can you get benefits for anxiety

There are also VA disability benefits available to veterans as well for anxiety disorders. In today's post, we will go over some of. If the symptoms become severe, you may experience an anxiety attack, also called a panic attack. What are the signs of an anxiety attack or panic attack? An. Employment Insurance (EI) sickness benefits can provide you with up to 15 weeks of Find out if you have employer-paid sick leave.

: Can you get benefits for anxiety

Can you get benefits for anxiety
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What evidence do I need to be approved for disability with anxiety?






 
First, before we discuss the anxiety disability listing, here are resource links about being approved for disability and medical evidence.

1. Medical Evidence Used on a Social Security Disability or SSI Claim
2. Qualifications for Disability Benefits and the Types of Evidence Social Security Looks at
3. Questions about Social Security Disability Approvals and Being Approved
4. Tips for Getting Disability Approved When you File with Social Security

Social Security has an impairment listing for anxiety disability determinations.

Impairment listing 12.06 Anxiety-Related Disorders provides the medical criteria needed to meet the severity requirement of disability.



The anxiety disorder must be either a predominant disturbance or experienced when the individual attempts to overcome symptoms. For instance, when an individual is confronting a dreaded object or situation in a phobic disorder, or when resisting obsessions or compulsions in obsessive compulsive disorders. orange and rockland spring valley ny

A. You must have a medically documented finding of at least one of the following:

www regions com online sign in 1.Generalized persistent anxiety along with three out of four of the following symptoms:

a. Motor tension
b. Autonomic hyperactivity
c. Apprehensive expectation
d. Vigilance and scanning

2. Persistent irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that results in a compelling desire to avoid the dreaded object, activity or situation.

3. Recurrent severe panic attacks demonstrated by a sudden unpredictable onset of intense apprehension, fear, terror, and sense of impending doom occurring on the average of at least once a week.

4. Recurrent obsessions or compulsions that are a source of severe distress.

5. Recurrent and intrusive recollections of a traumatic experience, which is a source of extreme distress.

AND

B. Resulting in at least two of the following.

1. marked restriction of activities of daily living
2. marked difficulties in maintaining social functioning
3. marked difficulties in maintaining concentration, persistence, or pace
4. repeated episodes of decompensation, each of extended duration.

OR

C. Resulting in complete inability to function independently outside the area of one�s home.

There are several ways your anxiety condition can meet or equal the severity of the anxiety impairment listing. A well documented history of medical treatment for anxiety that includes a diagnosis, prognosis, response to medication, and an opinion as to the limitations caused by your anxiety will be most helpful for your disability claim.

It should be pointed out, though, that most individuals who are approved for SSD or SSI are not approved through a listing as listing requirements are very specific.

Being approved for disability without satisfying a listing

If you cannot be awarded disability for anxiety through the listing, it may be possible to win benefits after an evaluation of your medical history and work history. The work history would be examined to find out what your past jobs required of you both physically and mentally to determine A. your skills and B. whether those skills transfer to other kinds of jobs. Your medical history is assessed to learn what you are still functionally capable of doing. This is known as residual functional capacity.

If your current limitations are more than what your past work required you to do, it is possible to be approved for disability. The evaluation of your claim, however, would also have to show that your skills do not transfer to other types of work. This type of approval is called a medical vocational allowance.

More about Anxiety disorder

Anxiety disorder is a nervous system disorder that affects the emotional state. Anxiety disorder causes anxious, fearful emotions that are usually thought of as irrational, meaning they are worries that are not based on factual information.

The cause of anxiety disorder is not fully understood. Doctors think the cause is linked to neurotransmitters in the brain, such as norepinephrine and serotonin, but they also acknowledge that it is likely that anxiety disorder stems from an intricate web of causes including genetics, environment, life experiences and the body�s biological processes.

The signs and symptoms of anxiety disorder are quite varied, from irritability, muscle tension, shortness of breath, stomachache, feeling on edge and being easily distracted to diarrhea, panic attacks and headache. Many people experiencing anxiety disorder feel extremely anxious, as if an impending �doom� is right around the corner, as if something bad can you get benefits for anxiety about to happen though there is no reason for the fear.

The term anxiety disorder covers a variety of different types of disorders; the most common are generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, social anxiety disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder.

General anxiety disorder is when the worries and fears are general and not focused on one particular object, event or reason.

Panic disorder is diagnosed when the patient suffers �attacks� of intense terror that cause dizziness, difficulty breathing, shaking, confusion and nausea. These attacks usually last ten minutes or less, but can sometimes last much longer.

Social anxiety disorder, also known as social phobia, is when the fear of being embarrassed can you get benefits for anxiety humiliated causes extreme anxiety, sometimes to the point that normal life is interrupted. Many with social anxiety disorder do not want to leave the house for fear of being judged negatively by society.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder is an anxiety disorder that is marked by repetition and ritualistic behavior. Usually this obsession or compulsion is a way to relieve anxiety or nervousness. Those with obsessive-compulsion disorder often have upsetting and repetitive thoughts and images play in their mind. Many times they feel compelled to do certain things in certain ways to keep bad things from happening. Often this will include common things like checking to make sure the door is locked, obsessing over personal items or arranging things in a certain way.

Post-traumatic stress disorder is an anxiety disorder that is usually the result of a traumatic experience, from warfare or violence to extreme stress. Those with the disorder may avoid certain places or things in order to not increase their anxiety.

Diagnosis for anxiety disorder includes an assessment/questionnaire, family history, reports from the patient and a medical examination. Those with anxiety disorder oftentimes also have symptoms of clinical depression and vice-versa. Treatment can include congnitive behavioral therapy and/or medications such as anti-anxiety medication, antidepressants and beta-blockers. Some people choose natural and alternative treatments such as acupuncture, hypnotherapy and relaxation techniques.

To help prevent anxiety disorder get plenty of rest, eat a balanced, healthy diet, engage in physical activity, eliminate caffeine, avoid alcohol and drugs and take time to relax and de-stress. Some people report that yoga, meditation, deep breathing exercises and relaxation techniques have helped their anxiety.







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Источник: https://www.ssdrc.com/condition-anxiety-disorder.html

How Do Veterans Establish VA Service Connection for Depression and Anxiety?

Generally speaking, there are three basic elements of service connection.  First and foremost, veterans must have a current diagnosis of the condition (i.e., depression, anxiety).  From there, veterans must show evidence of an in-service event, injury, or illness.  Finally, veterans must provide a medical nexus linking the current, diagnosed condition to the in-service occurrence.  Oftentimes a veteran is diagnosed with depression and anxiety, but they still need to establish that these conditions are related to something that happened during their time in service.  Importantly, veterans do not need to establish a “stressor” (i.e., a traumatic event).  Instead, evidence of an in-service stressor is only required when establishing service connection for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).  When it comes to claims for depression and anxiety, veterans may point to psychological symptoms that manifested during or shortly after service and continue into present day.

