is sugar free yogurt good for you

They contain a moderate amount of added sugars, but each flavor is on the Did we miss a good dairy-free yogurt that you can buy? Did you know that references to yogurt and health date back to 6000 BCE? The bacteria convert the sugar in milk, called lactose, to lactic acid. Yogurt is also one of those “health foods” that gained in popularity starting Note that there is no such thing as “sugar-free” yogurt. is sugar free yogurt good for you

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Yogurt is often marketed as a healthy, nutrient dense food. And unflavored plain yogurt can be part of a healthy diet. However, many flavored yogurts contain highly processed ingredients and are loaded with added sugar.

Healthy Flavored Yogurt:

  • Contains minimal added sugar
  • Avoids highly processed gums or thickeners, especially starch
  • Does not contain carrageenan
  • Avoids artificial colors or preservatives
  • Does not contain artificial sweeteners

In its simplest form, yogurt can be an extremely healthy food. Yogurt is made when bacteria ferments the lactic acid in milk. Healthy yogurt contains two ingredients: milk and bacterial cultures.

However, many flavored yogurts tend to have long ingredient lists.  This comprehensive guide covers what to look for in a healthier yogurt as well as what yogurt is best to avoid.

What to look for when choosing a healthy flavored yogurt

1. Healthy flavored yogurts contain minimal added sugar

Healthy yogurts should contain little to no added sugar

Many flavored yogurts contain a lot of added sugar.  In fact, some strawberry flavored yogurts contain more than a tablespoon of added sugar per 3/4 cup serving. That is more than half of the AHA’s daily recommendation of added sugar! 

Read more on recommended daily intake of added sugar and why you want to minimize added sugar consumption.

Recommendation:  The healthiest flavored yogurt is one that you make yourself. Simply buy healthy unsweetened plain yogurt and add fresh fruit. And if you want a slightly sweeter version, add a small amount of your preferred sweetener.  

2. Healthy flavored yogurts minimize gums and thickeners

healthy yogurts should avoid gums and thickeners

Many brands of flavored yogurt contain gums and other thickeners. 

Thickeners and gums are routinely used in packaged food to improve texture, shelf life, and product aesthetics. 

Typical gums and other thickeners in yogurt include guar gum, locust bean gum (also called carob bean gum), agar agar, chicory root gum, fruit pectin, modified food starch, and carrageenan.

Guar Gum.  Guar gum is a polysaccharide (polymer of sugar) extracted from the beans of the guar plant.  Also, guar gum is a soluble dietary fiber that is partially fermented by intestinal microflora.(1) 

Locust Bean Gum.  Locust Bean Gum a polysaccharide extracted from the seeds of the Carob Tree. Also called carob bean gum, locust Bean Gum is soluble dietary fiber that is fermented by intestinal microflora. (2,3)

Chicory Root Fiber.  Chicory Root Fiber is a polysaccharide extracted from chicory root. Also called inulin, Chicory Root Fiber is a soluble dietary fiber that is fermented by intestinal microflora. (4)

Chicory Root Fiber also has a slight sweet taste which is why some manufacturers add it to “reduced sugar” foods.

Fruit Pectin. Pectin is a polysaccharide found in the cell walls of most fruits and vegetables. A common ingredient in jams and fruit preserves, pectin is a soluble dietary fiber that is fermented by intestinal is sugar free yogurt good for you. Gelatin is a polypeptide (polymer of amino acids) derived from collagen. There are no vegan or vegetarian sources of gelatin.(6)

Agar Agar. Agar is a polysaccharide extracted from marine algae. Sometimes just called Agar, agar-agar is a soluble dietary fiber that can be fermented by intestinal microflora.(7)

Recommendation: It is best to avoid foods that contain gums and other thickeners, as they are often highly processed. 

However, occasionally eating small amounts of these gums and thickeners is probably fine, unless you experience gastrointestinal discomfort or are following a specific diet.

Starch and carrageenan are an exception. It is best to avoid both additives.

3. Healthy yogurts do not contain starch

Our bodies rapidly digest starch into sugar. As such, all forms of food starch are considered high Glycemic Index (GI). 

Eating predominantly high-GI foods is associated with chronic disease and strongly associated with heart disease. (8,9)

Types of rapidly digestible starch found yogurt include: modified corn starch, modified food starch, tapioca starch, and corn starch.

Recommendation: It is best to avoid yogurts that contain any added starch.

4. Healthy flavored yogurts do not contain carrageenan

healthy yogurt should not contain carrageenan

Carrageenan is a thickener manufactured from red algae seaweed and is widely used in processed foods. (2)

Though carrageenan is listed as a “generally regarded as safe” food additive by the FDA and WHO, there is growing research that links carrageenan to inflammatory conditions, including inflammatory bowl disease. (10)

In late 2016, the National Organic Is sugar free yogurt good for you Board voted to prohibit the use of carrageenan in organic products.(11)   However, in 2018 the USDA decided to not implement the recommendation and carrageenan is still allowed in organic products. (12)

Recommendation:  Avoid food products containing carrageenan.

5. Healthy flavored yogurts avoid artificial colors and preservatives

healthy yogurt should not contain artificial colors and preservatives

Many flavored yogurts are prepared with natural colors (often from fruit or vegetable juice) and natural preservatives improve appearance and shelf life.

As natural options are readily available, it is captain america endgame shield to avoid yogurts made with artificial colors and preservatives.

For detailed explanation on why it is best to avoid these artificial ingredients, check out this post on choosing healthy breakfast cereal.

6. Healthy flavored yogurts avoid artificial sweeteners

healthy yogurt should not contain artificial sweeteners

Many sweet tasting light yogurts use artificial sweeteners to achieve low calorie levels. However, though these yogurts contain minimal or no added sugar, they are still not a healthy choice.

Typical artificial sweeteners in flavored yogurt include sucralose and acesulfame potassium.

While artificial sweeteners are virtually calorie free and do not contain any added sugar, they still affect our bodies.

Artificial sweeteners can negatively impact our perception of how foods taste. Naturally sweet foods may not taste sweet enough and vegetables taste excessively bitter.(9)

Even more important, artificial sweeteners have been shown to change our microbiome, decrease satiety, and affect insulin secretion.(13) These changes can result in increased calorie consumption and weight gain.

Recommendation: Avoid foods with artificial sweeteners.

Which popular yogurts are healthy?

Strawberry yogurt is the most popular flavored yogurt in the United States. Annual sales of strawberry flavored yogurt are almost 2.5-times higher than vanilla, the second most popular yogurt flavor.(14)

We evaluated top selling strawberry yogurts using the criteria below. (15-29)

Criteria used to evaluate flavored yogurt

Healthy Strawberry Yogurt Evaluation Criteria. Healthy yogurt avoids added sugar and heavily processed gums and thickeners

Yogurt serving sizes vary, from 113 to 170 grams. To compare between brands, all information listed below is for a 150 gram serving, (approximately 3/4 cup), the size of a single serve greek yogurt.

  • Types of added sugar and sweeteners are listed in red
  • Gums and thickeners are italicized
  • Starches are listed in red italics
  • Ingredients that are important to avoid are in bold.

There are few healthier flavored yogurts

The healthiest yogurt contains only two simple ingredients: milk and bacterial yogurt cultures. The ideal strawberry yogurt would contain milk, strawberries, and yogurt cultures.

However, most strawberry yogurts are not a healthy choice.  They contain highly processed gums and thickeners, excessive amounts of added sugar, and some don’t even contain strawberries!

Examples of healthy flavored yogurt:

Unfortunately, no store-bought strawberry yogurts could meet our stringent requirements for a healthy flavored yogurt.

While a couple strawberry yogurts were not sweetened with added sugar or artificial sweeteners, they still contained highly processed gums and thickeners.

Also, there were a few strawberry yogurts that were made with simple ingredients. However, these yogurts contained excessive amounts of added sugar.

Flavored yogurts that are okay to eat occasionally:

okay fruit strips and healthy fruit roll-ups

Many of the flavored yogurts we evaluated fall into the “okay” category.  These strawberry yogurts are probably okay if you eat them occasionally, but you don’t want to eat them every day.

However, if you are following a particular diet which avoids gums or thickeners, you will want to avoid these strawberry yogurts.

As all of these strawberry yogurts contain a thickener of some kind, they are listed in increasing amounts of added sugar.

Wallaby No Sugar Added Aussie Greek Yogurt

wallaby no sugar added aussie greek strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Wallaby No Sugar Added Strawberry Ingredients: cultured whole milk, strawberries, water, strawberry puree, pectin, natural flavor, locust bean gum, cardamom, calcium citrate, lemon juice concentrate.

Fage TruBlend Greek Yogurt

fage trublend strawberry greek yogurt nutrition information

Fage TruBlend Strawberry Ingredients: Strained yogurt (skimmed milk and cream, cultures), strawberries, chicory root fiber, natural flavor, fruit pectin, elderberry juice concentrate (for color).

Oikos Triple Zero Greek Yogurt

oikos triple zero strawberry greek yogurt nutrition information

Oikos Triple Zero Strawberry Ingredients:  cultured nonfat milk, water, chicory root fiber, stevia leaf extract, natural flavors, vegetable juice concentrate (for color), lemon juice concentrate, sea salt, vitamin D3.

