is corn good or bad for you

Corn and other starchy foods have relatively high glycemic loads, which can product blood sugar spikes after they are eaten. This could. The topic of grains—and corn, in particular—as an ingredient in animal food other single category or individual ingredients, are neither good nor bad. Should I Eat Corn? 5/5 experts say yes. Corn as a health food seems like a no-brainer, and indeed it is: all five of our experts give it the.

Is corn good or bad for you -

This What Happens When You Eat Corn Every Day

Because of its superstar status, corn can be found in a lot of different foods. Healthline reports that you can find corn in tortillas, polenta, chips, oil, syrups, and so much more. It is even used as animal feed and for fuel (about 40 percent of corn that is cultivated in the U.S. is used for car fuel). But with so many functions, what occurs within the body when there is a steady intake of corn every day? Some benefits to eating corn, per Eat This, Not That!, are that the body can stay fuller for longer periods of time due to the fiber in it, and the vitamin B6 and vitamin B9 can give your overall energy a much-needed boost. 

Healthline adds that overall eye health can also improve due to the amounts of lutein and zeaxanthin found within corn. However, with all the positives, there also comes some negatives. Eat This, Not That! cites that eating too much processed corn can raise the inflammation levels within the body. Highly processed corn is essentially stripped of its nutrients leaving you with just sugar and oil. Another downside to eating too much corn is that it can spike your overall blood sugar levels, which can be bad if you have a family history of diabetes. Sounds like moderation is the key to reaping its full benefits. 

Источник: https://www.mashed.com/379014/this-what-happens-when-you-eat-corn-every-day/
Corn cobs with title "potassium in corn" over picture

What is better than an ear of freshly picked sweet corn? My mid-Michigan roots may make be biased, but corn on the cob is one of my favorite summer foods! But, is corn healthy? Is corn okay to eat if you have kidney disease or high potassium? Read on to understand everything you need to know about potassium in corn.

Health Benefits of Corn

Before we jump into the nitty gritty, lets talk about the health benefits of corn!

Counts as a Veggie!

The first benefit of corn is simply that it is a vegetable! Yep! Corn might have a bad reputation because it is higher in starch than other veggies, but it absolutely counts as a vegetable and can help you meet your goal of 5 servings of vegetables per day.

If you have diabetes, or are concerned about your blood sugar, just make sure to count corn as part of your carbohydrate for that meal. Remember, your goal to control blood sugar is not to completely avoid carbohydrate. Instead, you just need to eat foods higher in carbohydrate, like corn, in healthy portions!

Cartoon picture of an ear of corn. Text: 1 serving of corn = 1/2 cup or 1 medium ear

Fiber

Corn is a great source of fiber! A 1/2 cup of corn packs 3 grams of fiber. This is just as much as a slice of whole grain bread!

Natural Sweetness

Lastly, corn is delicious! Corn has a wonderful sweet flavor that is impossible not to love. Using corn, or other sweet veggies like carrots, to add just a touch of sweetness can cut down how much sugar or salt you need to make a tasty dish!

Potassium in Corn

And, the highlight of this post, the potassium in corn is a benefit for many people! A high potassium diet can help control blood pressure.

How Much Potassium Should I Eat?

Why should you care about potassium in corn? Getting potassium right can be confusing. Let’s clear it up!

Potassium for General Health

Most people should be eating more potassium. In fact, 98% of people in the United States are not eating enough! High potassium diets can help control blood pressure and promote heart health. The general recommendation for potassium is 2,600mg for women and 3,400mg for men.(1) Corn is a great way to add extra potassium to your day!

Kidney Disease

However, some people might need to limit how much potassium they eat. People who have kidney disease are at risk of high potassium blood levels, a condition called hyperkalemia. If this is you, you may need to limit how much potassium you eat. A 2,000mg potassium diet is considered “low” in potassium. But, your dietitian might have different recommendations for you.

Remember, not everyone with kidney disease needs to limit potassium. Only people who have high potassium need to limit how much potassium they eat. Ask your doctor or dietitian how much potassium is right for you.

The Amount of Potassium in Corn

So, how much potassium is in corn? The answer depends on the type of corn and how you cooked it. Check out this table to compare potassium in corn.

CornServing SizePotassium (mg)
Fresh Corn on the Cob (white or yellow)1 medium ear368
Boiled Fresh Corn on the Cob (white or yellow)1 medium ear158
Canned Corn1/2 cup cooked109
Frozen Corn1/2 cup cooked192
Popcorn3 cups popped kernels180
Cornmeal, de-germed1/4 cup56
Cornmeal, whole wheat1/4 cup88
Hominy1/2 cup8

Cooking Methods & Potassium in Corn

How corn is cooked has a big impact on how much potassium ends up in your body! Boiling corn (or any food!) tends to pull lots of vitamins and minerals from the food. Potassium included!

Cartoon pictures of corn being boiled, roasted and grilled. Text: Potassium in corn varies depending on cooking method

Boiled Corn

Generally, boiling food reduces potassium by half. Notice that 1 ear of fresh corn on the cob has about 60% more potassium in it compared to boiled corn on the cob. Because most people boil corn on the cob before eating it, that extra potassium in the “fresh” corn on the cob doesn’t make it into our bodies.

Any cooking method that utilizes water will reduce the amount of potassium and other water soluble nutrients in the food. Steaming will reduce nutrients a small amount, but not as much as boiling. Braising and pressure cooking also cause a loss of water soluble nutrients.

“Dry” cooking methods like baking, roasting or grilling, will not reduce potassium significantly.

Canned Corn

For a similar reason, canned corn tends to be lower in potassium than fresh or frozen. Canned corn is stored in liquid, which pulls some potassium out.

Be mindful of sodium in canned corn for a kidney friendly diet. Look for “low sodium” or “no salt added” canned options. Or, try frozen corn!

Healthy Corn Recipes

Here are some of my favorite healthy recipes that feature corn.

Lower Potassium Corn Recipes

Higher Potassium Corn Recipes

Happy Eating!

Melanie

Источник: https://www.thekidneydietitian.org/potassium-in-corn/

Why can't humans digest corn?

Corn has a way of staying intact from plate to poop. The bright yellow kernels found in our favorite summer dishes can show up — seemingly undigested — in the bathroom hours later. How does corn survive the digestive system? And maybe more importantly, should you even eat a food that's hard to digest?

It turns out that your digestive system is doing more work than you think, so don't skip the maize just yet. The yellow kernels in your poo are really just the corn kernel's outer coating, according to Andrea Watson, a ruminant nutritionist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Corn kernels are seeds carrying precious genetic material. The key to the seed's survival is the waxy, yellow outer coating that protects the genetic material from weather, pests and transport. The fact that it's hard to break down is actually ideal for the plant. The outer coating owes its resilience to a tough fiber called cellulose, which humans don't have the proper enzymes or gut bacteria to digest.

Related: Does sugar make kids hyper?

Even ruminant animals, such as cattle, which are much better equipped to digest cellulose, can't always fully digest corn, Watson told Live Science. While cattle don't eat the same sweet and soft corn that we do (they eat a tougher, more mature corn that can be stored long term), they, too, have whole kernels show up in their dung. Researchers have done the dirty work of picking out those expelled kernels and analyzing their nutritional content. "It turns out [the kernels] have been digested quite a bit," Watson said. 

The good news is that cellulose makes up only about 10% of corn, Watson said. So, the other 90% is useful nutrition. Corn is also a good source of dietary fiber, starch and antioxidants known as carotenoids, which give vegetables such as corn and carrots their stunning colors. However, there are fewer carotenoids in corn than in a typical serving of leafy greens, according to a 2019 Tufts University report.

