew stronger.

I don’t know if that was one of God’s intended outcomes of her death. I know some of her family and friends have unanswered questions and have struggled with the reality of her death.

Over the years I’ve tried to stop asking God, “Why?” Instead, I strive to ask questions like, “What are you trying to teach me?” or “How can I use this to bring you glory?”

I may not have all the answers, but I serve a God who does. As I anticipate the trials yet to come, I will remember the words I once heard, “When faced with the unknowns, I look to a God who is known.”

Источник: https://athletesinaction.org/articles/why-jeremiah-2911-doesnt-mean-what-you-think/

“I know the plans I have for you.”

Recently, I was visiting miwam www michigan gov uia someone who helps pregnancy centers share about the miraculous work God does through centers like ours. When I asked to hear one of their all-time favorite stories of impact, I heard this remarkable story that I hope will encourage you as much as it did me.

I’d just recently become the receptionist and one of my jobs was to occasionally be present for ultrasounds as a third-party observer. In one of the first few appointments I observed, I was waiting on the nurse and visiting with an 18-year-old woman who was particularly scared in the face of her unexpected pregnancy.

While the nurse was preparing next door, I felt the Lord prompting me to share a passage from Scripture. I but i know the plans i have for you sure it was my place, but the Spirit’s nudge was so clear, I finally said to the young woman, “Do you know when things feel really out of control in my life, there’s a verse from the Bible that brings me assurance and comfort. May I share it with you?” When she agreed, I shared Jeremiah 29:11: “‘For I know the plans I have for you,’ declares the LORD, ‘plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope but i know the plans i have for you a future.'”

“I just felt the Lord wanted you to hear that,” I added. Then, the nurse came back in and performed the sonogram. When the young woman left that day, she remained undecided about what to do, and despite repeated attempts to reach her, we never heard from her again.

I never forgot that young woman. And 19 years later, I was in the supermarket when I spotted someone who looked familiar. After passing her a couple times in different aisles, she approached me and quietly asked, “Do you remember me?”.

Then, it hit me. She was the woman I’d spoken briefly with in that pregnancy center appointment almost two decades ago. “I do remember you,” I replied. “I’ve prayed for you several times since then, and I’ve never forgotten you. How are you doing?”

The woman’s eyes lit up. “Wait here!” and she disappeared for a couple minutes. When she returned, she was accompanied by a tall, muscular young man looking sharp in his white military uniform. “I’d like you to meet my son,” she beamed. “His name is … Jeremiah.”

She said that the words and verse that God had prompted me to share nearly 20 years ago were a big part of what gave her the courage to parent her now 18-year-old son.

With your help, we currently perform more than 700 ultrasounds a year at Life Network. Despite our best efforts to follow up, there are some clients that we never hear from again after their ultrasound appointment. But we know that if we obediently share what God calls us to when they are with us, the rest is up to Him. Sometimes, like with Jeremiah, we get sweet affirmation much later that the care your support and prayers enable us to provide is used by God in truly remarkable ways.

If you would like ot see where God does the miraculous daily and learn more about opportunities to serve with us, next Thursday, July 29, at 6:30pm is our next “Sneak Peek” – where we provide a tour, an overview of Life Network and details on volunteer openings. For more information or to register, email our volunteer coordinator Kristin at [email protected]

Thank you for your faithful support to help ensure the lives of moms, dads, students and babies in our community are mightily valued.

To God be the glory,

Источник: https://www.elifenetwork.com/i-know-the-plans-i-have-for-you/

This article is part of the What Does It Mean? series.

For I know the plans I have for you, declares the LORD, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope.—Jeremiah 29:11

Understanding the Context

If you were to take a poll on the most well-known verse in Jeremiah, there is a good chance that Jeremiah 29:11 would rank near the top, if not at the very top. This verse is commonly found on bumper stickers, signs, cards, etc., placed there to encourage people to have hope for the future that God will work things out for them. But is that really what this well-known verse means?

The starting point for determining the meaning of any verse from the Bible is understanding the surrounding context. Jeremiah was a prophet who served during the final days before Judah was taken into machias savings bank bangor by the Babylonians, and his ministry continued throughout much of the time that the Jews remained in exile. The book of Jeremiah is a collection of his prophetic oracles that God spoke to and through him throughout his ministry.