Even though Oikos Triple Zero Strawberry Yogurt contains no added sugar, there are still a few reasons to think twice before buying:

  • Thickened with highly processed chicory root fiber
  • Contains stevia. While stevia is a natural non-caloric sweetener, it is significantly sweeter than cane sugar, which may negatively impact how less sweet foods (vegetables & fruit) taste. Also, there is preliminary scientific evidence that stevia may affect gut microbiota composition. (30)

Chobani Less Sugar Greek Yogurt

chobani less sugar greek yogurt strawberry nutrition information

Chobani Monterey Strawberry Ingredients: lowfat yogurt (cultured nonfat milk, cream), water, cane sugar, strawberry puree, natural flavors, fruit pectin, locust bean gum, lemon juice concentrate, fruit and vegetable juice concentrate (for color), guar gum

Stonyfield Organic Yogurt

stonyfield strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Stonyfield Organic Strawberry Ingredients: cultured low fat milk, cane sugar, strawberry juice from concentrate, natural flavor, pectin, vegetable juice concentrate (for color), vitamin D3

Siggi’s Skyr

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Siggi’s Skyr Strawberry Ingredients: skim milk, strawberries, cane sugar, fruit pectin, live active cultures

Strawberry yogurt to avoid:

unhealthy fruit strips and healthy fruit roll-ups

Most flavored yogurts are not healthy options. They often contain too much added sugar or other additives that should not be included in a healthy diet.

It is best to avoid following strawberry flavored yogurts.  Yogurts are in alphabetical order.

Activia Greek Yogurt

dannon activia greek strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Activia Strawberry Greek Yogurt Ingredients: cultured non fat milk, sugar, water, strawberries, modified food starch, black carrot juice is sugar free yogurt good for you annatto extract (for color), carrageenan, natural flavors, vitamin D3, sodium citrate, malic acid

Reasons to avoid Activia Greek Strawberry Yogurt:

  • Sugar is the second ingredient before strawberries
  • 10 grams of added sugar per 3/4 cup serving (150 grams)
  • Thickened with carrageenan
  • Thickened with modified food starch. Starches are rapidly converted to glucose during digestion. which will quickly be digested into glucose

Activia Yogurt

dannon activia strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Activia Strawberry Yogurt Ingredients: cultured reduced fat milk, canesugar, strawberries, modified food starch, milk protein concentrate, gelatin, fruit juice and vegetable juice ( for color ), natural flavors, agar agar, carrageenan, calcium lactate, lactic acid, milk calcium, vitamin D3

Reasons to avoid Activia Strawberry Yogurt:

  • Sugar is the second ingredient before strawberries
  • 7 grams of added sugar per 3/4 cup serving (150 grams)
  • Thickened with carrageenan
  • Thickened with modified food starch. Starches change rapidly to glucose during digestion
  • Also thickened with gelatin, and agar agar

Chobani Greek Yogurt

chobani greek yogurt strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Chobani Strawberry Greek Yogurt Ingredients: cultured nonfat milk, strawberries, cane sugar, water, fruit pectin, locust bean gum, natural flavors, lemon juice concentrate, fruit and vegetable juice concentrate (for color)

Reasons to avoid Chobani Strawberry Greek Yogurt:

  • 10 grams of added sugar per 3/4 cup serving (150 grams)
  • Thickened with highly processed gums and pectin

Dannon Fruit on the Bottom Yogurt

dannon fruit on the bottom strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Dannon Fruit on the Bottom Strawberry Yogurt Ingredients: cultured reduced fat milk, sugar, water, strawberries, modified food starch, gelatin, natural flavor, carrageenan, disodium phosphate, beta carotene and vegetable juice concentrate (for color), malic acid, vitamin D3

Reasons to avoid Dannon Fruit on the Bottom Strawberry Yogurt:

  • Sugar is the second ingredient before strawberries
  • 7 grams of added sugar per 3/4 cup serving (150 grams)
  • Thickened with carrageenan
  • Thickened with modified food starch which will quickly be digested into glucose
  • Also thickened with gelatin

Dannon Light & Fit

dannon light and fit original strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Dannon Light & Fit Strawberry Yogurt Ingredients: cultured non fat milk, strawberries, water, modified food starch, cane sugar, gelatin, vegetable juice (for color), natural and artificial flavors, sucralose, acesulfame potassium, malic acid, sodium citrate, vitamin A palmitate, vitamin D3, active yogurt cultures

Reasons to avoid Dannon Light & Fit Strawberry Yogurt:

  • Contains artificial sweeteners sucralose and acesulfame potassium
  • Contains artificial flavors
  • Thickened with modified food starch, which will quickly be digested into glucose
  • Thickened with gelatin

Dannon Light & Fit Carb Control

dannon light and fit carb and sugar control strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Dannon Light & Fit Carb Control Strawberry Yogurt Ingredients: water, cultured non fat milk, milk protein concentrate, cultured cream, strawberry puree, modified corn starch, modified tapioca starch, whey protein concentrate, natural and artificial flavors, gelatin, sucralose, malic acid, acesulfame potassium, potassium sorbate (to maintain freshness), sodium citrate, red 40, blue 1

Reasons to avoid Dannon Light & Fit Carb Control Strawberry Yogurt:

  • Contains the artificial preservative potassium sorbate
  • Sweetened with artificial sweeteners sucralose and acesulfame potassium
  • Contains artificial flavors
  • Colored with artificial colors red 40 and blue 1
  • Thickened with modified corn starch and modified tapioca starch. Starches change rapidly to glucose during digestion
  • Water is the first ingredient

Dannon Light & Fit Greek

dannon light and fit greek yogurt strawberry nutrition information

Dannon Light & Fit Strawberry Greek Yogurt Ingredients: cultured non fat milk, water, strawberry, fructose, modified food starch, natural and artificial flavors, carmine and black carrot juice concentrate (for color), malic acid, sucralose, potassium sorbate (to maintain freshness), acesulfame potassium, sodium citrate, active yogurt cultures

Reasons to avoid Dannon Light & Fit Strawberry Greek Yogurt:

  • Contains the artificial preservative potassium sorbate
  • Sweetened with artificial sweeteners acesulfame potassium and sucralose
  • Contains artificial flavors
  • Thickened with modified food starch. Starches change rapidly to glucose during digestion

Fage Total Greek Yogurt Split Cup

fage trublend strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Fage Strawberry Yogurt Ingredients: milk and cream, live active yogurt cultures.  Strawberry Fruit Ingredients: strawberries, cane sugar, water, corn starch, strawberry juice concentrate, lemon juice concentrate, natural flavors, fruit pectin 

Reasons to think twice before buying Fage Strawberry Yogurt:

  • Thickened with corn starch, which will quickly be digested into glucose
  • Thickened with fruit pectin
  • 7 grams added sugar per 3/4 cup serving (150 grams)

The Greek Gods Yogurt

the greek gods strawberry yogurt nutrition information

The Greek Gods Strawberry Yogurt Ingredients: cultured milk, canesugar, cream, brown cane sugar, honey, pectin, vegetable juice color, natural flavor

Reasons to avoid The Greek Gods Strawberry Yogurt:

  • 13 grams of added sugar per 3/4 cup serving (150 grams)
  • Thickened with pectin
  • Does not actually contain strawberries, only “natural flavor”

Liberte Yogurt

liberte strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Liberte Strawberry Yogurt Ingredients: cultured milk, cultured cream, cane sugar, strawberries, fruit pectin, fruit juice (for color), natural flavor, live and active cultures

Reasons to avoid Liberte Strawberry Yogurt:

  • Sugar is the second ingredient before strawberries
  • 15 grams of added sugar per 3/4 cup serving (150 grams)
  • Thickened with pectin

Noosa Yogurt

noosa strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Noosa Strawberry Yogurt Ingredients: whole milk, fruit purée (strawberries, sugar, water, natural flavor, pectin, locust bean gum, fruit and vegetable juice (for color), lemon juice concentrate), cane sugar, honey, gelatin, pectin, live active cultures

Reasons to avoid Noosa Strawberry Yogurt:

  • 18 grams of added sugar per 3/4 cup serving (150 grams). This is 90% of the AHA’s recommended daily intake of added sugar for a woman!
  • Thickened with pectin, gelatin, and locust bean gum

Oikos Greek Yogurt

oikos strawberry greek yogurt nutrition information

Oikos Strawberry Greek Yogurt Ingredients: cultured nonfat milk and cream, sugar, strawberries, modified food starch, black carrot juice concentrate and annatto extract (for color), natural flavors, carrageenan, potassium sorbate (to maintain freshness, vitamin D3, sodium citrate, malic acid.