Common Ways Depression and Anxiety Can Be Related to Military Service

Importantly, in-service causes of depression and anxiety do not have to be due to a military activity.  Rather, the cause merely needs to have happened during service.  Oftentimes veterans are experiencing problems not directly related to the military that still affect their functioning during service.  For example, if a veteran is deployed to another country and they are experiencing problems with their family at home, they might become depressed and anxious over their inability to be with their family while stationed abroad.  Again, as long as the factors causing the veteran’s symptomatology, or the symptomatology itself, manifested during service, they are eligible for service connection.

Secondary Service Connection for Depression can you get benefits for anxiety Anxiety

Service connection for depression and anxiety may also be established on a secondary basis.  In this case, an already service-connected condition aggravates or causes the veteran’s depression and/or anxiety.  For example, if the veteran is service-connected for a very can you get benefits for anxiety back condition, it is possible that they will develop depression due to the chronic pain and limitations on activities of daily living.  When filing for secondary service connection, providing a nexus opinion is especially important.  The nexus between the veteran’s primary service-connected condition and their secondary condition must be clearly established in order to be granted secondary service connection for the latter.

Do Veterans Have to File Separate VA Claims for Depression and Anxiety?

Importantly, VA recognizes that veterans are not qualified psychological experts.  Therefore, it is unreasonable to expect veterans to be certain of their exact mental health diagnosis.  Veterans can only attest to their symptomatology and how it affects them on a daily basis.  Clemons v. Shinseki (2009) held that a service connection claim for one psychiatric condition (e.g., PTSD) must be considered a claim for any psychiatric condition that may be reasonably raised by several factors (e.g., the veteran’s description of the claim and/or symptoms, evidence submitted by the veteran or obtained by VA).  In other words, if there are other psychological diagnoses on record, VA is required to consider whether those diagnoses are related to a veteran’s service even if the veteran best places to buy bathing suits in store not specifically file claims for those conditions.  In short, veterans do not have to file separate VA claims for depression and anxiety.

How Does VA Diagnose or Evaluate a Veteran’s Depression and Anxiety for VA Disability Benefits?

From a diagnostic perspective, VA relies on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) to rate all mental health conditions.  Again, for PTSD there is criterion requiring a stressor ; however, depressive and anxiety disorders have separate diagnostic criteria.  As long as the veteran’s particular symptoms meet the frequency, duration, and severity outlined for those conditions in the DSM-5, they should receive proper diagnoses.  Once a diagnosis is reached, VA will apply the General Rating Formula for Mental Health Conditions found under 38 CFR § 4.130.

The possible disability ratings are: 0, 10, 30, 50, 70, and 100 percent.   All mental health disability ratings are based on the severity of the condition and the resulting level of social and occupational impairment.

0% VA Rating for Depression and Anxiety

The 0 percent rating is reserved for a very mild presentation of psychopathology.  If VA awards a 0 percent rating for depression or anxiety, it has determined that the veteran has a qualifying diagnosis, but the symptoms do not result in functional impairment or require medication.  Importantly, a 0 percent disability rating is non-compensable, meaning the veteran will not receive monthly payments for that condition.

10% VA Rating for Depression and Anxiety

A 10 percent disability rating also represents a less severe form of depression or anxiety.  The veteran may experience mild periods of high stress resulting in minor social and occupational impairment.  However, the condition does not cause any major functional impairment and can be managed with medication.

30% VA Rating for Depression and Anxiety

The 30 percent rating criterion for depression and anxiety are also meant to represent mild symptomatology.  In this case, “occasional decrease in work efficiency and intermittent periods of inability to perform occupational tasks” might mean that the veteran is starting to periodically miss work due to their lack of motivation associated with their mental health condition.  However, their depression and/or anxiety does not fully prevent them from performing and succeeding in a work environment.  Furthermore, they may occasionally isolate themselves as a result of their depressed mood and anxiety.  Nonetheless, they are still able to maintain relationships with others.  Can you get benefits for anxiety, a 30 percent VA disability rating for depression and anxiety is assigned when a veteran presents with these symptoms in a mild manner, intermittently over time.

 50% VA Rating for Depression and Anxiety

The 50 percent rating criterion involves an escalation in the frequency, duration, and severity of symptomatology.  Furthermore, there are several additional symptoms included in this criterion that were not included in lower ratings.  If veterans receive a 50 percent rating for depression and/or anxiety, it is likely that they are beginning to display more noticeable cognitive deficits such as difficulty following instructions or making decisions that depart from past behavior.  Additionally, some of the mood-associated symptomatology may begin to manifest in physiological ways, such as a flattened affect.  In other words, due to feelings of depression, veterans might speak in a monotonous tone and lack facial expressions.  Overall, the level of occupational and social impairment also increases as part of the 50 percent rating.  Here, the symptoms mentioned above cause a decrease in veterans’ ability to efficiently complete work-related tasks.

70% VA Rating for Depression and Anxiety

The 70 percent disability rating criterion for depression and anxiety is the most inclusive insofar as it represents a wide array of symptoms, including a progression of symptoms noted in the lower disability ratings.  A veteran who receives a 70 percent rating for depression and/or anxiety may suffer from all of the symptoms included in the 50 percent rating, but at a higher frequency, duration, and severity.  Here, the veteran is almost always in a state of panic or depression that affects their ability to interact with others.  The veteran may also have trouble controlling their emotions in a way that leads to violent outbursts or conflicts with others.  The level of social and occupational impairment may be evidenced by the veteran’s inability to hold down a job or complete classes for school.

100% VA Rating for Chest workouts for men at home and Anxiety

The 100 percent rating is often difficult to obtain through VA because it requires a veteran’s symptoms to be so severe that they are totally impaired and unable to function in everyday life.  While the symptoms listed in the 70 percent rating criterion involve a high level of impairment, the jump to 100 percent remains significant.  There is often a substantial decline in cognitive and emotional functioning as compared to the rating criteria for lower percentages.  Importantly, this decline results in total impairment when it comes to a veteran’s work life and personal life.  An intermittent inability to perform activities of daily living can involve a veteran feeling too depressed to get out of bed, take a shower, or change clothes.

Self-injurious behaviors and suicide attempts are consistent with a 100 percent rating.  In addition to thoughts and tendencies toward self-harm, a 100 percent rating for depression and/or anxiety also includes homicidal ideation in which a veteran may have thoughts of harming others.    All of these symptoms and behaviors are consistent with the highest level of impairment reflected by the 100 percent rating criterion.

Do Veterans Get Separate VA Ratings for Mental Health Conditions?

VA’s General Rating Formula for Mental Health Conditions is meant to apply to a variety of psychiatric diagnoses.  Veterans are not going to receive separate disability ratings for each mental health condition.  Instead, they are going to receive a single disability rating under this formula that considers and accommodates all of their particular symptoms.  For example, both depressed mood and anxiety are listed as symptoms in the rating criteria.  Therefore, it is not a matter of getting separate ratings for each condition, but rather a matter of figuring out the severity of those symptoms and determining what the rating should be based on the level of social and occupational impairment that is present.