There's a way to make corn more digestible and disappear from your poop altogether: processing. "The more you process it, the easier it is to digest," Watson said. That's true for humans and animals alike. Grinding, wet milling, cooking — every processing step breaks down those hard to digest fiber molecules a little further, she said.

In fact, the majority of the corn you eat is processed. The Tufts University report estimates that each American consumes 160 lbs. (70 kilograms) of corn per year. The vast majority of that corn is not the hard to digest kernels nibbled off the cob, but corn that's been turned into soft tortillas, chips, popcorn and — the big one — high fructose corn syrup.

Easier to digest, however, is not to be confused with healthier. A look at the nutrition facts show common processed corn products, like corn oil and high fructose corn syrup, lose most of the beneficial fiber and nutrients during processing. Corn kernels in your poo might be odd, but they're not bad for your health. In fact, it's a sign you're eating corn in one of its healthiest forms. Watson’s best advice to avoid seeing whole kernels in the bathroom: chew carefully. 

Originally published on Live Science.

Источник: https://www.livescience.com/why-humans-cannot-digest-corn.html

Corn

Is corn healthful?

The widespread use of corn in food products has led to debate about whether corn is healthful. However, corn has nutritional benefits, and there is no evidence that it is harmful to health.

The internet is full of conflicting advice about corn. Some alternative health sites focus on the perceived harms of genetically-modified organism (GMO) corn or they dismiss corn as a potentially dangerous grain. Corn proponents, however, insist that corn forms a core part of a healthful diet.

Corn is in everything from soda to cereal. According to the Tufts University Health & Nutrition Letter, Americans consume about 160 pounds of corn per person each year. This consumption has raised concerns about whether corn is replacing more healthful foods.

Similarly to most foods, corn is neither a cure-all nor a poison. In moderation, it can form a healthful part of most people’s diets.

In this article, we explore the nutritional content and potential health benefits of corn. We also discuss risks, health myths, and some tips for eating and preparing corn.

Nutrition

Today’s corn is much different from the corn that the indigenous peoples of North America once grew. Through selective breeding, farmers have steadily domesticated corn, changing its size, color, and flavor in the process.

Most people think of corn as sweet yellow corn, a large form of maize. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), a 90-gram (g) ear of fresh corn contains:

Compared to many other fruits and vegetables, corn is low in vitamins and minerals. A 90-gram (g) ear of fresh corn contains:

  • 4 percent of the recommended daily intake (RDI) of vitamin A
  • 6 percent of the RDI for vitamin C
  • 2 percent of the RDI for iron
  • 0 percent of the RDI for calcium

Many nutrition advocates have expressed concern about corn’s high proportion of carbohydrates compared to its low concentration of vitamins and minerals. Carbohydrates are filling, so they argue that corn may replace more nutritionally dense foods.

Studies of diets that exclude corn, such as paleo and ketogenic diets, contain too many variables to isolate the benefits of corn avoidance. However, there is little other evidence to suggest that eating corn is harmful, especially in its organic, ancient form. In moderation, corn can still be a part of a healthful diet.

Health benefits

Corn offers several potential health benefits. These include:

Affordability

Producers can grow corn easily and quickly in many different regions of the world. Hybridization and domestication have made corn even easier to grow, making corn an affordable commodity.

For people with very low incomes, especially those living in developing nations, corn is a cheap and ready source of calories, carbohydrates, and protein.

Antioxidants

Some , specifically in a group of antioxidants called carotenoids.

Antioxidants combat the effects of harmful free radicals in the body. suggests that free radicals may play a role in the aging process and the development of a number of chronic diseases.

Many fruits and vegetables, including dark leafy greens, carrots, and sweet potatoes, are also rich in carotenoids.

Dietary fiber

Corn, similarly to many grains, legumes, and vegetables, contains dietary fiber.

However, the amount of fiber in corn is often lower than that from other sources. For instance, a half cup of cooked navy beans provides of fiber, while a half cup of cooked corn provides only

Fiber can help with digestion and reduce the risk of constipation. Some research also suggests fiber may help people live longer. A large found a correlation between dietary fiber intake and a lower overall risk of premature death, especially from cardiovascular, infectious, and respiratory diseases.

Gluten-free

Although corn is technically a grain, it is also gluten-free. This makes corn a safe option for people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance who want to add grains to their diet.

High in protein

Corn is higher in protein than many other vegetables, making it a good choice for vegetarians and vegans, or for people hoping to eat more protein from nonanimal sources.

Some studies also suggest that a diet rich in protein may support healthful weight loss by either reducing hunger or helping the body burn extra calories.

Risks

The primary health concern that nutrition advocates have with corn is that it may act as a filler, which may cause people to eat too many carbohydrates and too few of more nutrient-dense foods.

According the Tufts University Health & Nutrition Letter, more than a third of corn people eat in the U.S. is in the shape of high fructose corn syrup, or HFCS. This sugar, which is a derivative of cornstarch, has triggered numerous debates about manufacturers adding sweeteners to consumables.

The state that there is no compelling evidence that HFCS is more harmful than other sugars. However, the FDA also recommends that everyone limit their consumption of all added sugars, including HFCS and regular sugar.

Health concerns

Several concerns about corn have become popular, especially on message boards and alternative health sites. We discuss some common concerns below:

GMO corn

Some natural health advocates argue that GMO corn is dangerous. While farmers in America have been using GMO crops for a long time, a stated that data is scarce regarding GMO crops and their potential health effects.

A 2012 study, appearing in Food and Chemical Toxicology, found that rats who ate GMO corn experienced negative health effects. However, the journal subsequently retracted the paper amid concerns about fraud and faulty data.

The journal editors never uncovered evidence of fraud, but they did find that the data was inadequate, which fundamentally undermined the study’s findings. Also, an anti-GMO organization helped fund the study.

According to 2015 article from Harvard University’s Science in the News, both the World Health Organization (WHO) and the American Medical Association have concluded that GMO crops are safe for human consumption.

Corn is high in sugar

Some people confuse corn with HFCS, which is a sugar. Corn does contain naturally occurring sugars, but the amounts are comparable with those present in other starchy vegetables, although slightly higher.

The body cannot digest corn

Corn is high in cellulose, which is an insoluble fiber that the body cannot digest. However, the body breaks down the other components of corn.

Chewing corn for longer can also help the digestive system break down cellulose walls to access more of the nutrients.

Some producers still use an ancient method of corn preparation known as nixtamalization. This process involves soaking and cooking the corn in lime, which is an alkaline solution containing calcium hydroxide.

The producers then wash and hull the corn for processing into food products, such as cornmeal, tortillas, tamales, and others.

Nixtamalization enhances digestibility, flavor, and aroma while reducing mycotoxins, which come from fungal contamination.

Corn is high in fat

Naturally, corn is not high in fat. However, many people prepare it in a way that increases the fat content. Adding butter and other fats or oils to corn can turn it into a high-fat, high-calorie food.

Tips for eating and preparing corn

Most people prefer to eat corn after cooking it, often with butter, oils, and seasonings.

It is also safe to eat corn raw. Many people find that young, tender corn tastes best when raw.

The kernels can add texture to salads, soups, and casseroles. The USDA offer the following tips for preparing and storing corn:

  • Store uncooked corn in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.
  • It is safe to freeze cooked corn at zero degrees Fahrenheit for up to 6 months.
  • When using prepackaged corn, check for the “best by” or “best if used by” date.
  • Remove corn kernels by placing corn stem-first into a bowl of shallow water. While holding the corn, cut kernels away from the cob with a knife.

