how much do you get for unemployment in utah

It is probably one of the most common situations we receive questions the value of the claim and the amount of benefits to be paid. Tax Refunds: Tax/IRS Refunds do NOT have to be reported when you are filing a claim. If you have questions, please contact the Wyoming Claims Center at. On April 15, 2020, the state of Utah rolled out a new Pandemic If the tool shows an unemployment benefit amount of zero dollars and zero.

How much do you get for unemployment in utah -

How the CARES Act Can Help Drivers Who are Unemployed Due to COVID-19

As part of the CARES Act, the federal government created three new programs for people who are unemployed or out of work due to COVID-19. Because unemployment compensation is one of the most important parts of the newly enacted CARES Act, we wanted to take some time to expand just on this topic, specifically as it may relate to rideshare drivers. 

  • 13-week extension - For drivers who have held part-time or full-time “traditional” employment (as discussed in more depth below), traditional unemployment benefits have been extended by 13 weeks, on top of the regular 26 weeks that are available in most states. Eligible applicants can now receive a total of up to 39 weeks of unemployment compensation.

  • Additional $600 per week - You also may receive a larger weekly benefit amount. There is an additional compensation of $600 per week for weeks of unemployment in the spring and summer of 2020. 

  • Unemployment assistance for self-employed/independent contractors - Finally, there’s a brand new unemployment assistance program for self-employed people and independent contractors — which includes rideshare driving and other gig-economy work. This is called the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program, and it provides up to 39 weeks of unemployment compensation for eligible applicants.

The majority of people who drive with Lyft do so in their spare time, on top of a regular full-time or part-time job elsewhere. If you lose your traditional full-time or part-time job, you may be eligible for unemployment assistance through regular state unemployment programs — and also for the 13-week extension and additional $600 per week described above. 

However, if you make most of your earnings through driving with online platforms like Lyft, instead of through a traditional job, and you’re unable to work due to COVID-19, you’re now likely eligible for the new Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) Program.

Generally, you’re either eligible for regular unemployment or the new PUA program for independent contractors, but you can’t receive both types of unemployment assistance at once. The additional $600 per week is available no matter which unemployment program you’re eligible for. 

While this may sound confusing, we’re here to help with some FAQs. State and federal guidance is changing rapidly, but we’re working around the clock to keep you up-to-date. 

FAQs for drivers with a traditional full-time job and spare-time Lyft earnings 

We know the vast majority of you drive with Lyft part-time, or between other jobs. Here are some FAQs for you:

I still have a traditional full-time or part-time job with an employer and I make most of my earnings there. I drive with Lyft in my spare-time. I have recently paused my driving. Am I eligible for the new PUA program?

If the majority of your earnings are still coming in through a traditional full-time or part-time job, it is unlikely that you are eligible for the PUA, the type of unemployment compensation assistance that is reserved for independent contractors, business owners and/or the self-employed -- people without traditional employment. Every state is handling these claims differently. 

I’ve been laid off from my traditional job and normally drive with Lyft for a few hours a week, but now I’m driving more.  Am I eligible for “regular” unemployment or the new PUA program?

If you were laid off from your traditional job, you should apply for regular unemployment benefits. If you are eligible for regular unemployment benefits, you are likely not eligible for the new PUA program. 

Some states are calculating total pandemic unemployment assistance based on all lost income — both employment wages and self-employment earnings. But our understanding is that currently that is only happening in a small minority of states. 

I had a regular part-time job which I lost due to COVID, but it was only a small part of my earnings. The primary source of my earnings was from driving with Lyft. Am I eligible for the new PUA program?

In general yes, but it could depend on your state. 

For drivers who primarily rely on income from “gig economy” work like driving for rideshare, you are “self-employed” according to PUA regulations, and so you are eligible for the new PUA program for self-employed people and independent contractors. This is the case even if you have part-time earnings from a regular job (like working in a bookstore 10 hours per week), because you primarily rely on income from your self-employed rideshare work with Lyft.  

However, some states are requiring applicants to exhaust all “regular” unemployment benefits first (by applying for unemployment benefits via your traditional part-time job first) before you’re eligible for the new PUA program’s assistance. Only a few states are operating this way, and we are working hard to understand which states are requiring this. We will communicate more as soon as we know more. 

FAQs for drivers who make most of their earnings through a mix of “gig economy” self-employment platforms (Lyft, Uber, Airbnb, etc)

I don’t have a traditional full-time job but I do have several gig economy jobs. My income is down across the board. Am I eligible for the new PUA program?

Yes. The CARES Act was intended to provide assistance to workers who experience “partial unemployment” as a result of COVID-19. Guidance from the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) says that drivers who have lost income due to unsustainable losses in rider demand should be eligible to receive some types of unemployment assistance regardless of whether that lost income is from total unemployment, or because the COVID-19 public health emergency has severely limited your ability to continue performing your customary work. 

Do I have to stop driving completely to apply?

As above, DOL guidance indicates that you do not need to stop driving completely to be eligible for PUA assistance. The CARES Act was intended to provide assistance to workers who experience “partial unemployment” as a result of COVID.  Even if you are still receiving some earnings, the guidance indicates that the new PUA program may make up the difference.

How do I know if I’m eligible for PUA?

In order to qualify for the new PUA program, you must primarily rely on earnings through self-employed work, like driving with Lyft, and you must be unable to work because of COVID-19. There are a couple of qualifying reasons beyond the ones you may expect, and they include:

  • You work as an independent contractor and are unemployed, under-employed, or unable to work because the COVID-19 public health emergency has severely limited your ability to continue performing your regular work.

  • You or a member of your household are unable to work because you have been diagnosed with COVID-19 or are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 .

  • A child or other person in the household for whom you have primary caregiving responsibility is unable to attend school or another facility that is closed as a direct result of the COVID-19, and you are unable to work because you are caring for them.

Am I “self-employed”?

Under your agreement with Lyft, you are classified as an independent contractor, and you are therefore self-employed. Congress and the U.S. Department of Labor included rideshare drivers under the category of “self-employed” workers within the new PUA program.

While some states are struggling with standing up new systems and legal issues regarding how drivers should apply for PUA, we have been communicating around the clock with state agencies pushing for a streamlined “self-certification” process and fast-track processing of applications and checks. Many states have responded, and we are seeing more states move toward a fast-track, self-certification process, where drivers are able to fill out applications and receive checks quickly. 

What is a “gig-economy worker?”

The federal guidance for PUA talks about “gig-economy workers”, and this may come up in your application. There is no official definition of “gig worker” in state or federal law.  Individuals who get paid by the “project”, “event,” or “gig” (like freelance writers, translators, musicians, artists, event production), or who sell goods or services using online platforms (like Lyft, Task Rabbit, Etsy, Airbnb, Shopify, DoorDash, Postmates, Zeel) are generally considered gig-economy workers, which is included in the definition of “self-employed” under federal law. Whether you make the majority of your earnings driving with Lyft, or you are a full time teacher and only drive with Lyft in your spare time, you are part of the “gig-economy.” However, some self-employed people who are part of the “gig-economy” are eligible for PUA, but not all of them, as discussed above. You have to primarily rely on your earnings from the gig economy in order to apply for PUA.

Application Process: For Regular Unemployment Assistance or the New PUA Program

How do I apply?

Regardless of whether you are eligible for regular unemployment assistance because you’ve lost a traditional full-time or part-time job, or are applying for the new PUA program, you can apply through your state’s unemployment office (a list of state offices is available here). 

What information do I need to apply?

Requirements differ by state, but for both regular unemployment and PUA, you will likely need some or all of the following information to apply: 

  • Social Security Number

  • Driver’s license or motor vehicle ID card number (if you have either one)

  • Mailing address and ZIP Code

  • Phone number 

  • Alien registration card number (if you are not a U.S. Citizen)

  • Names and business address of your self-employment 

  • Employer Registration Number or Federal Employer Identification Number (if you have W2 earnings)

  • Historical earnings records (details below on how to find them for your earnings through Lyft)

  • Tax documents, such as Form 1040 and any schedules, 1099s, or W2s (if you have them) 

Lyft drivers can use the following info to apply for PUA as an independent contractor:

  • Company name: Lyft, Inc.

  • Phone number: 855-865-9553

  • Mailing address: 185 Berry Street Suite 5000 San Francisco, California 94107

  • Fed Tax ID #: 20-8809830

When is the new PUA program assistance available?

Many states are still in the process of establishing their PUA programs and applications. However, under the CARES Act, PUA benefits can be claimed retroactively beginning January 27, 2020, and until December 31, 2020. 

I believe I am eligible for PUA, but I can’t find the application on my state’s website. What should I do?

Not all states have established separate processes for PUA yet, so we encourage you to check back frequently if the PUA application process is not currently available in your state. 

In some states, you may first need to apply for regular unemployment insurance before applying for PUA.  Some states are making new, stand-alone applications for PUA, and paying out benefits based on your combined income. We are advocating for other states to follow this model. Lyft is actively working with state unemployment offices to streamline the application process for independent contractors to ensure eligible drivers receive benefits as quickly as possible. 

The state unemployment website or the new PUA program website say that I need to enter my past earnings. Where can I find my earnings records in the Driver Dashboard?

PDFs of your annual and weekly earnings statements are easily available for download or printing on the web dashboard:

  • From a web browser, log onto your driver dashboard (https://www.lyft.com/login)

  • Annual earnings statements and tax forms (if necessary) are available from the web dashboard or app:  Driver Dashboard > Tax Information > Documents

  • Weekly earnings statements are available on the web dashboard:> Driving History > Select Week of Driving > Select "Download Weekly Summary"

If you need to screenshot your earnings using your mobile device instead, there are two ways to view historical weekly earnings in your app:  

  • Option 1:  driver app > $ (earnings tab) > See weekly breakdown

  • Option 2:  driver app > Dashboard > Driving History

  • Instructions to take a screenshot are available here: iPhone, Android

CARES Act Earnings Summary

Categories

COVID-19CARES Act
Источник: https://www.lyft.com/hub/posts/how-the-cares-act-can-help-drivers-who-are-unemployed-due-to-covid-19

Learn about the rules governing child support in Utah.

Utah law requires both parents to financially support their child (or children). The amount of support that each parent pays will depend on the parents' income, custody arrangement, and the number of children involved.

Because there are a variety of factors that impact support, it can be difficult to figure out an exact amount on your own. Parents can use the Utah child support calculator to estimate a support obligation. However, a judge will determine the final child support amount in your case.

The Utah Child Support Guidelines are simply a fee schedule, or formula. Parents can agree to pay more than the amount given by the guidelines, but not less, and a court must approve the amount. Although a court presumes that the number given by the guidelines is the appropriate amount of child support, there are circumstances where the result would be unfair to a parent or the child. In those cases, a court will review a set of factors and may adjust the amount of support down or up.

Using the Utah Child Support Guidelines

To use the guidelines, you'll need to know the adjusted gross income of both parents. A parent's gross income is income from all sources, including:

  • salaries and wages
  • bonuses
  • rents
  • income from a trust
  • pensions
  • military pay
  • alimony received
  • social security benefits
  • unemployment compensation, and
  • gifts and prizes.

There are a few benefits that you can leave out, such as general assistance, housing subsidies, and welfare benefits. For a list of what to include in your calculations, see the Utah Code § 78B-12-203 (2020).

In situations where a parent is purposefully unemployed or underemployed to avoid making support payments, a court can impute a higher income based on the parent's past and current earnings. Income will not be imputed, however, for a custodial parent who stays home to meet a child's specific needs, or if the cost of childcare would be the same as the income this parent would make.