However, this is not to say that certain mental health conditions cannot first national bank of america lansing rated separately if deemed appropriate; for example, VA does have a separate set of criteria for eating disorders outside of the General Rating Formula.  As such, there are certain circumstances where separate ratings may be involved, but they are few and far between.  For the most part, mental health conditions are going to be rated together.

100% Individual Unemployability (TDIU)

In some cases, a veteran’s depression and anxiety are so severe that they are unable to secure and maintain substantially gainful employment.  Here, veterans can apply for total disability based on individual unemployability (TDIU) benefits.  Importantly, TDIU provides monthly compensation at the 100 percent level even if a veteran’s combined disability rating is less than 100 percent.  In theory, a veteran may be underrated for depression and anxiety at 50 or 70 percent.  However, if they can show that they are unable to work as a result of their depression and anxiety, they may be entitled to TDIU.

Evidence to Support Your VA Claim

Medical evidence is critical in claims for mental health conditions.  Submitting wells fargo propel payment address medical records or medical records can you get benefits for anxiety VA facilities is one way for veterans to demonstrate (1) the frequency, duration, and severity of their condition(s), and (2) how such symptomatology affects their daily functioning.  In addition, veterans may submit lay evidence on their own behalf, or from friends and family members.  Lay statements serve to outline in detail the onset and progression of the veteran’s condition.  Individuals close to the veteran who can attest to how the veteran’s condition affects their daily life should robert f kennedy jr cousins drafting a lay statement for submission.  Overall, having a statement that provides a clear, accurate picture of the veteran’s symptomatology and how it impairs their day to day life can be extremely helpful.

Are You a Can you get benefits for anxiety in Crisis or Know of One?

Please be advised, VA has implemented the Veteran Crisis Line equipped with specially trained responders ready to help veterans 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.  The Veterans Crisis Line connects service members and veterans in crisis, as well as their family members and friends, with qualified, caring VA responders through a confidential toll-free hotline, online chat, or text messaging service.  Veterans can access the Crisis Line in any of the following ways:

  • Dial 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1 to talk to someone
  • Send a text message to 838255 to connect with a VA responder
  • Start a confidential online chat session at VeteransCrisisLine.net/Chat
  • Take a self-check quiz at VeteransCrisisLine.net/Quiz to learn whether stress and depression might be affecting you
  • Find a VA facility near you
  • Visit MilitaryCrisisLine.net if you are an active duty service member, guardsman, or reservist

If you or someone you know is currently experiencing a crisis, please seek assistance through the resources listed above.

Источник: https://cck-law.com/blog/va-disability-rating-for-depression-and-anxiety/

Does an Anxiety Disorder Qualify Me For Social Security Benefits?

Generalized anxiety disorder is a common form of anxiety disorder that isn’t based on fear of a single object or event. Symptoms can include:

  • Excessive anxiety or worry, lasting at least 6 months and happening more days than not
  • Difficulty controlling worry
  • Restlessness or feeling “keyed up” or “on edge”
  • Being easily fatigued
  • Difficulty concentrating/mind going blank
  • Irritability
  • Muscle tension
  • Sleep disturbance (difficulty falling or staying asleep)

Panic disorder, unlike generalized anxiety, means that you suffer from intense episodes of extreme anxiety (lasting between 1-20 minutes, though some can require medical intervention, and some people experience bbva wallet sign in of panic attacks). Common symptoms of a panic episode include:

  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Sweating
  • Dizziness
  • Shortness of breath
  • Trembling
  • Uncontrollable fear
  • Hyperventilation
  • The sensation of choking
  • Chest pain
  • Nausea
  • Numbness or tingling
  • Chills or hot flashes
  • The sense of altered reality
  • Thoughts of impending doom

People who suffer from panic disorder may experience symptoms of a panic attack even outside of these episodes.

Phobia–an intense, irrational fear–can affect people in several ways. Social phobia, or social raymour and flanigan credit card pay by phone disorder, results from a crippling fear of social situations and leads people to avoid these situations or have panic attacks while in such situations. Specific phobias result from a single panic trigger, such as spiders zelle app pnc elevators, and lead to the person avoiding these triggers or reacting to them with a panic attack.

Agoraphobia is a fear of being in an open environment or one in which you have little control. It can be triggered by open spaces, crowds, or simply by being outside of a comfort area such as the home. Some people with agoraphobia may refuse to leave the house even in emergency situations, and suffer panic attacks if forced to go beyond the comfort area.

Another common anxiety disorder which can vary widely in its severity is obsessive-compulsive disorder. Symptoms include:

  • Recurrent and persistent thoughts, impulses, or images that are intrusive/inappropriate
  • Thoughts causing severe anxiety or distress
  • Thoughts are not just extra worries about real-life concerns
  • The sufferer knows that these thoughts are products of the mind, rather than reality
  • Repetitive behaviors or mental acts that the person feels “must” be performed
  • Repetitive behaviors for unrelated consequences, i.e. washing hands to keep an airplane flying, or for excessive results, i.e. washing hands to cure a chronic illness
  • A realization that these thoughts and compulsions are unreasonable or excessive

Some people may suffer from obsessive thoughts without the linked compulsive behaviors.

Anxiety disorders are included in the Social Security Listings of Impairments, which means that if your illness has been diagnosed by a qualified online saving account opening practitioner and is severe enough to keep you from working, you have an excellent chance of receiving benefits. However, because there are no medical tests for these mental illnesses, it is vital that you see a psychologist or psychiatrist who can support your application.

Improving Your Chances for Obtaining Benefits

It’s particularly important to see a psychologist or psychiatrist who can document the progression of your illness because this can sometimes be the only official record of your anxiety disorder. If you live with or frequently see family members or friends, ask them to document your behavior over time as well. Since severity is the key to determining whether or not your anxiety disorder qualifies you for benefits, tracking the frequency of panic attacks or other episodes can help your case.

  1. Keep a detailed medical history, including a calendar of notes about how you feel each day.
  2. Record any usual activities you could not do on any given day.
  3. Keep a detailed history of your current and past medications.
  4. See a health care professional regularly and take the medication that he/she gives you so that he/she can support your application for benefits.
  5. Ask your doctor or other health care professional to track the course of your symptoms and to keep a record of any evidence of fatigue, irritability, forgetfulness, unusual behavior, or other hard-to-document symptoms.
  6. Keep records of how your illness affected you on the job.

Helpful Links

US Social Security Administration official listing for Anxiety Related Disorders.

Источник: https://www.tcnf.legal/practice-areas/social-security/medical-conditions/anxiety-disorders/

What Qualifies a Veteran for an Anxiety Claim?

Veterans suffering from anxiety can file a claim and receive VA benefits, if they meet the criteria

Anxiety is a common condition for military veterans. A 2013 study found that 12% of participants met the diagnostic criteria for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Random community samples show that 1.6% to 3.5% of people in society have GAD, so the rate in the military is significantly higher.

Symptoms of anxiety can include restlessness, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, irritability, tense muscles, constant worry, and sleep problems. All of these can make it more challenging to function in society or hold a job.