Conclusion

Corn is not a harmful food, but while it does have several nutritional benefits, it is not particularly rich in any specific nutrient and contains less fiber than other complex carbohydrates.

Some people may have dietary restrictions that can make corn a poor choice to eat. For instance, people trying to reduce carbohydrate intake should avoid corn as it is high in carbs.

People seeking a high-protein diet may want to choose nuts, lean meat, fish, and dairy products instead since they are higher in protein than corn.

There is no harm in eliminating corn from the diet, so it is perfectly safe for people to avoid. However, many products contain corn and corn byproducts, so it is necessary to check ingredient labels. People concerned about the healthfulness of corn should talk to a doctor or dietitian.

Источник: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324199

is corn healthy

My favorite nutritional saying is: “No one ever got fat off a fruit or vegetable.”

I love this statement because it is so darn true.

We have a lot of nutritional problems in this country, but eating too many vegetables – starchy or otherwise – is not one of them.

If you’ve banished white potatoes (too starchy), beets (too much sugar), or corn (must be related to high fructose corn syrup), it’s time to reconsider.  Some of the veggies with the worst reputations are actually as nutritious as the “superfoods” that get so much attention. Here are four frequently-slammed examples that don’t deserve their bad rap.

  1. Corn. Poor corn. Thanks to its distant relatives (corn starch, corn syrup, etc), it has become the vegetable world’s scapegoat and it really doesn’t deserve it – especially if you buy organic. One ear of sweet corn on the cob yields fiber, B vitamins, lutein and a host of antioxidants that are even more available for body absorption than in veggies like broccoli or spinach. And you get all this for only 60-ish calories. Love corn on the cob? Go for it. Make it even better with one of these recipes.
  2. Potatoes. Veggie snobs often brag about how they’ve given up white potatoes, but unlike other “white” starches (white bread, pasta, rice etc.), white potatoes are loaded with nutritional benefits: fiber, potassium, vitamin C, vitamin B6, and all sorts of tiny phytonutrients. If you’re skeptical, remember that the flesh of these potatoes is naturally white, so it’s totally different than eating a refined grain product. As long as your mindful of how you cook and serve them (not fried or loaded with butter and sour cream), you can feel comfortable digging right in.
  3. Peas. Many people think of peas as starchy or sugary, but just a half cup of these tiny green veggies provides you with 4 grams fiber, 4 grams protein, and a myriad of vitamins and minerals. Plus, they’re mostly sold frozen, which means they were picked at peak ripeness and packaged within a few hours, so they maintain their nutritional value.
  4. Beets. Beets are often included on lists of “superfoods,” but they’re just as often called evil by the low-carb crowd. My verdict: superfood! Beets are one of the most nutritionally dense veggies, meaning they deliver more nutrition per bite than pretty much anything else. And their sweet, velvety taste is perfect in so many contexts…with blue cheese and walnuts, with oranges and parsley, grated onto a green salad…the options are endless!

Starchy veggies like peas, corn, potatoes, etc. are also filling – kind of like whole grains – so they help make meals more satisfying without adding a lot of calories. Your best bet is to eat them (and all veggies & fruits) alongside some protein and fat.

Enjoy these beauties this summer while the picking is good!

are potatoes healthyis corn healthystarchy vegetables

Источник: https://eating-made-easy.com/why-you-should-eat-corn-other-starchy-veggies/

This What Happens When You Eat Corn Every Day

Because of its superstar status, corn can be found in a lot of different foods. Healthline reports that you can find corn in tortillas, polenta, chips, oil, syrups, and so much more. It is even used as animal feed and for fuel (about 40 percent of corn that is cultivated in the U.S. is used for car fuel). But with so many functions, what occurs within the body when there is a steady intake of corn every day? Some benefits to eating corn, per Eat This, Not That!, are that the body can stay fuller for longer periods of time due to the fiber in it, and the vitamin B6 and vitamin B9 can give your overall energy a much-needed boost. 

Healthline adds that overall eye health can also improve due to the amounts of lutein and zeaxanthin found within corn. However, with all the positives, there also comes some negatives. Eat This, Not That! cites that eating too much processed corn can raise the inflammation levels within the body. Highly processed corn is essentially stripped of its nutrients leaving you with just sugar and oil. Another downside to eating too much corn is that it can spike your overall blood sugar levels, which can be bad if you have a family history of diabetes. Sounds like moderation is the key to reaping its is corn good or bad for you benefits. 

Источник: https://www.mashed.com/379014/this-what-happens-when-you-eat-corn-every-day/
corn is bad for / increases the risk of inhibited nutrient absorption
Longevity: corn is good for / helps detoxification, gut health, reduce the risk of diverticular disease

Is corn healthful?

The widespread use of corn in food products has led to debate about whether corn is healthful. However, corn has nutritional benefits, and there is no evidence that it is harmful to health.

The internet is full of conflicting advice about corn. Some alternative health sites focus on the perceived harms of genetically-modified organism (GMO) corn or they dismiss corn as a potentially dangerous grain. Corn proponents, however, insist that corn forms a core part of a healthful diet.

Corn is letter m cake everything from soda to cereal. According to the Tufts University Health & Nutrition Letter, Americans consume about 160 pounds of corn per person each year. This consumption has raised concerns about whether corn is replacing more healthful foods.

Similarly to most foods, corn is neither a cure-all nor a poison. In moderation, it can form a healthful part of most people’s diets.

In this article, we explore the nutritional content and potential health benefits of corn. We also discuss risks, health myths, and some tips for eating and preparing corn.

Nutrition

Today’s corn is much different from the corn that the indigenous peoples of North America once grew. Through selective breeding, farmers have steadily domesticated corn, changing its size, color, and flavor in the process.

Most people think of corn as sweet yellow corn, a large form of maize. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), a 90-gram (g) ear of fresh corn contains:

Compared to many other fruits and is corn good or bad for you, corn is low in vitamins and minerals. A 90-gram (g) ear of fresh corn contains:

Many nutrition advocates have expressed concern about corn’s high proportion of carbohydrates compared to its low concentration of vitamins and minerals. Carbohydrates are filling, so they argue that corn may replace more nutritionally dense foods.

Studies of diets that exclude corn, such as paleo and ketogenic diets, contain too many variables to isolate the benefits of corn avoidance. However, there is little other evidence to suggest that eating corn is harmful, especially in its organic, ancient form. In moderation, corn can still be a part of a healthful diet.

Health benefits

Corn offers several potential health benefits. These include:

Affordability

Producers can grow corn easily and quickly in many different regions of the world. Hybridization and domestication have made corn even easier to grow, making corn an affordable commodity.

For people with very low incomes, especially those living in developing nations, corn is a cheap and ready source of calories, carbohydrates, and protein.

Antioxidants

Somespecifically in a group of antioxidants called carotenoids.

Antioxidants combat the effects of harmful free radicals in the body. suggests that free radicals may play a role in the aging process and the development of a number of chronic diseases.

Many fruits and vegetables, including dark leafy greens, carrots, and sweet potatoes, are also rich in carotenoids.

Dietary fiber

Corn, similarly to many grains, legumes, and vegetables, contains dietary fiber.

