is white cabbage good for you

Vitamin C is perhaps best known for its immune-boosting properties, but did you know that it can also help keep your skin, bones, and teeth healthy. Most of the. Which cabbage color suits you best? While kale and red kale are good sources of this powerful antioxidant, red kale contains around 30% more of. You Can Eat Cabbage! · Also called “common” cabbage by Monash, and sometimes referred to as white cabbage, this cabbage is low FODMAP in amounts of 75 g (¾ cup). is white cabbage good for you

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The Amazing Health Benefits Of Cabbage Interpreted by Dr.Berg

Is white cabbage good for you -

18 Benefits of Cabbage You Should Know

Cabbage is one of the most consumed vegetables in India as well as in other countries. But not everyone knows that is also one of the most nutritious vegetables out there. It is loaded with several essential vitamins and minerals and is good for the digestive system, skin, hair, and immune system. Cabbage also has healing properties which also have a mention in Ayurveda.

Nutritional Profile of Cabbage

The table below states the nutrients present in one cup (89g) of chopped cabbage.

Principle NutrientsNutrient Content
Carbohydrates5.16 g
Protein1.14 g
Total Fat0.09 g
Dietary Fibre2.5 mg
Energy22 kcal
Vitamins
Folates38 mcg
Niacin0.234 mg
Vitamin A98 IU
Vitamin C32.6 mg
Vitamin K69 mcg
Electrolytes
Sodium16 mg
Potassium151 mg
Minerals
Calcium36 mg
Iron0.42 mg
Magnesium11 mg
Phosphorous23 mg
Zinc0.16 mg

Table source: https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/11109

Health Benefits of Cabbage

Here are 20 benefits of eating cabbage regularly:

1. Lowers the Signs of Ageing

Cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables contain a high amount of Vitamin C and E, which help in the production of collagen, the compound which keeps the skin elastic and wrinkle-free. Vitamin A along with Vitamin D protects the skin and gives you a youthful skin.

Woman holding a cabbage

2. Helps Fight Free Radicals

Cabbage is rich in antioxidants. Antioxidants help fight oxidative damage caused by free radicals and prevent a whole range of ailments.

3. Speeds Up the Recovery Process

Cabbage leaves are used as a poultice. Using these leaves can ease skin eruptions caused by acne, psoriasis, eczema, ulcers, wounds, insect bites and rashes. Grated leaves or blended leaves can be applied directly over the affected area with some dressing for faster healing.

4. Improves Complexion

Cabbage can also cure acne and other skin conditions. Some steamed cabbage leaves compressed in a cotton cloth can be placed on the affected area overnight for best results. The high levels of potassium and Vitamin A also improve complexion.

5. May Provide Relief From Allergies

Cabbages and other cruciferous vegetables of its kind contain anti-inflammatory properties. They are rich in sulforaphane and glutamine which are powerful anti-inflammatory agents. Regular consumption can ease health conditions worsened by inflammation such as allergies, irritation, fever, joint pain and skin disorders.

6. May Prevent Cancer

The Brassica vegetables such as cabbage contain a significant amount of glucosinolates that have strong anti-cancer properties. These compounds scavenge free radicals which are bad for health and contribute to cancers of different kinds. Red cabbages are particularly loaded with compounds such as sinigrin, lupeol and sulforaphane with anti-cancer properties.

7. Good for the Digestive Tract

Cabbage is high in fibre, which makes it healthy for the digestive tract. Eating cabbage can provide relief from constipation. This is very effective in treating constipation and related gastrointestinal disorders.

8. Promotes Weight Loss

As cabbage is loaded with essential nutrients and contains almost no calories or fats, hence it is perfect for people who are on a weight loss diet. If you don’t like to eat cabbage in the form of vegetable, you can drink cabbage juice.

Weight loss with cabbage

9. Protects the Eye

Vitamin A which is an essential nutrient for our eyes is present in cabbage and helps maintain good vision. The beta-carotene, an antioxidant present in cabbage is also helpful in preventing macular degeneration and delay the onset of cataracts.

10. Improves the Health of Hair

Cabbage being rich in many of the essential nutrients helps maintain healthy hair and prevents hair fall. It also prevents dry hair and protects the hair strands from physical damage. Vitamin C which is found in cabbage is essential for the production of the protein keratin which primarily makes up the hair and nails in the body.