You also need to know how much time each parent will spend with the child. There are a variety of ways to share parenting time, but the guidelines calculate support differently for parents with "sole physical custody" (the child lives with only one parent), "joint custody" (the child lives part time with each parent), or "split custody" (where the parents divide the kids between them – mom takes the older child while dad has the younger child, for example). If you have additional questions about the impact of custody on support, the Utah Courts website has a section on parent-time and custody.

Once you've determined both parents' adjusted gross incomes and custody, look to the base combined child support obligation table. These are the guidelines for a combined income from $726 through $100,000 a month. If the noncustodial parent has an adjusted gross income of $649 or less, or if the combined income is between $650 and $1,050, then you may need to use the low income table. Keep in mind that a court will have to review this number, to ensure it's in the child's best interests, but the minimum amount of support is $30. On the other hand, if the parents' combined income is greater than $100,000, then a court may increase the amount over the maximum allowed by the base combined child support obligation table.

The guidelines give you a total amount of child support due. After you have that number, you can calculate what each parent's share of that amount will be. There are additional calculations to be made, often referred to as "add ons,"—one or both of you will have to cover medical expenses, health insurance, and childcare costs too.

If it's been less than three years since the original order was issued or modified, then you must have a substantial change in circumstances.

Challenging the Amount

Sometimes, the total amount of child support given by the guidelines or the way that number is divided between the parents is unfair. If you think support should be increased or decreased before the court issues the order, then you can ask a court to adjust it. Once you ask, a court will review all relevant factors, but especially the following, to adjust the amount of child support either up or down:

  • the parents' standard of living and situation
  • the parents' relative wealth and income
  • the ability of the paying parent to earn
  • the ability of the receiving parent to earn
  • the ability of an incapacitated adult child to earn, or the child's benefits
  • the needs of both parents and the child
  • the parents' ages, and
  • whether either parent supports others.

Collecting Child Support and Enforcement

With a child support order in place, collecting your monthly payment from the other parent may be easy. Parents can pay support in whatever form is most convenient, including cash, check, bank transfer, direct deposit, money order, or by using payment apps, such as Venmo. If you're having trouble collecting child support, you can contact Utah's Office of Recovery Services for help at 801-536-8500.

Modifying the Amount of Support in Utah

Once a child support order is in place, you can ask the court to modify (change) it at any time, but this will require a different process. If it's been less than three years since the original order was issued or modified, then you must have a substantial change in circumstances. Usually, a substantial change is a significant shift in custody or an increase or decrease of 30% in income, but there can be other reasons.

The threshold is lower if an order has been in place for three years or more. You can read more about this on Utah's State Court website under Grounds to Modify Child Support.

Источник: https://www.divorcenet.com/resources/divorce/divorce-and-children/child-support-utah.htm

How Do I File for Unemployment Insurance?

Guidance on Unemployment Insurance Flexibilities During COVID-19 Outbreak

NOTE: Check with your state’s unemployment insurance program regarding the rules in your state.

Federal law permits significant flexibility for states to amend their laws to provide unemployment insurance benefits in multiple scenarios related to COVID-19. For example, federal law provides states flexibility to pay benefits where:

  1. An employer temporarily ceases operations due to COVID-19, preventing employees from coming to work;
  2. An individual is quarantined with the expectation of returning to work after the quarantine is over; and
  3. An individual leaves employment due to a risk of exposure or infection or to care for a family member.

In addition, federal law does not require an employee to quit in order to receive benefits due to the impact of COVID-19.

Webpages on this Topic

Office of Unemployment Insurance

State Unemployment Insurance

  • The Federal-State Unemployment Insurance Program provides unemployment benefits to eligible workers who are unemployed through no fault of their own (as determined under state law), and meet other eligibility requirements of state law.

Disaster Unemployment Assistance

  • Disaster Unemployment Assistance provides financial assistance to individuals whose employment or self-employment has been lost or interrupted as a direct result of a major disaster declared by the President of the United States.

Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees

  • The Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees program provides benefits for eligible unemployed former civilian federal employees.

Unemployment Compensation for Ex-Service Members

  • The Unemployment Compensation for Ex-Service Members program provides benefits for eligible ex-military personnel.

Unemployment Insurance Extended Benefits

  • Extended Benefits may be available to workers who have exhausted regular unemployment insurance benefits during periods of high unemployment.

Trade Readjustment Allowances

  • Trade Readjustment Allowances are income support to persons who have exhausted Unemployment Compensation and whose jobs were affected by foreign imports.

Self-Employment Assistance

  • Self-Employment Assistance offers dislocated workers the opportunity for early re-employment.

Unemployment Insurance Improper Payments By State

  • The U.S. Department of Labor collaborates with our state partners to identify several robust strategies that focus on the prevention of overpayments and will yield the highest impact in reducing unemployment insurance improper payment rates.

Through American Job Centers, all citizens can access services tailored to their individual needs. This includes employment and job training services, career planning and guidance and much more.

CareerOneStop provides online tools to assist workers with finding a job, utilizing available training opportunities or conducting career planning. There is no cost to businesses or workers who use this service.

The Department of Labor's toll-free call center can assist workers and employers with questions about job loss, layoffs, business closures, unemployment benefits and job training: 1-877-US-2JOBS (TTY: 1-877-889-5627).

Additional information on topics relevant to the unemployed can be found on the Department of Labor's web interface, Find It! By Audience - Job Seekers/Unemployed.

Источник: https://www.dol.gov/general/topic/unemployment-insurance

Misrepresenting your employment status and claiming that you're looking for work when you aren't are examples of unemployment insurance fraud, which can result in criminal prosecutions.

The unemployment insurance benefits program, commonly referred to as UI, is designed to provide people with an income when they are unable to find work, have been laid off, or are out of work because of factors out of their control. Each state has its own unemployment insurance benefits program that they run in conjunction with the federal government.

State laws determine who is eligible for unemployment payments, as well as determine the penalties for people who misuse or abuse the program. In some situations where people or employers misuse unemployment programs, criminal unemployment insurance fraud charges are possible.

To learn more about proper unemployment program eligibility and collecting unemployment benefits in your state, you can read more on Nolo.

Unemployment Insurance Fraud

Most unemployment insurance fraud cases occur after a worker intentionally and knowingly makes false statements or misrepresentations in order to obtain unemployment insurance payments. Any lies, misrepresentations, or other intentional action or statement that lead to receiving unemployment insurance payments when a person is ineligible can result in fraud charges. Here are several ways people commonly commit this crime.

Failure to Report Employment

Some people who apply for unemployment insurance later go on to find a job. When this happens, people receiving unemployment payments have a duty to report their employment, and how much they make, to the state unemployment office. Failing to do so, and continuing to receive payments (or non-adjusted payments) while being employed is unemployment insurance fraud.

False Information, Identification, or Identity Theft

Some workers try to obtain unemployment insurance payments by submitting applications that contain false or misleading information. For example, an applicant who uses a false name, or who uses the personal identifying information of someone else to obtain unemployment benefits, commits unemployment insurance fraud. Similarly, submitting false information about employment status, income, and other related issues can also result in fraud charges.

Misrepresenting Employment Efforts

A person has to actively look for employment in order to receive unemployment insurance payments. Someone who fails to actively seek employment while reporting to the state unemployment office that he or she is looking also commits unemployment insurance fraud.

Employer Fraud

In addition to workers, employers can also commit unemployment insurance fraud. There are several ways employers can do this, such as misclassifying workers as independent contractors, failing to report paid wages or paying workers "under the table," or providing false information about workers who would otherwise be eligible to receive unemployment payments.

Legal Defenses

In any criminal case, including unemployment fraud cases, the type of legal defenses available to someone charged with a crime will differ depending on the circumstances. However, many unemployment insurance fraud cases involve one or more of the following defenses.

Lack of Criminal Intent

You cannot accidentally commit unemployment insurance fraud. To be convicted of this crime, a person has to intentionally make misrepresentations, lie, conceal, or do something else to fraudulently receive payments. If, for example, you mistakenly underreport your prior income when you apply for unemployment, this isn't enough to commit fraud.

Lack of Evidence

In any criminal proceeding, the state has the responsibility to present evidence to show beyond a reasonable doubt that the accused has committed a crime. In some unemployment insurance fraud cases, this evidence is simply not there. If the state cannot prove its case, you cannot be found guilty of a crime.

Potential Penalties

People who commit unemployment insurance fraud can face both civil and criminal penalties. A civil penalty usually involves a fine, while criminal penalties can include fines, incarceration, probation, and other penalties. Individual state laws determine what penalties apply in unemployment fraud cases, and differ significantly from state to state.

  • Repayment. Someone convicted of unemployment insurance fraud will have to pay back any ill-begotten funds. If you don't have enough to pay the full amount back, the state might be able to take the money from you by, for example, garnishing your wages.
  • Incarceration. Unemployment insurance fraud can be a misdemeanor or felony offense, depending on state law and the circumstances involved. Misdemeanors are crimes that generally have a maximum penalty of up to a year in jail, while convictions for felony offenses can lead to multiple years in state prison. For example, someone who makes false statements in order to receive unemployment insurance payments in the state of Utah commits a Class B misdemeanor offense if the payments received are less than $500. However, if the fraudulently obtained payments exceed $1,500, the crime is punished as a third-degree felony. (Utah Code Annotated section 76-8-1301)
  • Probation. In addition to, or in lieu of, jail or prison time, courts can also send someone convicted of unemployment insurance fraud to a probation term. People on probation have their freedoms significantly limited, and must comply with a number of probation conditions. These conditions often include, for example, reporting to a probation officer, seeking the officer's permission before leaving the state, not interacting with known criminals, not committing more crimes, and maintaining suitable employment.
  • Fines. If you are convicted of unemployment insurance fraud you might also be forced to pay a fine in addition to any repayments you have to make. For example, if you received unemployment payments of $5,000 and are convicted of unemployment insurance fraud, you will have to pay back the $5,000. You might also have to pay a criminal fine. Fines differ significantly from state to state, but can exceed $10,000 in some situations.

Find a Lawyer in Your Area

Even though unemployment insurance fraud might not seem like a significant crime, you always need to speak to an experienced criminal defense lawyer if you are facing charges. A conviction for unemployment insurance fraud can lead to serious penalties. Even if you are not convicted, being investigated for a crime and being subject to the criminal justice process is not something you want to do without the aid and advice of a criminal defense attorney from your area.

Источник: https://www.criminaldefenselawyer.com/resources/unemployment-insurance-fraud.htm

How Much Will I Collect in Unemployment Benefits in Utah?

In Utah, you can earn up to $617 per week in unemployment benefits under state law. 

Although additional money ($300 extra per week) was available under the temporary Pandemic Unemployment Compensation program, that program expired on September 6, 2021 (or earlier, in states that cut off these benefits before the program ended). For weeks of unemployment starting on September 6, you will not receive these additional benefits. 

Every state has its own rules for calculating unemployment benefits. Typically, the amount you receive each week is based on your earnings when you were employed. After all, unemployment benefits are intended to replace some of the income you lost along with your job, and tide you over until you find new work.

Calculating Your Benefit Amount

Your weekly unemployment benefit amount depends on your earnings during the base period.

To calculate your weekly benefit amount in Utah, divide your wages from the highest quarter of the base period by 26, then subtract $5.

Currently, the most you can receive under Utah law each week is $617 per week; the minimum amount you can receive is $31 per week. These limits are adjusted from time to time for inflation. 

If You Earn Money While Collecting Unemployment Benefits

Once you get a new job that pays more than you are receiving in unemployment, you will no longer be eligible to receive benefits. But what if you are only able to pick up odd jobs and small amounts of work here and there? As long as you don’t earn too much from occasional work, you will still be eligible for unemployment benefits.