However, the amount of fiber in corn is often lower than that from other sources. For instance, a half cup of cooked navy beans provides of fiber, while a half cup of cooked corn provides only

Fiber can help with digestion and reduce the risk of constipation. Some research also suggests fiber may help people is corn good or bad for you longer. A large found a correlation between dietary fiber intake and a lower overall risk of premature death, especially from cardiovascular, infectious, and respiratory diseases.

Gluten-free

Although corn is technically a grain, it is also gluten-free. This makes corn a safe option for people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance who want to add grains to their diet.

High in protein

Corn is higher in protein than many other vegetables, making it a good choice for vegetarians and vegans, or for people hoping to eat more protein from nonanimal sources.

Some studies also suggest that a diet rich in protein may support healthful weight loss by either reducing hunger or helping the body burn extra calories.

Risks

The primary health concern that nutrition advocates have with corn is that it may act as a filler, which may cause people to eat too many carbohydrates and too few of more nutrient-dense foods.

According the Tufts University Health & Nutrition Letter, more than a third of corn people eat in the U.S. is in the shape of high fructose corn syrup, or HFCS. This sugar, which is a derivative of cornstarch, has triggered numerous debates about manufacturers adding sweeteners to consumables.

The state that there is no compelling evidence that HFCS is more harmful than other sugars. However, the FDA also recommends that everyone limit their consumption of all added sugars, including HFCS and regular sugar.

Health concerns

Several concerns about corn have become popular, especially on message boards and alternative health sites. We discuss some common concerns below:

GMO corn

Some natural health advocates argue that GMO corn is dangerous. While farmers in America have been using GMO crops for a long time, a stated that data is scarce regarding GMO crops and their potential health effects.

A 2012 study, appearing in Food and Chemical Toxicology, found that rats who ate GMO corn experienced negative health effects. However, the journal subsequently retracted the paper amid concerns about fraud and faulty data.

The journal editors never uncovered evidence of fraud, but they did find that the data was inadequate, which fundamentally undermined the study’s findings. Also, an anti-GMO organization helped fund the study.

According to 2015 article from Harvard University’s Science in the News, both the World Health Organization (WHO) and the American Medical Association have concluded that GMO crops are safe for human consumption.

Corn is high in sugar

Some people confuse corn with HFCS, which is a sugar. Corn does contain naturally occurring sugars, but the amounts are comparable with those present in other starchy vegetables, although slightly higher.

The body cannot digest corn

Corn is high in cellulose, which is an insoluble fiber is state farm bank safe the body cannot digest. However, the body breaks down the other components of corn.

Chewing corn for longer can also help the digestive system break down cellulose walls to access more of the nutrients.

Some producers still use an ancient method of corn preparation known as nixtamalization. This process involves soaking and cooking the corn in lime, which is an alkaline solution containing calcium hydroxide.

The producers then wash and hull the corn for processing into is corn good or bad for you products, such as cornmeal, tortillas, tamales, and others.

Nixtamalization enhances digestibility, flavor, and aroma while reducing mycotoxins, which come from fungal contamination.

Corn is high in fat

Naturally, corn is not high in fat. However, many people prepare it in a way that increases the fat content. Adding butter and other fats or oils to corn can turn it into a high-fat, high-calorie food.

Tips for eating and preparing corn

Most people prefer to eat corn after cooking it, often with butter, oils, and seasonings.

It is also safe to eat corn raw. Many people find that young, tender corn tastes best when raw.

The kernels can add is corn good or bad for you to salads, soups, and casseroles. The USDA offer the following tips for preparing and storing corn:

  • Store uncooked corn in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.
  • It is safe to freeze cooked corn at zero degrees Fahrenheit for up to 6 months.
  • When using prepackaged corn, check for the “best by” or “best if used by” date.
  • Remove corn kernels by placing corn stem-first into a bowl of shallow water. While holding the corn, cut kernels away from the cob with a knife.

Conclusion

Corn is not a harmful food, but while it does have several nutritional benefits, it is not particularly rich in any specific nutrient and contains less fiber than other complex carbohydrates.

Some people may have dietary restrictions that can make corn a poor choice to eat. For instance, people trying to reduce carbohydrate intake should avoid corn as it is high in carbs.

People seeking a high-protein diet may want to choose nuts, lean meat, fish, and dairy products instead since they are higher in protein than corn.

There is no harm in eliminating corn from the diet, so it is perfectly safe for people to avoid. However, many products contain corn and corn byproducts, so it is necessary to check ingredient labels. People concerned about the healthfulness of corn should talk to a doctor or dietitian.

Источник: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324199

Why sweet corn is a good addition to your summer diet

Leslie Beck, a Toronto-based private practice dietitian, is Director of Food and Nutrition at Medcan.

Q: I love corn on the cob. But how healthy is it? Does corn count as a vegetable?

This summer staple – in season July through September – often gets a bad rap. Many people (mistakenly) think that corn is fattening and has little to offer on the nutrition front.

People also associate corn with ingredients that aren’t nutritious.

Corn is processed into high fructose corn syrup, cornstarch, maltodextrins, dextrose, polydextrose, maltose and sugar alcohols, ingredients added to baked goods, breakfast cereals, snack foods, salad dressings, condiments, soups, candy and hundreds of other packaged foods.

The merrill lynch careers uk internships is, unless you cook all of your foods from scratch, you’re eating plenty of corn year-round.

Corn nutrition

Back to summer’s sweet corn, which has an impressive nutrition profile.

One cup of corn delivers 143 calories, five g of protein and 31 g of carbohydrate. One large ear of corn (eight to nine inches long) yields about one cup of corn kernels.

Sweet corn has a low glycemic index value, meaning its carbohydrates don’t spike blood sugar or insulin levels.

Corn is also a decent source of fibre, providing 3.5 g per one cup. Research has found that the bran in corn promotes satiety, helping you feel full longer.

The fibre in corn also acts as a prebiotic, feeding and fuelling the growth of beneficial gut bacteria.

There’s more. Sweet corn serves up niacin, folate, vitamin C, magnesium and potassium.

Yellow corn also contains lutein and zeaxanthin, phytochemicals that protect vision by guarding against cataract and macular degeneration. (White corn contains very little lutein and zeaxanthin.)

Scientists speculate that consuming at least six mg of lutein a day is optimal for eye health; one cup of yellow corn delivers 22 per cent of that.

Vegetable, starch or both?

When eaten fresh, sweet corn is considered a vegetable.

The kernel itself, though, is actually a whole grain made up of three layers: the outer bran layer, the inner nutrient-rich germ layer and the starchy endosperm layer. Dried corn, including popcorn, is classified as a whole grain.

Once corn is milled to remove the bran and germ, it becomes a refined grain. When buying foods made with corn such as tortillas, breakfast cereals and cornmeal, look for “whole corn” or “whole grain corn” on the ingredient list.

Cooking and eating corn

Fresh sweet corn doesn’t take long to cook – just five minutes in boiling water. Don’t add salt to the water, which will toughen the corn.

Or, place shucked ears of corn directly over a medium-hot grill and cook, rotating occasionally, until charred and cooked through, about 10 minutes. You can also wrap shucked corn in aluminum foil and cook directly on the grill or hot coals.

Naturally sweet, corn doesn’t need much – or anything at all – to make it taste delicious. If you want extra flavour, add a squeeze of lime juice and sprinkle with chili powder or smoked paprika.

Or, add chopped fresh herbs such as parsley, basil, thyme, cilantro or mint to softened butter and brush over corn. Dried herbs work well, too.

Go easy on the butter, though. Consider that one tablespoon adds 120 calories and seven g of saturated fat to your cob of corn.