The good news is that support is available for those suffering from anxiety through Veterans Affairs. Here’s what you should know about a VA claim for anxiety and the steps you’ll take before receiving benefits for your disability.

The VA’s requirements for anxiety claims

Before you can receive benefits, you’ll have to meet the VA’s requirements for your claim. You must have a formal diagnosis of your condition and link the disability to your active duty service. You must also present any medical records and lay evidence that shows the severity of your anxiety.

You’ll want to visit a doctor to go over your symptoms, including sleep problems, fatigue, irritability, and worry and have your symptoms documented.

When proving a service connection, you’ll need records from around the time you first noticed the condition. These records can include statements from friends and family, reports of any counseling appointments you made, and information on your employment status. 

If you’ve been unable to hold a steady job since your anxiety started, presenting this information can help you to receive a higher disability rating. 

Potential VA ratings for anxiety

Once your doctor has diagnosed you with anxiety and you’ve filed a claim with the VA, you’ll receive a rating based on the severity of your anxiety.

When it comes to mental health conditions, such as generalized anxiety disorder, the likelihood of receiving at least a 30% rating is high. Again, you just have to prove that the condition is service-related.

Those who deal with minor social and occupational impairment because of their anxiety receive a 30% VA rating. At this stage, your anxiety could hinder your ability to work, but won’t prevent you from finding a job entirely.

At 50%, your anxiety could lead to reduced reliability and productivity, making it more challenging to hold a job. You could also suffer from mood swings, impaired judgment, and lack of motivation. You might find it hard to maintain relationships.

A VA rating of 70% means that you likely struggle to have personal relationships at all and find it challenging to deal with stress. You might also have panic attacks or suicidal thoughts. You’ll receive more compensation at this stage because your inability to work with others holds you back.

Finally, a 100% disability rating means that you often cannot perform everyday tasks and are frequently hindered by your anxiety. You might struggle to communicate, find yourself disorientated, or be occupationally and socially impaired. At this point, you won’t be able to work and need far more help than at the other stages.

Starting your claim

If you believe you’re suffering from anxiety, your best bet is to meet with a doctor to go over your symptoms. You’ll also want to begin gathering evidence on how anxiety has impacted your life since your active duty service. The more evidence you can collect, the better chance you’ll have of receiving compensation.

Veterans Guardian VA Claim Consulting can support you in filing a VA claim. Our team will guide you through the paperwork and prepare you for a meeting with the VA’s representatives, so there aren’t any surprises when the time comes. Fill out the form below for a free consultation.

Источник: https://vetsguardian.com/va-claim-for-anxiety/

Can You Get Disability for Anxiety and Depression?

Can You Get Disability for Anxiety and Depression?

Anxiety and depression are both potentially serious mental health issues that can develop into severe disabilities if left untreated. If you have anxiety and/or depression, you may have trouble holding a job or earning enough money to support yourself. The Social Security Administration offers SSDI benefits for mental health-related disabilities, including anxiety and depression.

Anxiety and Depression

According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA), in 2017, there were 17.3 million adults over 18 who had been diagnosed with depression, and anxiety disorders affect 40 million adults in the United States. These numbers include older adults who may have fewer resources to cope with their effects.

Unlike normal sadness and worry, which can affect anybody, clinical anxiety and depression do not have obvious external causes and can seriously impair your ability to live a normal life. People with disabling anxiety and depression often earn less money, have fewer social contacts and live shorter lives than people without the disorders. If you think you might be suffering from either anxiety or depression, it's important to seek competent mental health services as early as you can.

While only a qualified mental health professional can diagnose you with an anxiety disorder or depression, only you know how you feel. Pay attention to the signs of anxiety and depression, and seek help if you notice distress from any of these symptoms.

Signs of Anxiety

Anxiety is a common condition that goes far beyond the normal worries matt holliday bat size concerns people get as part of life. Mental health professionals recognize about 10 major types of anxiety disorder, from specific phobias to panic disorders. Here are some of the most prevalent symptoms they have in common:

  • Excessive nervousness without an apparent external cause
  • Feeling a sense of impending doom, or suddenly developing a bout of panic for no obvious reason
  • Persistent restlessness or tension that doesn’t go away on its own and doesn’t seem connected to a clear cause
  • Elevated heart rate that is not connected to exercise or other likely causes
  • Hyperventilation
  • Cold sweats
  • Tremors in the hands or other parts of the body
  • Fatigue and weakness, or feeling a pressing need to sleep at odd times; this can occur along with insomnia at bedtime
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Indigestion, acid reflux and other GI problems
  • Avoidance of things you would normally do, in order to prevent feelings of anxiety
  • Loss of social contact with friends and family, often associated with a fear of going outdoors or to unfamiliar places

Signs of Depression

Despite its name, depression is not just a feeling of sadness. Normal grief or melancholy are part of being human, but a depressive disorder imposes these and several other feelings with no clear external cause. Ask a mental health professional for an evaluation if you have these signs of depression:

  • Unexplained sadness, bouts of crying and feelings of hopelessness
  • Bouts of anger that are difficult to control and not connected to a legitimate cause
  • Loss of motivation, or a loss of interest in activities you used to enjoy
  • Disturbed sleep patterns, both sleeping too much and not being able to sleep at appropriate times
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite and weight loss, or binge eating and rapid weight gain
  • Unexplained feelings of anxiety and restlessness
  • Altered or slow movements or speech
  • Persistent feelings of worthlessness or a fixation on perceived past failures
  • Memory problems
  • Recurring thoughts of death, suicide and harming others, even if they don’t feel serious
  • Physical pain that lacks an obvious cause, such as recurring headaches or chronic back pain

Getting Disability Benefits for Mental Health Issues

The Social Security Administration acknowledges the impact that anxiety and depression disorders can have on a person’s ability to make a living and get by in society. Both of these families of conditions are considered qualifying medical disorders for establishing eligibility for disability payments.

The process of applying for disability with anxiety or depression is the same as it is for physical disabilities. In order to get benefits, you must submit an application with the Social Security office in your local area. Be prepared to submit documentation of your condition from a doctor or psychiatrist who has treated you. Ask relatives, friends and people who know you whether they can write brief statements about how your mental health and ability to function have been affected by the anxiety or depression. These statements are not definitive, but they can help paint a whole picture for the disability eligibility reviewers.

If your initial claim for disability benefits has been rejected, which is common for first-time applications, you may have to appeal the administration’s decision. Consider hiring a lawyer who specializes in disability cases to help you prepare your appeal. Many lawyers in this field work with mental health professionals who have experience working with people who have anxiety disorders or clinical depression, as well as experience filling out the necessary forms to first interstate bank bozeman hours you claim the disability benefits you’re entitled to. A disability lawyer will usually work on contingency and ask for between 30% and 40% of your initial settlement.

Living With Can you get benefits for anxiety and Depression

If you have the symptoms of an anxiety or depressive disorder, getting the disability payments you need to get by can be just the beginning of the battle. Don’t hesitate to seek out the help you need to manage these chronic conditions, and lean on your family and friends for the emotional support you need to get through difficult periods.