Reasons to avoid Oikos Strawberry Greek Yogurt:

  • Sugar is the second ingredient before strawberries
  • 11 grams of added sugar per 3/4 cup serving (150 grams)
  • Thickened with carrageenan
  • Contains the artificial preservatives potassium sorbate
  • Thickened with modified food starch. Starches change rapidly to glucose during digestion

Tillamook Greek Yogurt

tillamook strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Tillamook Strawberry Yogurt Ingredients: nonfat milk and cream, sugar, water, strawberries, corn starch, natural flavor, lemon juice concentrate, fruit and vegetable juice (for color), guar gum, live active cultures

Reasons to avoid Tillamook Strawberry Yogurt:

  • Sugar is the second ingredient before strawberries
  • 10 grams of added sugar per 3/4 cup serving (150 grams)
  • Thickened with corn starch, which will quickly be digested into glucose
  • Thickened with guar gum

Two Good Yogurt

two good strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Two Good Strawberry Ingredients: cultured reduced fat milk, water, tapioca starch, natural flavors, lemon juice concentrate, gellan gum, sea salt, vegetable juice concentrate (for color), stevia leaf reb m, active yogurt cultures

Even though Two Good Strawberry Yogurt contains no added sugar, there are still a few reasons to think twice before buying:

  • Thickened with tapioca starch, which will quickly be digested into glucose
  • Thickened with highly processed gellan gums
  • Contains stevia. While stevia is a natural non-caloric sweetener, it is significantly sweeter than cane sugar, which may negatively impact how less sweet foods (vegetables & fruit) taste. Also, there is preliminary scientific evidence that stevia may affect gut microbiota composition. (30)

Wallaby Aussie Smooth Yogurt

wallaby organic aussie smooth strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Wallaby Strawberry Smooth Yogurt Ingredients: cultured whole milk, strawberries, cane sugar, water, natural flavors, locust bean gum, pectin, fruit and vegetable juice (for color)

Reasons to avoid Wallaby Strawberry Smooth Yogurt:

  • 12 grams of added sugar per 3/4 cup serving (150 grams)
  • Thickened with locust bean gum and pectin

Wallaby Aussie Greek Yogurt

wallaby organic aussie greek strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Wallaby Strawberry Greek Yogurt Ingredients: cultured whole milk, strawberries, cane sugar, water, natural flavors, fruit and vegetable juice (for color), locust bean gum, pectin

Reasons to avoid Wallaby Strawberry Greek Yogurt:

  • 12 grams of added sugar per 3/4 cup serving (150 grams)
  • Thickened with locust bean gum and pectin

Yoplait Original Yogurt

yoplait original strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Yoplait Original Strawberry Yogurt Ingredients: cultured reduced fat milk, sugar, strawberries, modified corn starch, gelatin, natural flavor, carmine (for color), pectin, vitamin A acetate, vitamin D3

Reasons to avoid Yoplait Original Strawberry Yogurt:

  • Sugar is the second ingredient before strawberries
  • 11 grams of added sugar per 3/4 cup serving (150 grams)
  • Thickened with modified corn starch, which will quickly be bank of america secure sign in into glucose
  • Thickened with gelatin, and pectin

Yoplait Light Yogurt

yoplait light strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Yoplait Light Strawberry Yogurt Ingredients: cultured nonfat milk, strawberries, modified corn starch, sugar, gelatin, citric acid, natural flavor, tricalcium phosphate, potassium sorbate (to maintain freshness), acesulfame potassium, sucralose, red #40, vitamin A acetate, vitamin D3

Reasons to avoid Yoplait Light Strawberry Yogurt:

  • Contains the artificial preservatives potassium sorbate
  • Colored with artificial food color red #40
  • Contains artificial sweeteners acesulfame potassium and sucralose
  • Thickened with modified corn starch. Starches change rapidly to glucose during digestion
  • Thickened with gelatin

Yoplait Greek 100 Protein Yogurt

yoplait greek strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Yoplait Greek 100 Protein Strawberry Yogurt Ingredients: nonfat milk, fruit blend (strawberries, water, fructose, sugar, modified corn starch, pectin, guar gum, vitamin A acetate, citric acid, vitamin D3, malic acid, sodium citrate), natural flavor, vegetable juice (for color), potassiumsorbate (to maintain freshness), yogurt cultures, acesulfame potassium, sucralose.

Reasons to avoid Yoplait Strawberry Greek Yogurt:

  • Contains the artificial preservative potassium sorbate
  • Contains artificial sweeteners acesulfame potassium and sucralose
  • Thickened with modified corn starch. Starches change rapidly to glucose during digestion
  • Thickened with pectin and guar gum

Yoplait Just 3 Yogurt

yoplait just 3 strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Yoplait Is sugar free yogurt good for you 3 Strawberry Yogurt Ingredients: cultured milk, cultured cream, strawberries, cane sugar

Yoplait’s Strawberry Just 3 Yogurt contains real ingredients and avoids fillers, preservatives, and other highly processed ingredients.

However, with 9 grams added sugar per 3/4 cup serving (150 grams), Just 3 still contains almost half of the AHA’s recommended daily intake of added sugar for women.

Yoplait Oui French Yogurt

yoplait oui french strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Yoplait Oui French Strawberry Yogurt Ingredients: milk, cane sugar, strawberries, pectin, carrot juice (for color), natural flavor, yogurt cultures 

Reasons to avoid Yoplait Strawberry Oui French Yogurt:

  • Sugar is the second ingredient before strawberries
  • 9 grams added sugar per 3/4 cup serving (150 grams)
  • Thickened with pectin

Yoplait YQ Yogurt

yoplait YQ strawberry yogurt nutrition information

Yoplait YQ Strawberry Yogurt Ingredients: nonfat milk, milk, cane sugar, strawberry puree, carrot juice (for color), pectin, sea salt, natural flavor, yogurt cultures

Reasons to avoid Yoplait YQ Strawberry Yogurt:

  • Sugar is the second ingredient before strawberries
  • 10 grams of added sugar per 3/4 cup serving (150 grams)
  • Thickened with pectin

Conclusions about choosing a healthy flavored yogurt

When it comes to finding a healthy yogurt, simple clean ingredients are best.  Most flavored yogurts contain too much added sugar and highly processed ingredients. 

If you love strawberry flavored yogurt, it is best to make your own. Find a good, high quality plain yogurt and add some fresh or frozen strawberries.

If you still prefer your yogurt a little sweeter, add a drizzle of maple syrup or honey. Just aim to keep the added sweetener to a teaspoon or so.

Find other healthy snacks and foods

Check out these other evaluations of popular foods and snacks!  Learn which products are healthy and those that are best avoided or only enjoyed as an occasional treat.

Pin article for later:

evaluation of popular strawberry yogurts. Learn what strawberry yogurt is healthy

References:

  1. Re-evaluation of Guar Gum as a Food Additive, EFSA Website, (link)
  2. Products, CPKelco Website (link)
  3. Re-evaluation of Locust Bean Gum as a Food Additive, EFSA Website, (link)
  4. Chicory Root Fiber, Cargill Website (link)
  5. Pectin, Wikipedia (link)
  6. Gelatin, Wikipedia (link)
  7. Re-evaluation of Agar as a Food Additive, EFSA Website (link)
  8. Whole Grains and Fiber, American Heart Association Website (link)
  9. Always Hungry? Conquer Cravings, Retrain Your Fat Cells & Lose Weight Permanently, David Ludwig, MD, PhD (link)
  10. The Role of Carrageenan and Carboxymethylcellulose in the Development of Intestinal Inflammation, Frontiers in Pediatrics, 2017, 5: 96 (link)
  11. “Board Nixes Use of Carrageenan in Organic Food Production”, Food Safety News Website. 2016 (link)
  12. USDA Defies Advisors, Allows Carrageenan to Keep Organic Label, NPR Website, (link)
  13. The Association Between Artificial Sweeteners and Obesity, Current Gastroenterology Reports, December 2017, 19:64 (link)
  14. US Volume Sales of Yogurt in the United States, Statista Website (link)
  15. Wallaby Yogurt Website (link)
  16. Fage Website (link)
  17. Oikos Website (link)
  18. Chobani Website (link)
  19. Stonyfield Website (link)
  20. Siggis Website (link)
  21. Activia Website (link)
  22. Dannon Yogurt Website (link)
  23. Dannon Light & Fit Website (link)
  24. Greek Gods Website (link)
  25. Liberte Website (link)
  26. Noosa Yogurt Website (link)
  27. Tillamook Website (link)
  28. Good Brand Yogurt Website (link)
  29. Yoplait Website (link)
  30. Effects of Sweeteners on the Gut Microbiota: A Review of Experimental Studies and Clinical Trials, Advances in Nutrition, Jan 2019 (link)
Источник: https://feedthemwisely.com/choosing-healthy-flavored-yogurt

01. Mashed Banana

HealthRecipes

Yogurt has an abundance of beneficial nutrients including protein, calcium, vitamin D, B12, magnesium, and potassium.  It is also a very easy way to consume probiotics, healthy “bugs” that thrive in the gastrointestinal system.  Different strains of these probiotics have been shown to help with several issues including:

  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation
  • Immune support
  • Vaginal health
  • Lactose intolerance

Most yogurts contain the phrase “live and active cultures” within the ingredient list and then list several strains included (ie. L. Bulgaricus, L. Acidophilus, etc).

Since yogurt is made from milk, it contains a naturally occurring form of sugar called lactose.  But, most brands also add sugars OR artificial sweeteners (like sucralose, acesulfame potassium, etc) to sweeten them. Because plain yogurt has a slight tang, brands doctor up their yogurt to make them more appealing to the masses.

BUT, as you know, sugar is simply empty calories.  It doesn’t mean we must be sugar-phobic but it certainly does NOTHING to improve our health and only causes more cravings for sugar and spikes in our blood glucose.

While the 5-6 ounce containers of yogurt in the refrigerated section of the grocery store are quite tempting to first commonwealth federal credit union login, there are sooooo many easy ways to sweeten and flavor your yogurt WITHOUT adding any sugar whatsoever!  These individual containers of sweetened yogurt usually contain anywhere from 3-4 teaspoons of added sugar!!  While a couple brands have a little less, there are very few brands that haven’t tainted this nutrient rich food with a heaping dose of sugar.

Right now, nutrition labels list total sugars and do not differentiate between added sugars and naturally occurring sugars.  By July 2018, brands are required to list added sugars on containers in addition to naturally occurring so that consumers can easily make educated decisions about what they want to buy for themselves and their families.  This is a HUGE WIN because there will be less confusion and brands will not be able to disguise sugary foods as “healthy”.

While there are less refined forms of sugar you can add to yogurt like raw honey, agave, coconut sugar, and maple syrup, these are all sources of calories, sugar, and very few nutritional benefits. Sure, they are tasty sweeteners, but still a source of empty calories.