In most states, as long as you earn less than your weekly benefit amount (or a bit more, in some states), you can still collect unemployment benefits. However, your benefits will be reduced by what you earn. A certain amount of what you earn will be disregarded: You will be able to keep it, and it won’t be subtracted from your benefit amount. Although this amount is generally small, this set-aside is intended to create an incentive for people to work, rather than just collecting unemployment benefits.

The amount that is disregarded when calculating your partial unemployment benefit is either a set dollar amount or a percentage of your usual weekly benefit. Contact the Utah Department of Workforce Services to find out how much you can earn without jeopardizing your benefits.

Benefits Are Taxable

Believe it or not, unemployment benefits usually count as taxable income, at least under federal law. You will have to declare the full amount you receive and, if your total income is high enough, pay taxes on your benefits.

The American Rescue Plan (which became law on March 11, 2021) waives federal income tax on the first $10,200 in unemployment benefits received in 2020. (Married couples filing jointly don't have to pay tax on the first $20,400 in unemployment benefits.) However, this law currently applies only to the 2020 tax year. 

If you wish, you can ask Utah to withhold 10% of your weekly check for federal income tax. To make this request, file Form W4-V, Voluntary Withholding Request.

Although some states don’t tax unemployment benefits, most do. 

 

by Lisa Guerin

Lisa Guerin has covered employment law topics for Legal Consumer since 2014. After getting her law degree from Berkeley Law, she worked in government, public interest, and private practice, specializing in employment law. She was a legal editor and author at Nolo for many years, where she wrote or contributed to more than a dozen books, mostly on employment issues. She volunteers with groups that help shelter and rescue dogs, and she enjoys hiking with her own Very Good Boy in the San Francisco Bay Area.

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Источник: https://www.legalconsumer.com/unemploymentlaw/topic.php?ST=UT&TopicID=18

25 GOP-led states and one Democratic state are cutting $300 weekly federal unemployment benefits. Here are the 26 states making the cut this summer.

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GettyImages 1231114054
Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images
  • Some Republican governors have decided Americans make too much from expanded unemployment benefits.
  • After a surprisingly dismal April jobs report, they moved to end federal jobless aid early.
  • That also includes eliminating programs benefiting gig workers, freelancers, and the long-term unemployed.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Alabama

kay ivey
Brynn Anderson/AP

Gov. Kay Ivey announced on Monday that the state was halting its participation in federal unemployment benefits starting June 19. 

Those include the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program for gig workers and Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation for the long-term unemployed.

"We have announced the end date of our state of emergency, there are no industry shutdowns, and daycares are operating with no restrictions. Vaccinations are available for all adults. Alabama is giving the federal government our 30-day notice that it's time to get back to work," Ivey said in a press release.

Alabama is also resuming its work-search requirements for recipients, which had been paused throughout the pandemic.

The average weekly benefit in Alabama amounted to $283 in March. Its unemployment rate stands at 3.8%, higher than the 2.8% it had in February 2020.

Alabama is among the seven states that have not raised the hourly minimum wage for workers since the hike to $7.25 in 2009. 

Experts say other factors are keeping workers from jumping back into the labor force, such as a lack of childcare access and fear of COVID-19 infection.

Alaska

Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy
Mark Thiessen/AP Photo

Alaska will end its participation in the extra $300 in weekly benefits effective June 12. 

"As Alaska's economy opens up, employers are posting a wide range of job opportunities and workers are needed," labor and workforce development commissioner, Dr. Tamika L. Ledbetter, said in a statement.

Extensions for the state benefit will continue through September 6. 

Alaska's unemployment rate was 6.6% in March 2021, a 0.8% increase from the rate of 5.8% in February 2020. The state's average weekly benefit is $298.

Arizona

Doug Ducey Arizona governor
Reuters

Gov. Doug Ducey said the state will terminate all federal jobless benefit programs on July 10, per a news release from his office.

Arizona, however, is setting aside some federal funds to provide a one-time $2,000 bonus for people who return to work by Sept. 6. There are some strings attached.

People qualify for the measure if they are already receiving jobless aid — and they must earn less than $25 hourly at their next job. That amounts to a yearly salary of $52,000. Individuals must also work 10 weeks with a new employer to get the cash.

The state last recorded an unemployment rate of 6.7%, higher than the 4.9% it had immediately before the pandemic in February 2020.

Arizona's average jobless payout is $238.

Arkansas

Asa Hutchinson
AP Photo/Andrew DeMillo, File

Gov. Asa Hutchinson announced on May 7 that the state would no longer participate in federal unemployment after June 26. 

"The $300 federal supplement helped thousands of Arkansans make it through this tough time, so it served a good purpose. Now we need Arkansans back on the job so that we can get our economy back to full speed," Hutchinson said in a press release, which cited South Carolina's and Montana's separate decisions to opt out of the federal assistance program.

Its unemployment rate is 4.4%, slightly higher than the 3.8% level of February 2020. The average weekly benefit in the state is $248.

In the fourth quarter of 2020, 74.7% of the UI Arkansas disbursed came from federal funds, according to a report from the left-leaning Economic Policy Institute. On January 1 of this year, Arkansas's minimum wage increased to $11 — several dollars above the federal rate of $7.25.

Florida

ron desantis florida vaccine 60 minutes
Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Florida will end its participation in the $300 in additional weekly benefits effective June 26. However, other federal programs, including PUA, "will continue for the time being as DEO [Department of Economic Opportunity] continues to carefully monitor job posting and industry hiring trends."

In a press release, DEO Secretary Dane Eagle said "transitioning away from this benefit will help meet the demands of small and large businesses who are ready to hire and expand their workforce." Florida's unemployment rate was 4.7% in March 2021, 1.9% higher than 2.8% in February 2020. The state's average weekly benefit is $235.22.

Georgia

brian kemp
AP Photo/John Amis

Gov. Brian Kemp announced Thursday that the state will end its participation in federal unemployment benefit programs effective June 26.

"Even in the middle of a global pandemic, job growth and economic development in Georgia remained strong — including an unemployment rate below the national average," Kemp said in a statement. "To build on our momentum, accelerate a full economic recovery, and get more Georgians back to work in good-paying jobs, our state will end its participation in the federal COVID-19 unemployment programs, effective June 26th."

The Georgia unemployment rate was 4.5% in March 2021, 1% above the February 2020 rate of 3.5%. The state's average weekly benefit is $278.95.

Idaho

Gov. Brad Little
Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/republican-states-cutting-unemployment-benefits-expanded-300-weekly-biden-stimulus-2021-5

On May 4, 2021, Montana Governor Greg Gianforte announced that his state was backing out of federal pandemic unemployment benefits, including the $300 per week supplement (PUC), Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) for gig workers and others not eligible for UI, and Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) for the long-term unemployed. Governors from South Carolina, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona,  Iowa, Indiana, Idaho, Georgia, Missouri, Ohio, Wyoming, Mississippi, Arkansas, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, West Virginia and North Dakota quickly followed suit  and more could follow. This fact sheet outlines the damage that these governors will inflict upon their most vulnerable populations (especially workers of color) and their economy by making this rash decision, and the potential harm to the recovery if more of the nation’s governors were to take a similar step.

Understanding the Cut-off of Benefits

Federal pandemic unemployment benefits are 100-percent federally funded and are delivered to workers at no additional cost to the states. However, the federal government relies on states to pay out these benefits, and they are generally paid out under the terms of an agreement between each state’s governor and the U.S. secretary of labor. Typically this agreement is a legal formality, as states have typically been eager to direct money to their citizens. While the American Rescue Plan signed by President Biden extended these benefits to September 6, 2021, the states mentioned above have chosen to end their benefits early, as soon as June 12 in Missouri and slightly later than in other states. These derelictions of responsibility are an affront to workers in these states. The CARES Act, which started Pandemic Unemployment Assistance, proclaims that “Secretary shall provide to any covered individual unemployment benefit assistance while such individual is unemployed” due to COVID-19 and not eligible for other unemployment benefits. Workers were right to believe that they would receive these benefits through September 6, but now they’ve been denied this federal aid. To this point, the National Employment Law Project has called on President Biden to require the continued payment of benefits to workers in these states.

On a national basis, benefits for 16 million workers, at a value of nearly $100 billion, are at stake.

Table 1, below, plots out the stakes in terms of workers and funds for each state were that state to pull benefits, including the decision to end the $300 top-off which affects all workers, and the ending of PUA, MEUC, and PEUC. In the eighteen states that have already announced pulling out of pandemic benefits, 2.2 million workers could be cut off early, at a cost of $12.4 billion. Thus far, only Republican governors have taken this step of pulling out of benefits early. If all of the Republican governors were to pull out, those totals would grow to 4.8 million workers. On a national basis, benefits for 16 million workers, at a value of nearly $100 billion, are at stake.

Table 1

Workers Impacted and Federal Dollars Lost per State, Following a Cut-Off of Benefits

State/TerritoryTotal Number of WorkersTotal Amount at StakeFPUC FundsOther Federal Funds
Alabama79,664$478,449,755$286,790,400$191,659,355
Alaska38,686$219,322,140$139,269,600$80,052,540
Arizona190,518$989,165,593$685,864,800$303,300,793
Arkansas80,713$419,840,030$290,566,800$129,273,230
California2,760,335$16,869,109,329$9,937,206,000$6,931,903,329
Colorado173,109$1,111,226,571$623,192,400$488,034,171
Connecticut197,556$1,171,958,871$711,201,600$460,757,271
Delaware31,059$165,305,766$111,812,400$53,493,366
District of Columbia38,863$194,448,148$139,906,800$54,541,348
Florida116,304$418,694,400$418,694,400N/A
Georgia268,531$1,283,145,876$966,711,600$316,434,276
Hawaii88,335$625,598,207$318,006,000$307,592,207
Idaho18,979$106,281,395$68,324,400$37,956,995
Illinois751,649$4,560,267,288$2,705,936,400$1,854,330,888
Indiana286,641$1,581,239,741$1,031,907,600$549,332,141
Iowa61,187$368,011,165$220,273,200$147,737,965
Kansas30,556$201,049,293$110,001,600$91,047,693
Kentucky63,606$385,828,645$228,981,600$156,847,045
Louisiana228,865$1,145,962,066$823,914,000$322,048,066
Maine43,502$257,197,066$156,607,200$100,589,866
Maryland300,392$1,927,903,058$1,081,411,200$846,491,858
Massachusetts567,975$4,243,111,572$2,044,710,000$2,198,401,572
Michigan707,791$4,388,283,425$2,548,047,600$1,840,235,825
Minnesota304,795$2,220,152,384$1,097,262,000$1,122,890,384
Mississippi91,626$446,625,842$329,853,600$116,772,242
Missouri147,890$770,970,498$532,404,000$238,566,498
Montana31,108$154,578,636$93,324,000$61,254,636
Nebraska15,276$82,989,797$54,993,600$27,996,197
Nevada240,047$1,419,395,042$864,169,200$555,225,842
New Hampshire35,445$170,257,786$127,602,000$42,655,786
New Jersey693,995$4,683,525,095$2,498,382,000$2,185,143,095
New Mexico98,395$581,789,228$354,222,000$227,567,228
New York2,378,077$14,610,295,956$8,561,077,200$6,049,218,756
North Carolina298,411$1,692,410,928$1,074,279,600$618,131,328
North Dakota15,057$104,469,203$54,205,200$50,264,003
Ohio594,944$3,664,359,401$2,141,798,400$1,522,561,001
Oklahoma84,054$471,237,081$302,594,400$168,642,681
Oregon223,722$1,384,084,392$805,399,200$578,685,192
Pennsylvania1,053,980$6,735,105,571$3,794,328,000$2,940,777,571
Puerto Rico254,088$1,101,493,476$914,716,800$186,776,676
Rhode Island76,788$471,517,537$276,436,800$195,080,737
South Carolina166,436$891,381,978$599,169,600$292,212,378
South Dakota5,059$25,017,006$18,212,400$6,804,606
Tennessee166,073$853,832,185$597,862,800$255,969,385
Texas1,317,443$8,775,169,916$4,742,794,800$4,032,375,116
Utah26,425$157,600,717$95,130,000$62,470,717
Vermont34,061$195,573,387$122,619,600$72,953,787
Virgin Islands1,428$5,257,625$5,140,800$116,825
Virginia210,330$1,423,828,934$757,188,000$666,640,934
Washington191,963$1,010,796,034$691,066,800$319,729,234
West Virginia45,782$240,416,510$164,815,200$75,601,310
Wisconsin137,132$648,582,030$493,675,200$154,906,830
Wyoming10,315$65,889,809$37,134,000$28,755,809
U.S. Total16,074,961$98,170,003,384$57,851,194,800$40,318,808,584
Source: Author’s analysis of U.S. Department of Labor data.