11. Improves the Health of the Heart

Red cabbages are rich in compounds called anthocyanins which give them their characteristic purple colour. Studies have shown a link between diet consisting of foods rich in these compounds and lowering of heart disease. Along with this, cabbages are also good sources of potassium and calcium essential for healthy functioning of the heart.

12. Good for the Brain

Cabbage is also brain food. Vitamin K and anthocyanins in cabbage promote mental function and focus. Vitamin K is also important to protect the nerve cells from damage and prevent degenerative diseases. Cabbage is also a rich source of iodine which is an essential nutrient for the brain.

13. Helps Strengthen the Bones

Cabbages are abundant sources of nutrients that are necessary for building strong bones. They are loaded with calcium, magnesium, and potassium which are all essential for strengthening the bones. Eating cabbage may also help in warding off diseases such as osteoporosis.

14. Regulates Blood Pressure

Red cabbage is an abundant source of anthocyanins which is known to lower blood pressure. Eating cabbage regularly helps maintain normal blood pressure and decreases the risk of heart diseases.

15. Good for Diabetic Patients

The potassium present in cabbage is not only good for lowering blood pressure but helps maintain blood sugar levels. It also improves mental well being by reducing stress and anxiety.

16. Good for Pregnant Women

Cabbage is an abundant source of folates. Folates are critical nutrients required in the early developmental stages of the foetus. The absence of folates can cause neural tube defects and other congenital disabilities in babies. Hence, this vegetable is good for pregnant women. However, it should not be consumed raw as eating raw or uncooked may lead to premature delivery or even miscarriage.

17. Boosts Immunity

Being loaded with Vitamin C and antioxidants, cabbage helps boost immunity. It supports the immune system and fights off various diseases.

18. Helps Treat Peptic Ulcer

The presence of anti-inflammation compounds such as glucosinolates helps reduce peptic ulcers in the stomach. Cabbage juice is a remedy for ulcers. It eases the inflammation in the stomach lining and speeds up the recovery process.

Peptic ulcer

Tips to Select and Store Cabbage

To get the most out of cabbage, you must first choose the best ones from the market. Here’s how to pick good cabbages:

  • Cabbages are available all year round in supermarkets. Look for ones that are large, dense, and firm. They should have colourful leaves that are crisp and shiny without bruises, blemishes or insect bites. They must also feel heavy for their size.
  • Tightly packed leaves at the bottom of the cabbage indicate freshness. If they are starting to separate from its stem, the cabbage is old. Don’t buy it if it seems old.
  • Shredded cabbage or which is already cut in half should be avoided as they would have lost their Vitamin C content.
  • To retain their freshness and Vitamin C level, it’s essential to keep them cold in a refrigerator.
  • Cabbages that are stored in plastic bags in a refrigerator can be stored for a week or two.
  • Cabbages with loose leaves will not last too long and are best stored in a cool dark place.
  • In case you need half a cabbage, the other half should be wrapped in a plastic bag with some water sprinkled on the cut side and refrigerated.
  • Another way to store cabbage effectively is to freeze it. First, shred the cabbage and blanch the shreds for two minutes. Filter out and freeze the shreds in an airtight container.

How to Cook Cabbage

You can include cabbage in soups, salads and casseroles. It can be boiled, fried, stuffed, steamed or even eaten raw. Here are some healthy ways to cook cabbages:

  • A simple cabbage dish can be made by boiling some water and adding chopped cabbage to it. Add sugar and sprinkle some meat seasoning and simmer for 35 minutes.
  • Grated cabbage can be cooked in milk for 3 to 4 minutes and seasoned with pepper and salt.
  • A low-calorie cabbage dish involves cooking cabbage leaves in a mixture of mustard and cucumber juice. Steamed cabbage and other vegetables can be diced and added to it. Cook until the cabbage is a little crispy.
  • Shred red cabbage into fine pieces and add sliced apples and a bit of vinegar. Cook for 1 minute.
  • To make stuffed cabbage rolls, remove the core and stuff it with vegetables of your choice. Cook for 3 minutes until it is soft and serve with a spicy sauce.
  • For a quick and delicious dish, stir-fry sliced cabbage with ginger, garlic, chillies and a bit of soy sauce.