If you have been hesitant to try plain yogurt due to the tang, there is a little trick… instead of buying fat-free yogurt, choose low-fat yogurt (greek or regular).  The little bit of fat actually tames the tartness, making it more appealing for many.  ALSO, make sure that you try a few different brands, as some are better than others.  My favorite brand is FAGE Total 2%- it is creamy and oh so good!

After choosing your favorite plain yogurt, it is time to flavor it up and add some pizazz!  Here are 10 creative and easy ways to transform boring yogurt into a flavorful treat!

You won’t miss the sugar and the sky is the limit to what you can stir up!

 

Super ripe bananas are incredibly sweet and they also mash easily!  A large banana is actually 2 fruit servings so when adding to yogurt, use ¼-½ of a large banana.  Half a banana provides almost 20% of your daily needs for B6 (pyridoxine), a nutrient involved in protein metabolism, immune function, cognitive development and more!  It also contains a healthy dose of manganese (8%) and potassium (5%).  One serving of a banana has virtually no fat, about 2 grams fiber, 60 calories and 15 grams carbohydrate.  There are few things easier than mashing banana in a bowl and stirring in yogurt for an on-the-go breakfast!

According to PBH Foundation, Bananas were the top consumed fruit in 2014 with 46%.  Apples and berries were runners up with 32% and 24% popularity. Bananas are obviously a common fruit being placed in the grocery cart each week.  Creamy mashed banana yogurt is the perfect breakfast pairing for healthy carbohydrate, protein, and fat.

Whether homemade or from a jar, no-sugar-added applesauce is a perfect sweetener for yogurt.  It stirs in easily and is already is most people’s pantry or fridge. Applesauce contains 2 grams fiber per ½ cup serving for only 50 calories.

Make sure to avoid any brands that include sugar, high fructose corn syrup, fruit juice concentrates or any other forms of sugar or artificial sweeteners in the ingredient list.

Curious to try making your own crock pot applesauce?  Try out this recipefrom Registered Dietitian Sally Kuzemchak at Real Mom Nutrition

 

Berries, peaches, plums, melon, mango, papaya,… There are just no limits to how creative you can be in adding fruit to your yogurt!  Use what you have on hand, what is in season or what needs to be eaten before it begins to turn.  Why not add some sweet orange slices and a squeeze of the juice? How about stirring in the leftover fruit salad from last night’s dinner?

 

This warm spice has a touch of sweetness and easily stirs in, enhancing your bowl of yogurt.  It is virtually calorie free and boasts some impressive nutrition benefits.  Cinnamon may increase sensitivity to insulin, helping improve blood glucose control.  Some studies show that it also may help fight inflammation and possibly improve heart health.  While a few sprinkles of cinnamon in your yogurt won’t be a magic cure, it certainly is worth incorporating into meals, particularly yogurt, for great flavor and a hint of sweetness.

 

Extracts are powerful flavor weapons that can transform a boring bowl of yogurt.  There are dozens of extracts you can buy, the most common being vanilla.  You only need a few drops, but they is sugar free yogurt good for you certainly take it up a notch!

Here are a few flavors you might want to try:

  • Almond
  • Banana
  • Cinnamon
  • Coconut
  • Maple
  • Coffee
  • Mint
  • Orange
  • Pumpkin pie spice

These are also tasty in yogurt smoothies!

 

Did you know you can make your own fruit syrup or compote in less than 20 minutes!  It barely takes any attention!  This Super Simple No-Guilt Blueberry Syrupis hardly a recipe.  Blueberries and water… that’s it!  Oh, you do need a small saucepan 🙂  When berries are ripe and sweet, melting them down to develop those rich, candy-sweet flavors is a perfect idea! This syrup thickens in the fridge.  I have even been caught grabbing a spoonful by itself but… NO GUILT… it’s just blueberries!  Your blueberry goodness can be stored in the refrigerator for 5-7 days.

 

Maybe a little bit odd sounding, but sweet potato yogurt is fantastic!  I developed this idea recently after looking for another creative way to help my daughter eat more nutrient dense foods.  We usually bake several sweet potatoes each weekend and eat them during the week.  After noticing an abundance of sweet potatoes in the fridge that needed to be home remedies for gout attack, I decided to try mashing some into yogurt.  I was happily surprised!

Sweet potatoes are practically exploding with nutrition and flavor!  These sweet jewels are jam-packed with vitamin A, Vitamin C, copper, manganese, B-6 and B-5.  Even just ½ cup of mashed sweet potato provides over 3 grams fiber and more than 100% of your daily needs for Vitamin A.  According to the Office of Dietary Supplements, there are no other plant foods (fruits or vegetables) that provide as much vitamin A as sweet potatoes!

Mashed sweet potato yogurt…give it a try…you just might be pleasantly surprised!

 

Many types of fruit can be pureed (just like baby food) to stir into yogurt as a natural fruit sweetener.  Mango (fresh or frozen) is a great fruit that blends in a food processor well, but many others can work great too! Purees can be added directly to a large container of yogurt or stored in a mason jar in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

Sometimes you can find frozen fruit puree with NO ADDED SUGARS/juice concentrates in the frozen section at the grocery store, often near frozen mixed drink ingredients.  If you make your own, simply freeze portions in a small ice cube tray.  Once frozen, place in an air-tight ziplock bag and remove a cube as needed.  It will melt over several hours, keeping your yogurt cold in your lunch box!

 

While these may not add much sweetness to your yogurt, they can certainly add richness, crunch, and decadence!  And, especially when paired with some state farm bank compliance test answers, it turns into the perfect bite hitting all the notes for sweet, savory, and tangy.

Some nut butters are very loose and stir in well, while others are a little thick.  Either way, the is sugar free yogurt good for you is better for it!  Make sure to buy nut butters where the only ingredient is nuts, and maybe a bit of salt- nothing else is needed!  You can include any type of chopped nuts in your yogurt bowl including walnuts, almonds, hazelnuts, peanuts or pistachios.  See what you already have in your pantry.

While the nut nutrition varies depending on the actual type, most nuts are a good source of healthy monounsaturated fats that help improve cholesterol numbers as well as rich in a variety of minerals!

The addition of 1 tablespoon of nuts or nut butter to yogurt adds 50-90 calories and healthy fat that will help keep you full for longer.  If you haven’t tried almond butter, make it a priority!  It has a slightly sweet, nutty flavor that I think is simply divine!  Add a tablespoon today!

 

Dried fruit can be rehydrated and pureed in a food processor to create a sweet paste to add to yogurt (or oatmeal, or even baked goods!).  This might sound complicated but is really quite simple.  I first tried this out about a year ago when my 1 year-old daughter was having some challenges with constipation, but prunes are much more than a constipation cure, they are incredibly sweet and rich in minerals.  You don’t need much to sweeten up yogurt, just a tablespoon or so.

For a super simple recipe to follow to create your own prune or date paste, check out this Eating Well recipe.

SOME OF MY FAVORITE YOGURT PAIRINGS:

Banana Nut Greek Yogurt

6oz low-fat greek yogurt

¼-½ large banana

2 tablespoons chopped walnuts

1/16- ⅛ tsp ground cinnamon

 

Cinnamon Sweet Potato Yogurt

4oz low-fat greek yogurt

¼ cup mashed sweet potato

⅛ tsp ground cinnamon

2-3 drops maple extract (optional)

 

Blueberry Vanilla Almond Yogurt

6oz low-fat greek yogurt

⅓ cup fresh or frozen blueberries

1-2 tbsp slivered almonds

2-3 drops vanilla extract

 

TRUTHHow sweet are Your words to my taste, Sweeter than honey to my mouth!  Psalm 119:103 (AMP)

Источник: http://jenniferhuntnutrition.com/10-ways-to-sweeten-and-flavor-yogurt-without-added-or-artificial-sugars/

Yogurt is a staple food in several cultures, originating from countries in Western Asia and the Middle East. The word yogurt is believed to be derived from the Turkish word “yoğurmak,” which means to thicken, coagulate, or curdle. [1] Historical accounts describe nomadic herdsmen carrying milk in pouches made of animal skins. Naturally occurring enzymes in the pouches that were carried close to the body produced enough body heat to ferment the milk, producing an edible food that lasted longer than milk; thus the introduction of yogurt!

Yogurt is ok google call regions bank when heated milk is combined with bacteria, specifically Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, and left to sit for several hours at a warm temperature (110-115°F). Additional types of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria may be added. The bacteria convert the sugar in milk, called lactose, to lactic acid, which thickens the milk and develops its distinctive tart flavor.

References to yogurt aol online help health date back to 6000 BCE, as seen in Indian Ayurvedic medicinal texts. In the 1900s, the Bulgarian microbiologist Stamen Grigorov discovered Lactobacillus bulgaricus bacillus, a strain of the bacillus bacteria not is sugar free yogurt good for you found in the human gut that caused the fermentation of yogurt. He also researched the specific health effects of lactic acid.

Today, yogurt can be found in a variety of forms—including plain, but often with added fruit or sweeteners. Thickeners and stabilizers such as gelatin and pectins may also be added for a thicker texture and richer taste.

Individuals with lactose intolerance who cannot tolerate dairy products may be able to eat some yogurt because of its lower concentration of lactose. Fermentation by the bacteria breaks down lactose to lactic acid. Another option may be plant-based yogurts, which do not contain lactose.