Cut Unemployment Benefits Will Hit Workers of Color the Hardest

There are significant racial consequences that will follow the decisions to eliminate federal pandemic benefits. Fifty percent of South Carolina Unemployment Insurance recipients are Black, as are 54 percent of Alabamians on UI and 66 percent of Mississippi’s claimant population, three times or more than the national average of 18 percent. The employers complaining the most about worker shortages are the ones that have depended on a largely disempowered, non-unionized, Black (and Latinx) workforce that make low wages. The cut-offs affecting these states thus will particularly target Black communities that endured near or over 10 percent unemployment rates as recently as the end of September (nearly twice the rate for whites). Federal unemployment programs, like PUA and PUC, were put into place to make up for the economic inequities that high-unemployment communities have faced as a result of state policies (including Montana’s Native American populations, the fifth-largest by proportion in the country). Moreover, Black Americans have been hit the hardest by the pandemic and have special reason to be reticent about returning to work in states that have reopened despite low vaccination rates. The governors who have made the move to cut off benefits have rejected the leveling impact of federal programs, subjecting their most vulnerable populations to greatly increased risk of poverty and COVID-19 infection.

Cutting Off Benefits Is Economically Short-Sighted

The governors who have withdrawn from the programs are complaining that federal benefits are holding back their recovery because certain employers cannot find the workers they need. However, this claim ignores the fact that the money from federal benefits flows into local businesses through consumer spending, generating another $1.61 in economic activity for every dollar spent. Any benefits that the state’s businesses might receive from some of these workers, in terms of faster ability to hire them in the short term, would be overwhelmed by the loss of unemployment debit card swipes hitting the cash registers of those same businesses.

On a national level, there are still only 8 million job openings as compared to 16 million jobless workers, and the U.S. economy is still short over 8 million jobs from before the pandemic. With jobs depressed, pandemic benefits have contributed to a fast start for gross domestic product in the first quarter of 2021 (up 6.4 percent in the first quarter of 2021, compared to 4.3 percent in the 4th quarter of 2020).

There Is Limited Evidence that Pandemic UI Is Holding Back Job Creation

Outside of the minimum wage, the employment incentives of unemployment insurance have been one of the most studied issues in microeconomics. Unemployment benefits have a modest impact on the length of unemployment, with recent studies finding very modest elasticities between increases in unemployment benefit rates and the length of time unemployed. This includes a close comparison of neighboring counties in states that had access to ninety-nine weeks of unemployment during the great recession and those that did not. Careful economic research during the pandemic found that major changes in pandemic unemployment compensation, first from $600 to $300 in September, and then from $0 to $300 in January, had little impact either way on job finding rates. In particular, these studies contradict the conventional wisdom that non-college graduates and those getting the biggest boost in UI would be incentivized to stay home from work. For many, the COVID-19 pandemic has represented a uniquely temporary economic downturn. Transitory economic and public health barriers are driving many into unemployment and it is changes in these factors, not UI, that are largely driving the trend. To the extent that there are pockets of worker shortages, such as in the restaurant sector, it’s good news that employers are being forced to raise wages after months of reduced tips and high risks of infection from COVID-19 drove many away from these jobs.

Cutting Back UI Benefits Won’t Solve the Child Care Crisis

The COVID-19 pandemic forced schools to go to hybrid lessons and child care centers to close, resulting in women’s labor force participation falling to a thirty-three-year low in January, and as of April 2021, employment was down far more among women, especially women of color, than among men. In Montana, one of out of eight workers quit a job due to the lack of child care in 2020. Research found that nearly 30 percent of child care centers closed in South Carolina because of the pandemic, and the recovery won’t come fast enough for those cut off from pandemic benefits. Of the eighteen states that have cut off pandemic benefits, only six allow for state unemployment benefits in situations when child care is not available—leaving no safety net for many working parents.

The employer segments complaining the most about employer shortages should be training their attention on working with their governors to resolve child care issues in their states if they want workers to be available for jobs.

As pointed out by economist Kathryn Edwards, more than half of food services workers are women, and more than one in four Black and Latina women works in a service occupation. So the employer segments complaining the most about employer shortages should be training their attention on working with their governors to resolve child care issues in their states if they want workers to be available for jobs. Cutting off these benefits at the beginning of the summer, which is the hardest time to locate child care, is far more damaging to families than if they were to continue until September when schools open.

The Biden Administration Has Offered a Productive Alternative Approach—or Search and Reemployment Services

On May 10, President Biden outlined an alternative approach to help more unemployed workers connect with available job openings. The president directed the U.S. Department of Labor to work with states to reinstate standard unemployment insurance requirements related to searching for a new job, and accepting a suitable job offer.

Despite what opponents to pandemic benefits have said, jobless workers can’t simply sit at home and collect benefits. While most states modified the typical federally mandated requirement to search for a job during the worst parts of the pandemic, the majority of states have reinstated rules that require recipients to be actively applying for new jobs. Given the progress of vaccine rollouts, it is legitimate progress to reinstate work search requirements with notable exceptions mentioned by the administration, like preserving benefits for those who do not have access to child care. This is an action that has been taken by Democratic governors, like Janet Mills of Maine, even before President Biden’s speech.

The administration also pledged to work with states to reintroduce cost-effective reemployment services programs that coach UI recipients on their job search. The pandemic is still causing major changes in the economy, and workers will need to have time to survey the labor market and see what suitable jobs are available to them. Proactive job searches are part of the transition out of the pandemic crisis, and given the still-large shortage of jobs, many workers will need through the summer or beyond on benefits to find work. Indeed, recent research has confirmed that unemployment benefits actually give recipients more time to find better-paid, more appropriate jobs than those not on aid.

We Must Continue to Support Our Workers

Aid to the unemployed has been the linchpin of the nation’s response to the economic damage of the pandemic. American workers deserve support until the economy has turned the corner and public health and child care conditions have fully turned around. The decisions these states have taken are deeply misguided, and no other states should follow suit.

header image: People wait in line at a food distribution outside of a church in the South Bronx on March 10, 2021 in New York City. source: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Tags: unemployment, u.s. economy, unemployment benefits, covid-19, biden-harris administration

Источник: https://tcf.org/content/commentary/fact-sheet-whats-stake-states-cancel-federal-unemployment-benefits/

How much do you get for unemployment in utah -

How the CARES Act Can Help Drivers Who are Unemployed Due to COVID-19

As part of the CARES Act, the federal government created three new programs for people who are unemployed or out of work due to COVID-19. Because unemployment compensation is one of the most important parts of the newly enacted CARES Act, we wanted to take some time to expand just on this topic, specifically as it may relate to rideshare drivers. 

  • 13-week extension - For drivers who have held part-time or full-time “traditional” employment (as discussed in more depth below), traditional unemployment benefits have been extended by 13 weeks, on top of the regular 26 weeks that are available in most states. Eligible applicants can now receive a total of up to 39 weeks of unemployment compensation.

  • Additional $600 per week - You also may receive a larger weekly benefit amount. There is an additional compensation of $600 per week for weeks of unemployment in the spring and summer of 2020. 

  • Unemployment assistance for self-employed/independent contractors - Finally, there’s a brand new unemployment assistance program for self-employed people and independent contractors — which includes rideshare driving and other gig-economy work. This is called the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program, and it provides up to 39 weeks of unemployment compensation for eligible applicants.

The majority of people who drive with Lyft do so in their spare time, on top of a regular full-time or part-time job elsewhere. If you lose your traditional full-time or part-time job, you may be eligible for unemployment assistance through regular state unemployment programs — and also for the 13-week extension and additional $600 per week described above. 

However, if you make most of your earnings through driving with online platforms like Lyft, instead of through a traditional job, and you’re unable to work due to COVID-19, you’re now likely eligible for the new Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) Program.

Generally, you’re either eligible for regular unemployment or the new PUA program for independent contractors, but you can’t receive both types of unemployment assistance at once. The additional $600 per week is available no matter which unemployment program you’re eligible for. 

While this may sound confusing, we’re here to help with some FAQs. State and federal guidance is changing rapidly, but we’re working around the clock to keep you up-to-date. 

FAQs for drivers with a traditional full-time job and spare-time Lyft earnings 

We know the vast majority of you drive with Lyft part-time, or between other jobs. Here are some FAQs for you:

I still have a traditional full-time or part-time job with an employer and I make most of my earnings there. I drive with Lyft in my spare-time. I have recently paused my driving. Am I eligible for the new PUA program?

If the majority of your earnings are still coming in through a traditional full-time or part-time job, it is unlikely that you are eligible for the PUA, the type of unemployment compensation assistance that is reserved for independent contractors, business owners and/or the self-employed -- people without traditional employment. Every state is handling these claims differently. 

I’ve been laid off from my traditional job and normally drive with Lyft for a few hours a week, but now I’m driving more.  Am I eligible for “regular” unemployment or the new PUA program?

If you were laid off from your traditional job, you should apply for regular unemployment benefits. If you are eligible for regular unemployment benefits, you are likely not eligible for the new PUA program. 

Some states are calculating total pandemic unemployment assistance based on all lost income — both employment wages and self-employment earnings. But our understanding is that currently that is only happening in a small minority of states. 

I had a regular part-time job which I lost due to COVID, but it was only a small part of my earnings. The primary source of my earnings was from driving with Lyft. Am I eligible for the new PUA program?

In general yes, but it could depend on your state. 

For drivers who primarily rely on income from “gig economy” work like driving for rideshare, you are “self-employed” according to PUA regulations, and so you are eligible for the new PUA program for self-employed people and independent contractors. This is the case even if you have part-time earnings from a regular job (like working in a bookstore 10 hours per week), because you primarily rely on income from your self-employed rideshare work with Lyft.  

However, some states are requiring applicants to exhaust all “regular” unemployment benefits first (by applying for unemployment benefits via your traditional part-time job first) before you’re eligible for the new PUA program’s assistance. Only a few states are operating this way, and we are working hard to understand which states are requiring this. We will communicate more as soon as we know more. 

FAQs for drivers who make most of their earnings through a mix of “gig economy” self-employment platforms (Lyft, Uber, Airbnb, etc)

I don’t have a traditional full-time job but I do have several gig economy jobs. My income is down across the board. Am I eligible for the new PUA program?