Jeremiah 29 records a letter that the prophet wrote to the exiles living in Babylon (Jer. 29:1–3). Some of the exiles had already been living in Babylon for nearly eight years, while others had just recently arrived. Jeremiah instructs them to get busy in establishing their new lives in Babylon by doing ordinary things like build houses, plant gardens, marry, and bear children; indeed, they are even to seek the welfare of Babylon while they are there (Jer. 29:4–7). They should ignore the so-called prophets who are claiming the exile will be brief because God has not spoken to them or sent them (Jer. 29:8–9). Rather than being brief, bankoh hawaiian airlines visa exile will last seventy years. And only then will God fulfill his promise and bring them back to the land (Jer. 29:10).

What Is Good?

That brings us to verse Jeremiah 29:11. Look at it again. God promises to fulfill his plans of doing good for his people. What is the nature of that plan and that good? Verses Jer. 29:12–14 tell us. God will answer the prayers of his people. When they seek God they will find him. God will restore them from their exile to the land that he has promised them.

God still speaks to us today through a promise he made to the Jewish people while in exile.

Therefore, in its original context, Jeremiah 29:11 is God’s promise to Jews living in exile in Babylon. So does that mean it does not apply to us as believers today? Understanding the larger context of the biblical story from Genesis to Revelation helps us see that the answer is yes, it does! As believers, God’s plan for us is to bring us into the new heavens and new earth that he has promised (Rev. 21–22). In the meantime, we live as exiles and sojourners here on this earth (1 Pet. 1:1; 2:11), waiting for the new creation in which righteousness dwells (2 Pet. 3:13). Jesus invites us to ask God in prayer and it will be given to us, to seek him and we will find him (Matt, 7:7). God promises that he will work all things for the eternal good of but i know the plans i have for you people (Rom. 8:28), even the suffering he ordains for us (Rom. 8:18).

Understood within the larger context of the Bible, God still speaks to us today through a promise he made to the Jewish people while in exile. Once we understand the nature of God’s plans for us as believers and the nature of the good he promises to do us, we can confidently apply the heart of this promise to our lives today.

Matthew S. Harmon is the author ofJeremiah: A 12-Week Study.


Matthew S. Harmon

Matthew S. Harmon (PhD, Wheaton College) is professor of New Testament studies at Grace Theological Seminary in Winona Lake, Indiana. He was previously on staff with Cru for eight years and is the author of several books. He also co-hosts the Various and Sundry podcast. Matthew and his wife, Kate, live in Warsaw, Indiana, and have two sons.


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Crossway but i know the plans i have for you a not-for-profit Christian ministry that exists solely for the purpose of proclaiming the gospel through publishing gospel-centered, Bible-centered content. Learn more or donate today at crossway.org/about.

Источник: https://www.crossway.org/articles/what-does-jeremiah-2911-mean/
by The Salvation Army

In a world of over seven billion people, it’s easy to feel small—to feel as if our day-to-day lives aren’t worth much, especially when we’re drowning in a sea of the mundane. Yet God has a purpose and a plan for each and every one of us. We all have unique gifts and talents. We all have unique perspectives, certain friend groups, and various workplaces. God uses this rich diversity to carry out his will, and his plans are always bigger, bolder, and better than anything we could ever imagine.

When you start to feel small, we hope these encouraging bible verses will remind you of God’s plan for your life. Although you may feel that your life is ordinary, in the hands of our maker the extraordinary is always possible.

1. Jeremiah 29:11

"For I know the plans I have for you," declares the LORD, "plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future."

2. Esther 4:14

Perhaps you were born for such a time as this.

3. Romans 8:28

And we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose.

4. Psalm 33:11

The plans of the LORD stand firm forever, the purposes of His heart through all generations.

5. Jeremiah 1:5

Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, and before you were born I consecrated you; I appointed you a prophet to the nations.

6. 2 Peter 3:9

The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. Instead he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance.

7. Psalm 32:8

I will instruct you and teach you in the way you should go; I will counsel you with my eye upon you.

8. Proverbs 3:5-6

Trust in the LORD with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight.

To worship with The Salvation Army Silicon Valley, click here for a list of times and locations. We also encourage you to read our blog post on 7 Inspiring Bible Verses for When You're Waiting.