Where to Get Help

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America lists several helpful resources that can connect you with others nearby who also have anxiety and depression that interferes with normal living. You can also find groups and treatment resources in your own ZIP code by searching the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)’s online resource database. These resources are free, and the communities and providers they connect you with can often help you at reduced or no cost. You do not have to give your information to SAMHSA when you search their database for help.

Источник: https://www.helpadvisor.com/social-security/disability-for-anxiety-and-depression
can you get benefits for anxiety

Can you get benefits for anxiety -

Read up on how Social Security evaluates disability claims based on generalized persistent anxiety, phobias, panic attacks, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

Social anxiety and other anxiety disorders can be socially limiting at best but at worst can be so disruptive to a person's life that it becomes impossible to work. Anxiety disorders involving phobias, panic disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and generalized anxiety can qualify for Social Security disability benefits if they are well documented and severely debilitating. If you've been diagnosed with one of the above disorders and it affects your ability to leave the house, function socially, concentrate, or manage the tasks of daily living, you may be eligible for disability benefits.

Some people claim they have anxiety, nervousness (called a "case of nerves" in the old days), or phobias, but their symptoms are unfortunately a part of modern, stressful life. To qualify for Social Security disability benefits for an anxiety disorder, you have to be able to show that your symptoms are chronic (will last for at least 12 months) and that they meet one of several specific medical diagnoses related to anxiety and that they severely and negatively impact your ability to function in life. In order to suss out cases of anxiety disorders that are truly preventing someone from doing any kind of work, the SSA has developed a list of requirements that your anxiety disorder must fit into.

Disability Caused by Anxiety Disorder

First, let's look at how the SSA evaluates the severity of anxiety disorders. Before it pays benefits, the SSA requires a mental disorder to be so severe that it disrupts your life to a point where you become unable to work at any type of job (no matter how "low pressure" it may be). In addition to fitting within a specific diagnosis below (under "Types of Anxiety Disorders), your anxiety disorder must cause severe limitations in the following areas:

  • understanding and remembering instructions and learning new things
  • interacting with others appropriately
  • concentrating and persisting to complete tasks, and/or
  • managing oneself (being able to cook, shop, pay bills, and practice good hygiene)

Alternatively, you might be able to qualify without having symptoms of the above limitations if your anxiety has improved with medication or psychosocial support, but your recovery is tenuous and you could experience a setback if you go back to work. To qualify under this alternative, your anxiety must be medically documented as having lasted at least two years, and you must have minimal capacity to adjust to changes in your environment or an increase in mental demands.

Anxiety Disorders That May Qualify

It's possible to get disability benefits for mental health conditions, but getting the proper diagnosis is a crucial first step. Your doctor will have to submit medical evidence of your diagnosis, consisting of psychological tests and documentation of symptoms. Here are five ways anxiety disorders can qualify you for disability benefits:

  • generalized persistent anxiety
  • agoraphobia
  • panic attacks
  • obsessive-compulsive disorder, or
  • post-traumatic stress disorder.

Generalized Persistent Anxiety

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a fairly common disorder characterized by chronic fearfulness, apprehension, and stress. While many people experience a mild amount of stress, worry, or fear, to qualify as a disability, the SSA needs to see that the generalized anxiety has profound physical or emotional effects on your body. Your anxiety disorder must be characterized by three or more of the following:

• restlessness

• getting fatigued easily

• difficulty concentrating

• becoming easily irritated

• muscle tension, and/or

• sleep disturbance.

Phobia

A phobia is a persistent extreme or irrational fear of a situation, activity, or place, such as the fear of driving over bridges (gephyrophobia), the fear of heights (acrophobia), or the fear of leaving the house (agoraphobia). A phobia causes a compelling need to avoid the feared situation or activity. Social phobia, or social anxiety disorder, an intense feeling of fear about and avoidance of interacting with others, can fall into this subcategory. To rise to the level of disability, the SSA requires that you have a disproportionate fear or anxiety about at least two different situations (for example, using public transportation, being in a crowd, being in a line, being outside of your home, or being in open spaces).

Panic Attacks

Panic attacks are characterized by sudden periods of intense fear along with physical symptoms such as sweating, increased heart rate, and shaking. Many people have experienced mild anxiety attacks in their life but take medication or therapy to manage them, but to rise to the level of disability, the SSA requires that you have severe panic attacks followed by a persistent concern or worry about having additional panic attacks in the future, or a fear of their consequences.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Obsessive-compulsive disorder, OCD, is characterized by repeated unwanted thoughts that compel a person to try to relieve them by performing repetitive tasks, such as constant cleaning or checking. The involuntary thoughts are often about germs, violence, religion, or sex. To qualify for benefits for OCD, the SSA requires that, even with treatment, you have either:

  • an involuntary, time-consuming preoccupation with intrusive, unwanted thoughts, or
  • repetitive behaviors aimed at reducing anxiety.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a reaction to a traumatic event that you experienced or witnessed, such as rape, physical abuse, killings, or natural disasters. PTSD causes recurrent flashback episodes and dreams that can disrupt day-to-day activity. Some forms of PTSD include an exaggerated startle response and hypervigilance. The SSA requires that even with treatment, you have medical documentation of all of the following:

  • exposure to the threat of death, serious injury, violence, or someone else's death
  • involuntary re-experiencing of the traumatic event (such as having intrusive memories, dreams, or flashbacks)
  • avoidance of external reminders of the event
  • disturbance in mood and behavior, and
  • increases in arousal and reactivity (such as having an exaggerated startle response or sleep disturbance).

Symptoms Affecting Your Functional Capacity

If you don't qualify under one of the above SSA impairment listings, as part of the disability determination process, the SSA will automatically consider your symptoms and impairments to see to what extent they impair your daily activities and if there is any kind of work you could do. The SSA will give you a rating of the type of work it thinks you can do (skilled work, semi-skilled work, unskilled work, or less than unskilled work). This is called your residual functional capacity (RFC). For anxiety disorders, the key question is whether you can do even unskilled work. If your disorder keeps you from leaving the house or interacting with people appropriately, it's possible the SSA could find this, but if your disorder is so severe, it's likely the SSA would have found that you fit into one of its impairment listings for anxiety, agoraphobia, OCD or PTSD, above.

Starting a Disability Claim

If you don't know whether you are eligible for Social Security disability insurance (SSDI, where you must have paid enough taxes into Social Security) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI, for low-income filers), you can apply for both. Call the SSA at 800-772-1213 to set up an appointment to fill out an application for disability. When you fill out your application, include a detailed description of what an episode of intense anxiety (for example, panic attacks or OCD, PTSD, or phobic episodes) looks like for you, as well as how often you have them and how they impair your ability to work.

If you have both an anxiety disorder and a physical impairment that keeps you from working, consider hiring a lawyer to help you file your claim, or if your initial claim gets denied, to file an appeal.

Источник: https://www.alllaw.com/articles/nolo/disability/determination-anxiety-disorders.html

What evidence do I need to be approved for disability with anxiety?