Cabbages also have a few side effects like any other vegetable, some of them include:

FAQs

1. What Are the Different Varieties of Cabbage?

There are 7 varieties of cabbage – red cabbage, Choy sum, Bok choy, Savoy cabbage, Napa cabbage, Cannonball cabbage, January king cabbage.

2. Can I Eat Raw Cabbage Daily?

Yes, cabbage can be consumed every day in small to moderate quantities.

Cabbage is an amazing vegetable loaded with plenty of essential nutrients. Since it can be incorporated into so many foods, you can reap its benefits every day.

Also Read:

Best Foods to Boost Your Metabolism
Unbelievable Health Benefits of Green Chillies
Benefits of Eating Garlic on Empty Stomach

Aarohi Achwal

Источник: https://parenting.firstcry.com/articles/magazine-20-benefits-of-cabbage-you-may-not-be-aware-of/

Did you know the USDA reports cabbage is the second most economical vegetable, (after potato), on your grocery list? With lots of beneficial vitamins and nutrients, you’ve got a munch-worthy veggie to bring to the table.

Humble Head of Cabbage

 

Say hello to a most-underused vegetable with a list of health benefits that may surprise you. These cruciferous vegetables derived their name from the shape of their flowers, which have 4 petals resembling a cross. This family of vegetables also includes cauliflower, broccoli, bok choy, kale, kohlrabi, collard and mustard greens, and of course, Brussels sprouts.

Some may find Brussels sprouts or broccoli bitter. Substitute cabbage, since it has all the health benefits of other cruciferous vegetables, but with a milder flavor.

Cabbage is known for its high antioxidant content like vitamin C, vitamin K and other nutrients whose names you may not recognize. Researchers have found 20 different flavonoids and 15 different phenols with antioxidant properties. Cyandins in red or purple cabbage protect against cholesterol from clogging the arteries. They lower inflammation and can prevent heart disease. Sinigrin is a sulfur compound that has been shown to protect against cancer. Studies show those who consume cabbage regularly have the least risk for developing diabetes. Cabbage is high in carotenoids like lutein, which helps protect your eyes from developing macular degeneration as you age.

You don’t have to know the names of all the good things in your cabbage–just eat it! To get the most benefit, try to consume ½ to ¾ cup cooked or 1 ½ cup raw cabbage per day at least 5 days per week.

This is pretty easy to do since there are so many ways to prepare cabbage. Traditional methods of steaming or boiling cabbage can extract flavor and nutrients. Sautéing or roasting bring out sweetness and texture while retaining nutrition. Just roast a side dish of cabbage with a little olive oil. Cook cabbage in soups or stews. Use the leaves (cooked or raw) like bread or tortillas to hold sandwich fillings, meat, beans or rice dishes, or bake up delicious stuffed cabbage rolls. Cabbage can be used to make raw slaw salads with vinegar or dressing, or just tossed it into raw green salads. It’s easy to ferment cabbage to make sauerkraut. All you need is cabbage, salt and about a week’s worth of patience. The OSU Extension office has all these recipes for kraut, relishes, and other recipes using cabbage.

Not only is cabbage a superstar in promoting health, it is also affordable. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has found cabbage to be the 2nd most economical vegetable (potatoes came in 1st). One head of uncut cabbage can last in the refrigerator for several weeks. Just peel off wilted layers to reveal perfect leaves underneath. Cut in half and remove the white core. Then slice and cook or enjoy raw. However you use it, add cabbage to your list of super foods.

Shopping Tips

 

A good cabbage should feel heavy for its size.

A bag of shredded cabbage will save you time, but usually costs you more than an uncut head and might not keep as long.

Sauteed Cabbage Recipe

 

Ingredients:
1 1⁄2 tablespoons margarine
1⁄2 head cabbage, shredded (about 6 cups) 2 carrots, grated (about 11⁄2 cups)
1⁄2 teaspoon salt
1⁄4 teaspoon pepper

Directions:
1. In a large skillet heat margarine until foamy. Add cabbage and carrots.
2. Sauté over high heat until tender but crisp, about 4-6 minutes.
3. Add salt and pepper and serve warm.
4. Refrigerate leftovers within 2 hours.

Notes: Enjoy the sweet mild flavor of cooked cabbage or spice it up with your favorite seasoning!

PDF recipe download includes shopping and cooking notes plus Tuna Cabbage Salad and Dutch Red Cabbage with Apples recipes.


