can you reverse the need for a root canal

Dental pain or symptoms can be a result of multiple combined causative factors. One tooth can have a necrotic pulp with a pressurized root tip infection in the. Why would someone need an apicoectomy? If you need more information requiring root canals and/or apicoectomies, schedule a dental. If the tooth or root were accidentally perforated during root canal treatment, the tooth would most likely need extraction. You may also experience pain if the.

Can you reverse the need for a root canal -

Holistic dentist offers effective root canal therapy alternatives in Richmond, VA

Root canal therapy has been used for many years in traditional dentistry to try to “save” a tooth that is deeply infected or damaged. It is up to a patient to decide if they would like to do a root canal treatment. As a holistic dentist, Dr. Olivia Hart from Richmond Family Dentistry offers her Richmond, VA area patients a possible alternative.

Zirconia dental implants and ceramic bridges are healthy, biocompatible alternatives. Below, Dr. Hart explains why!

Why dentists perform root canals

Also called “endodontic therapy,” root canals are performed when a tooth is severely compromised due to one of the following:

  • Infection
  • Abscess
  • Traumatic injury
  • Deep decay
  • A major crack or chip in the tooth
  • Multiple dental procedures on the same tooth

When someone opts to have a root canal, they often have severe pain before their treatment. While root canal therapy does relieve this pain, it might not eliminate the source of infection, inflammation, and toxins that are then free to circulate through your bloodstream and can wreak havoc throughout your body. Additionally, certain lifestyle factors can increase the risk of the treatment, such as smoking after a root canal.

How to cure a tooth infection without a root canal

Many patients ask us, “Are there alternatives to a root canal?” The answer is “Yes!”

In fact, there are alternatives to this treatment that help eliminate the bacteria and toxins that would otherwise be trapped in the decayed or infected tooth. The most common holistic alternatives to root canals are:

  • Zirconia implants: These biocompatible tooth restorations provide unparalleled stability, function, and feel. They are used to replace your natural tooth root and are topped with a natural-looking crown.
  • Ceramic bridges: These are also a good biocompatible tooth replacement option. The missing tooth is fabricated from natural-looking porcelain and then attached to your existing teeth.
  • Dental crowns: A common question is whether you can have a crown without a root canal. In fact, most crowns do not need a root canal – they can be used any time a tooth is damaged and needs a boost in strength, to restore its original shape, or to give it a more natural appearance. Dr. Hart is pleased to offer same-day crowns so you can get back to your regular life as soon as possible.

Treatments offered at Richmond Family Dentistry

Depending on your specific oral health needs and what the cause of your pain is, Dr. Hart will recommend the appropriate treatment and discuss any questions you have about it before proceeding.

If you are interested in learning more about alternatives to root canal treatment that are suitable for your oral health needs, call us at (804) 381-6238 or email us at [email protected] to schedule an appointment today!

Источник: https://www.richmondfamilydentistry.com/root-canal-therapy-alternatives.html

How Long Does It Take For a Cavity To Develop?

Cavities don't just form overnight. It can take months, or possibly even years, before the decay process advances to the point where a tooth requires attention. The entire process of tooth demineralization takes place whenever an acidic oral environment exists, and fortunately, this environment isn't the norm for a person's mouth. 

 

Early-stage tooth decay can be corrected when it's caught early enough, which is why it's so essential to visit your dentist every six months for an exam. 

 

Every Cavity Is Different

The time it takes for a cavity to form varies. It can, on average, take anywhere from six months to four or five years before a cavity requires treatment. The length of time it takes will vary on a case-by-case basis because the conditions of your mouth differ daily. This means that a cavity can start to form and then not have the right conditions to continue to develop. A cavity won't just go away on its own; however, it can be slower to form, which allows your dentist to correct the issue before it gets worse. 

 

Factors That Come Into Play 

There are several types of factors that can significantly influence the length of time it takes for a cavity to form. The most common factors that can increase or decrease the speed in which cavity forms include:

 

  • Acid Levels – Cavities will start to develop when acid levels in the mouth increase.

 

  • The number of Acid Attacks – Teeth are extremely strong. However, if a tooth is subjected to multiple small acid attacks, eventually, a cavity will form.

 

  • Location Where the Cavity is Forming – Enamel is durable and contains minerals, which means it will take longer for a cavity to form in enamel than in the dentin of a tooth.

 

  • The thickness of the Tooth Enamel – Tooth enamel is thinner near the gum line, which means that cavities form quicker near the gums than they do on the tops of teeth.

 

  • Quality of the Tooth Enamel – Enamel that contains lots of minerals will take longer to get a cavity than enamel that has fewer minerals.

 

Tooth Damage CAN Be Reversed

If your dentist tells you that you have a cavity forming, there are ways to stop early-stage tooth decay from progressing into a full-blown cavity. The process known as remineralization can occur, which can reverse tooth decay. 

 

Remineralization can correct damage to a tooth. When a cavity begins to form, the enamel or dentin starts to lose valuable minerals that protect the tooth. You can help to put these valuable materials back into the tooth by remineralizing it. The tooth will start to strengthen itself and repair the decay to the point where a cavity is no longer forming. 

 

While remineralization can reverse some damage to the surface of a tooth and prevent some cavities, it won't work for all situations. If the damage to the enamel or dentin is too severe, the process will be ineffective, and the cavity will need to be treated by your dentist. 

 

Cavity Prevention Is Simple 

You can do your part in helping to protect your teeth from tooth decay by following a few simple guidelines:

 

  • Gently brush your teeth at least twice a day for a full two minutes with a soft-bristled toothbrush and fluoride toothpaste.
  • Floss once a day. 
  • Incorporate a fluoride mouthwash into your oral care routine. 
  • Avoid sugary and starchy foods, and avoid frequent snacking. 

Having regular teeth cleanings and exams every six months is another necessary step in eliminating cavity-causing plaque and tartar. During these exams, your dentist will be able to identify any early signs of tooth decay and give you the tools and knowledge to combat cavities. Contact Tompkins Dental to schedule an appointment for a routine dental cleaning and exam. 

Dental Implant Recovery Timeline FAQ

Here’s a list of dental implant recovery timeline FAQ, including if dental implants are really worth the healing time and upfront costs in Ithaca.

How Long Should a Filling Last?

Dental fillings have a limited period of use before they fail, so it’s good to know the signs of a failing filling and when it needs to be replaced in Ithaca.

Tompkins Dental, Ithaca, NY

Phone (appointments): 607-257-8065

Apicoectomy

A Surgical Option When Root Canal Treatment Fails

This article is endorsed by the

American Association of Endodontics.

Dear Doctor,
My dentist referred me to an endodontist (root canal specialist) for an apicoectomy procedure. Could you please explain what this is and what it entails?

Dear John,
If your dentist is recommending an apicoectomy, it means that your tooth cannot be successfully treated with conventional root canal treatment (which will be described below). An apicoectomy is a minor surgical procedure in which the very tip of the tooth’s root is removed (“apico” – apex or end; “ectomy” – removal) and sealed. It is usually performed by an endodontist (“endo” – inside; “dont” – tooth), a dentist who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of tooth pain from root canal disease.

Apicoectomy - Healthy Tooth Anatomy.
Healthy Tooth Anatomy

Saving Teeth With Conventional Root Canal Treatment

As the illustration on this page shows, a space inside the tooth called the pulp chamber houses the pulp — the living tissue (nerves, blood vessels and connective tissues) that keeps the tooth alive. A root canal system branches from this chamber. Endodontic treatment, commonly known as root canal treatment, is needed when the pulp becomes inflamed or infected. This can happen for several reasons: deep tooth decay; repeated dental procedures to a tooth (replacing a large filling, for example); or traumatic damage such as a crack, chip or even a fracture. If the pulp dies, the pulp chamber and canals can become infected. That infection can eventually spread into the surrounding bone and other tissues around the tip of the root.

Endodontists use radiographs (x-rays), or sometimes CBCT scans (cone beam-computed tomography) that create three-dimensional views, to examine root canals and diagnose disease that might otherwise go undetected.

Apicoectomy - Previous root canal treatment can become reinfected.
Previous root canal treatment can become reinfected for a variety of reasons. If conventionaal root canal therapy is not possible, an apicoectomy is an option to save the tooth.
Apicoectomy - Infection and root tip are removed.
A small incision is made in the gum tissues at the level of the infection allowing the infection and root tip to be removed.

Conventional root canal treatment involves drilling a small access hole into the pulp chamber through the biting surface of a back tooth, or from behind a front tooth. Inflamed or infected tissue is removed from the pulp chamber and root canals, and the space is disinfected, shaped with tiny flexible instruments, filled, and sealed. A temporary or permanent filling material will then be placed to cover the access hole. A permanent cap (crown) is often used to replace lost tooth structure and to protect the tooth from biting stresses and further damage.

If At First It Didn’t Succeed

As you can see, a lot of work goes into treating root canal infection. But root canals may become re-infected for a variety of reasons: new or recurrent decay; previously undetected accessory (extra) canals branching from the primary canal at the root end of the tooth; and, occasionally, calcification (narrowing and hardening) of canals — a reaction to trauma or aging that can block the canals and prevent them from being fully cleaned by conventional root canal treatment.

Sometimes, conventional root canal retreatment may not be feasible, or may even jeopardize the tooth. For example, accessing the canals of a tooth that has a crown and a post in place may require taking apart the entire restoration, which could further weaken the tooth. In such cases, a better alternative is to treat infection from the root end of the tooth (instead of the crown end) with an apicoectomy.

Apicoectomy - Small filling is placed.
A small filling is placed at the end of the root canal to seal the canal and prevent further infection. A stitch is placed to close the gum tissue.
Apicoectomy - Healing.
The area heals with new bone formation and returns to normal function.

Unlike traditional root canal treatment, an apicoectomy is a surgical approach through the gum. After the area is thoroughly numbed with local anesthesia, a small incision is made through the gum tissues at the level of the affected root, permitting direct access to the infected peri-apical tissues (“peri” – around; “apex” – root end). This allows removal of any inflamed or infected tissue near or around the tip of the root — along with a few millimeters of the root tip itself. A very small filling is then placed in the end of the root canal to seal the canal and prevent further infection. Afterward, a few sutures (stitches) are placed to assure that the gum tissues are closed and will heal properly. Where necessary, bone grafting or other techniques are used to help the bone to grow and fill back in, particularly if infection has left a significant void. Over time, the absence of infection will allow the area to heal and return to normal function.

Endodontists use state-of-the-art technology such as fiber optic lights, operating microscopes, and ultrasonic instruments that clean via high frequency vibration, when performing endodontic surgery. These advanced technologies give endodontists a very accurate view of the tooth, making the treatment quick, comfortable and successful.

While only performed when conventional root canal retreatment is not practical, apicoectomy for failing root canal-treated teeth can save them, returning the tooth, bone and gum tissues to health for many years.

Источник: https://www.deardoctor.com/inside-the-magazine/issue-29/apicoectomy/

Root canal treatment

Dental treatment

Ambox current red Asia Australia.svg

This article needs to be updated. Please help update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information.(December 2017)

Root canal treatment
Root canalioso.jpg

Tooth #13, the upper left second premolar, after excavation of DO decay. There was a carious exposure into the pulp chamber (red oval), and the photo was taken after endodontic access was initiated and the roof of the chamber was removed.

Specialtyendodontics

[edit on Wikidata]

Root canal procedure: unhealthy or injured tooth, subsequent creation of an access cavity with a dental handpiece, cleaning & shaping the root canals with an endodontic file, and restoration with gutta-perchafillingand a crown
Removing infected pulp during a root canal procedure

Root canal treatment (also known as endodontic therapy, endodontic treatment, or root canal therapy) is a treatment sequence for the infectedpulp of a tooth which is intended to result in the elimination of infection and the protection of the decontaminated tooth from future microbial invasion.[1]Root canals, and their associated pulp chamber, are the physical hollows within a tooth that are naturally inhabited by nerve tissue, blood vessels and other cellular entities. Together, these items constitute the dental pulp.[2]

Endodontic therapy involves the removal of these structures, disinfection and the subsequent shaping, cleaning, and decontamination of the hollows with small files and irrigating solutions, and the obturation (filling) of the decontaminated canals. Filling of the cleaned and decontaminated canals is done with an inert filling such as gutta-percha and typically a zinc oxide eugenol-based cement.[3]Epoxy resin is employed to bind gutta-percha in some root canal procedures.[4] Another option is to use an antiseptic filling material containing paraformaldehyde like N2.[5] Endodontics includes both primary and secondary endodontic treatments as well as periradicular surgery which is generally used for teeth that still have potential for salvage.[6][7]

Treatment procedure[edit]

The procedure is often complicated, depending on circumstances, and may involve multiple visits over a period of weeks.

Dentist performing root canal treatment process

Diagnostic and preparation[edit]

An x-ray of a root canal operation

Before endodontic therapy is carried out, a correct diagnosis of the dental pulp and the surrounding periapical tissues is required. This allows the endodontist to choose the most appropriate treatment option, allowing preservation and longevity of the tooth and surrounding tissues. Treatment options for an irreversibly inflamed pulp (irreversible pulpitis) include either extraction of the tooth or removal of the pulp.

Removing the infected/inflamed pulpal tissue enables the endodontist to help preserve the longevity and function of the tooth. The treatment option chosen involves taking into account the expected prognosis of the tooth, as well as the patient's wishes. A full history is required (which includes the patient's symptoms and medical history), along with a clinical examination (both inside and outside the mouth), and the use of diagnostic tests.[8]

There are several diagnostic tests that can aid in the diagnosis of the dental pulp and the surrounding tissues. These include:

  • Palpation (this is where the tip of the root is felt from the overlying tissues to see if there is any swelling or tenderness present)
  • Mobility (this is assessing if there is more than normal movement of the tooth in the socket)
  • Percussion (TTP, tender to percussion; the tooth is tapped to see if there is any tenderness)
  • Transillumination (shining a light through the tooth to see if there are any noticeable fractures)
  • Tooth Slooth (this is where the patient is asked to bite down upon a plastic instrument; useful if the patient complains of pain on biting as this can be used to localise the tooth)
  • Radiographs
  • Dental pulp tests

In the situation that a tooth is considered so threatened (because of decay, cracking, etc.) that future infection is considered likely or inevitable, a pulpectomy (removal of the pulp tissue) is advisable to prevent such infection. Usually, some inflammation and/or infection is already present within or below the tooth. To cure the infection and save the tooth, the dentist drills into the pulp chamber and removes the infected pulp. To get freedom of bacteria the use of efficient antiseptics and disinfectants is necessary.[9] One of the most effective is N2 root canal material which contains a small dose of paraformaldehyde.[10] The nerve is either drilled out of the root canal(s)with engine driven files or with long needle-shaped hand instruments known as files (H files and K files).

Opening in the crown[edit]

The dentist makes an opening through the enamel and dentin tissues of the tooth, usually using a dental drill fitted with a dental burr.

Isolating the tooth

The use of a rubber dam for tooth isolation is mandatory in endodontic treatment for several reasons:

  1. It provides an aseptic operating field, isolating the tooth from oral and salivary contamination. Root canal contamination with saliva introduces new microorganisms to the root canal which compromise the prognosis.
  2. It facilitates the use of the strong medicaments necessary to clean the root canal system.
  3. It protects the patient from the inhalation or ingestion of endodontic instruments.