Yes. The CARES Act was intended to provide assistance to workers who experience “partial unemployment” as a result of COVID-19. Guidance from the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) says that drivers who have lost income due to unsustainable losses in rider demand should be eligible to receive some types of unemployment assistance regardless of whether that lost income is from total unemployment, or because the COVID-19 public health emergency has severely limited your ability to continue performing your customary work. 

Do I have to stop driving completely to apply?

As above, DOL guidance indicates that you do not need to stop driving completely to be eligible for PUA assistance. The CARES Act was intended to provide assistance to workers who experience “partial unemployment” as a result of COVID.  Even if you are still receiving some earnings, the guidance indicates that the new PUA program may make up the difference.

How do I know if I’m eligible for PUA?

In order to qualify for the new PUA program, you must primarily rely on earnings through self-employed work, like driving with Lyft, and you must be unable to work because of COVID-19. There are a couple of qualifying reasons beyond the ones you may expect, and they include:

  • You work as an independent contractor and are unemployed, under-employed, or unable to work because the COVID-19 public health emergency has severely limited your ability to continue performing your regular work.

  • You or a member of your household are unable to work because you have been diagnosed with COVID-19 or are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 .

  • A child or other person in the household for whom you have primary caregiving responsibility is unable to attend school or another facility that is closed as a direct result of the COVID-19, and you are unable to work because you are caring for them.

Am I “self-employed”?

Under your agreement with Lyft, you are classified as an independent contractor, and you are therefore self-employed. Congress and the U.S. Department of Labor included rideshare drivers under the category of “self-employed” workers within the new PUA program.

While some states are struggling with standing up new systems and legal issues regarding how drivers should apply for PUA, we have been communicating around the clock with state agencies pushing for a streamlined “self-certification” process and fast-track processing of applications and checks. Many states have responded, and we are seeing more states move toward a fast-track, self-certification process, where drivers are able to fill out applications and receive checks quickly. 

What is a “gig-economy worker?”

The federal guidance for PUA talks about “gig-economy workers”, and this may come up in your application. There is no official definition of “gig worker” in state or federal law.  Individuals who get paid by the “project”, “event,” or “gig” (like freelance writers, translators, musicians, artists, event production), or who sell goods or services using online platforms (like Lyft, Task Rabbit, Etsy, Airbnb, Shopify, DoorDash, Postmates, Zeel) are generally considered gig-economy workers, which is included in the definition of “self-employed” under federal law. Whether you make the majority of your earnings driving with Lyft, or you are a full time teacher and only drive with Lyft in your spare time, you are part of the “gig-economy.” However, some self-employed people who are part of the “gig-economy” are eligible for PUA, but not all of them, as discussed above. You have to primarily rely on your earnings from the gig economy in order to apply for PUA.

Application Process: For Regular Unemployment Assistance or the New PUA Program

How do I apply?

Regardless of whether you are eligible for regular unemployment assistance because you’ve lost a traditional full-time or part-time job, or are applying for the new PUA program, you can apply through your state’s unemployment office (a list of state offices is available here). 

What information do I need to apply?

Requirements differ by state, but for both regular unemployment and PUA, you will likely need some or all of the following information to apply: 

  • Social Security Number

  • Driver’s license or motor vehicle ID card number (if you have either one)

  • Mailing address and ZIP Code

  • Phone number 

  • Alien registration card number (if you are not a U.S. Citizen)

  • Names and business address of your self-employment 

  • Employer Registration Number or Federal Employer Identification Number (if you have W2 earnings)

  • Historical earnings records (details below on how to find them for your earnings through Lyft)

  • Tax documents, such as Form 1040 and any schedules, 1099s, or W2s (if you have them) 

Lyft drivers can use the following info to apply for PUA as an independent contractor:

  • Company name: Lyft, Inc.

  • Phone number: 855-865-9553

  • Mailing address: 185 Berry Street Suite 5000 San Francisco, California 94107

  • Fed Tax ID #: 20-8809830

When is the new PUA program assistance available?

Many states are still in the process of establishing their PUA programs and applications. However, under the CARES Act, PUA benefits can be claimed retroactively beginning January 27, 2020, and until December 31, 2020. 

I believe I am eligible for PUA, but I can’t find the application on my state’s website. What should I do?

Not all states have established separate processes for PUA yet, so we encourage you to check back frequently if the PUA application process is not currently available in your state. 

In some states, you may first need to apply for regular unemployment insurance before applying for PUA.  Some states are making new, stand-alone applications for PUA, and paying out benefits based on your combined income. We are advocating for other states to follow this model. Lyft is actively working with state unemployment offices to streamline the application process for independent contractors to ensure eligible drivers receive benefits as quickly as possible. 

The state unemployment website or the new PUA program website say that I need to enter my past earnings. Where can I find my earnings records in the Driver Dashboard?

PDFs of your annual and weekly earnings statements are easily available for download or printing on the web dashboard:

  • From a web browser, log onto your driver dashboard (https://www.lyft.com/login)

  • Annual earnings statements and tax forms (if necessary) are available from the web dashboard or app:  Driver Dashboard > Tax Information > Documents

  • Weekly earnings statements are available on the web dashboard:> Driving History > Select Week of Driving > Select "Download Weekly Summary"

If you need to screenshot your earnings using your mobile device instead, there are two ways to view historical weekly earnings in your app:  

  • Option 1:  driver app > $ (earnings tab) > See weekly breakdown

  • Option 2:  driver app > Dashboard > Driving History

  • Instructions to take a screenshot are available here: iPhone, Android

CARES Act Earnings Summary

Categories

COVID-19CARES Act
Источник: https://www.lyft.com/hub/posts/how-the-cares-act-can-help-drivers-who-are-unemployed-due-to-covid-19

Misrepresenting your employment status and claiming that you're looking for work when you aren't are examples of unemployment insurance fraud, which can result in criminal prosecutions.

The unemployment insurance benefits program, commonly referred to as UI, is designed to provide people with an income when they are unable to find work, have been laid off, or are out of work because of factors out of their control. Each state has its own unemployment insurance benefits program that they run in conjunction with the federal government.

State laws determine who is eligible for unemployment payments, as well as determine the penalties for people who misuse or abuse the program. In some situations where people or employers misuse unemployment programs, criminal unemployment insurance fraud charges are possible.

To learn more about proper unemployment program eligibility and collecting unemployment benefits in your state, you can read more on Nolo.

Unemployment Insurance Fraud

Most unemployment insurance fraud cases occur after a worker intentionally and knowingly makes false statements or misrepresentations in order to obtain unemployment insurance payments. Any lies, misrepresentations, or other intentional action or statement that lead to receiving unemployment insurance payments when a person is ineligible can result in fraud charges. Here are several ways people commonly commit this crime.

Failure to Report Employment

Some people who apply for unemployment insurance later go on to find a job. When this happens, people receiving unemployment payments have a duty to report their employment, and how much they make, to the state unemployment office. Failing to do so, and continuing to receive payments (or non-adjusted payments) while being employed is unemployment insurance fraud.

False Information, Identification, or Identity Theft

Some workers try to obtain unemployment insurance payments by submitting applications that contain false or misleading information. For example, an applicant who uses a false name, or who uses the personal identifying information of someone else to obtain unemployment benefits, commits unemployment insurance fraud. Similarly, submitting false information about employment status, income, and other related issues can also result in fraud charges.

Misrepresenting Employment Efforts

A person has to actively look for employment in order to receive unemployment insurance payments. Someone who fails to actively seek employment while reporting to the state unemployment office that he or she is looking also commits unemployment insurance fraud.

Employer Fraud

In addition to workers, employers can also commit unemployment insurance fraud. There are several ways employers can do this, such as misclassifying workers as independent contractors, failing to report paid wages or paying workers "under the table," or providing false information about workers who would otherwise be eligible to receive unemployment payments.

Legal Defenses

In any criminal case, including unemployment fraud cases, the type of legal defenses available to someone charged with a crime will differ depending on the circumstances. However, many unemployment insurance fraud cases involve one or more of the following defenses.

Lack of Criminal Intent

You cannot accidentally commit unemployment insurance fraud. To be convicted of this crime, a person has to intentionally make misrepresentations, lie, conceal, or do something else to fraudulently receive payments. If, for example, you mistakenly underreport your prior income when you apply for unemployment, this isn't enough to commit fraud.

Lack of Evidence

In any criminal proceeding, the state has the responsibility to present evidence to show beyond a reasonable doubt that the accused has committed a crime. In some unemployment insurance fraud cases, this evidence is simply not there. If the state cannot prove its case, you cannot be found guilty of a crime.

Potential Penalties

People who commit unemployment insurance fraud can face both civil and criminal penalties. A civil penalty usually involves a fine, while criminal penalties can include fines, incarceration, probation, and other penalties. Individual state laws determine what penalties apply in unemployment fraud cases, and differ significantly from state to state.

  • Repayment. Someone convicted of unemployment insurance fraud will have to pay back any ill-begotten funds. If you don't have enough to pay the full amount back, the state might be able to take the money from you by, for example, garnishing your wages.
  • Incarceration. Unemployment insurance fraud can be a misdemeanor or felony offense, depending on state law and the circumstances involved. Misdemeanors are crimes that generally have a maximum penalty of up to a year in jail, while convictions for felony offenses can lead to multiple years in state prison. For example, someone who makes false statements in order to receive unemployment insurance payments in the state of Utah commits a Class B misdemeanor offense if the payments received are less than $500. However, if the fraudulently obtained payments exceed $1,500, the crime is punished as a third-degree felony. (Utah Code Annotated section 76-8-1301)
  • Probation. In addition to, or in lieu of, jail or prison time, courts can also send someone convicted of unemployment insurance fraud to a probation term. People on probation have their freedoms significantly limited, and must comply with a number of probation conditions. These conditions often include, for example, reporting to a probation officer, seeking the officer's permission before leaving the state, not interacting with known criminals, not committing more crimes, and maintaining suitable employment.
  • Fines. If you are convicted of unemployment insurance fraud you might also be forced to pay a fine in addition to any repayments you have to make. For example, if you received unemployment payments of $5,000 and are convicted of unemployment insurance fraud, you will have to pay back the $5,000. You might also have to pay a criminal fine. Fines differ significantly from state to state, but can exceed $10,000 in some situations.

Find a Lawyer in Your Area

Even though unemployment insurance fraud might not seem like a significant crime, you always need to speak to an experienced criminal defense lawyer if you are facing charges. A conviction for unemployment insurance fraud can lead to serious penalties. Even if you are not convicted, being investigated for a crime and being subject to the criminal justice process is not something you want to do without the aid and advice of a criminal defense attorney from your area.

Источник: https://www.criminaldefenselawyer.com/resources/unemployment-insurance-fraud.htm

Laid off or cut hours due to the coronavirus? Here’s what you need to know to get help


Lexi Peery  

How Do I File for Unemployment Insurance?

Guidance on Unemployment Insurance Flexibilities During COVID-19 Outbreak

NOTE: Check with your state’s unemployment insurance program regarding the rules in your state.

Federal law permits significant flexibility for states to amend their laws to provide unemployment insurance benefits in multiple scenarios related to COVID-19. For example, federal law provides states flexibility to pay benefits where:

  1. An employer temporarily ceases operations due to COVID-19, preventing employees from coming to work;
  2. An individual is quarantined with the expectation of returning to work after the quarantine is over; and
  3. An individual leaves employment due to a risk of exposure or infection or to care for a family member.

In addition, federal law does not require an employee to quit in order to receive benefits due to the impact of COVID-19.