“Humble Head of Cabbage” article by Stephanie Polizzi, MPH, RDN. Recipe and fact sheet provided by Oregon State University Extension Service with Healthy Bytes Community Networking Initiative.

You may also like our blog post with spinach recipes.

Leave a reply
Источник: https://www.coastcommunityhealth.org/cabbage-health-benefits/

Red Cabbage: The Disease-Fighting, Gut-Healing Superfood

Fact Checked

This Dr. Axe content is medically reviewed or fact checked to ensure factually accurate information.

With strict editorial sourcing guidelines, we only link to academic research institutions, reputable media sites and, when research is available, medically peer-reviewed studies. Note that the numbers in parentheses (1, 2, etc.) are clickable links to these studies.

The information in our articles is NOT intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

This article is based on scientific evidence, written by experts and fact checked by our trained editorial staff. Note that the numbers in parentheses (1, 2, etc.) are clickable links to medically peer-reviewed studies.

Our team includes licensed nutritionists and dietitians, certified health education specialists, as well as certified strength and conditioning specialists, personal trainers and corrective exercise specialists. Our team aims to be not only thorough with its research, but also objective and unbiased.

The information in our articles is NOT intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

By Rebekah Edwards

March 20, 2018

Red cabbage - Dr. Axe

Just about everyone has eaten cabbage at one point or another in his or her life, whether as a New Year’s tradition or as part of the regular diet. But did you know that not all cabbage is the same? It’s true. Red cabbage is not the same as green cabbage, and I’m not just talking about color.

Red cabbage, also known as purple cabbage, is a cruciferous vegetable that’s delicious both raw and cooked. It’s often eaten raw in salads, steamed, braised or sautéed with other vegetables. It’s also referenced as red kraut or blue kraut and can provide the much-needed benefits of probiotics in this form due to the fermentation process. In addition, the insoluble fiber from red cabbage is known to prevent constipation, lower the risk of developing diverticular disease and may help relieve symptoms of some gastrointestinal conditions, such as IBS symptoms.

But that’s not all: Red cabbage benefits extend even further, as you’ll learn below — and why you want to include this tasty veggie in your rotation.


Red Cabbage Benefits

1. Boosts the Immune System

Red cabbage contains ever-so-important vitamin C, a crucial antioxidant needed in order for our bodies to have strong immune systems. It stimulates the activity of white blood cells, forming the first line of defense for the immune system. Nutrient-dense antioxidants such as vitamin C are known to have high antioxidant potency to assist in minimizing harmful effects of reactive species. As one of the top vitamin C foods on the planet, red cabbage is a major immune system booster.

The immune system is extremely vulnerable to oxidant and antioxidant balance, as uncontrolled free radical production can impair its function and defense mechanism. These free radicals can form in the body and promote tissue damage. However, antioxidants are the perfect defense mechanisms for the immune system and can help fight off intruders, including cancer. Additionally, vitamin C is important in the formation of collagen, which keeps our bodies and cells connected and solid. (1)

Due in large part to its vitamin C content, red cabbage is a high-antioxidant food that fights free radical damage and strengthens the immune system.

2. Fights Inflammation and Arthritis

Red cabbage contains phytonutrientsthat may help reduce chronic inflammation. (2) One compound in red cabbage that may be responsible is sulforaphane (found in many cruciferous vegetables), a potent inflammation killer. (3)

According to The Arthritis Foundation, eating a diet filled with anthocyanin-rich fruits and vegetables like red cabbage should be a part of an arthritis patient’s daily regimen. These type of anti-inflammatory foods may help naturally treat arthritis inflammation and arthritic complications. (4)

3. Aids Healthy Bones and Reduces the Risk of Osteoporosis

Red cabbage is a vitamin K-rich food, and we know that vitamin K increases the amount of a specific protein required to maintain bone calcium, thus reducing the risk of osteoporosis. Women, in particular, seem to have higher bone density when eating a diet high in vitamin K. (5)

Some research indicates vitamin K supplementation may effectively promote new bone fractures and help sustain bone density, which is why red cabbage is a good addition to an osteoporosis diet. (6)