 
First, before we discuss the anxiety disability listing, here are resource links about being approved for disability and medical evidence.

1. Medical Evidence Used on a Social Security Disability or SSI Claim
2. Qualifications for Disability Benefits and the Types of Evidence Social Security Looks at
3. Questions about Social Security Disability Approvals and Being Approved
4. Tips for Getting Disability Approved When you File with Social Security

Social Security has an impairment listing for anxiety disability determinations.

Impairment listing 12.06 Anxiety-Related Disorders provides the medical criteria needed to meet the severity requirement of disability.



The anxiety disorder must be either a predominant disturbance or experienced when the individual attempts to overcome symptoms. For instance, when an individual is confronting a dreaded object or situation in a phobic disorder, or when resisting obsessions or compulsions in obsessive compulsive disorders.

A. You must have a medically documented finding of at least one of the following:

1.Generalized persistent anxiety along with three out of four of the following symptoms:

a. Motor tension
b. Autonomic hyperactivity
c. Apprehensive expectation
d. Vigilance and scanning

2. Persistent irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that results in a compelling desire to avoid the dreaded object, activity or situation.

3. Recurrent severe panic attacks demonstrated by a sudden unpredictable onset of intense apprehension, fear, terror, and sense of impending doom occurring on the average of at least once a week.

4. Recurrent obsessions or compulsions that are a source of severe distress.

5. Recurrent and intrusive recollections of a traumatic experience, which is a source of extreme distress.

AND

B. Resulting in at least two of the following.

1. marked restriction of activities of daily living
2. marked difficulties in maintaining social functioning
3. marked difficulties in maintaining concentration, persistence, or pace
4. repeated episodes of decompensation, each of extended duration.

OR

C. Resulting in complete inability to function independently outside the area of one�s home.

There are several ways your anxiety condition can meet or equal the severity of the anxiety impairment listing. A well documented history of medical treatment for anxiety that includes a diagnosis, prognosis, response to medication, and an opinion as to the limitations caused by your anxiety will be most helpful for your disability claim.

It should be pointed out, though, that most individuals who are approved for SSD or SSI are not approved through a listing as listing requirements are very specific.

Being approved for disability without satisfying a listing

If you cannot be awarded disability for anxiety through the listing, it may be possible to win benefits after an evaluation of your medical history and work history. The work history would be examined to find out what your past jobs required of you both physically and mentally to determine A. your skills and B. whether those skills transfer to other kinds of jobs. Your medical history is assessed to learn what you are still functionally capable of doing. This is known as residual functional capacity.

If your current limitations are more than what your past work required you to do, it is possible to be approved for disability. The evaluation of your claim, however, would also have to show that your skills do not transfer to other types of work. This type of approval is called a medical vocational allowance.

More about Anxiety disorder

Anxiety disorder is a nervous system disorder that affects the emotional state. Anxiety disorder causes anxious, fearful emotions that are usually thought of as irrational, meaning they are worries that are not based on factual information.

The cause of anxiety disorder is not fully understood. Doctors think the cause is linked to neurotransmitters in the brain, such as norepinephrine and serotonin, but they also acknowledge that it is likely that anxiety disorder stems from an intricate web of causes including genetics, environment, life experiences and the body�s biological processes.

The signs and symptoms of anxiety disorder are quite varied, from irritability, muscle tension, shortness of breath, stomachache, feeling on edge and being easily distracted to diarrhea, panic attacks and headache. Many people experiencing anxiety disorder feel extremely anxious, as if an impending �doom� is right around the corner, as if something bad is about to happen though there is no reason for the fear.

The term anxiety disorder covers a variety of different types of disorders; the most common are generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, social anxiety disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder.

General anxiety disorder is when the worries and fears are general and not focused on one particular object, event or reason.

Panic disorder is diagnosed when the patient suffers �attacks� of intense terror that cause dizziness, difficulty breathing, shaking, confusion and nausea. These attacks usually last ten minutes or less, but can sometimes last much longer.

Social anxiety disorder, also known as social phobia, is when the fear of being embarrassed or humiliated causes extreme anxiety, sometimes to the point that normal life is interrupted. Many with social anxiety disorder do not want to leave the house for fear of being judged negatively by society.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder is an anxiety disorder that is marked by repetition and ritualistic behavior. Usually this obsession or compulsion is a way to relieve anxiety or nervousness. Those with obsessive-compulsion disorder often have upsetting and repetitive thoughts and images play in their mind. Many times they feel compelled to do certain things in certain ways to keep bad things from happening. Often this will include common things like checking to make sure the door is locked, obsessing over personal items or arranging things in a certain way.

Post-traumatic stress disorder is an anxiety disorder that is usually the result of a traumatic experience, from warfare or violence to extreme stress. Those with the disorder may avoid certain places or things in order to not increase their anxiety.

Diagnosis for anxiety disorder includes an assessment/questionnaire, family history, reports from the patient and a medical examination. Those with anxiety disorder oftentimes also have symptoms of clinical depression and vice-versa. Treatment can include congnitive behavioral therapy and/or medications such as anti-anxiety medication, antidepressants and beta-blockers. Some people choose natural and alternative treatments such as acupuncture, hypnotherapy and relaxation techniques.

To help prevent anxiety disorder get plenty of rest, eat a balanced, healthy diet, engage in physical activity, eliminate caffeine, avoid alcohol and drugs and take time to relax and de-stress. Some people report that yoga, meditation, deep breathing exercises and relaxation techniques have helped their anxiety.







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How to win your disability benefits
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These pages provide answers to basic questions about pursuing disability benefits

Social Security Disability status, How to check
How to find if a Social Security Disability claim has been approved or denied?
How to qualify for disability, who qualifies?
Qualify for disability, eligibility requirements, criteria
How long does a request for a disability hearing take?
How Long Will it Take To Get a Disability Decision Letter from Social Security?
How long does it take to get or be approved for SSI or Social Security Disability?
Applying for disability, how to apply, where to go
When should you File for Disability benefits
How Far Back Can SSI Back Pay Be Paid?
Maximum back pay you can get for Social Security Disability







Источник: https://www.ssdrc.com/condition-anxiety-disorder.html

Can You Get Disability for Anxiety and Depression?

Can You Get Disability for Anxiety and Depression?

Anxiety and depression are both potentially serious mental health issues that can develop into severe disabilities if left untreated. If you have anxiety and/or depression, you may have trouble holding a job or earning enough money to support yourself. The Social Security Administration offers SSDI benefits for mental health-related disabilities, including anxiety and depression.

Anxiety and Depression

According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA), in 2017, there were 17.3 million adults over 18 who had been diagnosed with depression, and anxiety disorders affect 40 million adults in the United States. These numbers include older adults who may have fewer resources to cope with their effects.

Unlike normal sadness and worry, which can affect anybody, clinical anxiety and depression do not have obvious external causes and can seriously impair your ability to live a normal life. People with disabling anxiety and depression often earn less money, have fewer social contacts and live shorter lives than people without the disorders. If you think you might be suffering from either anxiety or depression, it's important to seek competent mental health services as early as you can.