Instead of butter, you may prefer to baste corn with a teaspoon extra virgin olive oil for fewer calories and heart-healthy monounsaturated fats.

There are more ways to enjoy fresh corn this summer than eating it on the cob. Bake cooked corn into savoury muffins, toss into salads, make into salsas and stir into soups.

Источник: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/article-actually-there-are-good-reasons-to-add-sweet-corn-to-your-summer-diet/
corn increases the risk of spiking blood sugar levels
Appearance: corn is bad for / increases the risk of weight gain

Corn is…

  • Plant-based

  • Alkaline 7.5 pH level (fresh) once digested

  • Gluten-free

  • Not a common food allergen

ENVIRONMENT

Water footprint: low, 1,222 liters of water used to produce 1 kilogram or 2.2 pounds of corn / 146 gallons of water used to produce 1 kilogram or 2.2 pounds of corn
Carbon footprint: low, 0.60 kg CO2e to produce 1 kilogram or 2.2 pounds of dry corn, a car driving equivalent of 1.5 miles or 2.5 kilometers
Destruction: high, corn depletes nitrogen and other important nutrients from the soil, more than a third of U.S. corn is used for animal feed, another third grown for ethanol for cars, 92% of corn crops grown in the US in 2016 was genetically modified (GMO), crops are modified to increase yield and improve resistance to insects, disease or chemicals used is corn good or bad for you kill pests, corn production is associated with monocropping, which causes the soil structure and quality to be so poor that farmers must use chemical fertilizers to encourage plant growth, pesticides and fertilizers contaminate ground water and become airborne, creating pollution, monocropping is not an issue if the product is organic, be sure to buy Non-GMO/organic, as toxic, chemical pesticides contaminate air, water, soil, etc.

Corn is…

ANIMALS

Animals killed: none, corn production does not require any animals to be killed
Animals harmed: none, corn production does not require any animals to be used
Animals indirectly killed or harmed: wildlife and ecosystems, 92% of corn crops grown in the US in 2016 was genetically modified (GMO), crops are modified to resist chemicals used to kill pests, pesticides harm and kill wildlife and ecosystems by contaminating soil, water, air and plants that animals eat

Corn is…

  • Vegan

  • Harmful to wildlife and ecosystems

LABORERS

Health and safety: varies, overall, agriculture continues to be one of the most dangerous industries, farmworkers may be subject to dehydration, heat stroke, unprotected exposure to harmful, toxic chemicals and pesticides, unsafe machinery and clean drinking water may not always accessible
Living conditions: varies, laborers are often exploited, they may face tough working conditions including long hours in the sun and heat performing physically exhausting tasks, labor laws and rights may or may not be in place, even if worker protection exists, employer violations may go unreported, refugees and migrant workers are especially vulnerable to abuse and mistreatment, fearing consequences of job loss or deportation
Wages: varies, generally farmworkers earn meager wages, there are many cases of underpaid agricultural workers, wage theft and no overtime payment or benefits

Corn…

Where does most corn come from? The world’s top corn producing country is USA, followed by China and Brazil. The world’s top corn exporting country is USA, Brazil, Ukraine, South Africa, France, Romania, Poland, Canada, Hungary and Argentina.
Is corn nutritious?
Corn is high in Vitamin B1, Vitamin B5, and Vitamin C and fiber but high in starch.

corn is plant based.

plant based foods ingredients.png

Is corn plant based? Yes, corn is plant based since it is a vegetable. Plant based foods include fruits, vegetables, beans, legumes, whole grains, nuts and seeds that are best when fresh and unprocessed.

Those who eat seven or more portions of fruit and vegetables per day have a 33% reduced risk of premature death compared to people who eat less than one portion.

Incredible! 

After transitioning to a whole food, plant-based lifestyle, you will likely experience improved sleep and energy, decreased weight, and an overall sense of wellness.

Amazing!

It may also lower your risk of heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. Thousands of studies have been completed showing the amazing health benefits of a plant-based diet:

A plant-based diet could lower your risk of heart disease…

  • About one of every three deaths in the U.S. results from heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases.

A plant-based diet could lower your risk of diabetes… 

  • In the United States, 29.1 million people have diabetes (about 10% of the population). If current trends continue, one in three adults could have diabetes by 2050.

A plant-based diet could lower your risk of cancer…

  • Approximately 39% percent of men and women will be diagnosed with cancer of any type at some point during their lifetime.

A global move to a vegan diet would avert 8.1 million premature deaths per year!

The World Health Organization's first step to healthy eating is: "Eat a nutritious diet based on a variety of foods originating mainly from plants, rather than animals".*

High blood pressure, a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, is less common among vegans.

Body mass index and cholesterol levels are lower among vegans.

Go vegan for your health! There are endless health advantages to making the dietary switch…

Don’t wait!

Go plant-based for your health! Studies show it is an effective means of preventing illnesses and achieving optimal health. It’s not as difficult as you may think…

corn is alkaline when fresh.

alkaline acidic ph level HEALabel.png

Is corn alkaline or acidic? Corn is alkaline when fresh. What is the pH level of corn? Corn has a 7.5 pH level, when fresh once digested.

According to Marjorie Nolan, an American Dietetic Association spokeswoman, clinical studies have shown that eating high-alkaline foods and staying properly hydrated reduce the rate of cancer and other diseases.

When you eat food, it is broken down to an ash residue that can be neutral, acidic or alkaline. Minerals such as potassium, calcium, magnesium, sodium, zinc, silver, copper and iron produce an alkaline ash; whereas sulfur, phosphorus, chlorine and iodine, which are found in meat, coffee, dairy and alcohol, leave an acid ash.

Going alkaline easier than ever with this: Acidic and Alkaline Foods List

corn is gluten free.

gluten free food glutinous ingredient.png

Is corn gluten free? Yes, corn is naturally gluten free. Corn does not contain gluten.

While celiac disease may not be as rampant as many marketing trends lead us to believe, you may have a gluten sensitivity…

Celiac and gluten sensitivity symptoms are similar and may include: recurring abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea, constipation, tingling, numbness in hands and feet, chronic fatigue, joint pain, unexplained infertility and low bone density is corn good or bad for you or osteoporosis).

There are hundreds of potential symptoms, many of which are also symptoms of other conditions.

Going gluten-free easier than ever with this: Gluten and Gluten Free Foods List

corn is not a common food allergen.

big 8 food allergy allergens.png

Is corn a common food allergen? No, corn is not a common food allergen. Some people may experience allergic reactions to corn but it is uncommon.

A group of the eight major allergenic foods is often referred to as the Big-8 and includes milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soybeans. 

These foods account for about 90% of all food allergies in the United States.

Severe food allergies can be life threatening. Following ingestion of a food allergen, a person with food allergies can experience a severe, life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. 

Persons may still be allergic to and have serious reactions to foods other than the eight foods identified by the law.

Be aware of common dietary restrictions and food allergens with this: The Big 8 Most Common Food Allergens List

corn has a low water footprint.

water footprint food.png

Does corn have a high or low water footprint? Corn has a relatively low water footprint compared to other foods.

What is the water footprint of corn? It takes 1,222 liters of water to produce 1 kilogram or 2.2 pounds of corn / 146 gallons of water to produce 1 kilogram or 2.2 pounds of corn.

Did you know that water is a finite, non-renewable resource? Once it’s gone, it’s gone!