Webpages on this Topic

Office of Unemployment Insurance

State Unemployment Insurance

  • The Federal-State Unemployment Insurance Program provides unemployment benefits to eligible workers who are unemployed through no fault of their own (as determined under state law), and meet other eligibility requirements of state law.

Disaster Unemployment Assistance

  • Disaster Unemployment Assistance provides financial assistance to individuals whose employment or self-employment has been lost or interrupted as a direct result of a major disaster declared by the President of the United States.

Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees

  • The Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees program provides benefits for eligible unemployed former civilian federal employees.

Unemployment Compensation for Ex-Service Members

  • The Unemployment Compensation for Ex-Service Members program provides benefits for eligible ex-military personnel.

Unemployment Insurance Extended Benefits

  • Extended Benefits may be available to workers who have exhausted regular unemployment insurance benefits during periods of high unemployment.

Trade Readjustment Allowances

  • Trade Readjustment Allowances are income support to persons who have exhausted Unemployment Compensation and whose jobs were affected by foreign imports.

Self-Employment Assistance

  • Self-Employment Assistance offers dislocated workers the opportunity for early re-employment.

Unemployment Insurance Improper Payments By State

  • The U.S. Department of Labor collaborates with our state partners to identify several robust strategies that focus on the prevention of overpayments and will yield the highest impact in reducing unemployment insurance improper payment rates.

Through American Job Centers, all citizens can access services tailored to their individual needs. This includes employment and job training services, career planning and guidance and much more.

CareerOneStop provides online tools to assist workers with finding a job, utilizing available training opportunities or conducting career planning. There is no cost to businesses or workers who use this service.

The Department of Labor's toll-free call center can assist workers and employers with questions about job loss, layoffs, business closures, unemployment benefits and job training: 1-877-US-2JOBS (TTY: 1-877-889-5627).

Additional information on topics relevant to the unemployed can be found on the Department of Labor's web interface, Find It! By Audience - Job Seekers/Unemployed.

Источник: https://www.dol.gov/general/topic/unemployment-insurance

25 GOP-led states and one Democratic state are cutting $300 weekly federal unemployment benefits. Here are the 26 states making the cut this summer.

US Markets Loading...HMS

GettyImages 1231114054
Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images
  • Some Republican governors have decided Americans make too much from expanded unemployment benefits.
  • After a surprisingly dismal April jobs report, they moved to end federal jobless aid early.
  • That also includes eliminating programs benefiting gig workers, freelancers, and the long-term unemployed.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Alabama

kay ivey
Brynn Anderson/AP

Gov. Kay Ivey announced on Monday that the state was halting its participation in federal unemployment benefits starting June 19. 

Those include the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program for gig workers and Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation for the long-term unemployed.

"We have announced the end date of our state of emergency, there are no industry shutdowns, and daycares are operating with no restrictions. Vaccinations are available for all adults. Alabama is giving the federal government our 30-day notice that it's time to get back to work," Ivey said in a press release.

Alabama is also resuming its work-search requirements for recipients, which had been paused throughout the pandemic.

The average weekly benefit in Alabama amounted to $283 in March. Its unemployment rate stands at 3.8%, higher than the 2.8% it had in February 2020.

Alabama is among the seven states that have not raised the hourly minimum wage for workers since the hike to $7.25 in 2009. 

Experts say other factors are keeping workers from jumping back into the labor force, such as a lack of childcare access and fear of COVID-19 infection.

Alaska

Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy
Mark Thiessen/AP Photo

Alaska will end its participation in the extra $300 in weekly benefits effective June 12. 

"As Alaska's economy opens up, employers are posting a wide range of job opportunities and workers are needed," labor and workforce development commissioner, Dr. Tamika L. Ledbetter, said in a statement.

Extensions for the state benefit will continue through September 6. 

Alaska's unemployment rate was 6.6% in March 2021, a 0.8% increase from the rate of 5.8% in February 2020. The state's average weekly benefit is $298.

Arizona

Doug Ducey Arizona governor
Reuters

Gov. Doug Ducey said the state will terminate all federal jobless benefit programs on July 10, per a news release from his office.

Arizona, however, is setting aside some federal funds to provide a one-time $2,000 bonus for people who return to work by Sept. 6. There are some strings attached.

People qualify for the measure if they are already receiving jobless aid — and they must earn less than $25 hourly at their next job. That amounts to a yearly salary of $52,000. Individuals must also work 10 weeks with a new employer to get the cash.

The state last recorded an unemployment rate of 6.7%, higher than the 4.9% it had immediately before the pandemic in February 2020.

Arizona's average jobless payout is $238.

Arkansas

Asa Hutchinson
AP Photo/Andrew DeMillo, File

Gov. Asa Hutchinson announced on May 7 that the state would no longer participate in federal unemployment after June 26. 

"The $300 federal supplement helped thousands of Arkansans make it through this tough time, so it served a good purpose. Now we need Arkansans back on the job so that we can get our economy back to full speed," Hutchinson said in a press release, which cited South Carolina's and Montana's separate decisions to opt out of the federal assistance program.

Its unemployment rate is 4.4%, slightly higher than the 3.8% level of February 2020. The average weekly benefit in the state is $248.

In the fourth quarter of 2020, 74.7% of the UI Arkansas disbursed came from federal funds, according to a report from the left-leaning Economic Policy Institute. On January 1 of this year, Arkansas's minimum wage increased to $11 — several dollars above the federal rate of $7.25.

Florida

ron desantis florida vaccine 60 minutes
Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Florida will end its participation in the $300 in additional weekly benefits effective June 26. However, other federal programs, including PUA, "will continue for the time being as DEO [Department of Economic Opportunity] continues to carefully monitor job posting and industry hiring trends."

In a press release, DEO Secretary Dane Eagle said "transitioning away from this benefit will help meet the demands of small and large businesses who are ready to hire and expand their workforce." Florida's unemployment rate was 4.7% in March 2021, 1.9% higher than 2.8% in February 2020. The state's average weekly benefit is $235.22.

Georgia

brian kemp
AP Photo/John Amis

Gov. Brian Kemp announced Thursday that the state will end its participation in federal unemployment benefit programs effective June 26.

"Even in the middle of a global pandemic, job growth and economic development in Georgia remained strong — including an unemployment rate below the national average," Kemp said in a statement. "To build on our momentum, accelerate a full economic recovery, and get more Georgians back to work in good-paying jobs, our state will end its participation in the federal COVID-19 unemployment programs, effective June 26th."

The Georgia unemployment rate was 4.5% in March 2021, 1% above the February 2020 rate of 3.5%. The state's average weekly benefit is $278.95.

Idaho

Gov. Brad Little
Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/republican-states-cutting-unemployment-benefits-expanded-300-weekly-biden-stimulus-2021-5

25 GOP-led states and one Democratic state are cutting $300 weekly federal unemployment benefits. Here are the 26 states making the cut this summer.

US Markets Loading.HMS

GettyImages 1231114054
webbanking comerica Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images
  • Some Republican governors have decided Americans make too much from expanded unemployment benefits.
  • After a surprisingly dismal April jobs report, they moved to end federal jobless aid early.
  • That also includes eliminating programs benefiting gig workers, freelancers, and the long-term unemployed.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Alabama

kay ivey
Brynn Anderson/AP santander consumer car finance number

Gov. Kay Ivey announced on Monday that the state was halting its participation in federal unemployment benefits starting June 19. 

Those include the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program for gig workers and Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation for the long-term unemployed.

"We have announced the end date of our state of emergency, there are no industry shutdowns, and daycares are operating with no restrictions. Vaccinations are available for all adults. Alabama is giving the federal government our 30-day notice that it's time to get back to work," Ivey said in a press release.

Alabama is also resuming its work-search requirements for recipients, which had been paused throughout the pandemic.

The average weekly benefit in Alabama amounted to $283 in March. Its unemployment rate stands at 3.8%, higher than the 2.8% it had in February 2020.

Alabama is among the seven states that have not raised the hourly minimum wage for workers since the hike to $7.25 in 2009. 

Experts say other factors are keeping workers from jumping back into the labor force, such as a lack of childcare access and fear of COVID-19 infection.

Alaska

Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy
Mark Thiessen/AP Photo

Alaska will end its participation in the extra $300 in weekly benefits effective June 12. 

"As Alaska's economy opens up, employers are posting a wide range of job opportunities and workers are needed," labor and workforce development commissioner, Dr. Tamika L. Ledbetter, said in a statement.

Extensions for the state benefit will continue through September 6. 

Alaska's unemployment rate was 6.6% in March 2021, a 0.8% increase from the rate of 5.8% in February 2020. The state's average weekly benefit is $298.

Arizona

Doug Ducey Arizona governor
Reuters how much do you get for unemployment in utah

Gov. Doug Ducey said the state will terminate all federal jobless benefit programs on July 10, per a news release from his office.

Arizona, however, is setting aside some federal funds to provide a one-time $2,000 bonus for people who return to work by Sept. 6. There are some strings attached.

People qualify for the measure if they are already receiving jobless aid — and they must earn less than $25 hourly at their next job. That amounts to a yearly salary of $52,000. Individuals must also work 10 weeks with a new employer to how much do you get for unemployment in utah the cash.

The state last recorded an unemployment rate of 6.7%, higher than the 4.9% it had immediately before the pandemic in February 2020.

Arizona's average jobless payout is $238.

Arkansas

Asa Hutchinson
AP Photo/Andrew DeMillo, File

Gov. Asa Hutchinson announced on May 7 that the state would no longer participate in federal unemployment after June 26. 

"The $300 federal supplement helped thousands of Arkansans make it through this tough time, so it served a good purpose. Now we need Arkansans back on the job so that we can get our economy back to full speed," Hutchinson said in a press release, which cited South Carolina's and Montana's separate decisions to opt out of the federal assistance program.

Its unemployment rate is 4.4%, slightly higher than the 3.8% level of February 2020. The average weekly benefit in the state is $248.

In the fourth quarter of 2020, 74.7% of the UI Arkansas disbursed came from federal funds, according to a report from the left-leaning Economic Policy Institute. On January 1 of this year, Arkansas's minimum wage increased to $11 — several dollars above the federal rate of $7.25.

Florida

ron desantis florida vaccine 60 minutes
Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Florida will end its participation in the $300 in additional weekly benefits effective June 26. However, other federal programs, including PUA, "will continue for the time being as DEO [Department of Economic Opportunity] continues to carefully monitor job posting and industry hiring trends."

In a press release, DEO Secretary Dane Eagle said "transitioning away from this benefit will help meet the demands of small and large businesses who are ready to hire and expand their workforce." Florida's unemployment rate was 4.7% in March 2021, 1.9% higher than 2.8% in February 2020. The state's average weekly benefit is $235.22.

Georgia

brian kemp
AP Photo/John Amis

Gov. Brian Kemp announced Thursday that the state will end its participation in federal unemployment benefit programs effective June 26.

"Even in the middle of a global pandemic, job growth and economic development in Georgia remained strong — including an unemployment rate below the national average," Kemp said in a statement. "To build on our momentum, accelerate a full economic recovery, and get more Georgians back to work in good-paying jobs, our state will end its participation in the federal COVID-19 unemployment programs, effective June 26th."

The Georgia unemployment rate was 4.5% in March 2021, 1% above the February 2020 rate of 3.5%. The state's average weekly benefit is $278.95.

Idaho

Gov. Brad Little
Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/republican-states-cutting-unemployment-benefits-expanded-300-weekly-biden-stimulus-2021-5

Pandemic unemployment benefits end today. Why that's good for workers and the economy.


Utah and other states ended the extra benefits early, and it quickly proved to be the right decision.