Source Of 

Yogurt and Health

Yogurt offers several important nutrients including protein and calcium. However, much of the research on yogurt’s health benefits centers on its live bacterial content, which is also present in other fermented foods like kefir, kimchi, and sauerkraut. [2] It has been proposed that a lower number of some bacterial strains in the body may influence risk of certain disease conditions including obesity, type 2 diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, and chronic inflammatory diseases such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. [3, 4] A plant-based diet is associated with supporting a diverse and probably healthier gut microbiota more than a diet low in fruits and vegetables and high in meat, [5] and yogurt consumption may also help to increase microbiota diversity in the gut. [6] Learn more about the body’s microbiome.

Epidemiological research on specific health effects of yogurt is still limited td bank business direct customer service a few studies suggest a benefit. In a study following three large cohorts for up to 20 years that included 120,877 men and women free of obesity and chronic diseases at baseline, yogurt consumption appeared to protect from weight gain. [7] The authors suggested that changes in colonic bacteria from eating the yogurt may have influenced weight changes. Daily yogurt intake may also protect against heart disease and type 2 diabetes. [8,9] Two meta-analyses of prospective cohort studies found an 18% and 14% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes with daily yogurt intake. [10,11] Why yogurt affects diabetes is unclear, but it is believed that helpful bacteria in the yogurt may reduce inflammation or improve the action of the body’s natural insulin.

For Your Health and the Planet’s Health

icon of a globe with a fork and spoon on the sides of itThe production of dairy foods places considerable demand on land, water, and other natural resources, and dairy-producing ruminant animals like cattle, sheep, and goats generate methane—a powerful greenhouse gas. In identifying a dietary pattern both healthy for people and sustainable for the planet, the “planetary health diet” sets the target for dairy foods at 250 grams per day (with a range of 0 to 500 grams per day), which is about one (8-ounce) cup of yogurt.

Purchase

Along with fat content, flavor, and type of milk from which the yogurt is derived (cow, goat, etc.), here are some other terms you may find in the yogurt aisle:

  • Greek yogurt, also called “strained yogurt” or “yogurt cheese.” Yogurt that is strained to remove the whey portion, resulting in a thicker consistency than unstrained yogurt while preserving yogurt’s distinctive, sour taste.
  • Plant-based or non-dairy yogurts. Stemming from the rise in popularity of plant-based non-dairy milks, yogurts made from soy, coconut, nuts, rice, and other plant foods have become more common on supermarket shelves. Note that not all plant-based yogurts undergo fermentation so they may not contain live bacteria. Plant-based yogurts may be lower in protein, calcium, and other nutrients unless they are fortified, so check the Nutrition Facts label if these nutrients are important in your diet.
  • Probiotic. Refers to foods, beverages, and supplements containing specific strains of live bacteria or microbiota. Food manufacturers may add additional probiotic strains for perceived health benefits. However, the exact amount of probiotics and strain of bacteria that yield a beneficial health effect will vary among individuals and is not well-researched.
  • CFUsor colony forming units. The number of living bacteria per gram. This is an indication of how many live bacteria are present in the yogurt at the time of manufacture. Yogurt typically contains at least 1,000,000, or 106 CFUs, which is the minimum needed to display a “Live and Active Cultures” seal on the packaging. This minimum number is the standard provided because it is expected that some bacteria will be destroyed when passing through the digestive tract and exposed to stomach acid. Though food manufacturers often promote the health benefits of multiple strains of bacteria and a high amount of CFUs, with some products offering billions of CFUs, research does not support these claims.

Make

If you want to try making strained yogurt at home, it’s not as difficult as you might think:

  1. Heat 1/2 gallon of milk (may be skim, 2%, or whole). Pour the milk into a 3-quart saucepan and set over medium heat. Warm the milk until almost boiling when small bubbles appear; stir the milk periodically to prevent scorching.
  2. Cool the milk to a warm temperature of about 110°-115° F and transfer to a glass or ceramic bowl. A higher temperature can destroy the bacteria, while a cooler temperature can prevent fermentation.
  3. Whisk into the milk ½ cup plain yogurt with live cultures or a yogurt starter package. Cover the bowl with a lid or clean plate. Wrap the bowl in a towel.
  4. Heat oven to warm setting for 1-2 minutes and turn on oven light. Turn off the oven (leave light on) and place yogurt into oven. Let sit for at least 4 hours but may be left overnight. The oven temperature should be about 110°F.
  5. The yogurt is then ready to use. If you prefer this thinner consistency, refrigerate for a few hours before eating. If you wish a thicker Greek-style yogurt, strain the yogurt. Place a fine mesh sieve over a large bowl and line with a coffee filter or cheesecloth. Pour the yogurt into the sieve and refrigerate for up to several hours, which will strain out the liquid whey and excess water. The yogurt may be stored in the refrigerator for about 7 days.
a cup of yogurt and blueberries

Serve

  • Choose plain and unsweetened yogurt, either strained or unstrained. Add herbs and spices for savory preparations, or fresh fruit and spices like cinnamon, nutmeg, or ginger for a sweeter dish. Top with almonds, pecans, or other nuts for a crunchy addition.
  • For a delicious tzatziki sauce, blend together 1 whole diced peeled cucumber, 2-3 tablespoons lemon juice, 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, 1 garlic clove, 1 tablespoon dill, and a pinch of salt and black pepper. Stir mixture into 3 cups of plain Greek yogurt. Serve as a sauce or a dip.
  • Substitute plain yogurt in recipes calling for sour cream or mayonnaise. Examples:
    • For tuna salad, use half plain yogurt and half mayo. For extra zip, try adding any of the following to taste: Dijon mustard, chili powder, garlic powder, diced dill pickles, or red onion.
    • For a creamy honey mustard salad dressing or marinade, whisk together 1/2 cup 2% plain Greek yogurt, 2 tablespoons yellow mustard, 3 tablespoons honey, 1 tablespoon garlic powder, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, and pinch of salt and pepper.

Did You Know?

  • Greek yogurt did not originate in Greece! Although strained yogurt or straggisto is a staple dish in Greece, the term “Greek yogurt” was first made popular by a commercial yogurt company located in Greece, and later used by other U.S. and European yogurt companies. Britain is the only country that regulates the term, where yogurt must be produced in Greece to carry the title.
  • Some calcium is removed from Greek yogurt during the straining process. Commercial Greek yogurts may add back calcium, but some do not so if you are including Greek yogurt in your diet as a calcium source, be sure to check the Nutrition Facts label.
  • Some yogurts can contain up to 20-25 grams of sugar per 5 oz. container. Though some of this may come from naturally occurring lactose, most will be from added sweeteners. If you see sugar or other forms of sugar among the top four ingredients in the Ingredients list, consider choosing a lower sugar yogurt or use plain yogurt with your own addition of fresh fruit or a drizzle of honey. See Added Sugar in the Diet.

Terms of Use

The contents of this at and t iphone are for educational purposes and are not intended to offer personal medical advice. You should seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The Nutrition How to pay a discover card bill does not recommend or endorse any products.

Источник: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/food-features/yogurt/

Ever scarfed down a cup of yogurt assuming that it'd be a healthy breakfast option, only to catch a glimpse at the nutrition label and realize that it contains as much sugar as your favorite candy bar? Rough.

Believe it or not, tasty low-sugar yogurts do exist. To find them, start checking the ingredients list, says Chesney Blue, a registered dietician nutritionist (RDN) in New Jersey. "Looking at the ingredients in yogurt may be beneficial if you are diabetic and monitoring your carbohydrate intake for better blood sugar management, for weight management, or for other wellness goals," she says. Opting for lower-sugar yogurts can also help you avoid the dreaded post-breakfast sugar crash.

Though there's no industry standard of how much sugar you should have in your yogurt, Blue says that the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend no more than 10 percent of your daily caloric needs should come from 'added sugars.' That means that if you're consuming 2,000 calories a day, 200 calories of that can come from added sugar, though it'll depend on the person. Blue suggests looking for something with 10 grams of added sugar or less per serving. "It’s the added sugar you want to consume in moderation or reduce, to avoid increased inflammation in your body," she explains.

When shopping for for low-sugar yogurts, a good place to start is avoiding fruit-on-the-bottom or candy-topped yogurts, says Blue. One option you can't go wrong with is plain yogurt, adds dietitian Erin Coffield, RDN. "First, whether you like low-fat, whole milk, Greek or Icelandic, any plain unflavored yogurt will contain zero added sugar," she says.

Greek yogurt and Icelandic yogurts also pack more protein, which promotes fullness and satiety. You'll get some natural sugar in them, but nothing else. (Depending on how it's strained, these yogurts can contain anywhere from three to 13 grams of natural sugar.)

Ready to dig into some creamy goodness? Keep these low-sugar yogurts in mind the next time you hit the dairy aisle.

1Chobani Complete Strawberry Greek Yogurt

Chobaniamazon.com

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Blue calls this option a "game-changer." It's tasty without completely throwing you off your health goals." This yogurt uses natural sweeteners such as stevia leaf and monk fruit for its sweetener, so it has 0 grams of added sugars," says Blue. 

Per serving: 120 calories, 2.5 g fat (1.5 g sat), 12 g carbs, 6 g sugar, 55 mg sodium, 3 g fiber, 15 g protein

2Oatly Plain Oatgurt

Oatlyamazon.com

SHOP Contact chime representative you're looking for a great plant-based option, Blue says to go with Oatly. "It’s hard to find plant-based yogurts with less sugar, since sugar is used to better flavor of the product when dairy isn’t used," says Blue. But Oatly’s Plain Oatgurt is a plant-based yogurt you can't pass up, especially if you're a fan of oat milk.