We must do what we can to conserve fresh water and a major way to reduce needless water consumption is to change the way we eat. That’s not to say we need to reduce our water intake….quite the opposite. It’s important for our health to drink lots of water and eat foods that hydrate. The kind of water conservation we’re talking about here is behind the scenes.

How much water does it take to produce an apple? A serving of rice? A steak dinner?

We need to be aware of something referred to as a “water footprint”. That is, the amount of fresh water utilized in the production or supply of goods we consume. As it turns out it takes significantly more water to yield foods that come from animals than foods that come from plants. Imagine how much water a cow needs to consume to generate a piece of beef. Not only how much water a single cow drinks, rather all the water that went into producing the crops that the cow ate.

According to Oxford Academic, The Hidden Water Resource Behind Meat and Dairy by Arjen Y. Hoekstra, “The water footprint of any animal product is larger than the water footprint of a wisely chosen crop product with equivalent nutritional value. In industrialized countries, moving toward a vegetarian diet can reduce the water-related footprint of people by 36%”.

Find out how much water your food consumes with this: Water Footprints of Foods and Ingredients List

corn has a low carbon footprint.

carbon footprint co2e.png

Does corn have a high or low carbon footprint? Corn has a relatively low carbon footprint compared to other foods.

What is the carbon footprint of corn? It takes around 0.60 kg CO2e to produce 1 kilogram or 2.2 pounds of dry corn, a car driving equivalent of 1.5 miles or 2.5 kilometers.

Food not only has a water footprint but also a carbon footprint, known as CO2e, which stands for carbon dioxide equivalent. Since carbon measurements are a bit more difficult to comprehend, it is common to equate CO2e to the distance which a car drives in miles or kilometers.

When calculating product emissions, some factors that may be included are… farm equipment, animal feed production, hothouses (greenhouses), food processing, packaging, transport, refrigeration, freezing, package waste, and more.

There are a number of steps that can be taken to reduce energy output. According to Oxford Martin School researchers, if the world went vegan, eliminating animal-derived products, it could reduce greenhouse gas emissions by two thirds and avoid climate damages of $1.5 trillion.

But that’s not all!

It’s best to keep the following in mind when grocery shopping…

Shopping locally reduces transportation emissions.

Buying food without packaging reduces waste as well as the carbon footprint.

Buying refrigerated and frozen foods increases carbon emissions.

Buying seasonally reduces carbon emissions from hothouses (greenhouses).

Growing plant-based foods at home is the most environmentally sustainable method with zero carbon footprint.

Find out how much carbon your food emits with this: Carbon Footprints of Foods and Ingredients List

corn is unsustainable.

sustainable eco friendly food.png

Overall, is corn eco friendly? Is corn sustainable?

Corn production is unsustainable.

Corn production depletes nitrogen and other important nutrients from the soil. More than a third of American grown corn is used for animal feed, another third grown for ethanol for cars. 92% of corn crops grown in the US in 2016 was genetically modified (GMO). Such crops are modified to increase yield and improve resistance to insects, disease or chemicals used to kill pests. GMOs are often coupled with toxic, harmful pesticides that are toxic for eco systems and wildlife.

A 2018 Oxford University study – which is the most comprehensive analysis to date of the damage farming does to the planet – found that ‘avoiding meat is corn good or bad for you dairy is the single biggest way to reduce your impact on Earth’ as animal farming provides just 18% of calories but takes up 83% of our farmland.

Consuming animal products and byproducts is not environmentally friendly and is one of the worst things for the Earth. Not only is meat production wasteful, it causes enormous amounts of pollution. The industry is one of the biggest causes of climate change.

A 2010 United Nations report said that a global shift towards a vegan diet is vital to save the world the worst impacts of climate change.

corn is vegan but harmful to wildlife and ecosystems if not organic.

CRUELTY FREE HEALabel.png

Is corn vegan? Yes, corn is vegan. Corn is a cereal grain and not an animal product or byproduct, therefore making it a vegan food. However, it should be noted that corn is often harmful to wildlife and ecosystems if not organic.

According to Sentient Media, “more than 200 million land animals are killed for food around the world every day. Including wild-caught and farmed fishes, we get a total closer to 3 billion animals killed daily.”

Wild-caught fish: An estimated 2.7 billion wild-caught fish are killed for food every day worldwide.

Chicken: An estimated 178 million chicken are killed for food every day worldwide.

Farmed fish: An estimated 300 million farmed fish are killed for food every day worldwide.

Ducks: An estimated 11 million ducks are killed for food every day worldwide.

Pigs: An estimated 4 million pigs are killed for food every day worldwide.

Rabbits: An estimated 3 million rabbits are killed for food every day worldwide.

Geese: An estimated 2 million geese are killed for food around the world every day.

Turkeys: An estimated 2 million turkeys are killed for food around the world every day.

Sheep: An estimated 1.5 million sheep killed for food around the world every day.

Goats: An estimated 1.2 million goats are killed for food around the world every day.

Cows: An estimated 800,000 cows are killed for food around the world every day.

Wow.

Animals of factory farms and the livestock industry are suffering. They live in horrific conditions that often include confinement, physical abuse and unnatural environments…so much so that they need to receive antibiotics to keep from getting ill or spreading disease. They’re also injected with growth hormones to become fatter faster and live short lives, being slaughtered as soon as they finish growing and are killed prematurely, well before their natural lifespan.

Because we cannot see for ourselves how these animals live and what they endure does not mean it isn’t happening. The meat, poultry and dairy industries do everything they can to distance us from knowing how our food comes to be in order to keep us in the dark about what we support each time we buy animal derived products and byproducts.

Go vegan for animals!

It’s the best way to help animals and it’s not as difficult as you may think. Speak for animals with your actions, for they cannot speak at all.

Going vegan is easier than ever, at a glance with this: Vegan and Non Vegan Foods List

corn may have labor issues and human rights concerns.

labor human rights issues fair trade.png

Is corn a product that has known labor issues? At this time, there are no known specific reports of worker mistreatment regarding corn farming but that doesn’t mean it isn’t happening. Corn may or may not have labor issues.

Did you know the single largest employer in the world is agriculture? The labor involved behind each and every product cannot go unrecognized. 

Sadly, many labor concerns exist around the world in both developed and developing countries. We must be vigilant to ensure what we buy is not contributing to industries that are unfair to their valuable workers. Some known problems include workplace health and safety, child labor, gender inequality, inadequate pay, wage theft and exploitation. Workers can even be subjected to harassment, humiliation and violence and unfair employers often fail to provide laborers with access to shade, drinking water, restrooms and breaks. Consequently, laborers can face nausea, dizziness, heat exhaustion, dehydration and heat stroke -the leading cause of farmworker death! 

Such mistreatment has been likened to modern day slavery. Workers are often afraid to report issues because they fear it will result in losing their jobs or deportation. 

Fair trade organizations fight to ensure better social, environmental and economic standards. 

We can improve people’s lives with foods we eat every day simply by buying products that are certified fair trade.

Sources:

Corn

People who eat more sweets are at higher risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer… but that may not actually be sugar’s fault. BBC Future investigates the latest findings.

G

Given the current situation, many of us are more interested than ever in how food can (and can’t) support our health. To help you sort out fact from fiction, BBC Future is bringing back some of our most popular nutrition stories.

Our colleagues at BBC Good Food are also focusing on practical solutions for ingredient swaps, nutritious storecupboard recipes and all m words for kids of cooking and eating during lockdown.

It’s hard to imagine now, but there was a time when humans only had access to sugar for a few months a year when fruit was in season. Some 80,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers ate fruit sporadically and infrequently, since they were competing with birds.