Tarren Bragdon 

On May 4, 2021, Montana Governor Greg Gianforte announced that his state was backing out of federal pandemic unemployment benefits, including the $300 per week supplement (PUC), Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) for gig workers and others not eligible for UI, and Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) for the long-term unemployed. Governors from South Carolina, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona,  Iowa, Indiana, Idaho, How much do you get for unemployment in utah, Missouri, Ohio, Wyoming, Mississippi, Arkansas, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, West Virginia and North Dakota quickly followed suit  and more could follow. This fact sheet outlines the damage that these governors will inflict upon their most vulnerable populations (especially workers of color) and their economy by making this rash decision, and the potential harm to the recovery if more of the nation’s governors were to take a similar step.

Understanding the Cut-off of Benefits

Federal pandemic unemployment benefits are 100-percent federally funded and are delivered to workers at no additional cost to the states. However, the federal government relies on states to pay out these benefits, and they are generally paid out under the terms of an agreement between each state’s governor and the U.S. secretary of labor. Typically this agreement is a legal formality, as states have typically been eager to direct money to their citizens. While the American Rescue Plan signed by President Biden extended these benefits to September 6, 2021, the states mentioned above have chosen to end their benefits early, as soon as June 12 in Missouri and slightly later than in other states. These derelictions of responsibility are an affront to workers in these states. The CARES Act, which started Pandemic Unemployment Assistance, proclaims that “Secretary shall provide to any covered individual unemployment benefit assistance while such individual is unemployed” due to COVID-19 and not eligible for other unemployment benefits. Workers were right to believe that they would receive these benefits through September 6, but now they’ve been denied this federal aid. To this point, the National Employment Law Project has called on President Biden to require the continued payment of benefits to workers in these states.

On a national basis, benefits for 16 million workers, at a value of nearly $100 billion, are at stake.

Table 1, below, plots out the stakes in terms of workers and funds for each how much do you get for unemployment in utah were that state to pull benefits, including the decision to end the $300 top-off which affects all workers, and the ending of PUA, MEUC, and PEUC. In the eighteen states that have already announced pulling out of pandemic benefits, 2.2 million workers could be cut off early, at a cost of $12.4 billion. Thus far, only Republican governors have taken this step of pulling out of benefits early. If all of the Republican governors were to pull out, those totals would grow to 4.8 million workers. On a national basis, benefits for 16 million workers, at a value of nearly $100 billion, are at stake.

Table 1

Workers Impacted and Federal Dollars Lost per State, Following a Cut-Off of Benefits

State/TerritoryTotal Number of WorkersTotal Amount at StakeFPUC FundsOther Federal Funds
Alabama79,664$478,449,755$286,790,400$191,659,355
Alaska38,686$219,322,140$139,269,600$80,052,540
Arizona190,518$989,165,593$685,864,800$303,300,793
Arkansas80,713$419,840,030$290,566,800$129,273,230
California2,760,335$16,869,109,329$9,937,206,000$6,931,903,329
Colorado173,109$1,111,226,571$623,192,400$488,034,171
Connecticut197,556$1,171,958,871$711,201,600$460,757,271
Delaware31,059$165,305,766$111,812,400$53,493,366
District of Columbia38,863$194,448,148$139,906,800$54,541,348
Florida116,304$418,694,400$418,694,400N/A
Georgia268,531$1,283,145,876$966,711,600$316,434,276
Hawaii88,335$625,598,207$318,006,000$307,592,207
Idaho18,979$106,281,395$68,324,400$37,956,995
Illinois751,649$4,560,267,288$2,705,936,400$1,854,330,888
Indiana286,641$1,581,239,741$1,031,907,600$549,332,141
Iowa61,187$368,011,165$220,273,200$147,737,965
Kansas30,556$201,049,293$110,001,600$91,047,693
Kentucky63,606$385,828,645$228,981,600$156,847,045
Louisiana228,865$1,145,962,066$823,914,000$322,048,066
Maine43,502$257,197,066$156,607,200$100,589,866
Maryland300,392$1,927,903,058$1,081,411,200$846,491,858
Massachusetts567,975$4,243,111,572$2,044,710,000$2,198,401,572
Michigan707,791$4,388,283,425$2,548,047,600$1,840,235,825
Minnesota304,795$2,220,152,384$1,097,262,000$1,122,890,384
Mississippi91,626$446,625,842$329,853,600$116,772,242
Missouri147,890$770,970,498$532,404,000$238,566,498
Montana31,108$154,578,636$93,324,000$61,254,636
Nebraska15,276$82,989,797$54,993,600$27,996,197
Nevada240,047$1,419,395,042$864,169,200$555,225,842
New Hampshire35,445$170,257,786$127,602,000$42,655,786
New Jersey693,995$4,683,525,095$2,498,382,000$2,185,143,095
New Mexico98,395$581,789,228$354,222,000$227,567,228
New York2,378,077$14,610,295,956$8,561,077,200$6,049,218,756
North Carolina298,411$1,692,410,928$1,074,279,600$618,131,328
North Dakota15,057$104,469,203$54,205,200$50,264,003
Ohio594,944$3,664,359,401$2,141,798,400$1,522,561,001
Oklahoma84,054$471,237,081$302,594,400$168,642,681
Oregon223,722$1,384,084,392$805,399,200$578,685,192
Pennsylvania1,053,980$6,735,105,571$3,794,328,000$2,940,777,571
Puerto Rico254,088$1,101,493,476$914,716,800$186,776,676
Rhode Island76,788$471,517,537$276,436,800$195,080,737
South Carolina166,436$891,381,978$599,169,600$292,212,378
South Dakota5,059$25,017,006$18,212,400$6,804,606
Tennessee166,073$853,832,185$597,862,800$255,969,385
Texas1,317,443$8,775,169,916$4,742,794,800$4,032,375,116
Utah26,425$157,600,717$95,130,000$62,470,717
Vermont34,061$195,573,387$122,619,600$72,953,787
Virgin Islands1,428$5,257,625$5,140,800$116,825
Virginia210,330$1,423,828,934$757,188,000$666,640,934
Washington191,963$1,010,796,034$691,066,800$319,729,234
West Virginia45,782$240,416,510$164,815,200$75,601,310
Wisconsin137,132$648,582,030$493,675,200$154,906,830
Wyoming10,315$65,889,809$37,134,000$28,755,809
U.S. Total16,074,961$98,170,003,384$57,851,194,800$40,318,808,584
Source: Author’s analysis of U.S. Department of Labor data.

Cut Unemployment Benefits Will Hit Workers of Color the Hardest

There are significant racial consequences that will follow the decisions to eliminate federal pandemic benefits. Fifty percent of South Carolina Unemployment Insurance recipients are Black, as are 54 percent of Alabamians on UI and 66 percent of Mississippi’s claimant population, three times or more than the national average of 18 percent. The employers complaining the most about worker shortages are the ones that have depended on a largely disempowered, non-unionized, Black (and Latinx) workforce that make low wages. The cut-offs affecting these states thus will particularly target Black communities that endured near or over 10 percent unemployment rates as recently as the end of September (nearly twice the rate for whites). Federal unemployment programs, like PUA and PUC, were put into place to make up for the economic inequities that high-unemployment communities have faced as a result of state policies (including Montana’s Native American populations, the fifth-largest by proportion in the country). Moreover, Black Americans have been hit the hardest by the pandemic and have special reason to be reticent about returning to work in states that have reopened despite low vaccination rates. The governors who have made the move to cut off benefits have rejected the leveling impact of federal programs, subjecting their most vulnerable populations to greatly increased risk of poverty and COVID-19 infection.

Cutting Off Benefits Is Economically Short-Sighted

The governors who have withdrawn from the programs are complaining that federal benefits are holding back their recovery because certain employers cannot find the workers they need. However, this claim ignores the fact that the money from federal benefits flows into local businesses through consumer spending, generating another $1.61 in economic activity for every dollar spent. Any benefits that the state’s businesses might receive from some of these workers, in terms of faster ability to hire them in the short term, would be overwhelmed by the loss of unemployment debit card swipes hitting the cash registers of those same how much do you get for unemployment in utah a national level, there are still only 8 million job openings as compared to 16 million jobless workers, and the U.S. economy is still short over 8 million jobs from before the pandemic. With jobs depressed, pandemic benefits have contributed to a fast start for gross domestic product in the first quarter of 2021 (up 6.4 percent in the first quarter of 2021, compared to 4.3 percent in the 4th quarter of 2020).

There Is Limited Evidence that Pandemic UI Is Holding Back Job Creation

Outside of the minimum wage, the employment incentives of unemployment insurance have been one of the most studied issues in microeconomics. Unemployment benefits have a modest impact on the length of unemployment, with recent studies finding very modest elasticities between increases in unemployment benefit rates and the length of time unemployed. This includes a close comparison of neighboring counties in states that had access to ninety-nine weeks of unemployment during the great recession and those that did not. Careful economic research during the pandemic found that major changes in pandemic unemployment compensation, first from $600 to $300 in September, and then from $0 to $300 in January, had little impact either way on job finding rates. In particular, these studies contradict the conventional wisdom that non-college graduates and those getting the biggest boost in UI would be incentivized to stay home from work. For many, the COVID-19 pandemic has represented a uniquely temporary economic downturn. Transitory economic and public health barriers are driving many into unemployment and it is changes in these factors, not UI, that are largely driving the trend. To the extent that there are pockets of worker shortages, such as in the restaurant sector, it’s good news that employers are being forced to raise wages after months of reduced tips and high risks of infection from COVID-19 drove many away from these jobs.

Cutting Back UI Benefits Won’t Solve the Child Care Crisis

The COVID-19 pandemic forced schools to go to hybrid lessons and child care centers to close, resulting in women’s labor force participation falling to a thirty-three-year low in January, and as of April 2021, employment was down far more among women, especially women of color, than among men. In Montana, one of out of eight workers quit a job due to the lack of child care in 2020. Research found that nearly how much do you get for unemployment in utah percent of child care centers closed in South Carolina because of the pandemic, and the recovery won’t come fast enough for those cut off from pandemic benefits. Of the eighteen states that have cut off pandemic benefits, only six allow for state unemployment benefits in situations when child care is not available—leaving no safety net for many working parents.

The employer segments complaining the most about employer shortages should be training their attention on working with their governors to resolve child care issues in their states if they want workers to be available for jobs.

As pointed out by economist Kathryn Edwards, more than half of food services workers are women, and more than one in four Black and Latina women works in a service occupation. So the employer segments complaining the most about employer shortages should be training their attention on working with their governors to resolve child care issues in their states if they want workers to be available for jobs. Cutting off these benefits at the beginning of the summer, which is the hardest time to locate child care, is far more damaging to families than if they were to continue until September when schools open.

The Biden Administration Has Offered a Productive Alternative Approach—or Search and Reemployment Services

On May 10, President Biden outlined an alternative approach to help more unemployed workers connect with available job openings. The president directed the U.S. Department of Labor to work with states to reinstate standard unemployment insurance requirements related to searching for a new job, and accepting a suitable job offer.

Despite what opponents to pandemic benefits have said, jobless workers can’t simply sit at home and collect benefits. While most states modified the typical federally mandated requirement to search for a job during the worst parts of the pandemic, the majority of states have reinstated rules that require recipients to be actively applying for new jobs. Given the progress of vaccine rollouts, it is comenity victoria secret credit card login progress to reinstate work how much do you get for unemployment in utah requirements with notable exceptions mentioned by the administration, like preserving benefits for those who do not have access to child care. This is an action that has been taken by Democratic governors, like Janet Mills of Maine, even before President Biden’s speech.