Removal of pulp tissue[edit]

Procedures for shaping[edit]

There have been a number of progressive iterations to the mechanical preparation of the root canal for endodontic therapy. The first, referred to as the standardized technique, was developed by Ingle in 1961, and had disadvantages such as the potential for loss of working length and inadvertent ledging, zipping or perforation.[11][12] Subsequent refinements have been numerous, and are usually described as techniques. These include the step-back, circumferential filing, incremental, anticurvature filing, step-down, double flare, crown-down-pressureless, balanced force, canal master, apical box, progressive enlargement, modified double flare, passive stepback, alternated rotary motions, and apical patency techniques.[13]

The step back technique, also known as telescopic or serial root canal preparation, is divided in two phases: in the first, the working length is established and then the apical part of the canal is delicately shaped since a size 25 K-file reaches the working length; in the second, the remaining canal is prepared with manual or rotating instrumentation.[14] This procedure, however, has some disadvantages, such as the potential for inadvertent apical transportation. Incorrect instrumentation length can occur, which can be addressed by the modified step back. Obstructing debris can be dealt with by the passive step back technique.[15] The crown down is a procedure in which the dentist prepares the canal beginning from the coronal part after exploring the patency of the whole canal with the master apical file.

There is a hybrid procedure combining step back and crown down: after the canal's patency check, the coronal third is prepared with hand or Gates Glidden drills, then the working length is determined and finally the apical portion is shaped using step back techniques. The double flare is a procedure introduced by Fava where the canal is explored using a small file. Then canal is prepared in crown down manner using K-files then follows a "step back" preparation with 1 mm increments with increasing file sizes. With early coronal enlargement, also described as "three times technique", apical canals are prepared after a working length assessment using an apex locator; then progressively enlarged with Gates Glidden drills (only coronal and middle third). For the eponymic third time the dentist "arrives at the apex" and, if necessary, prepares the foramen with a size 25 K-file; the last phase is divided in two refining passages: the first with a 1-mm staggered instrument, the second with 0.5-mm staggering.[citation needed] From the early nineties engine-driven instrumentation were gradually introduced including the ProFile system, the Greater Taper files, the ProTaper files, and other systems like Light Speed, Quantec, K-3 rotary, Real World Endo, and the Hero 642.[citation needed]

All of these procedures involve frequent irrigation and recapitulation with the master apical file, a small file that reaches the apical foramen.[16] High frequency ultrasound based techniques have also been described. These can be useful in particular for cases with complex anatomy, or for retained foreign body retrieval from a failed prior endodontic procedure.[17]

  • An example of step back technique

  • An example of passive step back technique

  • An example of crown down technique

Operative techniques for instruments[edit]

There are two slightly different anti-curvature techniques. In the balanced forces technique, the dentist inserts a file into the canal and rotates clockwise a quarter of a turn, engaging dentin, then rotates counter-clockwise half/ three-quarter of a revolution, applying pressure in an apical direction, shearing off tissue previously meshed. From the balanced forces stem two other techniques: the reverse balanced force (where GT instruments are rotated first anti-clockwise and then clockwise) and the gentler "feed and pull" where the instrument is rotated only a quarter of a revolution and moved coronally after an engagement, but not drawn out.[citation needed]

Use of anesthetics[edit]

As of 2018, novocaine is most commonly used in dental procedures to numb the area around a tooth.[18] More novocaine is required for a root canal treatment than for a simple filling.[18]

Irrigation[edit]

The root canal is flushed with an irrigant. Some common ones are listed below:

The primary aim of chemical irrigation is to kill microbes and dissolve pulpal tissue.[22] Certain irrigants, such as sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine, have proved to be effective antimicrobials in vitro[22] and are widely used during root canal therapy worldwide. According to a systematic review, however, there is a lack of good quality evidence to support the use of one irrigant over another in terms of both short and long term prognosis of therapy.[23]

Root canal irrigation systems are divided into two categories: manual agitation techniques and machine-assisted agitation techniques. Manual irrigation includes positive-pressure irrigation, which is commonly performed with a syringe and a side vented needle. Machine-assisted irrigation techniques include sonics and ultrasonics, as well as newer systems which deliver apical negative-pressure irrigation.[24]

Filling the root canal[edit]

The standard filling material is gutta-percha, a natural polymer prepared from latex from the percha tree (Palaquium gutta). The standard endodontic technique involves inserting a gutta-percha cone (a "point") into the cleaned-out root canal along with a sealing cement.[25] Another technique uses melted or heat-softened gutta-percha which is then injected or pressed into the root canal passage(s). However, since gutta-percha shrinks as it cools, thermal techniques can be unreliable and sometimes a combination of techniques is used. Gutta-percha is radiopaque, allowing verification afterwards that the root canal passages have been completely filled and are without voids.[citation needed]

An alternative filling material was invented in the early 1950s by Angelo Sargenti. Filling material has undergone several formulations over the years (N2, N2 Universal, RC-2B, RC-2B White), but all contain paraformaldehyde. The paraformaldehyde, when placed into the root canal, forms formaldehyde, which penetrates and sterilizes the passage. The formaldehyde is then theoretically transformed into harmless water and carbon dioxide. According to some research, the outcome of this method is better than a root canal procedure performed with gutta-percha. There is, however, a lack of indisputable scientific studies according to the Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment.[citation needed]

Root canal sealer used to fill the spaces between the gutta-percha and the walls of root canal and between the gutta-percha cones

In rare cases, the paste, like any other material, can be forced past the root tip into the surrounding bone. If this happens, the formaldehyde will immediately be transformed into a harmless substance. Blood normally contains 2 mg formaldehyde per liter and the body regulates this in seconds. The rest of an overfill will be gradually absorbed and the end result is normally good. In 1991, the ADA Council on Dental Therapeutics resolved that the treatment was "not recommended", and it is not taught in American dental schools. Scientific evidence in endodontic therapy was, and still is lacking.[26] Despite this lack of support, the Sargenti technique has advocates who believe N2 to be less expensive and at least as safe as gutta-percha.[27]

Pain control can be difficult to achieve at times because of anesthetic inactivation by the acidity of the abscess around the tooth apex. Sometimes the abscess can be drained, antibiotics prescribed, and the procedure reattempted when inflammation has been mitigated. The tooth can also be unroofed to allow drainage and help relieve pressure.[citation needed]

A root treated tooth may be eased from the occlusion as a measure to prevent tooth fracture prior to the cementation of a crown or similar restoration. Sometimes the dentist performs preliminary treatment of the tooth by removing all of the infected pulp of the tooth and applying a dressing and temporary filling to the tooth. This is called a pulpectomy. The dentist may also remove just the coronal portion of the dental pulp, which contains 90% of the nerve tissue, and leave intact the pulp in the canals. This procedure, called a "pulpotomy", tends to essentially eliminate all the pain. A pulpotomy may be a relatively definitive treatment for infected primary teeth. The pulpectomy and pulpotomy procedures aim to eliminate pain until the follow-up visit for finishing the root canal procedure. Further occurrences of pain could indicate the presence of continuing infection or retention of vital nerve tissue.[citation needed]

Some dentists may decide to temporarily fill the canal with calcium hydroxide paste in order to thoroughly sterilize the site. This strong base is left in place for a week or more to disinfect and reduce inflammation in surrounding tissue, requiring the patient to return for a second or third visit to complete the procedure. There appears to be no benefit from this multi-visit option, however, and single-visit procedures actually show better (though not statistically significant) patient outcomes than multi-visit ones.[28]

Temporary filling[edit]

A temporary filling material is applied between the visits.[29] Leaky temporary filling will allow the root canals to become reinfected by bacteria in the saliva (coronal microleakage). Khayat et al. showed that all root canals obturated with gutta-percha and root canal sealer using either lateral or vertical condensation were recontaminated in less than 30 days when exposed to saliva.[30] Therefore, maintaining a coronal seal throughout root canal therapy is very important for the success of the treatment.[31]

Final restoration[edit]

Molars and premolars that have had root canal therapy should be protected with a crown that covers the cusps of the tooth. This is because the access made into the root canal system removes a significant amount of tooth structure. Molars and premolars are the primary teeth used in chewing and will almost certainly fracture in the future without cuspal coverage. Anterior teeth typically do not require full coverage restorations after a root canal procedure, unless there is extensive tooth loss from decay or for esthetics or unusual occlusion. Placement of a crown or cusp-protecting cast gold covering is recommended also because these have the best ability to seal the treated tooth. There is insufficient evidence to assess the effects of crowns compared to conventional fillings for the restoration of root-filled teeth, decision of restoration should rely on the clinical experience of the practitioner and the preference of the patients.[32] If the tooth is not perfectly sealed, the canal may leak, causing eventual failure. A tooth with a root canal treatment still has the ability to decay, and without proper home care and an adequate fluoride source the tooth structure can become severely decayed (often without the patient's knowledge since the nerve has been removed, leaving the tooth without any pain perception). Thus, non-restorable carious destruction is the main reason for extraction of teeth after root canal therapy, accounting for up to two-thirds of these extractions.[33] Therefore, it is very important to have regular X-rays taken of the root canal to ensure that the tooth is not having any problems that the patient would not be aware of.[citation needed]

Endodontic retreatment[edit]

Endodontic treatment may fail for many reasons: one common reason for failure is inadequate chemomechanical debridement of the root canal. This may be due to poor endodontic access, missed anatomy or inadequate shaping of the canal, particularly in the apical third of the root canal, also due to the difficulty of reaching the accessory canals which are minute canals that extend in from the pulp to the periodontium in a random direction. They are mostly found in the apical third of the root.[34]

Exposure of the obturation material to the oral environment may mean the gutta-percha is contaminated with oral bacteria. If complex and expensive restorative dentistry is contemplated then ideally the contaminated gutta percha would be replaced in a retreatment procedure to minimise the risk of failure.

The type of bacteria found within a failed canal may differ from the normal infected tooth. Enterococcus faecalis and/or other facultative enteric bacteria or Pseudomonas sp. are found in this situation.

Endodontic retreatment is technically demanding; it can be a time-consuming procedure, as meticulous care is required by the dentist. Retreatment cases are typically referred to a specialist endodontist. Use of an operating microscope or other magnification may improve outcomes.

Currently, there is no strong evidence favoring surgical or non-surgical retreatment of periapical lesions. However, studies have reported that patients experience more pain and swelling after surgical retreatment compared to non-surgical. When comparing surgical techniques, the use of ultrasonic devices may improve healing after retreatment. There is no evidence that the use of antibiotics after endodontic retreatment prevents post-operative infection.[35]

Instruments and equipment used[edit]

See also: Endodontic files and reamers and Nickel titanium rotary file

Since 2000 there have been great innovations in the art and science of root canal therapy. Dentists now must be educated on the current concepts in order to optimally perform a root canal procedure. Root canal therapy has become more automated and can be performed faster thanks in part to machine-driven rotary technology and more advanced root canal filling methods. Many root canal procedures are done in one dental visit which may last for around 1–2 hours. Newer technologies are available (e.g. cone-beam CT scanning) that allow more efficient, scientific measurements to be taken of the dimensions of the root canal, however, the use of CT scanning in endodontics has to be justified.[36] Many dentists use dental loupes to perform root canal therapy, and the consensus is that procedures performed using loupes or other forms of magnification (e.g. a surgical microscope) are more likely to succeed than those performed without them. Although general dentists are becoming versed in these advanced technologies, they are still more likely to be used by root canal specialist (known as endodontists).

Laser root canal procedures are a controversial innovation. Lasers may be fast but have not been shown to thoroughly disinfect the whole tooth,[37] and may cause damage.[citation needed]

Postoperative pain[edit]

Several randomized clinical trials concluded that the use of rotary instruments is associated with a lower incidence of pain following the endodontic procedure when compared to the use of manual hand instruments.[38][39]Corticosteroid intra-oral injections were found to alleviate pain in the first 24 hours in patients suffering from symptomatic irreversible pulp inflammation.[40]

Complications[edit]

Instrument fractures[edit]

Instruments may separate (break) during root canal treatment, meaning a portion of the metal file used during the procedure remains inside the tooth. The file segment may be left behind if an acceptable level of cleaning and shaping has already been completed and attempting to remove the segment would risk damage to the tooth. While potentially disconcerting to the patient, having metal inside of a tooth is relatively common, such as with metal posts, amalgam fillings, gold crowns, and porcelain fused to metal crowns. The occurrence of file separation depends on the narrowness, curvature, length, calcification and number of roots on the tooth being treated. Complications resulting from incompletely cleaned canals, due to blockage from the separated file, can be addressed with surgical root canal treatment.[41] To minimise the risk of endodontic files fracturing:[42]

  • Ensure access cavity allows straight-line introduction of files into canals
  • Create a glide path before use of larger taper NiTi files
  • Use rotary instruments at the manufacturer's recommended speed and torque setting
  • Adopt a single-use file policy to prevent overuse of files
  • Inspecting the file thoroughly every time before inserting it inside the canal
  • Using ample amounts of irrigation solutions
  • Avoid use of rotary files in severely curved or dilacerated canals

Sodium hypochlorite accident[edit]

A sodium hypochlorite incident is an immediate reaction of severe pain, followed by edema, haematoma and ecchymosis, as a consequence of the solution escaping the confines of the tooth and entering the periapical space.[43] This may be caused iatrogenically by binding or excessive pressure on the irrigant syringe or it may occur if the tooth has an unusually large apical foramen.[44] It is usually self-resolving and may take two to five weeks to fully resolve.[44]

Tooth discoloration[edit]

Tooth discoloration is common following root canal treatment; however, the exact causes for this are not completely understood.[45] Failure to completely clean out the necrotic soft tissue of the pulp system may cause staining, and certain root canal materials (e.g. gutta percha and root canal sealer cements) can also cause staining.[45] Another possible factor is that the lack of pulp pressure in dentinal tubules once the pulp is removed leads to incorporation of dietary stains in dentin.[45]

Poor-quality root filling[edit]

An X-ray explanation of bad root canal therapy
X-ray explanation of bad root canal therapy

Another common complication of root canal therapy is when the entire length of the root canal is not completely cleaned out and filled (obturated) with root canal filling material (usually gutta percha). On the other hand, the root canal filling material may be extruded from the apex leading to other complications.[46] The X-ray in the right margin shows two adjacent teeth that had received bad root canal therapy. The root canal filling material (3, 4 and 10) does not extend to the end of the tooth roots (5, 6 and 11). The dark circles at the bottom of the tooth roots (7 and 8) indicated infection in the surrounding bone. Recommended treatment is either to redo the root canal therapy if possible, or extract the tooth and place dental implants.[citation needed]

Outcome and prognosis[edit]

Root-canal-treated teeth may fail to heal—for example, if the dentist does not find, clean and fill all of the root canals within a tooth. On a maxillary molar, there is more than a 50% chance that the tooth has four canals instead of just three, but the fourth canal, often called a "mesio-buccal 2", tends to be very difficult to see and often requires special instruments and magnification in order to see it (most commonly found in first maxillary molars; studies have shown an average of 76% up to 96% of such teeth with the presence of an MB2 canal). This infected canal may cause a continued infection or "flare-up" of the tooth. Any tooth may have more canals than expected, and these canals may be missed when the root canal procedure is performed. Sometimes canals may be unusually shaped, making them impossible to clean and fill completely; some infected material may remain in the canal. Sometimes the canal filling does not fully extend to the apex of the tooth, or it does not fill the canal as densely as it should. Sometimes a tooth root may be perforated while the root canal is being treated, making it difficult to fill the tooth. The perforation may be filled with a root repair material, such as one derived from natural cement called mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). A specialist can often re-treat failing root canals, and these teeth will then heal, often years after the initial root canal procedure.[citation needed]