Now, our sugar hits come all year round, often with less nutritional value and far more easily – by simply opening a soft drink or cereal box. It doesn’t take an expert to see that our modern sugar intake is less healthy than it was in our foraging days. Today, sugar has become public health enemy number one: governments are taxing it, schools and hospitals are removing it from vending machines and experts are advising that we remove it completely from our diets. It has even been blamed for possibly increasing the risk of contracting infections because it allegedly suppresses the immune system, although in reality the impact it has on our ability to fight off diseases is a great deal more complicated than that.

And so far, scientists have had a difficult time proving how it affects our health, independent of a diet too high in calories. A review of research conducted over the last five years summarised that a diet of more than 150g of fructose per day reduces insulin sensitivity – and therefore increases the risk of developing health problems like high blood pressure and cholesterol levels. But the researchers also concluded that this occurs most often when high sugar intake is combined with excess calories, and that the effects on health are "more likely" due to sugar intake increasing the chance of excess calories, not the impact of sugar alone.

Meanwhile, there is also a growing argument that demonising a single food is dangerous – and causes confusion that risks us cutting out vital foods.

Sugar, otherwise known as "added sugar", includes table sugar, sweeteners, honey and fruit juices, and is extracted, refined and added to food and drink to improve taste.

The term ‘sugar’ includes a broad array of sweeteners, including the fructose naturally found in fruit (Credit: Getty)

But both complex and simple carbohydrates are made up of sugar molecules, which are broken down by digestion into glucose and used by every cell in the body to generate energy and fuel the brain. Complex carbohydrates include wholegrains and vegetables. Simple carbohydrates are more easily digested and quickly release sugar into the bloodstream. They include sugars found naturally in the foods we eat, such as fructose, lactose, sucrose and glucose and others, like high fructose corn syrup, which are manmade.

You might also like:
• Are artificial sweeteners really bad for us?
• We don’t need nearly as much protein as we consume
• The world’s most nutritious foods

Before the 16th Century only the rich could afford sugar. But it became more available with colonial trade.

Then, in the 1960s, the development of large-scale conversion of glucose into fructose led to the creation of high fructose corn syrup, a concentrate of glucose and fructose.

This potent combination, above any other single type of sugar, is the one first nebraska bank wayne public health advocates consider the most lethal – and it is the one that many people think of when they think of "sugar".

Sugar rush

Consumption of high fructose corn syrup in the US increased tenfold between 1970 and 1990, more than any other food group. Researchers have pointed out that this mirrors the increase in obesity across the country.

Some researchers believe that once high fructose corn syrup became so common, an obesity crisis was only a matter of time (Credit: Getty)

Meanwhile, sugary drinks, which usually use high fructose corn syrup, is corn good or bad for you been central to research examining the effects of sugar on our health. One meta-analysis of 88 studies found a link between sugary drinks consumption and body weight. In other words, people don’t fully compensate for getting energy from soft drinks by consuming less of other foods – possibly because these drinks increase hunger or decrease satiety.

But the researchers concluded that while the intake of soft drinks and added sugars has increased alongside obesity in the US, the data only represents broad correlations.

And not everyone agrees that high fructose corn syrup is the driving factor in the obesity crisis. Some experts point out that consumption of the sugar has been declining for the past 10 years in countries including the US, even while obesity levels have been rising. There also are epidemics of obesity and diabetes in areas where there is little or no high fructose corn syrup available, such as Australia and Europe.

High fructose corn syrup isn’t the only kind of sugar seen as problematic. Added sugar, particularly fructose, is blamed for a variety of problems.

For one, it’s said to cause heart disease. When liver cells break down fructose, one of the end products is triglyceride – a form of fat – which can build up in liver cells over time. When it is released into the bloodstream, it can contribute to the growth of fat-filled plaque inside artery walls.

Fructose, which naturally occurs in fruit and is a key component of high-fructose corn syrup, can contribute to the growth of plaque in arteries (Credit: Getty)

One 15-year study seemed to back this up: it found that people who consumed 25% or more of their daily calories as added sugar were more than twice as likely to die from heart disease than those who consumed less than 10%. Type 2 diabetes also is attributed to added sugar intake. Two large studies in the 1990s found that women who consumed more than one soft drink or fruit juice per day were twice as likely to develop diabetes as those who rarely did so.

Sweet nothings?

But again, it’s unclear if that means sugar actually causes heart disease or diabetes. Luc Tappy, professor of physiology at the University of Lausanne, is one of many scientists who argue that the main cause of diabetes, obesity and high blood pressure is excess calorie intake, and that sugar is simply one component of this.

Many scientists believe that sugar alone doesn’t cause obesity – but that, instead, sugar often is part of a diet with too high of a calorie intake in general (Credit: Getty)

“More energy intake than energy expenditure will, in the long term, lead to fat deposition, insulin resistance and a fatty liver, whatever the diet composition,” he says. “In people with a high energy output and a matched energy intake, even a high fructose/sugar diet will be well tolerated.”

Athletes often consume more sugar than other people, but because they is corn good or bad for you it during exercise, they still have lower rates of cardiovascular disease (Credit: Getty)

Overall, evidence that added sugar directly causes type 2 diabetes, heart disease, obesity or cancer is thin. Yes, higher intakes are associated with these conditions. But clinical trials have yet to establish that it causes them.

Sugar also has been associated with addiction… but this finding, too, may not be what it seems. A review published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine in 2017 cited findings that mice can experience sugar withdrawal and argued that sugar produces similar effects to cocaine, such as craving. But the paper was widely accused of misinterpreting the evidence. One key criticism was that the animals were restricted to having sugar for two hours a day: if you allow them to have it whenever they want it, which reflects how we consume it, they don’t show addiction-like behaviours.

Still, studies have demonstrated other ways in which sugar affects our brains. Matthew Pase, research fellow at Swinburne’s Centre for Human Psychopharmacology in Australia, examined the association between self-reported sugary beverage consumption and markers of brain health determined by MRI scans. Those who drank soft drinks and fruit juices more frequently displayed smaller average brain volumes and poorer memory function. Consuming two sugary drinks per day aged the brain two years compared to those who didn’t drink any at all. But Pase explains that since he only measured fruit juice intake, he can’t be sure that sugar alone is what affects brain health.

One study found that consuming two juice drinks per day aged the brain by two years, compared to not drinking any (Credit: Getty)

“People who drink more fruit juice or soft drinks may share other dietary or lifestyle habits that relate to brain health. For example, they may also exercise less,” Pase says.

One recent study found that sugar may even help improve memory and performance in older adults. Researchers gave participants a drink containing a small amount of glucose and asked them to perform various memory tasks. Other participants were given a drink containing artificial sweetener as a control. They measured the participants' levels of engagement, their memory score, and their own perception of how much effort they’d applied.

The results suggested that consuming sugar can make older people more motivated to perform difficult tasks at full capacity – without them feeling as if they tried harder. Increased blood sugar levels also made them feel happier during the task.

In older adults, consuming a sugary drink may make them more motivated and even happier during a task (Credit: Getty)

Younger adults showed increased energy after consuming the glucose drink, but it didn’t affect their mood or memory.

Teaspoon of sugar

While current guidelines advise that added sugars shouldn't make up more than 5% of our daily calorie intake, dietitian Renee McGregor says it’s important to understand that a healthy, balanced diet is different for everyone.

“I work with athletes who need to take on more sugar when doing a hard session because it’s easily digestible. But they worry they’re going over the guidelines,” she says.