The administration also pledged to work with states to reintroduce cost-effective reemployment services programs that coach UI recipients on their job search. The pandemic is still causing major changes in the economy, and workers will need to have time to survey the labor market and see what suitable jobs are available to them. Proactive job searches are part of the transition out of the pandemic crisis, and given the still-large shortage of jobs, many workers will need through the register bank account with western union or beyond on benefits to find work. Indeed, recent research has confirmed that unemployment benefits actually give recipients more time to find better-paid, more appropriate jobs than those not on aid.

We Must Continue to Support Our Workers

Aid to the unemployed has been the linchpin of the nation’s response to the economic damage of the pandemic. American workers deserve support until the economy has turned the corner and public health and child care conditions have fully turned around. The decisions these states have taken are deeply misguided, and no other states should follow suit.

header image: People wait in line at a food distribution outside of a church in the South Bronx on March 10, 2021 in New York City. source: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Tags: unemployment, u.s. economy, unemployment benefits, covid-19, biden-harris administration

Источник: https://tcf.org/content/commentary/fact-sheet-whats-stake-states-cancel-federal-unemployment-benefits/

Misrepresenting your employment status and claiming that you're looking for work when you aren't are examples of unemployment insurance fraud, which can result in criminal prosecutions.

The unemployment insurance benefits program, commonly referred to as UI, is designed to provide people with an income when they are unable to find work, have been laid off, or are out of work because of factors out of their control. Each state has its own unemployment insurance benefits program that they run in conjunction with the federal government.

State laws how much do you get for unemployment in utah who is eligible for unemployment payments, as well as determine the penalties for people who misuse or abuse the program. In some situations where people or employers misuse unemployment programs, criminal unemployment insurance fraud charges are possible.

To learn more about proper unemployment program eligibility and collecting unemployment benefits in your state, you can read more on Nolo.

Unemployment Insurance Fraud

Most unemployment insurance fraud cases occur after a worker intentionally and knowingly makes false statements or misrepresentations in order to obtain unemployment insurance payments. Any lies, misrepresentations, or other intentional action or statement that lead to receiving unemployment insurance payments when a person is ineligible can result in fraud charges. Here are several ways people commonly commit this crime.

Failure to Report Employment

Some people who apply for unemployment insurance later go on to find a job. When this happens, people receiving unemployment payments have a duty to report their employment, and how much they make, to the state unemployment office. Failing to do so, and continuing to receive payments (or non-adjusted payments) while being employed is unemployment insurance fraud.

False Information, Identification, or Identity Theft

Some workers try to obtain unemployment insurance payments by submitting applications that contain false or misleading information. For example, an applicant who uses a false name, or who uses the personal identifying information of someone else to obtain unemployment benefits, commits unemployment insurance fraud. Similarly, submitting false information about employment status, income, and other related issues can also result in fraud charges.

Misrepresenting Employment Efforts

A person has to actively look for employment in order to receive unemployment insurance payments. Someone who fails to actively seek employment while reporting to the state unemployment office that he or she is looking also commits unemployment insurance fraud.

Employer Fraud

In addition to workers, employers can also commit unemployment insurance fraud. There are several ways employers can do this, such as misclassifying workers as independent contractors, failing to report paid wages or paying workers "under the table," or providing false information about workers who would otherwise be eligible to receive unemployment payments.

Legal Defenses

In any criminal case, including unemployment fraud cases, the type of legal defenses available to someone charged with a crime will differ depending on the circumstances. However, many unemployment insurance fraud cases involve one or more of the following defenses.

Lack of Criminal Intent

You cannot accidentally commit unemployment insurance fraud. To be convicted of this crime, a person has to intentionally make misrepresentations, lie, conceal, or do something else to fraudulently receive payments. If, for example, you mistakenly underreport your prior income when you apply for unemployment, this isn't enough to commit fraud.

Lack of Evidence

In any criminal proceeding, the state has the responsibility to present evidence to show beyond a reasonable doubt that the accused has committed a crime. In some unemployment insurance fraud cases, this evidence is simply not there. If the state cannot prove its case, you cannot be found guilty of a crime.

Potential Penalties

People who commit unemployment insurance fraud can face both civil and criminal penalties. A civil penalty usually involves a fine, while criminal penalties can include fines, incarceration, probation, and other penalties. Individual state laws determine what penalties apply in unemployment fraud cases, and differ significantly from state to state.

  • Repayment. Someone convicted of unemployment insurance fraud will have to pay back any ill-begotten funds. If you don't have enough to pay the full amount back, the state might be able to take the money from you how much do you get for unemployment in utah, for example, garnishing your wages.
  • Incarceration. Unemployment insurance fraud can be a misdemeanor or felony offense, depending on state law and the circumstances involved. Misdemeanors are crimes that generally have a maximum penalty of up to a year in jail, while convictions for felony offenses can lead to multiple years in state prison. For example, someone who makes false statements in order to receive unemployment insurance payments in the state of Utah commits a Class B misdemeanor offense if the payments received are less than $500. However, if the fraudulently obtained payments exceed $1,500, the crime is punished as a third-degree felony. (Utah Code Annotated section 76-8-1301)
  • Probation. In addition to, or in lieu of, jail or prison time, courts can also send someone convicted of unemployment insurance fraud to a probation term. People on probation have their freedoms significantly limited, and must comply with a number of probation conditions. These conditions often include, for example, reporting to a probation officer, seeking the officer's permission before leaving the state, not interacting with known criminals, not committing more crimes, and maintaining suitable employment.
  • Fines. If you how much do you get for unemployment in utah convicted of unemployment insurance fraud you might also be forced to pay a fine in addition to any repayments you have to make. For example, if you received unemployment payments of $5,000 and are convicted of how much do you get for unemployment in utah insurance fraud, you will have to pay back the $5,000. You might also have to pay a criminal fine. Fines differ significantly from state to state, but can exceed $10,000 in some situations.

Find a Lawyer in Your Area

Even though unemployment insurance fraud might not seem like a significant crime, you always need to speak to an experienced criminal defense lawyer if you are facing charges. A conviction for unemployment insurance fraud can lead to serious penalties. Even if you are not convicted, being investigated for a crime and being subject to the criminal justice process is not something you want to do without the aid and advice of a criminal defense attorney from your area.

Источник: https://www.criminaldefenselawyer.com/resources/unemployment-insurance-fraud.htm
 St. George Spectrum & Daily News

This content is being provided for free as a public service to our readers during the coronavirus outbreak. Please support local journalism by subscribing to The Spectrum & Daily News.

Unemployment filings in Utah jumped 29.5% the week of March 14, which is “clearly attributable” to the spread of the coronavirus, according to a March 19 news release by the U.S. Department of Labor.

Social distancing and restrictions on businesses are leading to cuts in hours and wages for people — and some businesses ffnm rio rancho laying off their entire staff because of government restrictions.  

On Wednesday, the state health department announced that 346 people statewide had tested positive for the new coronavirus, a jump of 48 cases from the previous day. Nearly 7,000 people had been tested.

MORE: Coronavirus live updates: Utah at 346 confirmed cases of COVID-19

The Utah Department of Workforce Services is now offering a daily virtual workshop for people looking to file for unemployment assistance, according to DWS spokesperson Christina Davis. She said DWS has seen an "influx" of people recently due to the coronavirus.

"The most important thing is for people to apply online. We can process claims most efficiently that way. We have transferred people over from other departments to help with unemployment claims, and we’ve beefed up that division to deal with the influx we’re seeing," Davis said.

So how do you file online? How do you find out if you even qualify for assistance? Here’s what you need to know about filing for unemployment assistance in Utah.

Who qualifies for unemployment?

The Utah Department of Workforce Services has added more scenarios under which people can file for unemployment benefits. Normally, those who have been in the workforce for at least five quarters, those who are able and available for suitable employment and those laid off through no fault of their own are eligible to apply for unemployment benefits.

In addition to those guidelines, the state has released COVID-19 specific situations for which you can apply for unemployment benefits.

  • Your employer temporarily ceased operations with the expectation you will return to work.
  • You are quarantined, but not showing symptoms, and will return to work.
  • You are able and available (not showing any symptoms of COVID-19), but are unable to go to work because your place of employment has been quarantined.

There is also still weeklong waiting period before a person can receive assistance. 

MORE: What does it mean to stay at home and answers to your other coronavirus questions

To receive unemployment benefits, people need to be actively searching for a job. However, if you have been temporarily laid off due to the coronavirus, you may be granted a deferral, according to the DWS.

If your hours were reduced because of the coronavirus, you may also be eligible to apply for unemployment. Part-time workers who meet guidelines may also be eligible.

Davis encourages anyone that thinks this may apply to them to apply online. 

"We encourage people if they’ve gone from full-time to a reduction in hours or lost a job permanently or temporarily, get on the website and apply. At that point, we can determine if they are eligible," she said.

Who doesn’t qualify?

Those who have paid leave aren’t eligible for benefits, as well as those who are self-employed. Those without paid leave and contract the coronavirus may be eligible for assistance.

If you contract COVID-19 and quit your job, you may not qualify for unemployment benefits, however, cases are dealt with on an individual basis, according to DWS.

How do I file for unemployment?

The most efficient way to apply, according to Davis, is online. The state's website is: https://jobs.utah.gov/ui/home/

Here’s what you’ll need to apply for assistance:

  • Name, Date of Birth, and Social Security Number (SSN)
  • Information about where they work, or what kind of money they receive on a regular basis.
  • Information about any maryland unemployment benefits and severance pay accounts, vehicles, or property they may own.
  • Information about any expenses they pay for housing, child care, medical bills, or child support.

Who is hiring?

Grocery stores in the area are hiring as demand grows. There are Facebook groups and listings in the St. George area that can be useful for those looking for work at this time.

Also, around 30,000 listings for temporary and full-time jobs in Utah are available on the DWS website.

"If you are in a situation and you’re looking for employment we have a lot of industries and companies still hiring," Davis how much do you get for unemployment in utah. "If someone is going back to work eventually and is looking for something temporary in that time or their job loss is permanent, they can utilize the listings."

Federal assistance

President Donald Trump last week signed a measure to ensure paid sick leave for workers and widen coronavirus testing after its passage in the Senate.

Now, Congress is crafting its next emergency relief package: one that would provide checks of $1,000 or more for Americans and financial lifelines for businesses socked by the coronavirus pandemic that is ravaging the economy and upending daily life.

Senators overwhelmingly supported a House bill that covers the cost of all coronavirus testing, expands federal food programs serving low-income seniors and needy families, and provides paid sick leave for workers forced to stay at home.

The vote was passed 90-8.

The bill, Families First Coronavirus Response Act, would:

  • Offer two weeks of paid sick and family leave to many American workers who have been forced to stay home because of COVID-19 or who have children whose schools have closed. Workers will get 100% of their normal salary.
  • Provide up to 12 weeks of paid leave to many of those who have children whose schools have closed. Workers would get about 67% of their normal salary for this period.
  • Bolster unemployment insurance protections.
  • Provide free testing for the coronavirus for those who need it.
  • Boost food assistance (SNAP) for needy families and federal funding for Medicaid.

USA Today contributed to the reporting of this article.

Lexi Peery is the environment, politics and development reporter for The Spectrum & Daily News, a USA TODAY Network newsroom based in southern Utah. You can reach her at [email protected] and follow her on Twitter @LexiFP. 

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Источник: https://www.thespectrum.com/story/news/2020/03/25/coronavirus-hit-your-job-how-get-unemployment-assistance-utah/2912766001/

Laid off or cut hours due to the coronavirus? Here’s what you need to know to get help


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