Per serving: 160 calories, 8 g fat (1 g sat), 19 g carbs, 6 g sugar, 10 mg sodium, 1 g fiber, 3 g protein

3Oikos Triple Zero Peach Greek Yogurt

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Blue likes that this yogurt saves calories by using stevia as a sweetener instead of adding on extra sugar. The peachy taste makes this yogurt yummy on its own, but it's also delicious paired with fruit.  

Per serving: 90 calories, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 10 g carbs, 5 g sugar, 65 mg sodium, 3 g fiber, 15 g protein

4Dannon Light & Fit Strawberry/Banana Yogurt

Light & Fitamazon.com

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Though this brand uses the artificial sweetener sucralose for taste, Blue recommends this as a good low-sugar yogurt option. It's creamy and filling, without being a total calorie bomb. The yogurt is only 80 calories per serving and contains less than 8 grams of sugar.  

Per serving: 80 calories, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 8 g carbs, credit one bank mail payment g sugar, 45 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 12 g protein

5Total 2% Milkfat Plain Greek Yogurt

Fageamazon.com

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“I’m pro any plain yogurt,” says Coffield, who personally loves the Fage brand. Since this pick contains a little fat, it's extra creamy and satisfying (and, yes, still low in sugar).

Per serving: 160 calories, 4.5 g fat (3 g sat), 7 g carbs, 7 g sugar, 75 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 23 g protein

6So Delicious Dairy Free Coconut Milk Plain Yogurt Alternative

SO Deliciousinstacart.com

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This vegan yogurt option is made with coconut milk, which makes it another solid plant-based choice, says Blue. Though the yogurt does add in some sugar for sweetness, it doesn't go above 10 grams. 

Per serving: 130 calories, 7 g fat (6 g sat), 25 g carbs, 10 g sugar, 35 mg sodium, 2 g fiber, >1 g protein

7Plain Non-Fat Icelandic Style Yogurt

Siggi'samazon.com

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Because of their straining process, Icelandic yogurts like Siggi's tend to contain the least natural milk sugar (lactose), says Coffield. This way, you can afford to add some natural sweetness from fruit or honey without driving the sugar count up too high.

Per serving: 90 calories, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 6 g carbs, 4 g sugar, 55 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 16 g protein

8Less Sugar Madagascar Vanilla & Cinnamon Greek Yogurt

Chobaniamazon.com

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Though not as low in sugar as Icelandic yogurt, Coffield also recommends this popular lower-sugar option from Chobani. It offers just enough flavor (the vanilla with a hint of cinnamon is the best!), without racking up loads of sugar.

Per serving: 120 calories, 2.5 g fat (1.5 g sat), 11 g carbs, 9 g sugar, 55 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 12 g protein

90% Fat Plain Greek Yogurt

Stonyfield Organicamazon.com

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This plain, fat-free Greek yogurt might be tart, but it plays well with other flavors. 

“I prefer savory flavors, so I often mix it with za’atar or everything bagel seasoning and scoop it up with whole-grain pita or cut-up veggies,” says Coffield.

Per serving: 90 calories, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 7 g carbs, 5 g sugar, 60 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 15 g protein

10Strained Orange & Ginger Non-Fat Yogurt

Siggi'sinstacart.com

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Sure, fresh fruit is the ideal yogurt mix-in, but a trip to the farmer’s market isn’t always possible when sweet cravings strike. 

When she's on-the-go, Coffield sometimes turns to flavored yogurts. "One of my recent favorites is this fat-free orange and ginger Icelandic-style yogurt." For a flavored pick, it keeps sugar reasonable.

Per serving: 110 calories, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 12 g carbs, 9 g sugar, 55 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 15 g protein

11Oikos Triple Zero Vanilla Greek Yogurt

Dannonamazon.com

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For a high-protein, low-sugar snack, Coffield recommends this Greek yogurt, which earns its "triple zero" title because it’s entirely free of fat, added sugar, and artificial sweeteners.

Unlike many yogurts, this one also contains some fiber.

Per serving: 100 calories, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 10 g carbs, 5 g sugar, 65 mg sodium, 3 g fiber, 15 g protein

12Maple Hill Creamery, Organic Cream on Top Yogurt,

Maple Hill Creameryamazon.com

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For a thick, farm-fresh yogurt, grab this pick from Maple Hill. It's not only organic and unsweetened, but the milk is made from grass-fed cows, and won't contain any additives or antibiotics that you don't want in your yogurt parfait. 

Per serving: 170 calories, 10 g fat (7 g sat), 11 g carbs, 11 g sugar, 110 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 8 g protein

Marissa MillerMarissa Miller has spent a decade editing and reporting on women’s health issues from an intersectional lens with a focus on peer-reviewed nutrition, fitness trends, mental health, skincare, reproductive rights and beyond, and currently holds a certificate in plant-based nutrition from Cornell.

Jasmine GomezAssociate Lifestyle editorJasmine Gomez is the associate lifestyle editor at Women’s Health and covers health, fitness, sex, culture and cool products.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Источник: https://www.womenshealthmag.com/food/g29714443/low-sugar-yogurt/

Five reasons you should eat yogurt every day

Scientific studies across Turkey demonstrate that only 35 out of 100 Turkish people consume yogurt regularly. If you are one those who do not eat yogurt, I recommend you to open some space for it in your stomach. I want to share a few scientific information about yogurt to encourage you to include it in your diet.

1 Yogurt acts as an antidote while you are using antibiotics: You must keep in mind that whenever you are using antibiotics; yogurt becomes one of the most important foods in your diet. Although antibiotics destroy disease-causing bacteria while you are sick, they also cause benign bacteria to die. If 40 29 weather fort smith ar want to avoid the side effects of antibiotics you should not forget to consume yogurt.

2 It triggers vitamin B production: Our body can barely produce vitamins on its own. Only vitamins B and K are produced through a biological reaction in our bowels. People who regularly eat yogurt help their furniture stores edmond ok to produce vitamin B in the bowels. Vitamin B regulates the energy balance of the body while protecting you from neural and autoimmune diseases. In order to trigger this magical benefit of yogurt, you must consume it with its water; so I recommend you to buy normal yogurt instead of strained yogurt.

3 It balances your blood sugar: Studies show that the blood sugar levels of people who consume unfermented and non-skimmed yogurt rally. Moreover, as yogurt is a food that is absorbed slowly in the bowels, your blood sugar is affected by it much later. That is why I strongly recommend you eat unfermented and non-skimmed yogurt along with your meal every day.

is sugar free yogurt good for you It is a natural shield against diseases: With the lactic acid it includes, yogurt stands out among other foods. Lactic acid turns inner bowel environment into acid and prevents the production of cancerous cells by lowering the pH of the environment while facilitating the production of immune system booster metabolites. Basically, yogurt is the perfect immune system booster. The lactic acid bacteria in yogurt have important effects in preventing cancer, infections, gastrointestinal diseases and asthma. Regular consumption of daily and fresh yogurt increases the positive affects of yogurt.

5 It eases the digestive system: Lactobacillus bulgaricus is a bacterium which accelerates bowel movement and cannot be found in any food other than yogurt. The lactic acid in the yogurt kills the malicious bacteria in the bowel, preventing diarrhea and helps to create a healthy inner bowel environment. First international bank and trust motley mn other words, we can say that this fermented dairy product is a bowel cleanser. Yogurt increases calcium absorption after being consumed and stimulates the saturation hormone in the bowels as it features high quality animal fat and protein.

MAGICAL FACTS ABOUT YOGURT

1 Since yogurt is a rich source of conjugated linoleic acid, it is a protective food against is sugar free yogurt good for you and breast cancers. Furthermore, conjugated linoleic acid which is one of the most important compounds for boosting the immune system is more useful when it is taken from yogurt instead of pills.

2 By consuming yogurt, you can avoid helicobacter pylori infection, which is recently the main reason for 60 percent of peptic ulcer and stomach cancer cases in the world. Lactic acid in yogurt prevents this bacterium from multiplying and eliminates it in the stomach.

3 Allergic reactions are triggered by IgE (Immunoglobulin E) and it reveals itself on the skin. Yogurt prevents atopic diseases such as dermatitis, asthma and food allergies. As it balances the intestinal flora, yogurt minimalizes the allergic reactions.

4 Yogurt is also important for women's health. The lactobacillus in yogurt prevents the production of candida (a type of fungus) and vaginitis in the vagina. Studies reveal that women who regularly consume yogurt have better vaginal health.

Homemade Yogurt is Healthier


Of course, yogurts produced by industrial and reliable brands are healthy; however, others keybank mortgage sign on more dangerous than you think. The biggest danger is that we do not know what is used in those yogurts. Due to the legal loopholes, fructose and glucose syrup as well as unknown and preservative substances are used by some unreliable companies. Real yogurt should be produced without any preservative substances and its unique features should be preserved with its natural fermentation.

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Источник: https://www.dailysabah.com/health/2014/12/15/five-reasons-you-should-eat-yogurt-every-day

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Yogurt can be a delicious and nutritious breakfast or snack… if you know what to look for on the label. It can also be a sugar bomb masquerading as a health food.

That's right, a lot of yogurts—even the seemingly healthy ones—have a good amount turbo intuit prepaid card extra sugar added to them in order to enhance their flavor. Unfortunately, most Americans are eating too much added sugar, which can lead to health problems such as weight gain, type 2 diabetes, harmful inflammation, and even heart disease.

As you browse the many yogurt options lining the grocery store shelves, prioritize a yogurt that's high in protein and low in sugar. Dairy naturally has some sugar (from lactose), explains Nina Dahan, MS, RD, a registered dietitian in Brooklyn, New York. And, like milk, fruit also has naturally occurring sugars.

In the past, it's been tricky to differentiate how many natural sugars vs. added sweet stuff are pumped into yogurts, but now yogurt brands have to use the new nutrition facts panel. This update requires food manufacturers to specifically list the grams of added sugars in your yogurt, which will help you to choose better-for-you yogurts.

So while you might not find a yogurt that's entirely sugar-free, you can look for products that are low in added sugars (like fruit juice, jams, or sweeteners). "High sugar yogurts can cause you to feel hungrier sooner and drive more morning snacking," adds Dahan.

With this in bb&t and wells fargo, we asked nutritionists and dietitians for their expert advice on how to choose the best low-sugar yogurt brands.

Why choose low-sugar yogurt?

The American Heart Association recommends no more than about 6 teaspoons (25 grams) of added sugar for women, and no more than about 9 teaspoons (37.5 grams) for men. Though a few extra grams of sugar here and there might not seem like much, it adds up quickly. Plus, if you have a diet that's too heavy in sugar it can have an adverse effect on your overall health.

"Overall, low-sugar yogurts are important because we don't want to be consuming too much added sugar on a daily basis. Too much added sugar is not only empty calories, but it also impacts blood glucose and inflammation," explains Amanda Baker Lemein, MS, RD, LDN. "Flavored yogurts are notorious culprits for added sugar, so it's best to get used to unflavored or low added sugar varieties instead."

As ACSM certified exercise physiologist and ISSN certified nutritionist Melissa Morris notes, low-sugar yogurts have all the health benefits the food has to offer without any of the sugar-induced drawbacks. "Lower sugar yogurts are great because you are getting the benefits of eating yogurt without the unnecessary added sugar that most of them have," she says. "Yogurt is a great source of probiotics, which are good bacteria that live in our gastrointestinal tract and keep us healthy. Yogurt is also a source of protein, calcium, vitamin D, potassium, and other nutrients."

How much sugar is allowed in "low-sugar" yogurts?

"There is no industry standard for claiming a food to be 'low sugar,'" says Diana Gariglio-Clelland, RD, CDE with Balance One Supplements. "However, 'reduced sugar' does have a preset standard: it must contain 25 percent less sugar compared to a similar product of the same serving size." In other words, if a Chobani strawberry yogurt contains 15 grams of sugar (which it does), a low-sugar version of that yogurt must have 11.25 grams of sugar or less.

By doing your best to avoid added citizens bank na mobile app, you'll be choosing a protein-packed, calcium-rich yogurt that's also a great vehicle for delivering probiotics to your gut.

Choose better-for-you options from the below list of the best low-sugar yogurts that are nutritionist-approved, arranged by dairy and non-dairy products. (You'll see a lot of Greek varieties here since it can provide twice as much  protein as regular types.)

All of these options have 9 grams of sugar or less.

Dairy Options:

1. Chobani Less Sugar, Gili Cherry

chobani less sugar

PER 5.3 OZ: 110 calories, 2.5 g fat (1.5 g saturated fat), 50 mg sodium, 10 g carbs (0 g fiber, 8 g sugar), 12 g protein

Strained yogurts (like Greek varieties) have more protein and fat, which satiate you and keep you full and fueled for longer periods of time. This Chobani option is great for that reason, plus it contains less sugar.

"Chobani's Less Sugar variety contains 5 grams of added sugar. The sugar from milk isn't counted as added and isn't detrimental to health like added sugars are," says Gariglio-Clelland. "This is a decent option for those wanting to cut back on sugar without eating artificial sweeteners. The protein content is impressive because it's a Greek yogurt, so it's more filling. Plus it's made with 2 percent milk to be more filling than nonfat."

$48.44 (Pack of 12) at Amazon

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2. siggi's Low-Fat Skyr, Cherry

siggis low fat black cherry

PER 5.3 OZ: 120 calories, 3 g fat (1.5 g saturated fat), 35 mg sodium, 9 g carbs (6 g sugar), 14 g protein

Siggi's recently revamped their Icelandic yogurts to be lower in sugar than before, making them a great low-sugar yogurt option. "Like all of siggi's yogurts, it's a strained yogurt, so the protein is higher than traditional yogurts," says Lemein. "This yogurt still has a little fat, which means it will keep you fuller for longer. While some may be avoiding full-fat yogurts, the pre-portioned cup is the perfect size to keep serving sizes in check." As a bonus, "they tell you exactly what probiotics are in there," says Dahan, making it one of her go-tos.

3. Icelandic Provisions Skyr, Vanilla

icelandic provisions vanilla skyr

PER 5.3 OZ: 130 calories, 2 g fat (1 g saturated fat), 50 mg sodium, 13 g carbs (0 g fiber, 9 g sugar), 15 g protein

Icelandic-style yogurt tends to be higher in protein because of the way it's made, and this option has an impressive 15 grams of the satiating stuff per serving. The plain flavors have as little as 3 grams of sugar per serving.

$45.80 (Pack of 12) at Amazon

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4. Danone Two Good Yogurt, Blueberry

two good yogurt blueberry

PER 5.3 OZ: 80 calories, 2 g fat (1 g saturated fat), 35 mg sodium, 3 g carbs (0 g fiber, 2 g sugar), 12 g protein

This yogurt gets its name from the fact that every fruit-flavored variety contains just two grams of sugar. Its low sugar content is a result of the unusual slow-straining process (using reduced-fat milk) employed to create it. "The result is a product with 80 percent less sugar than most yogurts — 2 grams per 5.3-ounce container to be specific," says Sofia Norton, RD. "It comes in a variety of flavors to suit everyone's tastes and is sweetened with stevia, a natural zero-carb sweetener."

5. Wallaby Organic No Sugar Added Aussie Greek Yogurt, Strawberry Rose

no sugar added wallaby organic yogurt

PER 5.3 OZ: 120 calories, 5 g fat (3.5 g saturated fat), 50 mg sodium, 9 g carbs (1 g fiber, 5 g sugar), 11 g protein

As the name states, there's no added sugar here. "The sweet taste of this product comes from natural fruit sugars (fructose and glucose), i.e. it's naturally sweet," says Norton. "It also contains live and active cultures — another praiseworthy feature that can help with gut health."

$1.25 at Whole Foods via Amazon

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6. YQ By Yoplait, Coconut

yq protein yogurt

PER 5.3 OZ: 120 calories, 2.5 g fat (1.5 g saturated fat), 70 mg sodium, 9 g carbs (0 g fiber, 9 g sugar), 15 g protein

As Amanda A. Kostro Miller, RD, LDN, who serves on the advisory board for Smart Healthy Living, points out, this yogurt does contain 7 grams of added sugar. That sweet stuff is in addition to some naturally occurring sugars in the food itself, but it nabbed a spot on this list because it also packs a hefty dose of satiating protein, which can help to stabilize blood sugar levels.

To cut out all added sugars completely, opt for YQ's plain flavor, which has just 1 gram of sugar!

7. Dannon Oikos Triple Zero, Cherry

oikos triple zero

PER 5.3 OZ: 100 calories, 0 g fat (0 g saturated fat), 65 mg sodium, 10 g carbs (3 g fiber, 5 g sugar), 15 g protein

"This yogurt is sweetened with stevia, which is not an artificial sweetener and does not yield calories. This low-sugar yogurt contains 15 grams of protein per serving to keep you full for a long time!" says Miller. "Also, I have personally loved their wide variety of flavors. This can be a great healthier substitute for dessert as well."

According to Amanda Blechman, RD, CDN, and senior manager of scientific affairs at Danone North America, "Oikos Triple Zero is designed to provide an excellent source of high-quality protein to help people build and maintain strong muscles as part of a balanced diet and healthy lifestyle."

8. Clover Sonoma Nonfat Plain Greek Yogurt

best buy hours huntington wv sonoma greek yogurt" width="640">

PER 2/3 CUP: 100 calories, 0 fat (0 saturated fat), 50mg sodium, 9 g carbs (0 fiber, 5 g sugar), 15 g protein

If you're monitoring dietary fat for your heart health, Dahan recommends finding a low-fat or fat-free option with no added sugar since "some of the 4-5% fat yogurts can contribute too much saturated fat." One serving of this certified organic nonfat yogurt contains 15 grams of protein, making it a great option for Greek yogurt fans without the high fat content. If plain seems a little too tart for your tastebuds, you can always use it in savory dishes too, as a healthier sour-cream replacement, or as the base of homemade tzatziki.

Available on Instacart. 

9. Maple Hill's Plain Greek Yogurt

maple hill greek whole milk plain yogurt

PER 3/4 CUP: 150 calories, 7 g fat (3.5 g saturated fat), 65 mg sodium, 9 g carbs (0 fiber, 8 g sugar), 15 g protein

Maple Hill plain Greek yogurt gets major bonus points since it's one is sugar free yogurt good for you the few 100-percent grass-fed yogurts on store shelves. "Grass-fed" means that the milk came from an animal with a more nutritious diet of—you guessed it—grasses. (Think of the phrase "you how to check your account balance on amazon what you eat.") When you consume animal products, some of the nutrients that animal consumed get passed on to you. Plus, grass-fed products are higher in antioxidants and have higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids (the good kind) and lower levels of omega-6s (the bad kind that can increase cholesterol).

Available on Instacart. 

10. Trimona Bulgarian Plain Yogurt

trimona bulgarian yogurt

PER 5 OZ: 110 calories, 7 g fat (4.5 g saturated fat), 55 mg sodium, 9 g carbs (3 g fiber, 5 g sugar), 5 g protein

Another newcomer, Trimona Bulgarina superfood yogurts contain antioxidant-rich lacuma, which adds sweetness, along with monk fruit sugar (a zero-calorie sweetener derived from fruit) that won't spike your blood sugar. Depending on the is sugar free yogurt good for you, you'll get superfoods like maca, chlorella, spirulina, acai, and turmeric mixed in—a nice upgrade to your typical plain yogurt.

Non-Dairy Options:

11.Kite Hill's Plain Almond Milk Yogurt

Kite Hill dairy free almond yogurt

PER 5.3 OZ: 140 calories, 9 g fat (0.5 g saturated fat), 10 mg sodium, 12 g carbs (3 g fiber, 5 g sugar), 4 g protein

Made from low-calorie almond milk, one 5.3 ounce container of Kite Hill's plain yogurt has 140 calories and only 5 grams of added sugar. Plus, you're getting a dose of vitamin E—which works as a powerful inflammation-fighting antioxidant. For those opting for no-sugar, Kite Hill also has an unsweetened alternative.

$9.99 at Whole Foods Market

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12. Laava Blueberry

lava blueberry yogurt

PER 150 G: 160 calories, 11 g fat (7 g saturated fat), 65 mg sodium, 10 g carbs (1 g fiber, 7 g sugar), 2 g protein

Made from the low-carb pili nut, coconut, and cassava (a starchy root vegetable), Laava's yogurt has no added sugar, gums, or fillers. With 7 grams of sugar, it's sweetened with real blueberries and plantains, making it another healthy option for dairy-free folks. This plant-based yogurt is a good option for those sticking to a vegan diet.

13. Forager Project's Unsweetened Vanilla Bean Cashewmilk Yogurt

forager cashew yogurt

PER 5.3 OZ: 110 calories, 7 g fat (1.5 g saturated fat), 5 mg sodium, 9 g carbs (1 g fiber, 1 g sugar), 3 g protein

If you're not a fan of almond milk, cashews offer a creamier alternative. This yogurt from Forager Project combines cashews and coconut for a buttery base, with no added sugar, and the vanilla bean makes it a perfect pairing with fresh fruit.

14. GT's Cocoyo Pure

cocoyo coconut yogurt

PER 4 OZ: 100 calories, 6 g fat (6 g saturated fat), 15 mg sodium, 8 g carbs (0 g fiber, 2 g sugar), 1 g 2016 lexus gs f horsepower is a great non-dairy yogurt option. Though coconut products can be high in calories, this yogurt is only 100 calories for 4 ounces. More importantly, it contains just three ingredients: raw coconut, coconut water, and probiotic cultures. Though we recommend going with plain, if you're looking for a sweeter option, Cocoyo's cacao and vanilla flavors are sweetened with stevia.

Looking to cut back on dairy? Here are 22 expert tips to guide you.

$80.50 (Case of 6) at Walmart

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15. The Coconut Cult Original Probiotic Coconut Yogurt

the coconut cult yogurt

PER 2 TBSP: 70 calories, 6 g fat (6 g saturated fat), 5 mg sodium, 3 g carbs (2 g fiber, 1 g sugar), 1 g protein

For all the benefits of the probiotics found in yogurt with as little sugar as possible, there's almost nothing better than this dairy-free coconut yogurt from The Coconut Cult. The serving size is just 2 tablespoons, but it's packed with 25 billion probiotics from 16 unique strains.

For more, check out What Happens to Your Body When You Eat Yogurt Every Day.

$78.00 (2 16-oz jars) at The Coconut Cult

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Источник: https://www.eatthis.com/best-low-sugar-yogurt/

Tips for Choosing the Best Yogurt for Your Health

 By Catherine Newman

Some basic principles about yogurt – its benefits, pitfalls, types, and traps

When I was a child, way back in the Pleistocene era of the 1970s, there was one brand of yogurt, Dannon, and it came in a waxed-cardboard container, and you knew it was healthy because there were million-year-old Slavic people in the commercial for it, the point being that if you ate yogurt you would live forever. If you liked yogurt, you bought Dannon; if you didn’t like yogurt, you didn’t buy it.

Those were the days! Because now the yogurt aisle is fourteen miles long and more baffling than a word problem about colliding trains. Plus, yogurt is extra-tricky, since it still shines with that gloss of alleged good health – even if it’s flavored with cotton candy and contains as much sugar as your average serving of Laffy Taffy. In other words, you’ve got to watch out for the wolf in yogurt’s clothing. And if you are managing diabetes – or otherwise limiting your intake of sugar and carbs – then the stakes are even higher, and the yogurt aisle can feel like even more of a health landmine.

But yogurt, when it’s good yogurt, is good for you. And eating yogurt is linked with a lower risk of obesity, weight gain, and type 2 diabetes; a 2014 Harvard School of Public Health analysis actually found that eating (plain) yogurt every day was associated with a reduction in risk of type 2 san jose fire department hiring by a significant 18%.

We set out to clarify some basic principles about yogurt – its benefits, pitfalls, types, and traps. After arming yourself with this information, we encourage you to go to the store and take a look for yourself!

Click to jump to a section:

What is yogurt?

Yogurt is made from milk that’s been fermented. And thanks to fermentation, yogurt also contains probiotics, which are bacteria that might play a role in keeping your gut healthy, essentially by crowding out other, less healthy, microorganisms. Some yogurts may claim extra-special probiotic status, but pretty much any yogurt from a refrigerated dairy case is going to contain “live and active cultures,” i.e., bacteria. Please note that “yogurt” in the form of a candy coating (yogurt-covered pretzels, I’m looking at you) is not yogurt and, alas, not healthy.  

According to Alice H. Lichtenstein, executive editor of Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter, “Given the most prominent yogurt choices on the market today, the first criterion should be the amount of added sugar. The best option is to choose plain, unflavored yogurt and customize it to your personal preferences by adding fresh, frozen, or dried fruit and/or flavorings such as vanilla and cinnamon.”

Regular or Greek?

Regular yogurt is made from milk that gets tart and thick, thanks to the added cultures. Greek yogurt is regular yogurt that’s been strained so that it gets even thicker. This thickening actually works to accomplish two things, nutrition-wise: it concentrates the protein which makes it more satisfying and reduces the naturally occurring sugar (lactose), much of which drains out with the whey (the liquid left after straining). One 5.3-ounce serving of Greek yogurt can offer as much as 20 grams of protein (as well as a quarter of your daily calcium needs), making it a satisfying, energy-boosting, and nearly instant meal. (Icelandic yogurt, also called Skyr, is also strained, and similar to Greek yogurt, nutrient-wise.)

The takeaway:

  • Choose Greek Yogurt (or Icelandic Skyr)
  • Look for 12 or more grams of protein per 5.3-ounce (150 grams) serving to help keep you satisfied

Nonfat, low-fat, or whole-milk?

Although researchers are not exactly sure why this is true – and although we’ve been led to believe the opposite for decades – whole-milk products, including yogurt, may actually be better for you than their lower-fat or nonfat counterparts.

Although higher in calories, whole-milk yogurt tends to be more satisfying and lower in natural sugar and added carbs (like thickeners) than lower-fat yogurt. And if all that doesn’t convince you? Higher-fat yogurt is simply richer and more delicious, which means that you’ll be more likely to eat it plain or with as little added sweetener as possible.

The takeaway:

  • Choose Whole-Milk Yogurt (or 2%).
  • Look for 2 or more grams of fat per 5.3-ounce (150 grams) serving.

Plain or flavored?

If you already like plain, unsweetened yogurt, then read no further! You’re all set. Buy it, eat it, love yourself. Because while unsweetened yogurt is a wonderful, nutrient-dense food, sweetened yogurt offers diminishing returns. Sure, it’s healthier than soda – after all, it’s still got protein and calcium – but the added sugar is going to dramatically jack up the carbs hennessy and jose cuervo margarita mix recipe wreak havoc on your blood glucose levels. If you don’t eat your yogurt plain, then look very carefully at the label so that you nsf mcb be certain you’re choosing a yogurt with less than 20 grams of total carbs – and ideally that number will be closer to 15 or even 10.  (For reference: plain, whole-milk Greek yogurt contains 5 to 9 grams of naturally occurring carbs from the milk itself.) Thanks to Nordic tastes, Icelandic Skyr, even in its flavored incarnations, tends to have less added sugar than its American or Greek counterparts.

Some yogurts are sweetened artificially (with aspartame, acesulfame potassium, or sucralose) or with naturally-derived stevia. I’m not a huge fan of artificial sweeteners, but they may be better than real sugar.  

The takeaway:

  • Choose Plain Yogurt (or choose sweetened or flavored yogurt very carefully).
  • Look for 20 or fewer grams of carbohydrates per 5.3-ounce serving (150 grams).
  • Avoid artificial sweeteners (and flavors and colors, while you’re at it) if you can.

Beware any yogurt – especially kids’ yogurt – in 2-ounce tubes or 4-ounce tubs, which might seem to offer a reasonable amount of sugar until you recalibrate the serving size.

For example, converted to 5.3 ounces, a typical yogurt tube would have 30 grams of carbs and only 6 grams of protein. Yikes!

What else might you see on a yogurt label?

  • Thickeners, which might include pectin, gelatin, agar, guar gum, and corn or tapioca starch. These are not inherently bad or harmful, but may impact blood glucose and indicate that a product lacks natural richness.
  • Artificial flavors or colors: avoid these.
  • An indication that the milk is non-GMO, organic, or from cows not treated with rBGH (a growth hormone). These are all good and potentially more expensive things, and you can pay attention to them if your budget allows.
Источник: https://diatribe.org/tips-choosing-best-yogurt-your-health

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