However, the survival or functionality of the endodontically treated tooth is often the most important aspect of endodontic treatment outcomes, rather than apical healing alone.[47] Recent studies indicate that substances commonly used to clean the root canal space incompletely sterilize the canal.[48] A properly restored tooth following root canal therapy yields long-term success rates near 97%. In a large-scale study of over 1.6 million patients who had root canal therapy, 97% had retained their teeth 8 years following the procedure, with most untoward events, such as re-treatment, apical surgery or extraction, occurring during the first 3 years after the initial endodontic treatment.[49] Endodontically treated teeth are prone to extraction mainly due to non-restorable carious destruction, other times due to the improper fit of the crown margins that encircles the tooth which lead to the ingress of bacteria,[50] and to a lesser extent to endodontic-related reasons such as endodontic failure, vertical root fracture, or perforation (procedural error).[33]

Systemic issues[edit]

Nondisruption of the periodontal fiberis a benefit of endodontic over implant therapy (labeled I–K)

An infected tooth may endanger other parts of the body. People with special vulnerabilities, such as a recent prosthetic joint replacement, an unrepaired congenital heart defect, or immunocompromisation, may need to take antibiotics to protect from infection spreading during dental procedures. The American Dental Association (ADA) asserts that any risks can be adequately controlled. A properly performed root canal treatment effectively removes the infected part of the pulp from the tooth.[citation needed]

In the early 1900s, several researchers theorized that bacteria from teeth which had necrotic pulps or which had received endodontic treatment could cause chronic or local infection in areas distant from the tooth through the transfer of bacteria through the bloodstream. This was called the "focal infection theory", and it led some dentists to advocate dental extraction. In the 1930s, this theory was discredited, but the theory was recently revived by a book entitled Root Canal Cover-Up Exposed which used the early discredited research, and further complicated by epidemiological studies which found correlations between periodontal disease and heart disease, strokes, and preterm births.[citation needed] The book's author, George Meinig, has been a strong advocate against endodontic therapy for years; he has since lost his dental license for gross negligence and Root Canal Cover-Up Exposed has come under great criticism.[citation needed]

Bacteremia (bacteria in the bloodstream) can be caused by many everyday activities, e.g. brushing teeth, but may also occur after any dental procedure which involves bleeding. It is particularly likely after dental extractions due to the movement of the tooth and force needed to dislodge it, but endodontically treated teeth alone do not cause bacteremia or systemic disease.[51]

Alternatives[edit]

The alternatives to root canal therapy include no treatment or tooth extraction. Following tooth extraction, options for prosthetic replacement may include dental implants, a fixed partial denture (commonly referred to as a 'bridge'), or a removable denture.[52] There are risks to forgoing treatment, including pain, infection and the possibility of worsening dental infection such that the tooth will become irreparable (root canal treatment will not be successful, often due to excessive loss of tooth structure). If extensive loss of tooth structure occurs, extraction may be the only treatment option.

Implant therapy versus endodontic therapy[edit]

Research comparing endodontic therapy with implant therapy is considerable, both as an initial treatment and in retreatment for failed initial endodontic approaches.[53] Endodontic therapy allows avoidance of disruption of the periodontal fiber, which helps with proprioception for occlusal feedback, a reflex important in preventing patients from chewing improperly and damaging the temporomandibular joint. In a comparison of initial nonsurgical endodontic treatment and single-tooth implants, both were found to have similar success rates.[54] While the procedures are similar in terms of pain and discomfort, a notable difference is that patients who have implants have reported "the worst pain of their life" during the extraction, with the implantation itself being relatively painless. The worst pain of endodontic therapy was reported with the initial anesthetic injection. Some patients receiving implants also describe a dull nagging pain after the procedure, while those with endodontic therapy describe "sensation" or "sensitivity" in the area.[55] Other studies have found that endodontic therapy patients report the maximum pain the day following treatment, while extraction and implantation patients reported maximum pain the end of the week after the operation.[56]

Implants also take longer, with a typically 3- to 6-month gap between the tooth implantation and receiving the crown, depending on the severity of infection. With regard to gender, women tend to report higher psychological disability after endodontic therapy, and a higher rate of physical disability after tooth implantation, while men do not show a statistically significant difference in response.[55]Mastication is significantly stronger in endodontically treated teeth as compared to implants.[57] Initial success rates after single tooth implants and endodontic microsurgery are similar the first 2 to 4 years following surgery, though after this the success rate of endodontic microsurgery is decreased as compared to implantation.[56]

To an extent, the criteria for success due to the inherent differences in the procedure have historically limited comparisons, with success of endodontic therapy defined as the absence of periapical lucency on radiographs, or the absence of visible cavity at the root of the tooth on imaging. Implant success, on the other hand, is defined by osseointegration, or fusion of the implant to the adjacent maxilla or mandible.[56] Endodontically treated teeth have significantly less requirement for follow up treatment after final restoration, while implants need more appointments to finish treatment and more maintenance.[58] Socioeconomically, Americans of European descent and affluent patients tend to choose implant therapy, while African American and less affluent patients prefer endodontic therapy.[59]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Root_canal_treatment

Follow-Up

You’re likely to experience some pain or discomfort following an apicoectomy, as you will have infected tissue removed and be injected with anesthetics. Avoid eating while you’re still experiencing any numbness to avoid harming your mouth or stitches.

As your apicoectomy removes infected tissue, you could feel better than you did quickly after the surgery!

But what’s the normal recovery time? According to the American Association of Endodontists, pain after surgery is generally low, and many return to their normal routines the day after surgery. However, it can take several months for the bone to heal around the root fully.

Steps you can take after your apicoectomy:

  • Practice your dental routine especially gently as not to aggravate sensitive areas
  • Avoid smoking, crunchy foods, or damaging any stitches
  • Take medications as prescribed and follow provided aftercare instructions
  • Use over-the-counter pain relievers or anti-inflammatories to help with discomfort or swelling
  • Follow up with your dental professional if your stitches require removal (many dissolve on their own!)
  • Apply a cold compress or ice pack to the affected area for twenty minutes on, twenty minutes off (according to the Cleveland Clinic)

Though dental procedures can be challenging, many find their apicoectomy to require less recovery than a root canal treatment.

Important note: Contact your dental professional if you’re experiencing unusual or extreme symptoms. Be on the lookout for abnormal pain, swelling, numbness, or find signs of infection (like discharge draining into your mouth). When in doubt, it's best to reach out for professional advice.

Источник: https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/root-canals/apicoectomy
Education by Dr. Yuriy May Connecticut Holistic Dentist" width="368" height="147">Root canal therapy is typically recommended when a conventional dentist notices advanced decay extending into the dentin of a tooth. They say this will “save” the tooth, but in reality, it saves only the outer structure. In other words, the ‘banana peel’ of the tooth is preserved, while the ‘banana fruit’ inside is sucked out, and replaced with cement. This is analogous to the tooth structure being the external hard surface and in the pulp inside the root canals of the tooth structure, which is a living organ of real tissue that made the tooth alive and supplied it with nutrients – is removed. The tooth is now dead. The patient has had experienced a “root canal” procedure. Murder of the pulp, the life supply, of the tooth.The hollowed-out pulp chamber is then filled with a putty-like substance and sealed with a restoration.

Root Canal Dangers Dr. Tom Levy Biological Dentist CT NY NJ RI Natural Dentistry

Understanding the Root Canal Process & Anatomy: What does the Root Canal Accomplish? 

Is a Tooth Alive or is it a Dead Bone?  Does a Tooth Need a Nerve? Does the Tooth Need Blood Supply?Root Canal Alternative , Root Canal Toxicity, Tooth Anatomy, Holistic Dentist USA

  1. A tooth is a living, breathing, permeable appendage in the human body – just like a piece of bone in your leg, or finger on your hand. We refer to healthy, alive teeth as vital. (See the image above: The Tooth is ALIVE & Part of the System)
  2.  A tooth has a nerve (or pulp) inside that connects the inner structure of the tooth to the body’s waste system (lymphatic system) and nutrient system (cardiovascular system). The nerve provides the tooth with blood supply, nutrients, and with immune system defensive cells like T-Cells and cytokines. The nerve also is connected to the nervous system and has a feedback mechanism to alarm the human body when there is bacteria or damage to the tooth, the alarm system is called: PAIN.
  3. A tooth is made up of several components (See Image right: (a) Tooth, sectional view) with both the dentin and enamel being permeable, comprised of millions of microtubules which allow serum, microorganisms, nutrients, and cellular debris to pass through them. Remember: a tooth is not like glass (non-permeable), quite the opposite, it’s like a paper towel, or better said,  it is like all the other structures in our body, completely permeable. This means that microbes, pathogens, nutrients, serum, and molecules all easily pass throughout dental tubules and tooth structure – whether the canals are filled with gunk from an endodontist or have their original nerve and pulp inside. Teeth are permeable, whether root canaled or not.
  4. Event: A tooth is root canal treated, usually due to infection in the pulp chamber or never of the tooth, or because the pain is differential and unattributable to any specific abnormality. The patient is relieved of pain, but not necessarily of infection. The patient goes home happy, and lives life until the potential failure of the root canal that may lead to a secondary infection…why? Let’s read section 5. below.
  5. A tooth that no longer has a blood supply, loses its viability, becomes a non-viable, necrotic (dead) appendage in the body, can be clinically called dead. The lack of blood supply (post root canal procedure) prevents the immune system cells from fighting infections and bacteria inside the tooth. This leaves the dead tooth vulnerable to pathogens attacking its cellular matrix and festering inside the tooth without any defense.
  6. A tooth that no longer has its nerve or pulp in the canals of its teeth, loses viability, becomes a “non-viable” tooth that is considered by biological dentists to be a necrotic (dead) appendage in the body. Removal of the nerve prevents the very precious (yet unpleasant) critical feedback system (the body’s alarm system, or pain sensors) from being able to send pain signals to the patient. While the patient and doctor may seem thrilled that the pain is no more, this is actually extremely DANGEROUS. Why? Having no pain receptor in the tooth and losing all pain signaling pathways back to the brain prevents the tooth’s alarm system from going off when a serious and dangerous infection is brewing within the root-canaled, non-viable tooth. Without the “distress” signal of pain, a very serious infection could be eating the alveolus bone (the bone surrounding the bone) and the patient won’t know it until the infection is SO big that it begins to attack the adjacent teeth and tissues.
  7. Due to the lack of distress signal (pain feedback) in case of infection and decay in the tooth, most infections in root-canaled teeth may go undetected for too long and have time to potentially cause excessive damage to the surrounding oral environment, including bone and tissue degeneration. In some cases, by the time Dr. May is able to diagnose and treat the silently screaming infection, often larger more invasive surgeries are required to remove the necrotic bone and tissue and significant bone grafting must be done to replace the missing bone. If adjacent teeth have not yet been implicated or lost due to lateral spread of the infection, the costs of the surgery and grafting alone, oftentimes make patients wish they had done the root canal research PRIOR to trusting their traditional dentist or endodontist.
  8. Fast forward to an infected root canal: Now the biological dentist, such as Dr. May, considers extracting the infected root canal tooth (the dead tooth is going to have a funeral, as it should!) and disinfect/clean the surgical site with ozone , and then graft the extraction site with PRF grafting material to regenerate bone in order to support the ideal restoration long term: a biocompatible, metal-free, zirconia dental implant!
    1. You paid for a root canal (and endured one) $$$ & OUCH
    2. Your root-canaled tooth (potentially) develops a secondary infection because its dead and the bacteria are still in the tooth $$ & Ouch Again
    3. Your infection (potentially) spirals out of control because you didn’t feel any pain, because your dead tooth had no nerve to give you fair warning.  Uh Oh & Ouch
    4. You now may need your tooth extracted, disinfected during surgery, grafted. You pay for (and endure) extraction and grafting surgery. $ & Ouch Again
    5. You now may need to pay for an implant, abutment and a crown. $ & Ouch Again
  9. Wouldn’t it have been nice if you avoided Steps 8.1 to 8.3 and just had to incur the cost and the pain of only going through Steps 8.4 to 8.5?

Root Canal Toxicity Dangers: Side Effects of Root Canals

Our bodies are not made of solid, impermeable structures or barriers. In other words, bones and tooth structures are not 100% non-permeable materials through which liquid or microbes cannot pass (like steel, silicone or plastic). Our bones and tissue are all semi-permeable, which means, microbes, pathogens, nutrients, serum and molecules can pass through our tooth and bone structure at all times. This leads us to the eye opening realization that Hal Huggin’s has spent his life educating dental practitioners and patients alike on, and which holistic and biological dentists have embraced: Everything in our body that is alive is permeable, nothing in our body can be 100% sterilized, our body’s pathways are far more complex than meets the eye or the microscope, our tools to battle nature are limited, and infections are never local.

Our bones, teeth and all tissues are semi-permeable:
There is no way to create and permeable seal using the remaining root tooth structure from the inside, or from the outside. It is impossible to seal a tooth with removed pulp, where infection or necrotic tissue once resided.

Impossible to 100% Disinfect the Inside of the Tooth by Removing the Pulp:
There is no way to guarantee 100% of the bacteria/infection or dead tissue has been removed, as inflections can travel through the microtubules of the actual tooth structure and a dentists’ tools, including burrs and liquid disinfectant (think bleach/alcohol/antibiotics, cannot reach all microscopic crevices of the tooth structure and reach all tissue. This means it is nearly impossible to remove 100% of the necrotic tissue or infection.

Endodontist Alternative, Root Canal Alternative, Root Canal Danger  <div><div><h3>Follow-Up</h3><p>You’re likely to experience some pain or discomfort following an apicoectomy, as you will have infected tissue removed and be injected with anesthetics. Avoid eating while you’re still experiencing any numbness to avoid harming your mouth or stitches.</p><p>As your apicoectomy removes infected tissue, you could feel better than you did quickly after the surgery!</p><p>But what’s the normal recovery time? According to the American Association of Endodontists, pain after surgery is <strong>generally low</strong>, and many return to their normal routines the day after surgery. However, it can take several months for the bone to heal around the root fully.</p><p>Steps you can take after your apicoectomy:</p><ul><li>Practice your <strong>dental routine</strong> especially gently as not to aggravate sensitive areas</li><li>Avoid smoking, crunchy foods, or damaging any stitches</li><li>Take medications as prescribed and follow provided aftercare instructions</li><li>Use over-the-counter pain relievers or anti-inflammatories to help with discomfort or swelling</li><li>Follow up with your dental professional if your stitches require removal (many dissolve on their own!)</li><li>Apply a cold compress or ice pack to the affected area for <strong>twenty minutes on, twenty minutes off</strong> (according to the Cleveland Clinic)</li></ul><p>Though dental procedures can be challenging, many find their apicoectomy to require less recovery than a root canal treatment.</p><p><strong>Important note</strong>: Contact your dental professional if you’re experiencing unusual or extreme symptoms. Be on the lookout for abnormal pain, swelling, numbness, or find signs of infection (like discharge <strong>draining into your mouth</strong>). Can you reverse the need for a root canal in doubt, it's best to reach out for professional advice.</p></div>Источник: https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/root-canals/apicoectomy</div> <div><h2>How Long Does It Take For a Cavity To Develop?</h2><div><div><p></p></div><div><img src=

Cavities don't just form overnight. It can take months, or possibly even years, before the decay process advances to the point where a tooth requires attention. The entire process of tooth demineralization takes place whenever an acidic oral environment exists, and fortunately, this environment isn't the norm for a person's mouth. 