For most of us non-athletes, it’s true that added sugar isn’t crucial for a healthy diet. But some experts warn we shouldn’t single it out as toxic.

McGregor, whose clients include those with orthorexia, a fixation with eating healthily, says that it isn’t healthy to label foods as "good" or "bad". And turning sugar into a taboo may only make it more tempting. “As soon as you say you can’t have something, you want it,” she says. “That’s why I never say anything is off-limits. I’ll say a food has no nutritional value. But sometimes foods have other values.”

Even when sweet foods have little or no nutritional value, they have other values (Credit: Getty)

Associate professor at James Madison University Alan Levinovitz studies the relationship between religion and science. He says there’s a simple reason we look at sugar as evil: throughout history, we’ve demonised the things we find hardest to resist (think of sexual pleasure in the Victorian times).

Today, we do this with sugar to gain control over cravings.

“Sugar is intensely pleasurable, so we have to see it as a cardinal sin. When we see things in simple good and evil binaries, it becomes unthinkable that this evil thing can exist in moderation. This is happening with sugar,” he says.

He argues that that seeing food in such extremes can make us anxious about what we’re eating – and add a moral judgment onto something as necessary, and as everyday, as deciding what to eat.

We demonise the things we find difficult to resist – including sugar (Credit: Getty)

Taking sugar out of our diets can even be counterproductive: it can mean replacing it with something potentially more calorific, such as if you substitute a fat for a sugar in a recipe.

And amid the rising debate around sugar, we risk confusing those foods and drinks with added sugar that lack other essential nutrients, like soft drinks, with healthy foods that have sugars, like fruit.

One person who struggled with this distinction is 28-year-old Tina Grundin of Sweden, who says she used to think all sugars were unhealthy. She pursued a high-protein, high-fat vegan diet, which she says led to an undiagnosed eating disorder.

“When I started throwing up after eating, I knew I couldn’t go on much longer. I’d grown up fearing sugar in all forms,” she says. “Then I realised there was a difference between added sugar and sugar as a carbohydrate and I adopted a high-fructose, high-starch diet with natural sugars found in fruit, vegetables, starches and legumes.

“From the first day, it was like the fog lifted and I could see clearly. I finally gave my cells fuel, found in glucose, from carbohydrates, from sugars.”

While there’s disagreement around how different types of sugars affect our health, the irony is we might be better off thinking about it less.

“We’ve really overcomplicated nutrition because, fundamentally, what everyone is searching for is a need to feel complete, to feel perfect and successful,” says McGregor. “But that doesn’t exist.”

Correction: An earlier version of this story referred to glucose and sucrose as being manmade. This has been changed. An earlier version of the story also said that high fructose corn syrup doesn't lead to a rise in leptin; however, as most related research has been done on fructose, not high fructose corn syrup, this has been changed. Sugar's effect on insulin and its relation also has been clarified.

Join 900,000+ Future fans by liking us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitteror Instagram.

If you liked this story, sign up for the weekly bbc.com features newsletter, called “If You Only Read 6 Things This Week”. A handpicked selection of stories from BBC Future, Culture, Capital, and Travel, delivered to your inbox every Friday.

Источник: https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20180918-is-sugar-really-bad-for-you

What can go wrong with corn? They are tasty, they have versatile usages, they are nutritious—what else is there to know? Do you want to know about the potential side effects of corn?

The pretty corn needs no introduction. But one misconception that many of us still have is that we think of corn as a vegetable. Nothing could be further from the truth! The corn is actually a food grain! Available everywhere today, corns were first grown in Central America and Mexico. And we Indians have developed a special bond with them!

These juicy, sweet, yellow kernels of health are surely a sight for sore eyes. But corn need not just be yellow! Now days, corn is available in brown, purple and blue colors too! The yellow and white corn is known as sugar and butter corn and they remain the absolute favorite food ingredient for children and adults alike!

It is eaten roasted over the fire, like we do in India. It is also used as a pizza topping, cooked as a separate dish or eaten as sweet corn—the way to consume corn are numerous but the benefits they provide remain the same. But is there a darker side to corn? Can eating corn lead to side effects?

Actually, yes! Corn does have its own set of side effects. Many of these sweet corn side effects can simply be shrugged aside while others need a little more care.

Subscribe

Top 10 Side Effects Of Corn:

Here are some of the major corn side effects that you should be aware of:

1. Allergic Reactions

Consuming corn can lead to allergies and symptoms like rashes on the skin, swelling of mucous membrane, vomiting, etc. Many people also suffer from asthma attack and anaphylaxis after eating corn. The main reason behind the allergies is the ingestible protein present in the corn.

[ Read: Health Benefits of Corn ]

2. Risk Of Pellagra

Corn is a staple food of many people. If you consume corn in high amounts, then you are at the risk of pellagra. Pellagra is nothing but the deficiency of vitamins, especially niacin in the body. Corn is deficient in amino acids (lysine and tryptophan) and niacin, which helps to protect the body from pellagra. If corn forms the major chunk of your diet, then make sure that you supplement your diet with vitamin-rich foods to prevent pellagra.

3. Not Good For Diabetics

Corn adversely affects people suffering from diabetes as it increases the blood sugar level in the body. Corn has a high carbohydrate content, which leads to the increase in blood sugar levels. So people suffering from diabetes should not consume corn in large quantities.

4. Causes Bloating And Flatulence

Corn contains a high percentage of starch. When you consume corn, it breaks down in the large intestine and produces a lot of gas. So if someone consumes corn in large quantities, then it can cause bloating and flatulence.

5. Causes Indigestion And Stomach Upset

Corn is a good source of fiber and other vital nutrients, which helps in flushing out bad toxins from the body. But an overdose of these fibers can be bad for your stomach. Even if you eat large portions of cereals, then it can lead to indigestion and stomach cramps! So, keep a watch on how much corn you are consuming, in any of its forms.

6. Causes Intestinal Irritation And Diarrhea

Corn should not be consumed raw as it can result in diarrhea. Corn also leads to many intestinal disorders. You must consult your doctor if you find symptoms that warrant some checking out.

7. Causes Tooth Decay

Corn contains a good amount of sugar, so it can lead to tooth decay in some people. This is a relatively one of the rare side effects of corn, but not one that should be taken lightly! Make sure you follow a good oral hygiene and brush your teeth after eating corn.

[ Read: Benefits Of Corn Silk Tea ]

8. Causes Osteoporosis

People who depend on corn diet can suffer from osteoporosis as corn contains very less amount of calcium. But this is relevant only if corn is not supplemented with appropriate calcium-rich food.

9. Increases Weight

As mentioned before, corn contains a heavy dose of sugar and carbohydrate. Overzealous eating of corn can surely lead to weight gain. People on a diet should avoid consumption of corn.

10. Leads To Lethargy

Corn contains an ample amount of starch. Starch can cause drowsiness and lead to lethargy.

These are the side effects of eating corn. Most of these so-called negative effects of corn can actually be countered with a balanced meal. For the rest, well, just watch your portion size!

Hope you liked our post on side effects of corn. Do you like corn? How do you like to eat your corn-roasted, boiled or as a topping? Share with us.

Recommended Articles:

Was this article helpful?

YesNo

Related

The following two tabs change content below.

The one with a constant energy that can leave you awed, Tanya can jump around and talk for the whole. more

Источник: https://www.stylecraze.com/articles/10-surprising-side-effects-corn/
is corn good or bad for you

Similar video

0 Replies to “Is corn good or bad for you”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *