is seaweed good for you

By eating wakame, you will get a good dose of vitamins A, C, D, E and K. All of these vitamins are off these are essential in keeping your body healthy. They. Seaweeds are incredibly nutrient dense — high in vitamin B2, vitamin C, iodine, copper, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and vanadium, as well as. Nori Seaweed (Laver): The Intriguing Health Benefits of the World's That's right, you can collect your own laver right on the coast of.

Is seaweed good for you -

7 Ways to Eat More Seaweed (and Why You Should)

An oldie but goodie superfood, Seaweed, is making waves again thanks to the discovery of a new type of seaweed that tastes like bacon and is better for you than kale. This could be good news for bacon lovers given the World Health Organization’s recent declaration that eating processed meats such as bacon and sausage can increase the risk of colorectal cancer.

But why is seaweed so good for you? And can it actually taste good?

Nutrition-wise, it’s a powerhouse of vitamins and minerals. Seaweeds contain dietary fiber, essential amino acids, vitamins, A, B, C, and E, Omega-3 fats, and minerals such as iodine, calcium, iron, zinc, and magnesium. All of these nutrients combine to reduce inflammation, lift your energy, maintain strong bones and teeth, support thyroid health and hormonal balance, and even reduce your risk of cancer.

It’s no wonder seaweed has been a staple in Asian cuisine for centuries!

While some may have concerns in recent years that seaweed is becoming a potentially harmful food due to the increasing pollution of our oceans, there has not been any evidence to support this despite ongoing testing. That being said, it’s always best to seek out quality products. We recommend finding brands that grow seaweed in sustainable ways and in pure or tested waters.

Let’s get cookin’!

While seaweed hasn’t quite risen to popularity as a superfood like kale or other leafy greens, it’s so versatile and easy to prepare we have a feeling it’ll win you over.

Here are some delicious ways to incorporate more seaweed into your diet:

1. Cook your beans with kombu.
Try adding a strip of kombu when cooking your dried beans to add a rich array of vitamins and minerals to your dish while enhancing the flavor and making the beans more digestible!

2. Snack on nori.
Nori is lightweight and easy to pack yet also nutritious and surprisingly filling.  It’s the perfect thing to throw into your bag for a quick snack at work or on the go, and is a healthy alternative for those with salty cravings. Even your kids will enjoy its crispy texture. Want another great way to use nori? Try these delicious seaweed breakfast wraps!

3. Enhance your smoothies with spirulina.
Powdered seaweed such as spirulina is a great source of natural protein, making it a morning and pre- or post-workout favorite among Health Coaches and smoothie-lovers alike.  Start with a teaspoon added to your preferred smoothie combo (it goes especially well with avocado, banana, or pineapple) and adjust the amount as you get used to it.

4. Add a dash of seaweed flakes to every meal.
Health food stores or Asian markets will have a variety of packaged salts and seasoning that include seaweed. Or you can make your own by combining fine-chopped or ground nori, kombu, dulse, sea salt, black pepper, and sesame seeds. Keep this right along with your most frequently used seasonings and sprinkle it over daily meals.

5. Mix in kelp or kombu to stocks, soups, and stews.
Add seaweed to any savory liquid-based foods! If you make your own vegetable stock from veggie scraps toss in a strip of seaweed and strain it out along with the other ingredients. If adding directly to soups or stews remove the solid strip before serving but don’t worry about any small pieces left in, they’re edible and will enhance the overall meal.

6. Stir it into your salad dressing.
Sprinkle some powdered seaweed into any salad dressing you’re using, allow it to sit for a minute to mix and absorb, shake well, then toss into your salad.

7. Toss together a seaweed salad.
Wakame and arame are best for a salad made predominantly of seaweed.  Combine with vinegar, sesame oil, garlic, and scallions. You can also incorporate other veggies like cucumbers, carrots, or radishes. Experiment to find your favorite combination and share it as a unique side dish at your next potluck.

There are many more ways to eat seaweed but we hope these ideas are enough to get you started so you can try it for yourself.

What’s your favorite way to eat seaweed? Share in the comments below!

Источник: https://www.integrativenutrition.com/blog/7-ways-to-eat-more-seaweed-and-why-you-should
Mara Seaweed flakes piles

Why is seaweed so healthy?

Seaweed is so good for us because it’s packed with nutrients. Seaweed absorbs minerals directly from sunlight and the ocean. When seaweed is dried, moisture is removed and the minerals become more concentrated.

Seaweed is the most mineralised vegetable on Earth. It contains all 56 elements essential for our health in a similar ratio to human blood. It’s a good source of fibre, protein, calcium, iron and iodine. Seaweed is low in fat, suitable for vegans and gluten-free. That’s why we call it 'the superfood of the sea.’

Seaweed for a modern diet

The only nutritional element missing in edible seaweed is calories. But as Western cultures continue to struggle with overeating, this may not be a bad thing. Instead, seaweed is high in fibre, which can make you feel fuller for longer and reduce snacking.

Seaweed is also able to provide nutrients which are often missing from crops grown in mineral-depleted soils. This means it has a unique ability to fill gaps in the modern diet.

If you’re after more detailed information, we highly recommend this research paper. You can also find further resources at the end of the blog.

Seaweed compared to other food

Seaweed is essential for everyday health, and in some cases nutritionally superior to other food, gram for gram.

The table below outlines some of the nutrients contained in seaweed and what they do for your body. This combination of vitamins, minerals, electrolytes and trace elements isn’t found in any other land or sea vegetable.

Seaweed is unique in its ability to deliver all of these health benefits in one go, and all it takes is just 1 teaspoon of Mara Seaweed a day.

Naturally, there are variations in the concentrations of nutrients in seaweeds due to variety and seasonality.

Nutrient (high in seaweed)

What does the nutrient do?

How does seaweed compare to other foods?

Iodine

Iodine regulates the thyroid gland. The thyroid helps to maintain thinking and reasoning, your metabolism, body temperature and heart function.

No other food is such a good source of iodine, particularly other so-called ‘superfoods’ such as spirulina.

Fibre

The combination of soluble and insoluble fibre in seaweed promote good gut health and create a bulking agent that helps food move more easily through the body.  

2g of seaweed is higher in fibre than the equivalent quantity of spirulina, sunflower seeds, coconut meat or pine nuts. Fibre also helps you feel fuller, helping with weight management.

Calcium

Seaweed is one of the best vegetable sources of calcium, which is essential for building strong bones and teeth.

2g of seaweed contains more calcium than 2g of spirulina, sunflower seeds, or flaxseeds.

Protein

Seaweed is a good source of protein for vegetarians and vegans. It contributes to the maintenance of normal bones and muscle mass.

Seaweed contains a similar amount of protein to pine nuts.

Iron

Iron is part of all body cells and helps muscles to store and use oxygen. This helps fight tiredness and fatigue.

One 2g serving of Dulse seaweed contains almost twice as much iron as sunflower, chia or flax seeds.

Potassium

Potassium prevents high blood pressure and improves cardiovascular health.

One serving provides 4-8% of daily recommended potassium intake, more than spirulina, pine nuts or flaxseeds.

Magnesium

Magnesium helps to maintain normal function of the nervous system.

2g of Kombu kelp or Shony contains more magnesium than chia seeds, flax seeds or sunflower seeds.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C accelerates healing and prevents colds, but it also with the absorption of iron.

B Vitamins

B vitamins are critical to maintaining normal metabolism, enhancing the immune system and combating stress.

Sodium

Seaweed contains just the right amount of sodium for the correct balance of body fluids, 85% less than in salt.

Even iodized salt, which contains iodine to help address deficiencies, cannot offer the other added health benefits naturally found in seaweed.


For more detailed information, a table of nutritional contents can be found under each product in our shop.

Can I eat too much seaweed?

As with anything, moderation is key. However, there are few dramatic side effects to consuming too much seaweed. Symptoms may include dizziness and feeling tired, rather than energised. 

In most cases, this is the result of hyperthyroidism, or an overactive thyroid due to too much iodine, which is rare. Iodine is water soluble which means it’s easily absorbed by the body - but also easily removed. The body uses what it needs and the rest is excreted in through urine.

If you normally enjoy seaweed and it starts to seem unappealing, listen to your body and stop eating it. The side effects will soon fade away.

Further resources

Discover nutritional facts about seaweed, try our other health blogs, or take some time to look through the following research papers.

  • Brownlee, I.A., Fairclough, A.C., Hall, A.C., Paxman, J.R. 2012. The potential health benefits of seaweed and seaweed extract. In: POMIN, Vitor H., (ed.) Seaweed: ecology, nutrient composition and medicinal uses. Marine Biology: Earth Sciences in the 21st Century. Hauppauge, New York, Nova Science Publishers, 119-136.
  • Jibril, S.M, Jakada, B.H., Umar, H.Y., and Ahmad, T.A. 2016. Importance of Some Algal Species as a Source of Food and Supplement. International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences. 5 (5).186-193.
  • Rupérez, P. 2002. Mineral content of edible marine seaweeds. Food Chem. 79, 23–26.
  • Lordan, S., Ross, R.P, and Stanto,C. 2011. Marine Bioactives as Functional Food Ingredients: Potential to Reduce the Incidence of Chronic Diseases. Mar Drugs. 9(6): 1056–1100.
  • MacArtain, P.; Gill, C.I.R.; Brooks, M.; Campbell, R.; Rowland, I.R. 2007. Nutritional value of edible seaweeds. Nutr. Rev. 65, 535–543.

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Источник: https://maraseaweed.com/blogs/news/the-health-benefits-of-seaweed

Unexpected Ways to Eat More Seaweed—Plus All the Reasons You'll Want To

We all know seaweed salad, sushi, and those omnipresent seaweed snacks and crackers, but there are a myriad of other ways to enjoy seaweed, and even more reasons why you’ll want to.

Seaweed is loaded with health benefits

“Seaweed, a sea algae, is high in minerals and vitamins including iodine, copper, calcium, magnesium, manganese, vitamin B2, and vitamin C,” says Lisa Dreher, a registered dietician with the UltraWellness Center in Lenox, Massachusetts. “It’s also one of the few food sources of the less well-known mineral vanadium. Preliminary research shows that vanadium may improve the body’s sensitivity to insulin and decrease the body’s production of glucose.”

Moreover, Dreher notes that seaweed contains unique phytonutrients and antioxidants needed to protect cells and DNA against damage. “Plus, it favorably alters estrogen and phytoestrogen metabolism, meaning if eaten in moderate amounts over time, it can be protective in women at risk of estrogen-sensitive breast cancers,” she says.

There are three different types of seaweed

“Seaweeds are categorized based on their coloring, cell structure, and other traits,” says Tammy Lakatos Shames and Lyssie Lakatos, both registered dieticians and founders of The Nutrition Twins. “Red algae/seaweed is in nori and is the seaweed used in sushi; brown algae is known as seaweeds like kombu and kelp, and is used in miso soup; green algae is found in sea lettuce and sea grapes.” According to Dreher, brown seaweed tends to accumulate more iodine than other sea vegetables and can range anywhere from 110 to 1,500 micrograms of iodine per gram.” But whether you eat nori, dulse, a blue-green alga like spirulina, or something else, every seaweed offers its own unique set of nutritional perks, making them all worthy dietary additions for most people.

But seaweed isn’t great for everyone

While seaweed is said to benefit people with hypothyroidism, it’s not a great idea in abundance for people with hyperthyroidism. “Eating too many iodine-rich foods can worsen hyperthyroidism, so if you have it, you should avoid seaweed, as well as sushi rolls that are wrapped in seaweed,” says Shames and Lakatos. “Further, if you’re on any blood thinners, check with your doctor before eating seaweed because it’s rich in vitamin K, and blood thinners often work by interfering with the actions of vitamin K. Typically, if you increase the amount of vitamin K in your diet, you also need to increase your medication.”

Dreher also notes that excess amounts of polysaccharides (carbohydrates) found in seaweed, which feed the bacteria in our gut, may contribute to gas, bloating, and gut discomfort in certain individuals, especially those with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. “While the benefits outweigh the risks of eating seaweed in these situations, it’s important to start with a small amount and then adjust based on how you feel.”

So how much seaweed is safe to eat?

For healthy individuals without a thyroid condition, the recommended daily allowance for adults 19 years and older is 150 micrograms and the upper limit is 1,100 micrograms, according to Dreher. “All seaweed varies as far as its iodine content. One dried sheet (1 gram) can contain anywhere from 11 to 1,989 percent of the RDA for iodine,” she says. Dreher singles out the average iodine content of three common seaweeds to elucidate the disparity:

  • Nori contains 37 mcg iodine per gram
  • Wakame contains 139 mcg iodine per gram
  • Kombu contains 2,523 mcg iodine per gram

Remember: quality matters

“Seaweed can act like a sponge, easily absorbing heavy metals such as arsenic, lead, mercury and cadmium,” Dreher says. “Although trace amounts of arsenic are present in a lot of seaweed, these heavy metals can be much more concentrated in seaweed grown in water polluted by industrial waste as well as those that aren’t organic.” Dreher strongly recommends always opting for organic seaweed from companies that are dedicated to producing products in clean waters, such as the Gulf of Maine and the North Atlantic.

Easy ways to add seaweed to your diet

Mary’s Gone Crackers and SeaSnax are the two most popular nutritionist-approved seaweed snacks, but you can also opt for miso soup packed with kombu, or seaweed flakes, which can be added to roasted veggies and salads. (Many store-bought seaweed snacks are also very high in sodium, so be sure to check the labels.) Another option is to add powdered spirulina, a type of seaweed that’s rich in protein, to your favorite smoothie recipe, says Nealy Fischer, founder of The Flexible Chef.

“Seaweed wraps are also a great idea because they’re basically a veggie-packed wrap without the carb-heavy exterior,” says Fischer. “Start by simply julienning whatever veggies you have on hand (think carrots, cucumber, mushrooms) then place them in a full-size nori sheet and roll everything like you would a wrap. Serve with a miso dressing for dipping.”

For something more filling, Fischer suggests raw kelp pad Thai. “Soak one package of kelp noodles in water until they become soft and mix with your favorite pad Thai sauce until evenly coated. Serve with fresh cilantro, red pepper flakes, and other desired toppings,” she says. You can bulk this dish up with your lean protein option of choice and an unlimited amount of non-starchy vegetables for a belly-filling, healthy meal.

Источник: https://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/ingredients-guide/seaweed

Is pickled seaweed good for you?

Wakame is a highly nutritious, edible seaweed that can add a range of vitamins and minerals to your diet for a low number of calories. It's also been associated with various health benefits, including lower cholesterol levels, decreased blood pressure, enhanced weight loss and reduced blood sugar.

Click to see full answer.

In respect to this, is dried seaweed good for you?

Seaweed can help control your appetite. "Seaweed is low in fat but packed with soluble fiber, which helps control blood sugar levels and keeps your bowels moving. "Seaweed is a great source of vitamins A, C, E, K and B vitamins," Berman says. "It's also rich in minerals, including iodine, selenium, calcium and iron."

Also Know, what happens if you eat too much seaweed? A primary concern is the risk of consuming too much iodine. Most seaweed contains high levels, and a person may consume too much if they eat a lot of seaweed over an extended period. While many people can handle high levels of iodine, some are more vulnerable to its effects, which can include thyroid dysfunction.

Besides, is seaweed good for cholesterol?

Interestingly, seaweed may help reduce your blood cholesterol levels ( 37 , 38). One eight-week study fed rats with high cholesterol a high-fat diet supplemented with 10% freeze-dried seaweed. Seaweed contains carbohydrates called fucans, which may help prevent blood from clotting ( 40 , 41 ).

Is seaweed salad bad for you?

But with all of those health benefits, you do need to be careful about how much seaweed salad you eat because it can be high in sodium and sugar. That's because 1 cup of seaweed salad has about 130 calories, 25 grams of carbohydrate, 4 grams of sugar, 3 grams of fiber and the real kicker – 900-1200 mg sodium.

Источник: https://askinglot.com/is-pickled-seaweed-good-for-you

What Is Kelp and Why Should I Eat It?

Vegetarians and vegans can eat seafood, too. Wait, what?! Sea vegetables like seaweed and algae are also types of seafood and are great sources of iodine, vitamin K, B vitamins, iron, and zinc, along with omega-3s and with plant compounds that work together to have strong antioxidant effects. Classified as marine algae, seaweeds are fast-growing, chlorophyll-containing plants that play a vital role in marine life and are the primary source of food for a variety of creatures in the ocean.

Did you know there are dozens of seaweed farms in waters across the United States from New England to Alaska? Seaweed production and farming has seen a big boom in the past few years and has created a perfect opportunity to introduce a delicious seafood option to vegetarians and vegans! Seaweed farmers in the U.S. are producing various types of seaweed including dulse, bull kelp, ribbon kelp, and sugar kelp. 

What is kelp?

Kelp is a large, brown seaweed that typically grows in shallow saltwater near coastal areas around the world. You can eat it raw, cooked, as a powder, and it’s included in a number of supplements. Because of its versatility and health benefits, kelp is typically used in sushis, sauces, salads, as seasoning and other products. 

Kelp Sustainability

Seaweed farming is also a sustainable practice, mainly because these farms help improve water quality and buffer acidification effects of the ocean which is ideal in the aquaculture world. Seaweed is not only delicious, but one of the fastest growing aquaculture sectors in the U.S.! Seaweed also has the ability to use carbon dioxide to grow, which also helps balance out high nutrient levels in surrounding waters. Being that seaweed and kelp are both fast-growing, they create excellent conditions for commercially important fish and diversity for seafood!

 

Check out this video from Maine Aqua about how one family decided to start seaweed farming. 

 

harvesting sea kelp

Health Benefits of Kelp

There are numerous health benefits to introducing kelp into your diet and plenty of ways to do so! Seaweed and kelp are high in antioxidants, which means they might help play a role in combating heart disease, cancer, and other diseases. They are also both high in iodine, potassium, magnesium, iron, calcium which are all nutrients your body needs to stay healthy. 

Enjoy Kelp

Seaweed and kelp can be easily introduced into your diet with recipes you might already have on hand. For instance, you can now purchase seaweed pasta for your favorite pasta dish, kelp noodles for an Asian inspired dish, or even as a sauce on top of your favorite salmon fillet. There are kelp burgers, snacks such as kelp popcorn, jerky and pickles, and condiments such as fermented kelp, salsa, hot sauce, and a favorite seasoning of ours – furikake – a sesame and seaweed sprinkle for rice, soups, salads and more.

 

Check out this collection of kelp and seaweed recipes to see a few of the different ways you can put this superfood into your dish:

Kelp Smoothie
Источник: https://www.seafoodnutrition.org/seafood-101/recipe-roundup/what-is-kelp-and-why-should-i-eat-it/

Seaweed is a form of marine plants and algae that grow in salty water. Traditionally an Asian-cuisine favorite, this sea vegetable has made its way across the oceans and become a popular ingredient in western dishes, too — you’ll see it wrapped around sushi, roasted as a kid’s snack, and served as a bright green seaweed salad. It’s unsurprising, as the delicious umami-flavored ingredient is not only versatile, but low in calories and packs a serious nutritional punch.

Humans have been foraging for seaweed for centuries, with some researchers suggesting we have seaweed to thank for our highly evolved brains. But due to potentially high arsenic and iodine levels, which come with scary cancer warnings, you need to consider your choice of seaweed and how much you’re eating.

Get the gist on this Asian staple ingredient.

Seaweed Delivers Plenty of Nutrients in Very Few Calories

By sprinkling some seaweed into your salad, you’ll be boosting your dose of disease-fighting nutrients, including essential amino acids, antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber. Take a look at a few of the health benefits:

  • Seaweed is an excellent source of iodine, a mineral vital during pregnancy and early childhood to ensure proper growth and brain development.
  • A rich source of fiber, seaweed may help you curb your appetite, reduce blood cholesterol, and control your blood sugar levels. The fiber also acts as a prebiotic or food for the good bacteria in your gut.
  • Wakame seaweed, the type traditionally added to miso soup, has been shown to boost immunity and have antiviral activity, particularly against the herpes virus which is responsible for giving you cold sores.
  • With its high amino acid, iron, and vitamin C content, seaweed is a nourishing addition to a vegan diet. Some varieties, like nori, also show promise in being a source of vitamin B12, however, it’s still not entirely clear whether the body can absorb vitamin B12 from seaweed.

Don’t Go Overboard

While the high levels of iodine have benefit for growing brains, consuming too much iodine can be harmful. Some kelps, a type of seaweed often consumed as a supplement, contains very high amounts of iodine, and eating too much can affect your thyroid function and possibly lead to thyroid cancer, although a recent large study on Japanse women found no association between eating natural seaweed (not taking a supplement) a few times a week and cancer risk. As iodine content can vary greatly and supplements deliver a large dose, it’s best to not go overboard on kelp..

Another type of seaweed, Hijiki, contains high levels of arsenic, a heavy metal which can act as a carcinogen in the body. For this reason, most food standards agencies around the world, including the USDA, have advised the public to avoid eating Hijiki seaweed. Hijiki is easy to spot because of its distinctive black and shredded appearance. It’s mainly added to Japanese and Korean soups and salads, but is not used to make sushi.

And don’t confuse minimally processed seaweed with its highly processed by-product, carrageenan a food additive used as a stabilizer and thickener in foods like non-dairy milks and ice-cream, which can cause tummy upsets in some people.

Seaweed is Another Way to Eat More Plants

If a superfood is something that’s packed with nutrients and comes with serious health benefits, then yes seaweed can be considered a superfood. Does this mean you should be snacking on copious amounts of seaweed or adding it to every salad? Nope. Like with all things in life, moderation is key. View seaweed as another tasty way to add more nourishing plants to your plate, along with other vegetables, fruit, whole grains, nuts, and legumes. The good news is because seaweed supplies a concentrated dose of nutrients, you only need a small amount to boost the nutritional quality of your meal. Go for natural seaweed over supplements to safely include it in small quantities, a couple of times a week as part of an overall healthy diet.

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for medical diagnosis or treatment. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or condition. Always check with your doctor before changing your diet, altering your sleep habits, taking supplements, or starting a new fitness routine.

Tracy Morris

tracy-morris

Tracy Morris is Fitbit’s Lead Nutritionist. With a master’s degree in nutrition and dietetics from South Africa, she’s also an Australian Accredited Practising Dietitian, and an international member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in the US. Over the past 20 years, Tracy's lived in five different countries, inspiring people around the globe to be healthy. She currently lives in sunny Sydney, Australia where she helps Fitbit fans around the globe live their best lives. When she’s not working, running after her three young kids, or practicing pilates, she can be found sipping pinot noir with her husband watching the sun set.

Источник: https://blog.fitbit.com/seaweed/

Oceans make up about 70 percent of our planet, so it’s only natural that holistic hidden treasures live beyond the shore. Seaweed, is seaweed good for you instance, absorbs nutrients from the seabed, making the marine vegetable packed with even more nutrients and vitamins than mainland-grown fruits and veggies.

Lately, we’ve been noticing the unlikely superfood popping up everywhere: in our drinks, meals and even our skincare. The salty snack is popular in plant-based diets, as it is a is seaweed good for you vegan source of essential amino acids. Meanwhile, seaweed is an abundant, carbon-negative food source (meaning it doesn’t require water or fertilizer to harvest), so it's ideal for eco-conscious consumers. If you’re still not convinced about adding seaweed to more than just your sushi rolls, read on for its potent benefits—plus easy ways to incorporate into your everyday routine.

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The edible form of algae is high in fiber, which is great for promoting satiety, reducing bloating and easing digestion. “Seaweed contains both soluble and insoluble fiber, making seaweed a great prebiotic source to support gut health,” explains dietitian Chelsea Gloeckner, MS, RD.

"These fibers include particular sugars called sulfated polysaccharides, which have been shown to increase the growth of ‘good’ gut bacteria and also increase the production ofshort-chain fatty acids (SCFA), which provide support and nourishment to the GI tract celllining,” adds dietitian Rachel Fine MS, RD, CSSD, CDN .

Tip: Gloeckner suggests adding seaweed strips to your favorite soups and salads.

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The underwater wonder contains many immune-boosting minerals and vitamins. “Seaweed is a source of a potent antioxidants, including alginate and fucoxanthin,” says Fine. “There is promising research showing potential anti-inflammatory benefits that may relate to reducing the risk of diabetes and obesity.”

Thanks to iodine and an amino acid called tyrosine, the “grass” of the sea also benefits the thyroid and may help prevent thyroid disease. Seaweed also contains polyphenols, “which can support anti-cancer processes in the body,” adds functional medicine expert Dr. Elroy Vojdani, MD.

Tip: The salty snack is more nutrient-dense than crackers and has fewer carbohydrates, explains dietitian Monica Auslander Moreno, MS, RD. She suggests toasting it with olive or avocado oil (and avoid pairing it with foods that have artificial chemicals or sweeteners).


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It turns out seaweed is good for your ticker. Some studies is seaweed good for you shown the plant to reduce the risk of heart disease, while many experts agree that it stabilizes blood sugar levels, thanks to its rich fiber content. “Seaweed is rich in fiber, which [can reduce] blood lipids and improve blood sugar control,” notes dietitian Suzanne Fisher. Celebrity nutritionist and chef Serena Poon adds, “Seaweed fuels our bodies with the ability to help regulate and detox our blood and lymphatic system.”

Tip: Consider cooking with algae oil, instead of traditional extra virgin olive oil, to stir-fry your favorite veggies. Bonus points for sprinkling seaweed seasoning on your meal of choice.

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Go on, let the seaweed benefits get to your head: Experts, including Vojdani and Montemayor, agree that the omega-3 fatty acids, EPA, and DHA found in seaweed are great cognitive health, which can include improved memory and performance. Some populations also rely on the food for brain development in children.

Tip: Swap your go-to pasta with kelp noodles, which are a gluten-free, fiber-rich alternative lowin carbohydrates.

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Seaweed—whether applied topically or ingested—is great for combating acne and signs of aging. According to Poon, its minerals, including calcium, zinc, iron, sodium, potassium and magnesium, reduce inflammation and help protect skin from dehydration as well as free radical and sun damage.

“The rich vitamin C in seaweed provides the added beauty benefit of supporting collagen production, and the natural niacin is great for hyperpigmentation and blemishes.” Another celeb-approved holistic nutritionist, Sally Pansing Kravich, agrees adding, “Chlorella is a cleansing seaweed that is helpful for removing toxins,heavy metals and radiation.”

Tip: “We can wrap ourselves in seaweed to nourish our skin and draw out toxins—or ingest it for the same benefits,” recommends Kravich.

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The iron and is seaweed good for you found in seaweed support the bones, while the omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial for joints.

Tip: “Agar is a form of seaweed that is a good substitute for making gelatin and a vegan replacement for bone broth,” notes Kravich.

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Similar to carrots (and avocados!), seaweed can help your vision. “Although seaweed is low in fat, it typically contains small amounts of essential omega-3 fatty acids,” explains Ysabel Montemayor, a lead dietitian for Fresh n’ Lean. “This is a type of fat that many of us don't get enough of and [is] good for eye health.” Additionally, seaweed contains astaxanthin, a powerful nutrient that protects eyesight.

Tip: Try adding spirulina into your juice, smoothie or yogurt. “This type of seaweed contains all essential amino acids and is trending as an add-in to drinks such as kombucha,” notes Montemayor.

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Katie DavidsonKatie Davidson is a freelance writer based in California.

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Источник: https://www.elle.com/beauty/health-fitness/news/a26568/seaweed-snacks-healthy/

Seaweed is very nutritious. It offers a host of health benefits to individuals, and it is a rich source of minerals. There are numerous types of seaweed. Most people know about kelp, nori, and kombu. However, wakame, bladderwrack, hijiki, wakame, sea lettuce, and dulse are also favorites for raw foodists and non-raw foodists alike.

The Many Health Benefits of Seaweed

Seaweed has been around for thousands and thousands of years. This food was nicknamed an ancient superfood by our ancestors since it was their secret to living long and healthy lives. For many years, our ancestors ate seaweed for nutrition. The Chinese have considered it the go-to food for more than 2,000 years.

Eating seaweed is a great way to boost your intake of minerals and vitamins. This nutritious food gets all its minerals from the sea. In fact, the mineral elements make up approximately 36% of seaweed’s dry mass.

Seaweed is rich in iodine, magnesium, iron, and calcium. It is a good source of proteins and vitamins such as vitamin A, vitamin B, and C. It is also high in EPA, alpha-linoleic acid, and fiber. Finally, it’s a great source of antioxidants that help lessen inflammation and prevent oxidative stress in the body.

Nori contains almost all minerals that are beneficial to the body. This seaweed is rich in dietary fiber, and it has more vitamins than most vegetables and fruits. Raw and sun-dried seaweed contains:

The protein content in seaweed can range from 20% in green algae to as high as 70% in spirulina. The protein in seaweeds like chlorella and spirulina is rich in all essential amino acids. By eating these two types, you will get all the amino acids your body needs.

Raw or sun-dried seaweed is a good source of minerals, especially calcium, iron, iodine, and magnesium. This food also contains folate, zinc, and sodium, and it is a good supply of vitamins A, E, and K. Interestingly enough, it has a higher vitamin C level than oranges!

Seaweed is also a rich source of fiber, which helps prevent obesity. Eating fiber makes you feel full, and it does not add any calories. It reduces the urge to eat. Fiber is ideal for someone trying to lose weight.

Seaweed helps support thyroid function because it contains a good supply of natural and organic iodine. Your thyroid glands require iodine to release hormones necessary for energy production, growth, and damaged tissue repair. Without iodine, your thyroid cannot release hormones. The iodine in seaweed is natural and non-toxic.

  • Anti-inflammatory and Anti-bacterial Properties

Seaweed contains antioxidants such as carotenoids that help protect the body cells from damage caused by free radicals. Wakame, for instance, is a rich source of carotenoids. The antioxidants in seaweed help make free radicals in your body less reactive, which reduces the damage they might cause. Antioxidants help prevent health problems like cancer and inflammation.

Polysaccharides play a vital role in preventing degenerative diseases, cardiovascular problems, and Type 2 diabetes. They help improve liver function and stabilize blood sugar levels. Polysaccharides also help increase feel-good chemicals and hormones in the brain.

Is Seaweed Good for You?

Eating seaweed results in the following overall health benefits:

  • Improved hearing and eyesight
  • Healthy thyroid gland function
  • Clear skin
  • Dental health
  • Improved body immunity
  • Better digestion
  • Prevention of infections and allergies due to a strong-antioxidant function
  • Low blood pressure and stable blood sugar
  • Normalized cholesterol levels
  • Improved bone health
  • Healthy heart vessels

Seaweed, particularly nori, is often used in sushi. You can use nori to make sushi rolls or eat the nori sheets without using them to make anything. You can also use seaweed to prepare a tasty seaweed salad. Here’s a great recipe you can try out.

Seaweed Salad Recipe

This seaweed salad recipe is not only delicious, but it’s also incredibly healthy and nutritious. You can prepare it easily, and it will only take you a couple of minutes. For this recipe, we went with stevia instead of sugar and lemon juice in place of rice vinegar. We’ve also used non-pasteurized soy sauce (tamari). Let’s get started!

Ingredients

  • Your preferred seaweed (raw and unroasted)
  • Raw sesame oil
  • Sesame seeds
  • Lemon juice
  • Tamari or Bragg Liquid Aminos
  • Stevia

Dressing Instructions

  • Mix the sesame oil, soy sauce, lemon juice, and stevia in a medium-sized bowl
  • Add the raw, unroasted seaweed of your choice
  • Mix and sprinkle it with some sesame seeds
  • Serve and enjoy!

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Источник: https://wonderfulcook.com/raw-food-diet/seaweed-health-benefits/

Unexpected Ways to Eat More Seaweed—Plus All the Reasons You'll Want To

We all know seaweed salad, sushi, and those omnipresent seaweed snacks and crackers, but there are a myriad of other ways to enjoy seaweed, and even more reasons why you’ll want to.

Seaweed is loaded with health benefits

“Seaweed, a sea algae, is high in minerals and vitamins including iodine, copper, calcium, magnesium, manganese, vitamin B2, and vitamin C,” says Lisa Dreher, a registered dietician with the UltraWellness Center in Lenox, Massachusetts. “It’s also one of the few food sources of the less well-known mineral vanadium. Preliminary research shows that vanadium may improve the body’s sensitivity to insulin and decrease the body’s production of glucose.”

Moreover, Dreher notes that seaweed contains unique phytonutrients and antioxidants needed to protect cells and DNA against damage. “Plus, it favorably alters estrogen and phytoestrogen metabolism, meaning if eaten in moderate amounts over time, it can be protective in women at risk of estrogen-sensitive breast cancers,” she says.

There are three different types of seaweed

“Seaweeds are categorized based on their coloring, cell structure, and other traits,” says Tammy Lakatos Shames and Lyssie Lakatos, both registered dieticians and founders of The Nutrition Twins. “Red algae/seaweed is in nori and is the seaweed used in sushi; brown algae is known as seaweeds like kombu and kelp, and is used in miso soup; green algae is found in sea lettuce and sea grapes.” According to Dreher, brown seaweed tends to accumulate more iodine than other sea vegetables and can range anywhere from 110 to 1,500 micrograms of iodine per gram.” But whether you eat nori, dulse, a blue-green alga like spirulina, or something else, every seaweed offers its own unique set of nutritional perks, making them all worthy dietary additions for most people.

But seaweed isn’t great for everyone

While seaweed is said to benefit people with hypothyroidism, it’s not a great idea in abundance for people with hyperthyroidism. “Eating too many iodine-rich is seaweed good for you can worsen hyperthyroidism, so if you have it, you should avoid seaweed, as well as sushi rolls that are wrapped in seaweed,” says Shames and Lakatos. “Further, if you’re on any blood thinners, check with your doctor before eating seaweed because it’s rich in vitamin K, and blood thinners often work by interfering with the actions of vitamin K. Typically, if you increase the amount of vitamin K in your diet, you also need to increase your medication.”

Dreher also notes that excess amounts of polysaccharides (carbohydrates) found in seaweed, which feed the bacteria in our gut, may contribute to gas, bloating, and gut discomfort in certain individuals, especially those with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. “While the benefits outweigh the risks of eating seaweed in these situations, it’s important to start with a small amount and then adjust based on how you feel.”

So how much seaweed is safe to eat?

For healthy individuals without a thyroid condition, the recommended daily allowance for adults 19 years and older is 150 micrograms and the upper limit is 1,100 micrograms, according to Dreher. “All seaweed varies as far as its iodine content. One dried sheet (1 gram) can contain anywhere from 11 to 1,989 percent of the RDA for iodine,” she says. Dreher singles out the average iodine content of three common seaweeds to elucidate the disparity:

  • Nori contains 37 mcg iodine per gram
  • Wakame contains 139 mcg iodine per gram
  • Kombu contains 2,523 mcg iodine per gram

Remember: quality matters

“Seaweed can act like a sponge, easily absorbing heavy metals such as arsenic, lead, mercury and cadmium,” Dreher says. “Although trace amounts of arsenic are present in a lot of seaweed, these heavy metals can be much more concentrated in seaweed grown in water polluted by industrial waste as well as those that aren’t organic.” Dreher strongly recommends always opting for organic seaweed from companies that are dedicated to producing products in clean waters, such as the Gulf of Maine and the North Atlantic.

Easy ways to add seaweed to your diet

Mary’s Gone Crackers and SeaSnax are the two most popular nutritionist-approved seaweed snacks, but you can also opt for miso soup packed with kombu, or seaweed flakes, which can be added to roasted veggies and salads. (Many store-bought seaweed snacks are also very high in sodium, so be sure to check the labels.) Another option is to add powdered spirulina, a type of seaweed that’s rich in protein, to your favorite smoothie recipe, says Nealy Fischer, founder of The Flexible Chef.

“Seaweed wraps are also a great idea because they’re is seaweed good for you a veggie-packed wrap without the carb-heavy exterior,” says Fischer. “Start by simply julienning whatever veggies you have on hand (think carrots, cucumber, mushrooms) then place them in a full-size nori sheet and roll everything like you would a wrap. Serve with a miso dressing for dipping.”

For something more filling, Fischer suggests raw kelp pad Thai. “Soak one package of kelp noodles in water until they become soft and mix with your favorite pad Thai sauce until evenly coated. Serve with fresh cilantro, red pepper flakes, and other desired toppings,” she says. You can bulk this dish up with your lean protein option of choice and an unlimited amount of non-starchy vegetables for a belly-filling, healthy meal.

Источник: https://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/ingredients-guide/seaweed

It’s not just for wrapping around rice is seaweed good for you (Corbis)

You should be getting more seaweed in your diet. That’s the takeaway from a new scientific article published in the journal Phycologia, that says it doesn’t take a lot to reap the benefits.

In the article, researchers from the University of Southern Denmark say that adding seaweed to processed foods like frozen pizzas, hot dogs, and dried pasta could help reduce instances of heart disease.

They also argue that swapping salty-tasting seaweed for traditional sodium salt can help lower blood pressure, and that dried and granulated seaweed can be swapped for some flour used to make dry pasta, bread, and snack bars.

It sounds a little extreme, but experts say they’re on to something.

Related: Are Pastured Eggs Worth the Extra Money?

“Seaweed is very good for you — it has the full mineral profile,” Toronto-based nutritionist Theresa Albert, author of “Ace Your Health,” tells Yahoo Health.

Among the nutrients included in seaweed: Vitamins A and C, potassium, magnesium, and iodine, which helps with your thyroid function. And they can have a big impact on your health.

“There have been some studies that link consumption of this ‘superfood’ to reducing the risk of breast cancer, decreasing inflammation, preventing obesity, improving fertility — the list goes on,” certified dietitian-nutritionist Lisa Moskovitz, RD, CEO of NY Nutrition Group, tells Yahoo Health.

The paper’s lead author Ole G. Mouritsen, PhD, says in a press release that it doesn’t take a lot of seaweed to reap the benefits: He recommends eating up to 10 grams (less than a tablespoon) of dried seaweed a day.

There are several different types of seaweed that you can eat, but their nutritional makeup is similar. Dried versions include nori and kelp, powdered versions include spirulina, and fresh versions include wakame or kelp.

Related: Why The Apples We Eat Today Are Not The Ones Our Grandparents

Substituting seaweed for salt sounds unusual, but Albert says it’s actually pretty common in Japan where it’s not unusual to see a salt shaker on a table filled with sesame seeds and dried nori (the most commonly used form of seaweed).

Swapping dried nori for regular table salt can do two things, she says: It can increase your intake of minerals like magnesium and potassium and reduce the amount of sodium you’re putting into your body (which, when eaten in excess, can increase your risk of developing heart disease and high blood pressure.)

While you can make it a habit to order seaweed salads when you eat at certain restaurants, Moskovitz says you can also eat seaweed at home roasted, chopped up in salads, blended into smoothies, or cooked into vegetable soups.

There are a lot of packaged seaweed snacks on the market, but Albert notes that they can often contain additives, artificial flavorings, or unhealthy fats that you want to steer clear of. “Is it better than chips? Yes, if it’s the best you can do,” she says.

While it’s beneficial to eat seaweed, New York City registered dietitian Jessica Cording points out that too much of anything is bad. “For people who need to watch their intake of potassium salts, iodine, iron, and fiber, they may need to keep their intake on the lower end,” she tells Yahoo Health.

Albert recommends that most people look into increasing their seaweed intake (often found at health food stores and even some larger chain grocery stores): “It fills in a lot of the gaps that we’re missing from other foods.”

Read This Next:Here’s How Many Bugs, Rat Hairs and Cigarette Butts the FDA Allows in Your Food

Let’s keep in touch! Follow Yahoo Health on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Источник: https://sg.news.yahoo.com/seaweed-health-benefits-200245898.html

Is pickled seaweed good for you?

Wakame is a highly nutritious, edible seaweed that can add a range of vitamins and minerals to your diet for a low number of calories. It's also been associated with various health benefits, including lower cholesterol levels, decreased blood pressure, enhanced weight loss and reduced blood sugar.

Click to see full answer.

In respect to this, is dried seaweed good for you?

Seaweed can help control your appetite. "Seaweed is low in fat but packed with soluble fiber, which helps control blood sugar levels and keeps your bowels moving. "Seaweed is a great source of vitamins A, C, E, K and B vitamins," Berman says. "It's also rich in minerals, including iodine, selenium, calcium and iron."

Also Know, what happens if you eat too much seaweed? A primary concern is the risk of consuming too much iodine. Most seaweed contains high levels, and a person may consume too much if they eat a lot of seaweed over an extended period. While many people can handle high levels of iodine, some are more is seaweed good for you to its effects, which can include thyroid dysfunction.

Besides, is seaweed good for cholesterol?

Interestingly, seaweed may help reduce your blood cholesterol levels ( 3738). One eight-week study fed rats with high cholesterol a high-fat diet supplemented with 10% freeze-dried seaweed. Seaweed contains carbohydrates called fucans, which may help prevent blood from clotting ( 4041 ).

Is seaweed salad bad for you?

But with all of those health benefits, you do need to be careful about how much seaweed salad you eat because it can be high in sodium and sugar. That's because 1 cup of seaweed salad has about 130 calories, 25 grams of carbohydrate, 4 grams of sugar, 3 grams of fiber and the real kicker – 900-1200 mg sodium.

Источник: https://askinglot.com/is-pickled-seaweed-good-for-you
Mara Seaweed flakes piles

Why is seaweed so healthy?

Seaweed is so good for us because it’s packed with nutrients. Seaweed absorbs minerals directly from sunlight and the ocean. When seaweed is dried, moisture is removed and the minerals become more concentrated.

Seaweed is the most mineralised vegetable on Earth. It contains all 56 elements essential for our health in a similar ratio to human blood. It’s a good source of fibre, protein, calcium, iron and iodine. Seaweed is low in fat, suitable for vegans and gluten-free. That’s why we call it 'the superfood of the sea.’

Seaweed for a modern diet

The only nutritional element missing in edible seaweed is calories. But as Western cultures continue to struggle with overeating, this may not be a bad thing. Instead, seaweed is high in fibre, which can make you feel fuller for longer and reduce snacking.

Seaweed is also able to provide nutrients which are often missing from crops grown in mineral-depleted soils. This means it has a unique ability to fill gaps in the modern diet.

If you’re after more detailed information, we highly recommend this research paper. You can also find further resources at the end of the blog.

Seaweed compared to other food

Seaweed is essential for everyday health, and in some cases nutritionally superior to other food, gram for gram.

The table below is seaweed good for you some of the nutrients contained in seaweed and what they do for your body. This combination of vitamins, minerals, electrolytes and trace elements isn’t found in any other land or sea vegetable.

Seaweed is unique in its ability to deliver all of these health benefits in one go, and all it takes is just 1 teaspoon of Mara Seaweed a day.

Naturally, there are variations in the concentrations of nutrients in seaweeds due to variety and seasonality.

Nutrient (high in seaweed)

What does the nutrient do?

How does seaweed compare to other foods?

Iodine

Iodine regulates the thyroid gland. The thyroid helps to maintain thinking and reasoning, your metabolism, body temperature and heart function.

No other food is such a good source of iodine, particularly other so-called ‘superfoods’ such as spirulina.

Fibre

The combination of soluble and insoluble fibre in seaweed promote good gut health and create a bulking agent that helps food move more easily through the body.  

2g of seaweed is higher in fibre than the equivalent quantity of spirulina, sunflower seeds, coconut meat or pine nuts. Fibre also helps you feel fuller, helping with weight management.

Calcium

Seaweed is one of the best vegetable sources of calcium, which is essential for building strong bones and teeth.

2g of seaweed contains more calcium than 2g of spirulina, sunflower seeds, or flaxseeds.

Protein

Seaweed is a good source of protein for vegetarians and vegans. It contributes to the maintenance of normal bones and muscle mass.

Seaweed contains a similar amount of protein to pine nuts.

Iron

Iron is part of all body cells and helps muscles to store and use oxygen. This helps fight tiredness and fatigue.

One 2g serving of Dulse seaweed contains almost twice as much iron as sunflower, chia or flax seeds.

Potassium

Potassium prevents high blood pressure and improves cardiovascular health.

One serving provides 4-8% of daily recommended potassium intake, more than spirulina, pine nuts or flaxseeds.

Magnesium

Magnesium helps to maintain normal function of the nervous system.

2g of Kombu kelp or Shony contains more magnesium than chia seeds, flax seeds or sunflower seeds.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C accelerates healing and prevents colds, but it also with the absorption of iron.

B Vitamins

B vitamins are critical to maintaining normal metabolism, enhancing the immune system and combating stress.

Sodium

Seaweed contains just the right amount of sodium for the correct balance of body fluids, 85% less than in salt.

Even iodized salt, which contains iodine to help address deficiencies, cannot offer the other added health benefits naturally found in seaweed.


For more detailed information, a table of nutritional contents can be found under each product in our shop.

Can I eat too much seaweed?

As with anything, moderation is key. However, there are few dramatic side effects to consuming too much seaweed. Symptoms may include dizziness and feeling tired, rather than energised. 

In most cases, this is the result of hyperthyroidism, or an overactive thyroid due to too much iodine, which is rare. Iodine is water soluble which means it’s easily absorbed by the body - but also easily removed. The body uses what it needs and the rest is excreted in through urine.

If you normally enjoy seaweed and it starts to seem unappealing, listen to your body and stop eating it. The side effects will soon fade away.

Further resources

Discover nutritional facts about seaweed, try our other health blogs, or take some time to look through the following research papers.

  • Brownlee, I.A., Fairclough, A.C., Hall, A.C., Paxman, J.R. 2012. The potential health benefits of seaweed and seaweed extract. In: POMIN, Vitor H., (ed.) Seaweed: ecology, nutrient composition and medicinal uses. Marine Biology: Earth Sciences in the 21st Century. Hauppauge, New York, Nova Science Publishers, 119-136.
  • Jibril, S.M, Jakada, B.H., Umar, H.Y., and Ahmad, T.A. 2016. Importance of Some Algal Species as a Source care credit synchrony bank contact Food and Supplement. International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences. 5 (5).186-193.
  • Rupérez, P. 2002. Mineral content of edible marine seaweeds. Food Chem. 79, 23–26.
  • Lordan, S., Ross, R.P, and Stanto,C. 2011. Marine Bioactives as Functional Food Ingredients: Potential to Reduce the Incidence of Chronic Diseases. Mar Drugs. 9(6): 1056–1100.
  • MacArtain, P.; Gill, C.I.R.; Brooks, M.; Campbell, R.; Rowland, I.R. 2007. Nutritional value of edible seaweeds. Nutr. Rev. 65, 535–543.

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Источник: https://maraseaweed.com/blogs/news/the-health-benefits-of-seaweed

7 Ways to Eat More Seaweed (and Why You Should)

An oldie but goodie superfood, Seaweed, is making waves again thanks to the discovery of a new type of seaweed that tastes like bacon and is better for you than kale. This could be good news for bacon lovers given the World Health Organization’s recent declaration that eating processed meats such as bacon and sausage can increase the risk of colorectal cancer.

But why is seaweed so good for you? And can it actually taste good?

Nutrition-wise, it’s a powerhouse of vitamins and minerals. Seaweeds contain dietary fiber, essential amino acids, vitamins, A, B, C, and E, Omega-3 fats, and minerals such as iodine, calcium, iron, zinc, and magnesium. All of these nutrients combine to reduce inflammation, lift your energy, maintain strong bones and teeth, support thyroid health and hormonal balance, and even reduce your risk of cancer.

It’s no wonder seaweed has been a staple in Asian cuisine for centuries!

While some may have concerns in recent years that seaweed is becoming a potentially harmful food due to the increasing pollution of our oceans, there has not been any evidence to support this despite ongoing testing. That being said, it’s always best to seek out quality products. We recommend finding brands that grow seaweed in sustainable ways and in pure or tested waters.

Let’s get cookin’!

While seaweed hasn’t quite risen to popularity as a superfood like kale or other leafy greens, it’s so versatile and easy to prepare we have a feeling it’ll win you over.

Here are some delicious ways to incorporate more seaweed into your diet:

1. Cook your beans with kombu.
Try adding a strip of kombu when cooking your dried beans to add a rich array of vitamins and minerals to your dish while enhancing the flavor and making the beans more digestible!

2. Snack on nori.
Nori is lightweight and easy to pack yet also nutritious and surprisingly filling.  It’s the perfect thing to throw into your bag for a quick snack at work or on the go, and is a healthy alternative for those with salty cravings. Even your kids will enjoy its crispy texture. Want another great way to use nori? Try these delicious seaweed breakfast wraps!

3. Enhance your smoothies with spirulina.
Powdered seaweed such as spirulina is a great source of natural protein, making it a morning and pre- or post-workout favorite among Health Coaches and smoothie-lovers alike.  Start with a teaspoon added to your preferred smoothie combo (it goes especially well with avocado, banana, or pineapple) and adjust the amount as you get used to it.

4. Add a dash of seaweed flakes to every meal.
Health food stores or Asian markets will have a variety of packaged salts and seasoning that include seaweed. Or you can make your own by combining fine-chopped or ground nori, kombu, dulse, sea salt, black pepper, and sesame seeds. Keep this right along with your most frequently used seasonings and sprinkle it over daily meals.

5. Mix in kelp or kombu to stocks, soups, and stews.
Add seaweed to any savory liquid-based foods! If you make your own vegetable stock from veggie scraps toss in a strip of seaweed and strain it out along with the other ingredients. If adding directly to soups or stews remove the solid strip before serving but don’t worry about any small pieces left in, they’re edible and will enhance the overall meal.

6. Stir it into your salad dressing.
Sprinkle some powdered seaweed into any salad dressing you’re using, allow it to sit for a minute to mix and absorb, shake well, then toss into your salad.

7. Toss together a seaweed salad.
Wakame and arame are best for a salad made predominantly of seaweed.  Combine with vinegar, sesame oil, garlic, and scallions. You can also incorporate other veggies like cucumbers, carrots, or radishes. Experiment to find your favorite combination and share it as a unique side dish at your next potluck.

There are many more ways to eat seaweed but we hope these ideas are enough to get you started so you can try it for yourself.

What’s your favorite way to eat seaweed? Share in the comments below!

Источник: https://www.integrativenutrition.com/blog/7-ways-to-eat-more-seaweed-and-why-you-should

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