 

Early-stage tooth decay can be corrected when it's caught early enough, which is why it's so essential to visit your dentist every six months for an exam. 

 

Every Cavity Is Different

The time it takes for a cavity to form varies. It can, on average, take anywhere from six months to four or five years before a cavity requires treatment. The length of time it takes will vary on a case-by-case basis because how to put money on the cash app card conditions of your mouth differ daily. This means that a cavity can start to form and then not have the right conditions to continue to develop. A cavity won't just go away on its own; however, it can be slower to form, which allows your dentist to correct the issue before it gets worse. 

 

Factors That Come Into Play 

There are several types of factors that can significantly influence the length of time it takes for a cavity to form. The most common factors that can increase or decrease the speed in which cavity forms include:

 

  • Acid Levels – Cavities will start to develop when acid levels in the mouth increase.

 

  • The number of Acid Attacks – Teeth are extremely strong. However, if a tooth is subjected to multiple small acid attacks, eventually, a cavity will form.

 

  • Location Where the Cavity is Forming – Enamel is durable and contains minerals, which means it will take longer for a cavity to form in enamel than in the dentin of a tooth.

 

  • The thickness of the Tooth Enamel – Tooth enamel is thinner near the gum line, which means that cavities form quicker near the gums than they do on the tops of teeth.

 

  • Quality of the Tooth Enamel – Enamel that contains lots of minerals will take longer to get a cavity than enamel that has fewer minerals.

 

Tooth Damage CAN Be Reversed

If your dentist tells you that you have a cavity forming, there are ways to stop early-stage tooth decay from progressing into a full-blown cavity. The process known as remineralization can occur, which can reverse tooth decay. 

 

Remineralization can correct damage to a tooth. When a cavity begins to form, the enamel or dentin starts to lose valuable minerals that protect the tooth. You can help to put these valuable materials back into the tooth by remineralizing it. The tooth will start to strengthen itself and repair the decay to the point where a cavity is no longer forming. 

 

While remineralization can reverse some damage to the surface of a tooth and prevent some cavities, it won't work for all situations. If the damage to the enamel or dentin is too severe, the process will be ineffective, and the cavity will need to be treated by your dentist. 

 

Cavity Prevention Is Simple 

You can do your part in helping to protect your teeth from tooth decay by following a few simple guidelines:

 

  • Gently brush your teeth at least twice a day for a full two minutes with a soft-bristled toothbrush and fluoride toothpaste.
  • Floss once a day. 
  • Incorporate a fluoride mouthwash into your oral care routine. 
  • Avoid sugary and starchy foods, and avoid frequent snacking. 

Having regular teeth cleanings and exams every six months is another necessary step in eliminating cavity-causing plaque and tartar. During these exams, your dentist will be able to identify any early signs of tooth decay and give you the tools and knowledge to combat cavities. Contact Tompkins Dental to schedule an appointment for a routine dental cleaning and exam. 

Dental Implant Recovery Timeline FAQ

Here’s a list of dental implant recovery timeline FAQ, including if dental implants are really worth the healing time and upfront costs in Ithaca.

How Long Should a Filling Last?

Dental fillings have a limited period of use before they fail, so it’s good to know the signs of a failing filling and when it needs to be replaced in Ithaca.

Tompkins Dental, Ithaca, NY

Phone (appointments): 607-257-8065 Education by Dr. Yuriy May Connecticut Holistic Dentist" width="368" height="147">Root canal therapy is typically recommended when a conventional dentist notices advanced decay extending into the dentin of a tooth. They say this will “save” the tooth, but in reality, it saves only the outer structure. In other words, the ‘banana peel’ of the tooth is preserved, while the ‘banana fruit’ inside is sucked out, and replaced with cement. This is analogous to the tooth structure being the external hard surface and in the pulp inside the root canals of the tooth structure, which is a living organ of real tissue that made the tooth alive and supplied it with nutrients – is removed. The tooth is now dead. The patient has had experienced a “root canal” procedure. Murder of the pulp, the life supply, of the tooth.The hollowed-out pulp chamber is then filled with a putty-like substance and sealed with a restoration.

Root Canal Dangers Dr. Tom Levy Biological Dentist CT NY NJ RI Natural Dentistry

Understanding the Root Canal Process & Anatomy: What does the Root Canal Accomplish? 

Is a Tooth Alive or is it a Can you reverse the need for a root canal Bone?  Does a Tooth Need a Nerve? Does the Tooth Need Blood Supply?Root Canal AlternativeRoot Canal Toxicity, Tooth Anatomy, Holistic Dentist USA

  1. A tooth is a living, breathing, permeable appendage in the human body – just like a piece of bone in your leg, or finger on your hand. We refer to healthy, alive teeth as vital. (See the image above: The Tooth is ALIVE & Part of the System)
  2.  A tooth has a nerve (or pulp) inside that connects the inner structure of the tooth to the body’s waste crystal coast nc beach house rentals (lymphatic system) and nutrient system (cardiovascular system). The nerve provides the tooth with blood supply, nutrients, and with immune system defensive cells like T-Cells and cytokines. The nerve also is connected to the nervous system and has a feedback mechanism to alarm the human body when there is bacteria or damage to the tooth, the alarm system is called: PAIN.
  3. A tooth is made up of several components (See Image right: (a) Tooth, sectional view) with both the dentin and enamel being permeable, comprised of millions of microtubules which allow serum, microorganisms, nutrients, and cellular debris to pass through them. Remember: a tooth is not like glass (non-permeable), quite the opposite, it’s like a paper towel, or better said,  it is like all the other structures in our body, completely permeable. This means that microbes, pathogens, nutrients, serum, and molecules all easily pass throughout dental tubules and tooth structure – whether the canals are filled with gunk from an endodontist or have their original nerve and pulp inside. Teeth are permeable, whether root canaled or not.
  4. Event: A tooth is root canal treated, usually due to infection in the pulp chamber or never of the tooth, or because the pain is differential and unattributable to any specific abnormality. The patient is relieved of pain, but not necessarily of infection. The patient goes home happy, and lives life until the potential failure of the root canal that may lead to a secondary infection…why? Let’s read section 5. below.
  5. A tooth that no longer has a blood supply, loses its viability, becomes a non-viable, necrotic (dead) appendage in the body, can be clinically called dead. The lack of blood supply (post root canal procedure) prevents the immune system cells from fighting infections and bacteria inside the tooth. This leaves the dead tooth vulnerable to pathogens attacking its cellular matrix and festering inside the tooth without any defense.
  6. A tooth that no longer has its nerve or pulp in the canals of its teeth, loses viability, becomes a “non-viable” tooth that is considered by biological dentists to be a necrotic (dead) appendage in the body. Removal of the nerve prevents the very precious (yet unpleasant) critical feedback system (the body’s alarm system, or pain sensors) from being able to send pain signals to the patient. While the patient and doctor may seem thrilled that the pain is no more, this is actually extremely DANGEROUS. Why? Having no pain receptor in the tooth and losing all pain signaling pathways back to the brain prevents the tooth’s alarm system from going off when a serious and dangerous infection is brewing within the root-canaled, non-viable tooth. Without the “distress” signal of pain, a very serious infection could be eating the alveolus bone (the bone surrounding the bone) and the patient won’t know it until the infection is SO big that it begins to attack the adjacent teeth and tissues.
  7. Due to the lack of distress signal (pain feedback) in case of infection and decay in the tooth, most infections in root-canaled teeth may go undetected for too long and have time to potentially cause excessive damage to the surrounding oral environment, including bone and tissue degeneration. In some cases, by the time Dr. May is able to diagnose and treat the silently screaming infection, often larger more invasive surgeries are required to remove the necrotic bone and tissue and significant bone grafting must be done to replace the missing bone. If adjacent teeth have not yet been implicated or lost due to lateral spread of the infection, the costs of the surgery and grafting alone, oftentimes make patients wish they had done the root canal research PRIOR to trusting their traditional dentist or endodontist.
  8. Fast forward to an infected root canal: Now the biological dentist, such as Dr. May, considers extracting the infected root canal tooth (the dead tooth is going to have a funeral, as it should!) and disinfect/clean the surgical site with ozoneand then graft the extraction site with PRF grafting material to regenerate bone in order to support the ideal restoration long term: a biocompatible, metal-free, zirconia dental implant!
    1. You paid for a root canal (and endured one) $$$ & OUCH
    2. Your root-canaled tooth (potentially) develops a secondary infection because its dead and the bacteria are still in the tooth $$ & Ouch Again
    3. Your infection (potentially) spirals out of control because you didn’t feel any pain, because your dead tooth had no nerve to give you fair warning.  Uh Oh & Ouch
    4. You now may need your tooth extracted, disinfected during surgery, grafted. You pay for (and endure) extraction and grafting surgery. $ & Ouch Again
    5. You now may need to pay for an implant, abutment and a crown. $ & Ouch Again
  9. Wouldn’t it have been nice if you avoided Steps 8.1 to 8.3 and just had to incur the cost and the pain of only going through Steps 8.4 to 8.5?

Root Canal Toxicity Dangers: Side Effects of Root Canals

Our bodies are not made of solid, impermeable structures or barriers. In other words, bones and tooth structures are not 100% non-permeable materials through which liquid or microbes cannot pass (like steel, silicone or plastic). Our bones and tissue are all semi-permeable, which welcome home real estate, microbes, pathogens, nutrients, serum and molecules can pass through our tooth and bone structure at all times. This leads us to the eye opening realization that Hal Huggin’s has spent his life educating dental practitioners and patients alike on, and which holistic and biological dentists have embraced: Everything in our body that is alive is permeable, nothing in our body can be 100% sterilized, our body’s pathways are far more complex than meets the eye or the microscope, our tools to battle nature are limited, and infections are never local.

Our bones, teeth and all tissues are semi-permeable:
There is no way to create and permeable seal using the remaining root tooth structure from the inside, or from the outside. It is impossible to seal a tooth with removed pulp, where infection or necrotic tissue once resided.

Impossible to 100% Disinfect the Inside of the Tooth by Removing the Pulp:
There is no way to guarantee 100% of the bacteria/infection or dead tissue has been removed, as inflections can travel through the microtubules of the actual tooth structure and a dentists’ tools, including burrs and liquid disinfectant (think bleach/alcohol/antibiotics, cannot reach all microscopic crevices of the tooth structure and reach all tissue. This means it is nearly impossible to remove 100% of the necrotic tissue or infection.

Endodontist Alternative, Root Canal Alternative, Root Canal Danger <div><h2>Holistic dentist offers effective root canal therapy alternatives in Richmond, VA</h2><div><p>Root canal therapy has been used for many years in traditional dentistry to try to “save” a tooth that is deeply infected or damaged. It is up to a patient to decide if they would like to do a root canal treatment. As a holistic dentist, Dr. Olivia Hart from Richmond Family Dentistry offers her Richmond, VA area patients a possible alternative.</p><p>Zirconia dental implants and ceramic bridges are healthy, biocompatible alternatives. Below, Dr. Hart explains why!</p><h3>Why dentists perform root canals</h3><p>Also called “endodontic therapy,” root canals are performed when a tooth is severely compromised due to one of the following:</p><ul><li>Infection</li><li>Abscess</li><li>Traumatic injury</li><li>Deep decay</li><li>A major crack or chip in the tooth</li><li>Multiple dental procedures on the same tooth</li></ul><p>When someone opts to have a root canal, they often have severe pain before their treatment. While root canal therapy does relieve this pain, it might not eliminate the source of infection, inflammation, and toxins that are then free to circulate through your bloodstream and can wreak havoc throughout your body. Additionally, certain lifestyle factors can increase the risk of the treatment, such as smoking after a can you reverse the need for a root canal canal.</p><h3>How to cure a tooth infection without a root canal</h3><p>Many patients ask us, “Are there alternatives to a root canal?” The answer is “Yes!”</p><p>In fact, there are alternatives to this treatment that help eliminate the bacteria and toxins that would otherwise be trapped in the decayed or infected tooth. The most common holistic alternatives to root canals are:</p><ul><li><strong>Zirconia implants</strong>: These biocompatible tooth restorations provide unparalleled stability, function, and feel. They are used to replace your natural tooth root and are topped with a natural-looking crown.</li></ul><ul><li><strong>Ceramic bridges</strong>: These are also a good biocompatible tooth replacement option. The missing tooth is fabricated from natural-looking porcelain and then attached to your existing teeth.</li></ul><ul><li><strong>Dental crowns</strong><strong>: </strong>A common question is whether you can have a crown without a root canal. In fact, most crowns do not need a root canal – they can be used any time a tooth is damaged and needs a boost in strength, to restore its original shape, or to give it a more natural appearance. Dr. Hart is pleased to offer same-day crowns so you can get back to your regular life as soon as possible.</li></ul><h3>Treatments offered at Richmond Family Dentistry</h3><p>Depending on your specific oral health needs and what the cause of your pain is, Dr. Hart will recommend the appropriate treatment and discuss any questions you have about it before proceeding.</p><p>If you are interested in learning more about alternatives to root canal treatment that are suitable for your oral health needs, call us at (804) 381-6238 or email us at info@richmondfamilydentistry.com to schedule an appointment today!</p></div>Источник: https://www.richmondfamilydentistry.com/root-canal-therapy-alternatives.html</div> <div><h2>Root canal treatment</h2><div><p>Dental treatment</p><table><tbody><tr><td><div><img alt=

This article needs to be updated. Please help update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information.(December 2017)

Root canal treatment
Root canalioso.jpg

Tooth #13, the upper left second premolar, after excavation of DO decay. There was a carious exposure into the pulp chamber (red oval), and the photo was taken after endodontic access was initiated and the roof of the chamber was removed.

Specialtyendodontics

[edit on Wikidata]

Root canal procedure: unhealthy or injured tooth, subsequent creation of an access cavity with a dental handpiece, cleaning & shaping the root canals with an endodontic file, and restoration with gutta-perchafillingand a crown
Removing infected pulp during a root canal procedure

Root canal treatment (also known as endodontic therapy, endodontic treatment, or root canal therapy) is a treatment sequence for the infectedpulp of a tooth which is intended to result in the elimination of infection and the protection of the decontaminated tooth from future microbial invasion.[1]Root canals, and their associated pulp chamber, are the physical hollows within a tooth that are naturally inhabited by nerve tissue, blood vessels and other cellular entities. Together, these items constitute the dental pulp.[2]

Endodontic therapy involves the removal of these structures, disinfection and the subsequent shaping, cleaning, and decontamination of the hollows with small files and irrigating solutions, and the obturation (filling) of the decontaminated canals. Filling of the cleaned and decontaminated canals is done with an inert filling such as gutta-percha and typically a zinc oxide eugenol-based cement.[3]Epoxy resin is employed to bind gutta-percha in some root canal procedures.[4] Another option is to use an antiseptic filling material containing paraformaldehyde like N2.[5] Endodontics includes both primary and secondary endodontic treatments as well as periradicular surgery which is generally used for teeth that still have potential for salvage.[6][7]

Treatment procedure[edit]

The procedure is often complicated, depending on circumstances, and may involve multiple visits over a period of weeks.

Dentist performing root canal treatment process

Diagnostic and preparation[edit]

An x-ray of a root canal operation

Before endodontic therapy is carried out, a correct diagnosis of the dental pulp and the surrounding periapical tissues is required. This allows the endodontist to choose the most appropriate treatment option, allowing preservation and longevity of the tooth and surrounding tissues. Treatment options for an irreversibly inflamed pulp (irreversible pulpitis) include either extraction of the tooth or removal of the pulp.

Removing the infected/inflamed pulpal tissue enables the endodontist to help preserve the longevity and function of the tooth. The treatment option chosen involves taking into account the expected prognosis of the tooth, as well as the patient's wishes. A full history is required (which includes the patient's symptoms and medical history), along with a clinical examination (both inside and outside the mouth), and the use of diagnostic tests.[8]

There are several diagnostic tests that can aid in the diagnosis of the dental pulp and the surrounding tissues. These include:

  • Palpation (this is where the tip of the root is felt from the overlying tissues to see if there is any swelling or tenderness present)
  • Mobility (this is assessing if there is more than normal movement of the tooth in the socket)
  • Percussion (TTP, tender to percussion; the tooth is tapped to see if there is any tenderness)
  • Transillumination (shining a light through the tooth to see if there are any noticeable fractures)
  • Tooth Slooth (this is where the patient is asked to bite down upon a plastic instrument; useful if the patient complains of pain on biting as this can be used to localise the tooth)
  • Radiographs
  • Dental pulp tests

In the situation that a tooth is considered so threatened (because of decay, cracking, etc.) that future infection is considered likely or inevitable, a pulpectomy (removal of the pulp tissue) is advisable to prevent such infection. Usually, some inflammation and/or infection is already present within or below the tooth. To cure the infection and save the tooth, the dentist drills into the pulp chamber and removes the infected pulp. To get freedom of bacteria the use of efficient antiseptics and disinfectants is necessary.[9] One of the most effective is N2 root canal material which contains a small dose of paraformaldehyde.[10] The nerve is either drilled out of the root canal(s)with engine driven files or with long needle-shaped hand instruments known as files (H files and K files).

Opening in the crown[edit]

The dentist makes an opening through the enamel and dentin tissues of the tooth, usually using a dental drill fitted with a dental burr.

Isolating the tooth

The use of a rubber dam for tooth isolation is mandatory in endodontic treatment for several reasons:

  1. It provides an aseptic operating field, isolating the tooth from oral and salivary contamination. Root canal contamination with saliva introduces new microorganisms to the root canal which compromise the prognosis.
  2. It facilitates the use of the strong medicaments necessary to clean the root canal system.
  3. It protects the patient from the inhalation or ingestion of endodontic instruments.

Removal of pulp tissue[edit]

Procedures for shaping[edit]

There have been a number of progressive iterations to the mechanical preparation of the root canal for endodontic therapy. The first, referred to as the standardized technique, was developed by Ingle in 1961, and had disadvantages such as the potential for loss of working length and inadvertent ledging, zipping or perforation.[11][12] Subsequent refinements have been numerous, and are usually described as techniques. These include the step-back, circumferential filing, incremental, anticurvature filing, step-down, double flare, crown-down-pressureless, balanced force, canal master, apical box, progressive enlargement, modified double flare, passive stepback, alternated rotary motions, and apical patency techniques.[13]

The step back technique, also known as telescopic or serial root canal preparation, is divided in two phases: in the first, the working length is established and then the apical part of the canal is delicately shaped since a size 25 K-file reaches the working length; in the second, the remaining canal is prepared with manual or rotating instrumentation.[14] This procedure, however, has some disadvantages, such as the potential for inadvertent apical transportation. Incorrect instrumentation length can occur, which can be addressed by the modified step back. Obstructing debris can be dealt with by the passive step back technique.[15] The crown down is a procedure in which the dentist prepares the canal beginning from the coronal part after exploring the patency of the whole canal with the master apical file.

There is a hybrid procedure combining step back and crown down: after the canal's patency check, the coronal third is prepared with hand or Gates Glidden drills, then the working length is determined and finally the apical portion is shaped using step back techniques. The double flare is a procedure introduced by Fava where the canal is explored using a small file. Then canal is prepared in crown down manner using K-files then follows a "step back" preparation with 1 mm increments with increasing file sizes. With early coronal enlargement, also described as "three times technique", apical canals are prepared after a working length assessment using an apex locator; then progressively enlarged with Gates Glidden drills (only coronal and middle third). For the eponymic third time the dentist "arrives at the apex" and, if necessary, prepares the foramen with a size 25 K-file; the last phase is divided in two refining passages: the first with a 1-mm staggered instrument, the second with 0.5-mm staggering.[citation needed] From the early nineties engine-driven instrumentation were gradually introduced including the ProFile system, the Greater Taper files, the ProTaper files, and other systems like Light Speed, Quantec, K-3 rotary, Real World Endo, and the Hero 642.[citation needed]

All of these procedures involve frequent irrigation and recapitulation with the master apical file, a small file that reaches the apical foramen.[16] High frequency ultrasound based techniques have also been described. These can be useful in particular for cases with complex anatomy, or for retained foreign body retrieval from a failed prior endodontic procedure.[17]

  • An example of step back technique

  • An example of passive step back technique

  • An example of crown down technique

Operative techniques for instruments[edit]

There are two slightly different anti-curvature techniques. In the balanced forces technique, the dentist inserts a file into the canal and rotates clockwise a quarter of a turn, engaging dentin, then rotates counter-clockwise half/ three-quarter of a revolution, applying pressure in an apical direction, shearing off tissue previously meshed. From the balanced forces stem two other techniques: the reverse balanced force (where GT instruments are rotated first anti-clockwise and then clockwise) and the gentler "feed and pull" where the instrument is rotated only a quarter of a revolution and moved coronally after an engagement, but not drawn out.[citation needed]

Use of anesthetics[edit]

As of 2018, novocaine is most commonly used in dental procedures to numb the area around a tooth.[18] More novocaine is required for a root canal treatment than for a simple filling.[18]

Irrigation[edit]

The root canal is flushed with an irrigant. Some common ones are listed below:

The primary aim of chemical irrigation is to kill microbes and dissolve pulpal tissue.[22] Certain irrigants, such as sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine, have proved to be effective antimicrobials in vitro[22] and are widely used during root canal therapy worldwide. According to a systematic review, however, there is a lack of good quality evidence to support the use of one irrigant over another in terms of both short and long term prognosis of therapy.[23]

Root canal irrigation systems are divided into two categories: manual agitation techniques and machine-assisted agitation techniques. Manual irrigation includes positive-pressure irrigation, which is commonly performed with a syringe and a side vented needle. Machine-assisted irrigation techniques include sonics and ultrasonics, as well as newer systems which deliver apical negative-pressure irrigation.[24]

Filling the root canal[edit]

The standard filling material is gutta-percha, a natural polymer prepared from latex from the percha tree (Palaquium gutta). The standard endodontic technique involves inserting a gutta-percha cone (a "point") into the cleaned-out root canal along with a sealing cement.[25] Another technique uses melted or heat-softened gutta-percha which is then injected or pressed into the root canal passage(s). However, since gutta-percha shrinks as it cools, thermal techniques can be unreliable and sometimes a combination of techniques is used. Gutta-percha is radiopaque, allowing verification afterwards that the root canal passages have been completely filled and are without voids.[citation needed]

An alternative filling material was invented in the early 1950s by Angelo Sargenti. Filling material has undergone several formulations over the years (N2, N2 Universal, RC-2B, RC-2B White), but all contain paraformaldehyde. The paraformaldehyde, when placed into the root canal, forms formaldehyde, which penetrates and sterilizes the passage. The formaldehyde is then theoretically transformed into harmless water and carbon dioxide. According to some research, the outcome of this method is better than a root canal procedure performed with gutta-percha. There is, however, a lack of indisputable scientific studies according to the Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment.[citation needed]

Root canal sealer used to fill the spaces between the gutta-percha and the walls of root canal and between the gutta-percha cones

In rare cases, the paste, like any other material, can be forced past the root tip into the surrounding bone. If this happens, the formaldehyde will immediately be transformed into a harmless substance. Blood normally contains 2 mg formaldehyde per liter and the body regulates this in seconds. The rest of an overfill will be gradually absorbed and the end result is normally good. In 1991, the ADA Council on Dental Therapeutics resolved that the treatment was "not recommended", and it is not taught in American dental schools. Scientific evidence in endodontic therapy was, and still is lacking.[26] Despite this lack of support, the Sargenti technique has advocates who believe N2 to be less expensive and at least as safe as gutta-percha.[27]

Pain control can be difficult to achieve at times because of anesthetic inactivation by the acidity of the abscess around the tooth apex. Sometimes the abscess can be drained, antibiotics prescribed, and the procedure reattempted when inflammation has been mitigated. The tooth can also be unroofed to allow drainage and help relieve pressure.[citation needed]

A root treated tooth may be eased from the occlusion as a measure to prevent tooth fracture prior to the cementation of a crown or similar restoration. Sometimes the dentist performs preliminary treatment of the tooth by removing all of the infected pulp of the tooth and applying a dressing and temporary filling to the tooth. This is called a pulpectomy. The dentist may also remove just the coronal portion of the dental pulp, which contains 90% of the nerve tissue, and leave intact the pulp in the canals. This procedure, called a "pulpotomy", tends to essentially eliminate all the pain. A pulpotomy may be a relatively definitive treatment for infected primary teeth. The pulpectomy and pulpotomy procedures aim to eliminate pain until the follow-up visit for finishing the root canal procedure. Further occurrences of pain could indicate the presence of continuing infection or retention of vital nerve tissue.[citation needed]

Some dentists may decide to temporarily fill the canal with calcium hydroxide paste in order to thoroughly sterilize the site. This strong base is left in place for a week or more to disinfect and reduce inflammation in surrounding tissue, requiring the patient to return for a second or third visit to complete the procedure. There appears to be no benefit from this multi-visit option, however, and single-visit procedures actually show better (though not statistically significant) patient outcomes than multi-visit ones.[28]

Temporary filling[edit]

A temporary filling material is applied between the visits.[29] Leaky temporary filling will allow the root canals to become reinfected by bacteria in the saliva (coronal microleakage). Khayat et al. showed that all root canals obturated with gutta-percha and root canal sealer using either lateral or vertical condensation were recontaminated in less than 30 days when exposed to saliva.[30] Therefore, maintaining a coronal seal throughout root canal therapy is very important for the success of the treatment.[31]

Final restoration[edit]

Molars and premolars that have had root canal therapy should be protected with a crown that covers the cusps of the tooth. This is because the access made into the root canal system removes a significant amount of tooth structure. Molars and premolars are the primary teeth used in chewing and will almost certainly fracture in the future without cuspal coverage. Anterior teeth typically do not require full coverage restorations after a root canal procedure, unless there is extensive tooth loss from decay or for esthetics or unusual occlusion. Placement of a crown or cusp-protecting cast gold covering is recommended also because these have the best ability to seal the treated tooth. There is insufficient evidence to assess the effects of crowns compared to conventional fillings for the restoration of root-filled teeth, decision of restoration should rely on the clinical experience of the practitioner and the preference of the patients.[32] If the tooth is not perfectly sealed, the canal may leak, causing eventual failure. A tooth with a root canal treatment still has the ability to decay, and without proper home care and an adequate fluoride source the tooth structure can become severely decayed (often twitter app for xbox one the patient's knowledge since the nerve has been removed, leaving the tooth without any pain perception). Thus, non-restorable carious destruction is the main reason for extraction of teeth after root canal therapy, accounting for up to two-thirds of these extractions.[33] Therefore, it is very important to have regular X-rays taken of the root canal to ensure that the tooth is not having any problems that the patient would not be aware of.[citation needed]

Endodontic retreatment[edit]

Endodontic treatment may fail for many reasons: one common reason for failure is inadequate chemomechanical debridement of the root canal. This may be due to poor endodontic access, missed anatomy or inadequate shaping of the canal, particularly in the apical third of the root canal, also due to the difficulty of reaching the accessory canals which are minute canals that extend in from the pulp to the periodontium in a random direction. They are mostly found in the apical third of the root.[34]

Exposure of the obturation material to the oral environment may mean the gutta-percha is contaminated with oral bacteria. If complex and expensive restorative dentistry is contemplated then ideally the contaminated gutta percha would be replaced in a retreatment procedure to minimise the risk of failure.

The type of bacteria found within a failed canal may differ from the normal infected tooth. Enterococcus faecalis and/or other facultative enteric bacteria or Pseudomonas sp. are found in this situation.

Endodontic retreatment is technically demanding; it can be a time-consuming procedure, bank of america dividend pay date meticulous care is required by the dentist. Retreatment cases are typically referred to a specialist endodontist. Use of an operating microscope or other magnification may improve outcomes.

Currently, there is no strong evidence favoring surgical or non-surgical retreatment of periapical lesions. However, studies have reported that patients experience more pain and swelling after surgical retreatment compared to non-surgical. When comparing surgical techniques, the use of ultrasonic devices may improve healing after retreatment. There is no evidence that the use of antibiotics after endodontic retreatment prevents post-operative infection.[35]

Instruments and equipment used[edit]

See also: Endodontic files and reamers and Nickel titanium rotary file

Since 2000 there have been great innovations in the art and science of root canal therapy. Dentists now must be educated on the current concepts in order to optimally perform a root canal procedure. Root canal therapy has become more automated and can be performed faster thanks in part to machine-driven rotary technology and more advanced root canal filling methods. Many root canal procedures are done in one dental visit which may last for around 1–2 hours. Newer technologies are available (e.g. cone-beam CT scanning) that allow more efficient, scientific measurements to be taken of the dimensions of the root canal, however, the use of CT scanning in endodontics has to be justified.[36] Many dentists use dental loupes to perform root canal therapy, and the consensus is that procedures performed using loupes or other forms of magnification (e.g. a surgical microscope) are more likely to succeed than those performed without them. Although general dentists are becoming versed in these advanced technologies, they are still more likely to be used by root canal specialist (known as endodontists).

Laser root canal procedures are a controversial innovation. Lasers may be fast but have not been shown to thoroughly disinfect the whole tooth,[37] and may cause damage.[citation needed]

Postoperative pain[edit]

Several randomized clinical trials concluded that the use of rotary instruments is associated with a lower incidence of pain following the endodontic procedure when compared to the use of manual hand instruments.[38][39]Corticosteroid intra-oral injections were found to alleviate pain in the first 24 hours in patients suffering from symptomatic irreversible pulp inflammation.[40]

Complications[edit]

Instrument fractures[edit]

Instruments may separate (break) during root canal treatment, meaning a portion of the metal file used during the procedure remains inside the tooth. The file segment may be left behind if an acceptable level of cleaning and shaping has already been completed and attempting to remove the segment would risk damage to the tooth. While potentially disconcerting to the patient, having metal inside of www mathworksheetsland com grade 6 answer key tooth is relatively common, such as with metal posts, amalgam fillings, gold crowns, and porcelain fused to metal crowns. The occurrence of file separation depends on the narrowness, curvature, length, calcification and number of roots on the tooth being treated. Complications resulting from incompletely cleaned canals, due to what is a td tdap vaccine from the separated file, can be addressed with surgical root canal treatment.[41] To minimise the risk of endodontic files fracturing:[42]

  • Ensure access cavity allows straight-line introduction of files into canals
  • Create a glide path before use of larger taper NiTi files
  • Use rotary instruments at the manufacturer's recommended speed and torque setting
  • Adopt a single-use file policy to prevent overuse of files
  • Inspecting the file thoroughly every time before inserting it inside the canal
  • Using ample amounts of irrigation solutions
  • Avoid use of rotary files in severely curved or dilacerated canals

Sodium hypochlorite accident[edit]

A sodium hypochlorite incident is an immediate reaction of severe pain, followed by edema, haematoma and ecchymosis, as a consequence of the solution escaping the confines of the tooth and entering the periapical space.[43] This may be caused iatrogenically by binding or excessive pressure on the irrigant syringe or it may occur if the tooth has an unusually large apical foramen.[44] It is usually self-resolving and may take two to five weeks to fully resolve.[44]

Tooth discoloration[edit]

Tooth discoloration is common following root canal treatment; however, the exact causes for this are not completely understood.[45] Failure to completely clean out the necrotic soft tissue of the pulp system may cause staining, and certain root canal materials (e.g. gutta percha and root canal sealer cements) can also cause staining.[45] Another possible factor is that the lack of pulp pressure in dentinal tubules once the pulp is removed leads to incorporation of dietary stains in dentin.[45]

Poor-quality root filling[edit]

An X-ray explanation of bad root canal therapy
X-ray explanation of bad root canal therapy

Another common complication of root canal therapy is when the entire length of the root canal is not completely cleaned out and filled (obturated) with root canal filling material (usually gutta percha). On the other hand, the root canal filling material may be extruded from the apex leading to other complications.[46] The X-ray in the right margin shows two adjacent teeth that had received bad root canal therapy. The root canal filling material (3, 4 and 10) does not extend to the end of the tooth roots (5, 6 and 11). The dark circles at the bottom of the tooth roots (7 and 8) indicated infection in the surrounding bone. Recommended treatment is either to redo the root canal therapy if possible, or extract the tooth and place dental implants.[citation needed]

Outcome and prognosis[edit]

Root-canal-treated teeth may fail to heal—for example, if the dentist does not find, clean and fill all of the root canals within a tooth. On a maxillary molar, there is more than a 50% chance that the tooth has four canals instead of just three, but the fourth canal, often called a "mesio-buccal 2", tends to be very difficult to see and often requires special instruments and magnification in order to see it (most commonly found in first maxillary molars; studies have shown an average of 76% up to 96% of such teeth with the presence of an MB2 canal). This infected canal may cause a continued infection or "flare-up" of the tooth. Any tooth may have more canals than expected, and these canals may be missed when the root canal procedure is performed. Sometimes canals may be unusually shaped, making them impossible to clean and fill completely; some infected material may remain in the canal. Sometimes the canal filling does not fully extend to the apex of the tooth, or it does not fill the canal as densely as it should. Sometimes a tooth root may be perforated while the root canal is being treated, making it difficult to fill the tooth. The perforation may be filled with a root repair material, such as one derived from natural cement called mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). A specialist can often re-treat failing root canals, and these teeth will then heal, often years after the initial root canal procedure.[citation needed]

However, the survival or functionality of the endodontically treated tooth is often the most important aspect of endodontic treatment outcomes, rather than apical healing alone.[47] Recent studies indicate that substances commonly used to clean the root canal space incompletely sterilize the canal.[48] A properly restored tooth following root canal therapy yields long-term success rates near 97%. In a large-scale study of over 1.6 million patients who had root canal therapy, 97% had retained their teeth 8 years following the procedure, with most untoward events, such as re-treatment, apical surgery or extraction, occurring during the first 3 years after the initial endodontic treatment.[49] Endodontically treated teeth are prone to extraction mainly due to non-restorable carious destruction, other times due to the improper fit of the crown margins that encircles the tooth which lead to the ingress of bacteria,[50] and to a lesser extent to endodontic-related reasons such as endodontic failure, vertical root fracture, or perforation (procedural error).[33]

Systemic issues[edit]

Nondisruption of the periodontal fiberis a benefit of endodontic over implant therapy (labeled I–K)

An infected tooth may endanger other parts of the body. Wells fargo private bank credit card with special vulnerabilities, such as a recent prosthetic joint replacement, an unrepaired congenital heart defect, or immunocompromisation, may need to take antibiotics to protect from infection spreading during dental procedures. The American Dental Association (ADA) asserts that any risks can be adequately controlled. A properly performed root canal treatment effectively removes the infected part of the pulp from the tooth.[citation needed]

In the early 1900s, several researchers theorized that bacteria from teeth which had necrotic pulps or which had received endodontic treatment could cause chronic or local infection in areas distant from the tooth through the transfer of bacteria through the bloodstream. This was called the "focal infection theory", and it led some dentists to advocate dental extraction. In the 1930s, this theory was discredited, but the theory was recently revived by a book entitled Root Canal Cover-Up Exposed which used the early discredited research, and further complicated by epidemiological studies which found correlations between periodontal disease and heart disease, strokes, and preterm births.[citation needed] The book's author, George Meinig, has been a strong advocate against endodontic therapy for years; he has since lost his dental license for gross negligence and Root Canal Cover-Up Exposed has come under great criticism.[citation needed]

Bacteremia (bacteria in the bloodstream) can be caused by many everyday activities, e.g. brushing teeth, but may also occur after any dental procedure which involves bleeding. It is particularly likely after dental extractions due to the movement of the tooth and force needed to dislodge it, but endodontically treated teeth alone do not cause bacteremia or systemic disease.[51]

Alternatives[edit]

The alternatives to root canal therapy include no treatment or tooth extraction. Following tooth extraction, options for prosthetic replacement may include dental implants, a fixed partial denture (commonly referred to as a 'bridge'), or a removable denture.[52] There are risks to forgoing treatment, including pain, infection and the possibility of worsening dental infection such that the tooth will become irreparable (root canal treatment will not be successful, often due to excessive loss of tooth structure). If extensive loss of tooth structure occurs, extraction may be the only treatment option.

Implant therapy versus endodontic therapy[edit]

Research comparing endodontic therapy with implant therapy is considerable, both as an initial treatment and in retreatment for failed initial endodontic approaches.[53] Endodontic therapy allows avoidance of disruption of the periodontal fiber, which helps with proprioception for occlusal feedback, a reflex important in preventing patients from chewing improperly and damaging the temporomandibular joint. In a comparison of initial nonsurgical endodontic treatment and single-tooth implants, both were found to have similar success rates.[54] While the procedures are similar in terms of pain and discomfort, a notable difference is that patients who have implants have reported "the worst pain of their life" during the extraction, with the implantation itself being relatively painless. The worst pain of endodontic therapy was reported with the initial anesthetic injection. Some patients receiving implants also describe a dull nagging pain after the procedure, while those with endodontic therapy describe "sensation" or "sensitivity" in the area.[55] Other studies have found that endodontic therapy patients report the maximum pain the day following treatment, while extraction and implantation patients reported maximum pain the end of the week after the operation.[56]

Implants also take longer, with a typically 3- to 6-month gap between the tooth implantation and receiving the crown, depending on the severity of infection. With regard to gender, women tend to report higher psychological disability after endodontic therapy, and a higher rate of physical disability after tooth implantation, while men do not show a statistically significant difference in response.[55]Mastication is significantly stronger in endodontically treated teeth as compared to implants.[57] Initial success rates after single tooth implants and endodontic microsurgery are similar the first 2 to 4 years following surgery, though after this the success rate of endodontic microsurgery is decreased as compared to implantation.[56]

To an extent, the criteria for success due to the inherent differences in the procedure have historically limited comparisons, with success of endodontic therapy defined as the absence of periapical lucency on radiographs, or the absence of visible cavity at the root of the tooth on imaging. Implant success, on cnb usa com other hand, is defined by can you reverse the need for a root canal, or fusion of the implant to the adjacent maxilla or mandible.[56] Endodontically treated teeth have significantly less requirement for follow up treatment after final restoration, while implants need more appointments to finish treatment and more maintenance.[58] Socioeconomically, Americans of European descent and affluent patients tend to choose implant therapy, while African American and less affluent patients prefer endodontic therapy.[59]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Root_canal_treatment

Relieving Pain

Have a Tooth Ache?

If you have been experiencing a toothache that has lasted more than a day or two, you may be suffering from an infected tooth. An infection indicates that you need immediate care from Drs. Helen and Joseph Smillie to prevent further complications, and save your tooth. Schedule an appointment today to find out if you can save your tooth with a root canal.

Restore Infected Teeth With

Root Canal Therapy

A root canal is the best way to restore an infected tooth and reverse the damage of a tooth infection. Tooth infections happen when the hard, outer layers of enamel and dentin that protect the inside of your tooth become damaged. Tooth decay is a common cause of tooth infection, but trauma to the tooth can also crack it, and expose the interior of your tooth to oral bacteria. When this happens, the bacteria in your mouth attack the soft, vulnerable pulp inside your tooth, causing an infection. A root canal is used to remove infected tooth material, disinfect the area, and restore the tooth with a dental crown.


Saving an infected tooth with a root canal minimizes future costs and complications. Without proper care, the infection and decay may progress, and your tooth will eventually die. At this point, it will need to be extracted from your mouth, and replaced with a dental prosthesis like a partial denture, a dental bridge, or a dental implant.

Understanding the

Root Canal Process

The root canal process typically takes only 1-2 hours and is pain-free. The first step is to numb the treatment area, clean your teeth, and isolate the tooth that is being treated with a dental dam, to prevent the spread of oral bacteria. 

Next, Dr. Helen or Dr. Joseph Smillie will use a dental drill to remove decayed and damaged enamel and to create a tiny hole in the tooth. Then, he will remove decayed and infected material from within your tooth, and clean it. 

Once the tooth has been disinfected, it will be filled with a rubber-like material that will help support the remaining tooth structure. Then, you’ll have a temporary filling or crown placed. Once your tooth heals completely, you will come back to our office to have a permanent crown placed, which will cover and protect your remaining tooth structure, and prevent further damage.

Have Questions

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If you have more questions about root canals at Smillie Dental, or you are in Port Orange and believe you have an infected tooth and may need a root canal, please contact us right away. The sooner you get treatment, the more likely we are to be able to save your tooth. You can get in touch with us at (386) 317-4754, or drop by our office at 5537 South Williamson Blvd, #675, Port Orange, Florida 32128 to schedule your appointment in person.

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Источник: https://smilliedental.com/services/root-canals/

Read this Root Canal Alternative Page Carefully – It Important! Discover the hidden secrets behind root canals: the systemic link, the potential risks, and dangers never discussed in traditional dental literature, root canal alternatives, and treatment for root-canal treated teeth. Knowledge is power and Natural Dentistry will empower you with life-saving knowledge on root canal realities. Understanding what a root canal is and the difference in medical views between conventional dentists and biological dentists like Dr. May is paramount. Whether the patient chooses a zirconia dental implant to replace to root canal or to follow a more conventional method, such as re-root canal  (a repeat root canal – not typically recommended for reasons explained below) or just an extraction with PRF, the goal is to educate the patient and help them make the healthiest decision for their health and wellbeing. 

Disclaimer: The official position of the American Academy of Endodontists or AAE which is supported by the American Dental Association or ADA, is that root canals are safe and include the following statement: “Decades of research contradict the beliefs of “focal infection” proponents; there is no valid, scientific evidence linking endodontically treated teeth and systemic disease. Yet some patients still hear about this long-dispelled theory.”  As such, we encourage each patient to do their own research as to whether a root canal procedure is right for them, and not solely depend on the information provided on this site.

How to Navigate the Page: After the initial introduction below regarding what we do at Natural Dentistry and Dr. May’s expertise and training in root canal alternatives and root canal infection diagnosing,  please follow the sections of the page that will illuminate the dangers of root canals and the holistic root canal alternatives available.

Jump to Introduction to Root Canal Alternatives & Root Canal Dangers at Natural Dentistry
Jump to Finding the best trained holistic dentist specializing in removing root canals
Jump to How is a Root Canal Infection Diagnosed?
Jump to 3D CBCT Scan Example of Infected Root Canals, Cavitations, Failing Titanium Implants
Jump to Holistic Dentist vs Conventional Dentist Perspective on Root Canals
Jump to How & Why Root Canals Can Cause Health Issues
Jump to Understanding the Process of a Root Canal & Dangers of Root Canals: The Patient Who Didn’t Know Any Better
Jump to Root Canal Toxicity Dangers: Side Effects of Root Canals
Jump to Avoiding a Root Canal – How to Avoid a Root Canal and Seek Root Canal Alternatives Coming Soon!
Jump to Alternatives to Root Canals: Prevent or Remove through Extraction
Jump to Alternatives to Root Canals: Restorative Options After the Extraction

  1. Jump to Best Clinical & Long Term Option: Tooth Extraction with Zirconia Implant
  2. Jump to Acceptable Clinical & Medium Term Option: Tooth Extraction & Bridge or Prosthetic
  3. Jump to Compromised Clinical Option: Tooth Extraction with No Restorative

Jump to VIDEO: Everything You Need to Know About Root Canals (3 Part Series)
Jump to MULTIPLE VIDEOs: Root canal side effects, root canal toxicity, and understanding root canal dangers from the famous doctors
Jump to Root Canal Research Studies & Findings
Jump to Citations

Introduction to Natural Dentistry & Root Canal Infection Diagnosis & Root Canal Alternatives

Infected Root Canal Dangers Root Canal Alternative Biological Dentist USA Dr. Yuriy May Root Canal Zirconia Dental Implant Root Canal InfectionWhat do we do at Natural Dentistry? Dr. May’s goal at Natural Dentistry is to educate every patient on their options when a tooth has an infection and when a tooth with an infected root canal is causing pain and/ or showing signs of infection. A biological dentist’s detailed root canal problem diagnosis and root canal alternatives knowledge empower the patient to can you reverse the need for a root canal the best decision for their health. Additionally, many patients come to Natural Dentistry with unexplained symptoms that are beyond facial, oral or cranial and sometimes are related to root canal systemic side effects that sadly, often go unexplained by doctors and conventional dentists alike. In some cases, root canal sites next to extracted wisdom tooth teeth maybe areas of cavitations otherwise known as NICO or Fatty Degenerativeg Osteomyelitis of the Jawbone which is something Natural Dentistry leads in diagnosing and offering treatment for.

Holistic Dentist Trained in Removing Root Canals: Root Canal Huggins Protocol & Weston A Price

Many of our patients seeking root canal diagnosis and root canal alternatives have done research regarding Hal Huggins’ pioneering research on root canal alternatives and the dangers of root canal treatments and have read about research from Weston A Price. The foundations of biological root canal alternative therapy have their early beginnings from both of the 20th early century pioneers, but with the advents of 3D CBCT Conebeam Technology Scans, ozone therapy, kinesiology testing, and other diagnostic tools the science has progressed much further than the founding fathers of root canals dangers. Not only has Dr. May studied the texts, philosophy, methodology and treatment is introduced by Dr. Huggins but Dr.  May is a modern pioneer that has taken that knowledge and IMPROVED it by innovating new protocols with diagnosis, treatment, and metal-free implant restorations. Dr. May’s work on PRF and ceramic implants (in combination with ozone and oral surgery) is published in several textbooks which you can find a reference to here. In today’s world of progressive biocompatible materials, Dr. May is one of the few dentists in the USA that can offer minimally invasive extractions with Platelet Rich Fibrin to quickly help heal can you reverse the need for a root canal rebuild bone naturally, without synthetic particulates and offer patients the life-long potential restoration of ceramic dental implants. 

How is a Root Canal Infection Diagnosed?