While only a qualified mental health professional can diagnose you with an anxiety disorder or depression, only you know how you feel. Pay attention to the signs of anxiety and depression, and seek help if you notice distress from any of these symptoms.

Signs of Anxiety

Anxiety is a common condition that goes far beyond the normal worries and concerns people get as part of life. Mental health professionals recognize about 10 major types of anxiety disorder, from specific phobias to panic disorders. Here are some of the most prevalent symptoms they have in common:

  • Excessive nervousness without an apparent external cause
  • Feeling a sense of impending doom, or suddenly developing a bout of panic for no obvious reason
  • Persistent restlessness or tension that doesn’t go away on its own and doesn’t seem connected to a clear cause
  • Elevated heart rate that is not connected to exercise or other likely causes
  • Hyperventilation
  • Cold sweats
  • Tremors in the hands or other parts of the body
  • Fatigue and weakness, or feeling a pressing need to sleep at odd times; this can occur along with insomnia at bedtime
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Indigestion, acid reflux and other GI problems
  • Avoidance of things you would normally do, in order to prevent feelings of anxiety
  • Loss of social contact with friends and family, often associated with a fear of going outdoors or to unfamiliar places

Signs of Depression

Despite its name, depression is not just a feeling of sadness. Normal grief or melancholy are part of being human, but a depressive disorder imposes these and several other feelings with no clear external cause. Ask a mental health professional for an evaluation if you have these signs of depression:

  • Unexplained sadness, bouts of crying and feelings of hopelessness
  • Bouts of anger that are difficult to control and not connected to a legitimate cause
  • Loss of motivation, or a loss of interest in activities you used to enjoy
  • Disturbed sleep patterns, both sleeping too much and not being able to sleep at appropriate times
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite and weight loss, or binge eating and rapid weight gain
  • Unexplained feelings of anxiety and restlessness
  • Altered or slow movements or speech
  • Persistent feelings of worthlessness or a fixation on perceived past failures
  • Memory problems
  • Recurring thoughts of death, suicide and harming others, even if they don’t feel serious
  • Physical pain that lacks an obvious cause, such as recurring headaches or chronic back pain

Getting Disability Benefits for Mental Health Issues

The Social Security Administration acknowledges the impact that anxiety and depression disorders can have on a person’s ability to make a living and get by in society. Both of these families of conditions are considered qualifying medical disorders for establishing eligibility for disability payments.

The process of applying for disability with anxiety or depression is the same as it is for physical disabilities. In order to get benefits, you must submit an application with the Social Security office in your local area. Be prepared to submit documentation of your condition from a doctor or psychiatrist who has treated you. Ask relatives, friends and people who know you whether they can write brief statements about how your mental health and ability to function have been affected by the anxiety or depression. These statements are not definitive, but they can help paint a whole picture for the disability eligibility reviewers.

If your initial claim for disability benefits has been rejected, which is common for first-time applications, you may have to appeal the administration’s decision. Consider hiring a lawyer who specializes in disability cases to help you prepare your appeal. Many lawyers in this field work with mental health professionals who have experience working with people who have anxiety disorders or clinical depression, as well as experience filling out the necessary forms to help you claim the disability benefits you’re entitled to. A disability lawyer will usually work on contingency and ask for between 30% and 40% of your initial settlement.

Living With Anxiety and Depression

If you have the symptoms of an anxiety or depressive disorder, getting the disability payments you need to get by can be just the beginning of the battle. Don’t hesitate to seek out the help you need to manage these chronic conditions, and lean on your family and friends for the emotional support you need to get through difficult periods.

Where to Get Help

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America lists several helpful resources that can connect you with others nearby who also have anxiety and depression that interferes with normal living. You can also find groups and treatment resources in your own ZIP code by searching the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)’s online resource database. These resources are free, and the communities and providers they connect you with can often help you at reduced or no cost. You do not have to give your information to SAMHSA when you search their database for help.

Источник: https://www.helpadvisor.com/social-security/disability-for-anxiety-and-depression

What Qualifies a Veteran for an Anxiety Claim?

Veterans suffering from anxiety can file a claim and receive VA benefits, if they meet the criteria

Anxiety is a common condition for military veterans. A 2013 study found that 12% of participants met the diagnostic criteria for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Random community samples show that 1.6% to 3.5% of people in society have GAD, so the rate in the military is significantly higher.

Symptoms of anxiety can include restlessness, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, irritability, tense muscles, constant worry, and sleep problems. All of these can make it more challenging to function in society or hold a job.

The good news is that support is available for those suffering from anxiety through Veterans Affairs. Here’s what you should know about a VA claim for anxiety and the steps you’ll take before receiving benefits for your disability.

The VA’s requirements for anxiety claims

Before you can receive benefits, you’ll have to meet the VA’s requirements for your claim. You must have a formal diagnosis of your condition and link the disability to your active duty service. You must also present any medical records and lay evidence that shows the severity of your anxiety.

You’ll want to visit a doctor to go over your symptoms, including sleep problems, fatigue, irritability, and worry and have your symptoms documented.

When proving a service connection, you’ll need records from around the time you first noticed the condition. These records can include statements from friends and family, reports of any counseling appointments you made, and information on your employment status. 

If you’ve been unable to hold a steady job since your anxiety started, presenting this information can help you to receive a higher disability rating. 

Potential VA ratings for anxiety

Once your doctor has diagnosed you with anxiety and you’ve filed a claim with the VA, you’ll receive a rating based on the severity of your anxiety.

When it comes to mental health conditions, such as generalized anxiety disorder, the likelihood of receiving at least a 30% rating is high. Again, you just have to prove that the condition is service-related.

Those who deal with minor social and occupational impairment because of their anxiety receive a 30% VA rating. At this stage, your anxiety could hinder your ability to work, but won’t prevent you from finding a job entirely.

At 50%, your anxiety could lead to reduced reliability and productivity, making it more challenging to hold a job. You could also suffer from mood swings, impaired judgment, and lack of motivation. You might find it hard to maintain relationships.

A VA rating of 70% means that you likely struggle to have personal relationships at all and find it challenging to deal with stress. You might also have panic attacks or suicidal thoughts. You’ll receive more compensation at this stage because your inability to work with others holds you back.

Finally, a 100% disability rating means that you often cannot perform everyday tasks and are frequently hindered by your anxiety. You might struggle to communicate, find yourself disorientated, or be occupationally and socially impaired. At this point, you won’t be able to work and need far more help than at the other stages.

Starting your claim

If you believe you’re suffering from anxiety, your best bet is to meet with a doctor to go over your symptoms. You’ll also want to begin gathering evidence on how anxiety has impacted your life since your active duty service. The more evidence you can collect, the better chance you’ll have of receiving compensation.

Veterans Guardian VA Claim Consulting can support you in filing a VA claim. Our team will guide you through the paperwork and prepare you for a meeting with the VA’s representatives, so there aren’t any surprises when the time comes. Fill out the form below for a free consultation.

Источник: https://vetsguardian.com/va-claim-for-anxiety/

I get nervous every time I have to leave my apartment. I worry about all the things that can happen when I go outside, so I stay home. Is it possible to get Social Security disability benefits for an anxiety disorder?

Yes, it is possible to get Social Security disability benefits (SSDI) for an anxiety disorder; however, not everyone with anxiety will meet the Social Security Administration’s (SSA) requirements for benefits.

When you apply for SSDI for an anxiety disorder, the SSA will first consider whether your condition meets or equals listing 12.06 for Anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorders. To qualify, you must satisfy the criteria in sections “A” and “B,” or “A” and “C”:

  1. Medical documentation of the requirements of paragraph 1, 2, or 3:
    1. Anxiety disorder, characterized by three or more of the following;
      1. Restlessness
      2. Easily fatigued
      3. Difficulty concentrating
      4. Irritability
      5. Muscle tension
      6. Sleep disturbance
    2. Panic disorder or agoraphobia, characterized by one or both:
      1. Panic attacks followed by a persistent concern or worry about additional panic attacks or their consequences
      2. Disproportionate fear or anxiety about at least two different situations (for example, using public transportation, being in a crowd, being in a line, being outside of your home, being in open spaces)
    3. Obsessive-compulsive disorder, characterized by one or both:
      1. Involuntary, time-consuming preoccupation with intrusive, unwanted thoughts
      2. Repetitive behaviors aimed at reducing anxiety

AND

  1. Extreme limitation of one, or marked limitation of two, of the following areas of mental functioning:
    1. Understand, remember, or apply information
    2. Interact with others
    3. Concentrate, persist, or maintain pace
    4. Adapt or manage oneself

OR

  1. Your mental disorder in this listing category is “serious and persistent”; that is, you have a medically documented history of the existence of the disorder over a period of at least 2 years, and there is evidence of both:
    1. Medical treatment, mental health therapy, psychosocial support(s), or a highly structured setting(s) that is ongoing and that diminishes the symptoms and signs of your mental disorder
    2. Marginal adjustment—that is, you have minimal capacity to adapt to changes in your environment or to demands that are not already part of your daily life

You must also be receiving treatment for your diagnosis. Treatment from a licensed psychologist or mental health provider is preferred over treatment by a general practitioner or family doctor.

It is important to remember that not all anxiety disorders will meet the specific requirements of Social Security listing 12.06. If your condition is not equivalent to an existing listing, the SSA will need to assess whether your disability prevents you from performing any type of work, including any job you have held in the past. In fact, most cases do not meet a listing; however, this does not mean that you lose your case. You just have to prove you cannot perform any type of work, including unskilled work, for your application to be approved.

This may sound overwhelming, but don’t give up. Our Omaha disability lawyers can help you get the evidence you need to help show that your anxiety disorder prevents you from working. To learn more, request a free copy of Why You Should Hire an Attorney to Handle Your Social Security Disability Claim, or contact Cuddigan Law at 402-933-5405 and ask for a free evaluation of your claim.

Источник: https://www.cuddiganlaw.com/faqs/i-get-nervous-every-time-i-have-to-leave-my-apartment--i-worry-about-all-the-things-that-can-hap.cfm

Does an Anxiety Disorder Qualify Me For Social Security Benefits?

Generalized anxiety disorder is a common form of anxiety disorder that isn’t based on fear of a single object or event. Symptoms can include:

  • Excessive anxiety or worry, lasting at least 6 months and happening more days than not
  • Difficulty controlling worry
  • Restlessness or feeling “keyed up” or “on edge”
  • Being easily fatigued
  • Difficulty concentrating/mind going blank
  • Irritability
  • Muscle tension
  • Sleep disturbance (difficulty falling or staying asleep)

Panic disorder, unlike generalized anxiety, means that you suffer from intense episodes of extreme anxiety (lasting between 1-20 minutes, though some can require medical intervention, and some people experience waves of panic attacks). Common symptoms of a panic episode include:

  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Sweating
  • Dizziness
  • Shortness of breath
  • Trembling
  • Uncontrollable fear
  • Hyperventilation
  • The sensation of choking
  • Chest pain
  • Nausea
  • Numbness or tingling
  • Chills or hot flashes
  • The sense of altered reality
  • Thoughts of impending doom

People who suffer from panic disorder may experience symptoms of a panic attack even outside of these episodes.

Phobia–an intense, irrational fear–can affect people in several ways. Social phobia, or social anxiety disorder, results from a crippling fear of social situations and leads people to avoid these situations or have panic attacks while in such situations. Specific phobias result from a single panic trigger, such as spiders or elevators, and lead to the person avoiding these triggers or reacting to them with a panic attack.

Agoraphobia is a fear of being in an open environment or one in which you have little control. It can be triggered by open spaces, crowds, or simply by being outside of a comfort area such as the home. Some people with agoraphobia may refuse to leave the house even in emergency situations, and suffer panic attacks if forced to go beyond the comfort area.

Another common anxiety disorder which can vary widely in its severity is obsessive-compulsive disorder. Symptoms include:

  • Recurrent and persistent thoughts, impulses, or images that are intrusive/inappropriate
  • Thoughts causing severe anxiety or distress
  • Thoughts are not just extra worries about real-life concerns
  • The sufferer knows that these thoughts are products of the mind, rather than reality
  • Repetitive behaviors or mental acts that the person feels “must” be performed
  • Repetitive behaviors for unrelated consequences, i.e. washing hands to keep an airplane flying, or for excessive results, i.e. washing hands to cure a chronic illness
  • A realization that these thoughts and compulsions are unreasonable or excessive

Some people may suffer from obsessive thoughts without the linked compulsive behaviors.

Anxiety disorders are included in the Social Security Listings of Impairments, which means that if your illness has been diagnosed by a qualified medical practitioner and is severe enough to keep you from working, you have an excellent chance of receiving benefits. However, because there are no medical tests for these mental illnesses, it is vital that you see a psychologist or psychiatrist who can support your application.

Improving Your Chances for Obtaining Benefits

It’s particularly important to see a psychologist or psychiatrist who can document the progression of your illness because this can sometimes be the only official record of your anxiety disorder. If you live with or frequently see family members or friends, ask them to document your behavior over time as well. Since severity is the key to determining whether or not your anxiety disorder qualifies you for benefits, tracking the frequency of panic attacks or other episodes can help your case.

  1. Keep a detailed medical history, including a calendar of notes about how you feel each day.
  2. Record any usual activities you could not do on any given day.
  3. Keep a detailed history of your current and past medications.
  4. See a health care professional regularly and take the medication that he/she gives you so that he/she can support your application for benefits.
  5. Ask your doctor or other health care professional to track the course of your symptoms and to keep a record of any evidence of fatigue, irritability, forgetfulness, unusual behavior, or other hard-to-document symptoms.
  6. Keep records of how your illness affected you on the job.

Helpful Links

US Social Security Administration official listing for Anxiety Related Disorders.

Источник: https://www.tcnf.legal/practice-areas/social-security/medical-conditions/anxiety-disorders/

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