Yes, a 3D Dental Scan is also known as 3D Conebeam or Dental CBCT Scan is one of the only tools to see a root canal infection that is just starting or has been small and unable to be identified by a typical dental x-ray. X-rays ONLY show the coronal surface of the tooth (not the roots) and can’t identify issues with root canals. Periapical X-rays (“PAs”) are the same as an x-ray but show the roots of the tooth sometimes miss the apex of the tooth (tip of the tooth root where root canal infections typically begin) and secondly, can ONLY show a root canal infection after its been brewing for a LONG time and is massive in size (so much so that there is a large abscess or visual fistula and so much bone loss has occurred that the tooth is doomed AGAIN, after its initial death and pulp gutting). What about the root canals that are infected but aren’t the size required to been diagnosed by a conventional dentist without a CBCT scan or without the knowledge to interpret a 3D cone beam scan? What about the tooth that keeps hurting but your bangor savings bank coin counter dentist is telling you “it looks fine on the x-ray” and you don’t know what to do. The answer is: you need a 3D Conebeam Scan and a knowledgeable practitioner who knows how to identify abnormal and infected root canals. 

How Does a Biological Holistic Dentist Diagnose an Abnormal or Infected Root Canal?

Root canals are diagnosed most accurately using a 3D CBCT Scan also known as a 3D Conebeam Image.  While a holistic dentist may have a scan, not every dentist is radiologically trained to properly interpret or read a 3D scan (even though they may take one.) A diagnosis by an experienced biological dentist like Dr. May who also performs the surgery to extract the abnormal infected root canal treated teeth and understands the abnormal anatomy radiologically and how that translates to actual tissue and bone findings via surgery is critical. Typical dental xrays, usually bitewings will NOT diagnose a root canal infection as they do not show anything except the coronal (crown) portion of the tooth. Another form of a dental x-ray is the Periapical Xray (“PA x-ray”) which is just like a bitewing x-ray except it also shows the root of the tooth, thus showing more pertinent information but only in 2D (flat image file) and unless the root canal infection has been festering for an extended period of time, is massively large and has significant bone loss around it, the root canal infection will still likely be undiagnosed by the dentist. Less than 10% of dentists have 3D CBCT scan machines, and of those, less than 10% of them scan patients for any other reasons other black owned banks in san francisco bay area surgery or procedure planning based on an existing diagnosis (nothing to do with the suspect root canal causing potential issues.) The math shows that less than 1% of dentists scan their patients with 3D Conebeams, usually oral surgeons preparing for extractions based on an existing diagnosis or an endodontist to perform a root canal based on an initial diagnosis. Understanding that the 3D Conebeam is generally not used in conventional dentistry to assess unknown root canal can you reverse the need for a root canal, patients should be able to understand why 90+% of root canal infections go undiagnosed by conventional dentists and non-3D CBCT radiology trained dentists. By the time a typical dentist with a typical PA x-ray where only the largest of the large (as in the most grossly obvious infections) can be seen by a dentist. 

3D CBCT Scan Example of Infected Root Canals, Cavitations, Failing Titanium Implants 

Below is the scan of a typical Natural Dentistry patient (this is a 3D Scan that is exported into 2D format ONLY for illustrative purposes – it is housed on the server and accessed by Dr. Yuriy May in 3D format for all clinical purposes) The importance of getting a 3D Conebeam scan cannot be overstated, as it is the only diagnostic tool to identify root canal infections, titanium implant failures, dental cavitations, sinus abnormalities, abnormal bone grafts and other pathological processes which CANNOT be identified on xrays, PAs or 2D panos. 

3D Dental Scan Root Canal Infections Diagnose Dental Infections Holistic Dentist CBCT Jaw Bone Infection Best Holistic Dentist Root Canal Alternatives Dangers of Root Canals Dental Cavitations

Holistic Dentist vs Conventional Dentist Perspective on Root Canals

Conventional Dentist Root Canals Philosophy

Many conventional dentists simply don’t know any better – they learn that root canals are the standard of care in dentistry (which they are!), safe and effective and that the leading clinical option in dentistry is to save a tooth that has started to die or has already died. Think of the conventional dentistry perspective and endodontist perspective as “embalming the tooth” just like funeral homes “embalm a dead body” to make it last longer. Conventional dentists think “the only purpose of the tooth is to chew and exist in the mouth” so if they save it and keep it in the mouth for another 5, 10, 15 years – they have just become heroes and saved the tooth. The failure in the thinking that “root canals save teeth” is that teeth are MORE than just chewing surfaces – they are live organs with immune support and blood flow and autonomous nerve system participation. Once dead, they are dead organs even though conventional dentists consider dead root canal treated teeth “functional” as they still can perform “chewing” functions without pain. Further, teeth are NOT solid, they are permeable organs with interconnectedness into the human cellular matrix to our entire body system. Conventional dentists tend to believe that root canals do not cause side effects, and on rare occasion can develop secondary root infections which are treated by RE-root canaling or performing root canal treatment a SECOND time. If the root canal treated tooth is crumbling, conventional dentist to back to the “hero save a tooth” mentality and put can you reverse the need for a root canal posts to glue and support pieces of the dead and crumbling tooth together, know as a “post and core” mixing together the elements of a dead organ, gutta-percha, metal rods, composite or amalgam metal buildups, and a crown or filling. Root Canal Dangers Root Canal Alternatives Conventional Dentist vs Holistic Dentist Root Canals Natural Dentistry Center Root Canal Alternative Dentist

Holistic Dentist Root Canal Philosophy

Contrary to the conventional dentistry “be a hero, save a dead tooth” approach, holistic dentists tend to believe that teeth are vital organs, with blood flow and lymphatic impacts and the bacteria and infections harbored in a tooth can spread all over the body through the surrounding tissues absorbing the bacterial overloads. The goal is never to “save a tooth” for the sake of chewing surfaces but instead to cautiously evaluate the impact the damaged and infected tooth can cause the overall body system. Biological dentists evaluate the risk of keeping an infected and dying organ in the body and the overall immune system burden to the body it can cause. For those patients with autoimmune conditions (Lyme, CIRS, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, MARCONS, MCS, chronic fatigue, SIBO, mold, neuralgia, parasites) or history of immune system dysregulation (like cancer, oncology, hashimotos, etc) the burden of a root canal generally outweighs the risk of keeping  “chewing surface” and there is always a solution through restorative dentistry to create a new “chewing surface” or tooth once the dying infected tooth or the dead tooth is removed. Therefore, long term, the burden of a root canal to a patient’s immune system and overall bodily disease processes is considered greater than the benefit of a root canal. This leads most holistic and biological dentists to avoid recommending root canals and instead seek alternatives such as removal of a dead, non-viable or infected tooth. This yields a benefit to the body and immune system overall, whereas to a conventional dentist keeping or “saving” the dead tooth is a narrow perspective without taking into account systemic health effects and side effects down the line.  Many options exist after a root canal tooth, dying tooth or infected tooth is extracted, which you can explore in this section HERE on this page

Root Canal Dangers Root Canal Alternatives Conventional Dentist vs Holistic Dentist Root Canals Natural Dentistry Center Root Canal Alternative Dentist

Understanding How Root Canals Can Cause Infections & Health Issues: Getting to the Root (Canal) of the Issue

Alternative Root Canals from Biological Holistic Dentist Dr. Yuriy May

The Tooth is ALIVE & Part of the System: Teeth interact with the body’s ecosystem via their blood supply and root canal channels.

Patients who have seen endodontists – those dentists who specialize in root canals – understand that if the one and only tool you have is a hammer, everything is a nail – and thus with endodontists, everything is solved with a root canal. Endodontists and traditional general dentists will discuss the wonders of root canals, whilst naturopathic doctors, functional MDs, DOs, biological dentists, holistic dentists will tell you this bit of wisdom: encourage patients to RESEARCH root canal procedures, associate risk and importantly, the available alternatives. Intuition is one of our strongest, truest and most primal internal warnings – and is understandable that over 70% of patients treatment planned for a root canal prefer to avoid them. Patients are right to be wary…but maybe not for the reasons they think.

The symptoms associated with root canals span across a number of publications including research papers, testimonials, peer-reviewed clinical papers and books published by some of the industry’s most prolific physicians. While not every individual experiences negative side effects, others have been said to experience a combination of chronic and debilitating conditions associated with root insight credit union mobile banking The official position of the American Academy of Endodontists or AAE which is supported by the American Dental Association or ADA, is  that root canals are safe and include the following statement: “Decades of research contradict the beliefs of “focal infection” proponents; there is no valid, scientific evidence linking endodontically treated teeth and systemic disease. Yet some patients still hear about this long-dispelled theory.”  As such, we encourage can you reverse the need for a root canal patient to do their own research as to whether a root canal procedure is right for them, and not solely depend on the information provided on this site.

Root Canals Dangers May Include: Autoimmune disorders, leaky gut, neuropathy, weight gain, arthritis, cancer, psoriasis, chronic fatigue syndrome, ischemic bone disease, diabetes, heart disease, depression, anxiety, psoriasis, sinusitis, eczema, insomnia, migraines, sinusitis…

 

Understanding the Process of a Root Canal & Dangers of Root Canals: The Patient Who Didn’t Know Can you reverse the need for a root canal Better

Let’s first start with laying the groundwork of understanding the physiology and anatomy of a tooth and then dive into the unexpected process of a root canal. Below is a typical story of a root canaled tooth and the most common patient stories that come to Natural Dentistry daily from all over the country and globe. The allegory below is for your education and to help you better understand the chronology of events patients experience when they don’t research root canals prior to having them done.

What is a Root Canal: A Deep Dive on the Process that Kills Teeth

Dangers of Root Canals <h3>Can you reverse the need for a root canal - </h3> <div><div><div><div><h4>Relieving Pain</h4><h3>Have a Tooth Ache?</h3><p>If you have been experiencing a toothache that has lasted more than a day or two, you may be suffering from an infected tooth. An infection indicates that you need immediate care from Drs. Helen and Joseph Smillie to prevent further complications, and save your tooth. Schedule an appointment today to find out if you can save your tooth with a root canal. </p></div><div><h4>Restore Infected Teeth With</h4><h3>Root Canal Therapy</h3><p>A root canal is the best way to restore an infected tooth and reverse the damage of a tooth infection. Tooth infections happen when the hard, outer layers of enamel and dentin that protect the inside of your tooth become damaged. Tooth decay is a common cause of tooth infection, but trauma to the tooth can also crack it, and expose the interior of your tooth to oral bacteria. When this happens, the bacteria in your mouth attack the soft, vulnerable pulp inside your tooth, causing an infection. A root canal is used to remove infected tooth material, disinfect the area, and restore the tooth with a dental crown.</p><p><br>Saving an infected tooth with a root canal minimizes future costs and complications. Without proper care, the infection and decay may progress, and your tooth will eventually die. At this point, it will need to be extracted from your mouth, and replaced with a dental prosthesis like a partial denture, a dental bridge, or a dental implant.</p></div><div><h4>Understanding the</h4><h3>Root Canal Process</h3><p>The root canal process typically takes only 1-2 hours and is pain-free. The first step is to numb the treatment area, clean your teeth, and isolate the tooth that is being treated with a dental dam, to prevent the spread of oral bacteria. </p><p>Next, Dr. Helen or Dr. Joseph Smillie will use a dental drill to remove decayed and damaged enamel and to create a tiny hole in the tooth. Then, he will remove decayed and infected material from within your tooth, and clean it. </p><p>Once the tooth has been disinfected, it will be filled with a rubber-like material that will help support the remaining tooth structure. Then, you’ll have a temporary filling or crown placed. Once your tooth heals completely, you will come back to our office to have a permanent crown placed, which will cover and protect your remaining tooth structure, and prevent further damage.</p><h4>Have Questions</h4><h3>About Root Canals?</h3><p>If you have more questions about root canals at Smillie Dental, or you are in Port Orange and believe you have an infected tooth and may need a root canal, please contact us right away. The sooner you get treatment, the more likely we are to be able to save your tooth. You can get in touch with us at (386) 317-4754, or drop by our office at 5537 South Williamson Blvd, #675, Port Orange, Florida 32128 to schedule your appointment in person.</p></div></div><div><p><h3>Ready to feel special?</h3><h4>New patients save big with Dr. Helen Smillie and Dr. Joseph Smillie.</h4></p></div><div><div><div><h4>Don't Be a Stranger!</h4><h3>Book Your Appointment</h3><p>Drop us a line to schedule your next appointment with Dr. Helen Smillie or Dr. Joseph Smillie. We do everything we can to provide expedient, satisfactory service. New patients and lifetime returners are all welcome. Just let us know what kind of treatment you’re looking for, and we’ll find a time that works for both parties.</p></div><div><p>Schedule Online</p></div><div><p>For all other inquiries, please use the corresponding contact form, and we'll get back to you as soon as possible.</p></div></div><div><ul><li>Mon8:00am - 5:00pm</li><li>Tues8:00am - 5:00pm</li><li>Wed8:00am - 5:00pm</li><li>Thurs8:00am - 4:00pm</li><li>FriClosed</li></ul></div></div></div>Источник: https://smilliedental.com/services/root-canals/</div> <div><h2>10 natural remedies for a tooth infection</h2><div><h3>Some natural remedies can help you control tooth pain and help stop tooth infections from getting worse.</h3><p>The only way to truly get rid of an infection is with antibiotics. However, home remedies for tooth infection can help manage the symptoms and alleviate some of the pain. If you have a tooth infection you need to see a dentist to assess whether or not you need a root canal and to get prescription antibiotics to make sure that the infection goes away and doesn’t cause any more pain or damage to your teeth. </p><p>There are some natural remedies that you can use to both help control the pain and help stop the infection from getting worse or spreading while you wait for the infection to die off. Not all of these remedies will work for every person but if you’re in pain from an infected tooth they can bring you some relief.</p><h3>1. Saltwater rinse</h3><p>One of the easiest things that you can do to help lessen the pain of a tooth infection and try to stop the spread of an infection is to rinse your mouth with a warm saltwater solution. A saltwater rinse will kill off some of the bacteria in your mouth and irrigate your mouth. It can rinse some of the debris out of your mouth and if you have an abscess it can help break up the pus surrounding the tooth. You can use regular table salt and warm tap water to make a basic saltwater rinse. Just add about ½ a teaspoon of salt to a small cup of warm water and stir it will. Rinse your mouth with for a couple of minutes swishing the solution thoroughly around your mouth and then spit it out. </p><h3>2. Baking soda</h3><p>A tooth abscess home treatment that you probably have in your kitchen right is baking soda. The same baking soda that you keep in the refrigerator to mitigate odor has antibacterial properties. Rinsing your mouth with a solution of baking soda and warm water will help reduce the amount of plaque in your mouth and help relieve pain. If you have an abscess on the side of your tooth or in your gums, you can make a paste of baking soda and water and apply that directly to your tooth or gum instead of using the rinse. If the infection in your tooth is in another part of the tooth, use the rinse. </p><h3>3. Essential oils </h3><p>Essential oils have been used for their medicinal properties for centuries. Essential oils are made from plants that are distilled with water or steam or cold pressed to extract the oil within the plant leaves and stems. Steam distillation is the most common modern method of extracting oil from plants but in earlier centuries they often used cold pressing to make sure that they got the best quality oil. </p><p>To use essential oils to alleviate pain and promote healing you should always keep the essential oils in a cool place away from things like spices or food. Put a couple of drops of the essential oil on a cotton ball or cotton swab and then use that to apply the oil to your tooth. </p><p>There are many different gentle essential oils that have been proven to have some success treating any number of dental issues including infection like:</p><ul><li><p>Oregano oil</p></li><li><p>Thyme oil</p></li><li><p>Clove oil</p></li><li><p>Tea Tree oil</p></li><li><p>Lavender oil</p></li></ul><p>When you’re using essential oils, make sure that you are using pure medicinal grade essential oils. You can find these at any health food store. Some food co-ops also sell them and you can buy them online. Buy from trusted brands that have a reputation for high quality. Double check to make sure that the bottle says that the oil is therapeutic grade essential oil before using it. These days many makers use “natural” oils to do everything from flavor baked goods to make perfume and soaps. Those oils are scent oils not pure essential oils. Those oils have no therapeutic value and can be dangerous if ingested. </p><h3>4. Herbal teas </h3><p>Herbal teas are another time-tested home remedy for many different ailments. You can make your own herbal teas by buying the leaves and stems of various herbs and simply steeping them in hot water to make a tea. However, it will probably be more effective to buy medicinal grade teas that are already made. High quality therapeutic grade teas will contain a higher quality of herb and a stronger concentration than anything you can buy so they will most likely be more effective. If your teeth are sensitive to heat because of the infection brew the tea, let it steep for up to 15 minutes depending on  how string you want it to be, and let it cool to room temperature before you drink it. </p><p>Fenugreek a popular tea to help alleviate the symptoms of a tooth infection. Fenugreek has been documented to have medicinal properties although not enough research has been done to prove that those properties are beneficial for tooth infection home treatment. Fenugreek tea is easy to find at most health food stores and even in some grocery stores with an alternative medicine or alternative health food section. </p><p>The other recommended tea for a tooth infection is Goldenseal tea. Goldenseal is an herb related to Turmeric and it has many of the same anti-inflammatory and immune-boosting properties that Turmeric has. Goldenseal also has natural antibacterial and antibiotic properties for a tooth infection. Drink up to three cups a day to help knock out a tooth infection. </p><h3>5. Hydrogen peroxide</h3><p>Hydrogen peroxide is something almost everyone has in their medicine kit or first aid cabinet. It has many household and first aid uses, but it’s best known for preventing infections in cuts and for being an effective mouthwash. This simple first aid staple is one of the best remedies for an infected tooth. To make a Hydrogen Peroxide mouth rinse use a 1:1 ratio or mix equal parts peroxide and warm water then rinse your mouth with that. </p><h3>6. Garlic</h3><p>A tooth abscess home remedy that is easy to find and inexpensive to buy is garlic. You may not like the idea of smelling like garlic just because you’re trying to treat a tooth but the healing effects of garlic might make the smell worth it. There is a compound in fresh raw garlic called Allicin that may have significant pain relief and antibacterial properties that can reduce or eliminate the infection in a tooth. If you suspect that you have a tooth infection and you can’t get to a dentist right away, peeling a clove of garlic and gently biting down on it with your infected tooth can help. You will need to leave the piece of garlic against your tooth for a few minutes for it to be effective. </p><h3>7. Over-the-counter pain killers</h3><p>You can take over-the-counter painkillers like acetaminophen, naproxen, or aspirin to control the pain and any radiating pain caused by your tooth infection. Just make sure that you don’t take more than the recommended dose and that you make sure that they won’t have a bad interaction with any medications that you are taking. </p><h3>8. Coconut oil pulling </h3><p>Oil pulling is a rather controversial practice. Some people say that it helps maintain good dental hygiene and recommend doing it daily. However, there is no evidence that oil pulling has any medicinal benefits for oral health. Coconut oil has some powerful antibacterial properties so it’s possible that oil pulling using liquid coconut oil could help lessen the duration of the infection or make the symptoms more manageable. </p><h3>9. Cold compress</h3><p>A cold compress can help if you have a swollen face from tooth infection. Home remedies can help tooth pain but cold is the best thing to bring down swelling. Most commercially available cold packs don’t bend so it can be difficult to get them to sit right on the curves of your face or neck. Instead of a commercial cold pack, you can make your own by wrapping up some ice in a washcloth or towel. Or, you can always dip into the freezer and grab a bag of frozen corn or peas that will stay cold for a long time and fit well into the contours of your face and neck. </p><h3>10. Aloe vera gel </h3><p>Aloe Vera gel is often used to treat burns and cuts or skin irritations because it has natural antibacterial properties but it is also an effective way to stop the pain of an infected tooth. It can also help heal abscesses in the gums. When you buy Aloe Vera gel to use in your mouth make sure that you are buying food-grade Aloe Vera so that it’s safe to ingest. You can also use Aloe Vera liquid but the gel is easier to apply to your teeth and gums. Keep the bottle in the refrigerator for extra pain relief. Applying cold Aloe Vera gel to a painful infected tooth or infected gums can give you instant pain relief and the added benefit of fighting infection. </p><h3>When to call a dentist</h3><p>A tooth infection happens when bacteria get into the tooth through a cavity, a chip, or a crack. Infections in the teeth can spread to other teeth, your jaw, or your gums. If a tooth infection is left untreated, it can have serious health consequences, so it’s important that you see a dentist to treat it promptly if you have the symptoms of a tooth infection. </p><p>Natural remedies can help you manage the symptoms of a tooth infection but you still need to see a dentist about the infection. The dentist can take X-rays to determine if you need a root canal and see how bad the damage from the infection is. You may also need a course of antibiotics. You should call a dentist as soon as you suspect that you have an infected tooth. </p><h3>How a dentist will treat a tooth infection</h3><p>Once a dentist has determined that you have an infection, the dentist can work to treat the infection, clear out any abscesses that have formed, and assess the damage. You will usually be given a prescription for antibiotics too. If there are abscesses in the tooth or in the gums near the tooth the dentist will go in and clean those pockets out to get rid of the bacteria. Often that can provide immediate relief from the pain of an infected tooth. The dentist will also check your teeth to see if you will need a root canal in order to save the tooth. </p><h3>What causes a tooth infection?</h3><p>The primary cause of a tooth infection is dental caries, or tooth decay. Your mouth is full of bacteria all the time, but usually that bacteria doesn’t get inside your teeth where it can cause an infection. When decay causes cavities and cracks or holes in your teeth, bacteria can seep into your teeth and cause a tooth infection. An infection can also happen if you have an injury to your tooth that causes a crack or a chip in the tooth. Keeping your teeth strong and healthy through regular brushing and flossing can help prevent decay and infections. </p><p>Infection can happen in different parts of the tooth. Sometimes the infection occurs on the side of the tooth if there is an opening there and that can cause the infection to spread to the gums. Pockets of pus called abscesses can form around the infection that will need to be drained by the dentist for the infection to go away. </p><div><div><h3>Looking for plans?<br>Let’s find the right dental plan for you. </h3><hr></div></div><h3>Symptoms of a tooth infection</h3><p>The most obvious symptom of a tooth infection is pain. Intense, sharp, or shooting pain in a tooth is a good indication that there is an infection that needs to be dealt with. Some of the other common symptoms of a tooth infection are:</p><ul><li><p>Severe, persistent, throbbing toothache that can radiate to the jawbone, neck or ear</p></li><li><p>Sensitivity to hot or cold temperatures</p></li><li><p>Sensitivity to the pressure of chewing or biting</p></li><li><p>Fever not associated with flu or another illness</p></li><li><p>Swelling in your face, cheek, or jaw.</p></li><li><p>Tender, swollen lymph nodes under your jaw or in your neck</p></li><li><p>Sudden rush of foul-smelling and foul-tasting, salty fluid in your mouth and pain relief, if the abscess ruptures</p></li><li><p>Difficulty breathing or swallowing</p></li></ul><h3>How dental insurance can help</h3><p>Dental emergencies happen. Even if you are practicing good dental hygiene and you take care of your teeth, you can still end up with an infected tooth that needs to be dealt with right away. Dental insurance can help cover the costs of things like X-rays, exams, and other treatments, as well as more expensive care like root canals. </p><p><br>This is not dental care advice and should not be substituted for regular consultation with your dentist. If you have any concerns about your dental health, please contact your dentist's office.<br><br></p><div><p><h3>Subscribe</h3></p><div><h3>Insights for the people.</h3><p>Join our new digital insurance community that includes tips, resources and useful information from Guardian Direct. </p><hr></div></div><div><hr><h4>Sources</h4><p>Brought to you by The Guardian Life Insurance Company of America (Guardian), New York, NY. Material discussed is meant for general illustration and/or informational purposes only and it is not to be construed as tax, legal, investment or medical advice.(exp.06/22)</p></div></div>Источник: https://www.guardiandirect.com</div> <div><h2>How Long Does It Take For a Cavity To Develop?</h2><div><div><p></p></div><div><img src=

Cavities don't just form overnight. It can take months, or possibly even years, before the decay process advances to the point where a tooth requires attention. The entire process of tooth demineralization takes place whenever an acidic oral environment exists, and fortunately, this environment isn't the norm for a person's mouth. 

 

Early-stage tooth decay can be corrected when it's caught early enough, which is why it's so essential to visit your dentist every six months for an exam. 

 

Every Cavity Is Different

The time it takes for a cavity to form varies. It can, on average, take anywhere from six months to four or five years before a cavity requires treatment. The length of time it takes will vary on a case-by-case basis because the conditions of your mouth differ daily. This means that a cavity can start to form and then not have the right conditions to continue to develop. A cavity won't just go away on its own; however, it can be slower to form, which allows your dentist to correct the issue before it gets worse. 

 

Factors That Come Into Play 

There are several types of factors that can significantly influence the length of time it takes for a cavity to form. The most common factors that can increase or decrease the speed in which cavity forms include:

 

  • Acid Levels – Cavities will start to develop when acid levels in the mouth increase.

 

  • The number of Acid Attacks – Teeth are extremely strong. However, if a tooth is subjected to multiple small acid attacks, eventually, a cavity will form.

 

  • Location Where the Cavity is Forming – Enamel is durable and contains minerals, which means it will take longer for a cavity to form in enamel than in the dentin of a tooth.

 

  • The thickness of the Tooth Enamel – Tooth enamel is thinner near the gum line, which means that cavities form quicker near the gums than they do on the tops of teeth.

 

  • Quality of the Tooth Enamel – Enamel that contains lots of minerals will take longer to get a cavity than enamel that has fewer minerals.

 

Tooth Damage CAN Be Reversed

If your dentist tells you that you have a cavity forming, there are ways to stop early-stage tooth decay from progressing into a full-blown cavity. The process known as remineralization can occur, which can reverse tooth decay. 

 

Remineralization can correct damage to a tooth. When a cavity begins to form, the enamel or dentin starts to lose valuable minerals that protect the tooth. You can help to put these valuable materials back into the tooth by remineralizing it. The tooth will start to strengthen itself and repair the decay to the point where a cavity is no longer forming. 

 

While remineralization can reverse some damage to the surface of a tooth and prevent some cavities, it won't work for all situations. If the damage to the enamel or dentin is too severe, the process will be ineffective, and the cavity will need to be treated by your dentist. 

 

Cavity Prevention Is Simple 

You can do your part in helping to protect your teeth from tooth decay by following a few simple guidelines:

 

  • Gently brush your teeth at least twice a day for a full two minutes with a soft-bristled toothbrush and fluoride toothpaste.
  • Floss once a day. 
  • Incorporate a fluoride mouthwash into your oral care routine. 
  • Avoid sugary and starchy foods, and avoid frequent snacking. 

Having regular teeth cleanings and exams every six months is another necessary step in eliminating cavity-causing plaque and tartar. During these exams, your dentist will be able to identify any early signs of tooth decay and give you the tools and knowledge to combat cavities. Contact Tompkins Dental to schedule an appointment for a routine dental cleaning and exam. 

Dental Implant Recovery Timeline FAQ

Here’s a list of dental implant recovery timeline FAQ, including if dental implants are really worth the healing time and upfront costs in Ithaca.

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Tompkins Dental, Ithaca, NY

Phone (appointments): 607-257-8065

Follow-Up

You’re likely to experience some pain or discomfort following an apicoectomy, as you will have infected tissue removed and be injected with anesthetics. Avoid eating while you’re still experiencing any numbness to avoid harming your mouth or stitches.

As your apicoectomy removes infected tissue, you could feel better than you did quickly after the surgery!

But what’s the normal recovery time? According to the American Association of Endodontists, pain after surgery is generally low, and many return to their normal routines the day after surgery. However, it can take several months for the bone to heal around the root fully.

Steps you can take after your apicoectomy:

  • Practice your dental routine especially gently as not to aggravate sensitive areas
  • Avoid smoking, crunchy foods, or damaging any stitches
  • Take medications as prescribed and follow provided aftercare instructions
  • Use over-the-counter pain relievers or anti-inflammatories to help with discomfort or swelling
  • Follow up with your dental professional if your stitches require removal (many dissolve on their own!)
  • Apply a cold compress or ice pack to the affected area for twenty minutes on, twenty minutes off (according to the Cleveland Clinic)

Though dental procedures can be challenging, many find their apicoectomy to require less recovery than a root canal treatment.

Important note: Contact your dental professional if you’re experiencing unusual or extreme symptoms. Be on the lookout for abnormal pain, swelling, numbness, or find signs of infection (like discharge draining into your mouth). When in doubt, it's best to reach out for professional advice.

Источник: https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/root-canals/apicoectomy

Holistic dentist offers effective root canal therapy alternatives in Richmond, VA

Root canal therapy has been used for many years in traditional dentistry to try to “save” a tooth that is deeply infected or damaged. It is up to a patient to decide if they would like to do a root canal treatment. As a holistic dentist, Dr. Olivia Hart from Richmond Family Dentistry offers her Richmond, VA area patients a possible alternative.

Zirconia dental implants and ceramic bridges are healthy, biocompatible alternatives. Below, Dr. Hart explains why!

Why dentists perform root canals

Also called “endodontic therapy,” root canals are performed when a tooth is severely compromised due to one of the following:

  • Infection
  • Abscess
  • Traumatic injury
  • Deep decay
  • A major crack or chip in the tooth
  • Multiple dental procedures on the same tooth

When someone opts to have a root canal, they often have severe pain before their treatment. While root canal therapy does relieve this pain, it might not eliminate the source of infection, inflammation, and toxins that are then free to circulate through your bloodstream and can wreak havoc throughout your body. Additionally, certain lifestyle factors can increase the risk of the treatment, such as smoking after a root canal.

How to cure a tooth infection without a root canal

Many patients ask us, “Are there alternatives to a root canal?” The answer is “Yes!”

In fact, there are alternatives to this treatment that help eliminate the bacteria and toxins that would otherwise be trapped in the decayed or infected tooth. The most common holistic alternatives to root canals are:

  • Zirconia implants: These biocompatible tooth restorations provide unparalleled stability, function, and feel. They are used to replace your natural tooth root and are topped with a natural-looking crown.
  • Ceramic bridges: These are also a good biocompatible tooth replacement option. The missing tooth is fabricated from natural-looking porcelain and then attached to your existing teeth.
  • Dental crowns: A common question is whether you can have a crown without a root canal. In fact, most crowns do not need a root canal – they can be used any time a tooth is damaged and needs a boost in strength, to restore its original shape, or to give it a more natural appearance. Dr. Hart is pleased to offer same-day crowns so you can get back to your regular life as soon as possible.

Treatments offered at Richmond Family Dentistry

Depending on your specific oral health needs and what the cause of your pain is, Dr. Hart will recommend the appropriate treatment and discuss any questions you have about it before proceeding.

If you are interested in learning more about alternatives to root canal treatment that are suitable for your oral health needs, call us at (804) 381-6238 or email us at [email protected] to schedule an appointment today!

Источник: https://www.richmondfamilydentistry.com/root-canal-therapy-alternatives.html

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