During the first twenty or so years of life, skeletal tissue continues to form. From that point until about age 40, your body maintains the bone mass you have at 20. Women experiencing menopause will then experience a rapid decline in the density of their bones, with men finally joining in around age 70. The less strong your bones become, the more likely you are to experience fractures. These fractures debilitate older people and are among the leading causes of lost mobility (becoming bedridden), which can then drastically decrease the ability to live a healthy life. That’s why vitamin K-rich foods like red cabbage are so important to help maintain bone health and delay or prevent osteoporosis. (7)

4. Combats Chronic Disease

During the course of the normal human life, cell degeneration will happen no matter how healthy you live. However, by filling your diet with foods high in antioxidants, you can give your body the best chance possible at preventing and combating serious chronic diseases. As a Brassica vegetable, red cabbage is one of those antioxidant-rich foods, with an ORAC value of 2,496 when raw and 3,145 when boiled. Brassica vegetables like red cabbage, kale and broccoli are thought to aid the body in preventing chronic diseases like cancer, heart disease and diabetes. (8)

In a laboratory study from the University of Auckland in New Zealand, researchers compared antioxidant potential of six plants high in anthocyanins (flavonoid pigments that give plants a blue, red or violet hue). Red cabbage, along with four of the other five plants, had significant antioxidant activity and successfully protected against one type of internal DNA damage caused by a specific colon cancer cell line, suggesting red cabbage may be a cancer-fighting food. (9)

5. Promotes a Healthy Gut

We know that probiotic foods provide a good dose of much-needed good bacteria that our digestive systems crave, but what does that have to do with red cabbage? I’m sure you have heard of kimchi. Most kimchi is made from green cabbage, but kimchi made from red or purple cabbage is becoming more popular. Kimchi is a traditional Korean fermented food — in fact, it’s one of the most popular vegetable probiotic foods in the world.

Probiotic-rich foods like kimchi support gut health by supporting the growth of healthy bacteria, protecting against leaky gut syndrome and boosting immunity. According to scientists at Pusan National University in Korea, kimchi may also protect against obesity, blood clots, age-related degeneration, neurodegeneration and even skin issues. (10)

Related: Tatsoi: The Immune-Boosting, Heart-Healthy Benefits of ‘Vitamin Green’

Red cabbage benefits - Dr. Axe

Related: Iceberg Lettuce: Healthy Leafy Green or Nutrient-Poor Filler?


Red Cabbage Nutrition

One cup (89 grams) of chopped, raw red cabbage has about: (11)

  • 28 calories
  • 7 grams carbohydrates
  • 1 grams protein
  • 2 grams fiber
  • 50.7 milligrams vitamin C (85 percent DV)
  • 34 micrograms vitamin K (42 percent DV)
  • 993 IU vitamin A (20 percent)
  • 0.2 milligram manganese (11 percent DV)
  • 0.2 milligram vitamin B6 (9 percent DV)
  • 216 milligrams potassium (6 percent DV)
  • 0.1 milligram thiamine (4 percent DV)
  • 0.1 milligram riboflavin (4 percent DV)
  • 16 micrograms folate (4 percent DV)
  • 40 milligrams calcium (4 percent DV)
  • 0.7 milligram iron (4 percent DV)
  • 14.2 milligrams magnesium (4 percent DV)

Red Cabbage vs. Green Cabbage

While both red and green cabbage are good for you, red cabbage packs a more powerful nutritional profile. For example, red cabbage contains about 85 percent of the daily vitamin C our bodies need, while the green variety provides 47 percent. In fact, red cabbage has more vitamin C than oranges, believe it or not.

Red and green cabbage are two different cabbage varieties, but they have a similar flavor. Red cabbage tends to be more peppery and is usually smaller and denser than green cabbage heads. The leaves of the red cabbage are dark purple or reddish, which comes from the pH levels of the soil in which it’s grown, as well as the pigment that comes from the nutritionally valuable anthocyanins in contains.

In acidic soils, the leaves usually grow more reddish, while in neutral soils, they grow more purple. This explains why the same plant is known by different colors in various regions. Red cabbage needs well-fertilized soil and sufficient humidity to grow at its best. It’s a seasonal plant, seeded in spring and harvested in late fall.

It’s also important to note that red cabbage is ranked fifth in the Clean 15 on the Environmental Working Group’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce, noted as one of the fruits and vegetables with the lowest amount of pesticide residues. However, if you are concerned at all about pesticide use, go for organic cabbage. (12)

Here’s a little more on how red and green cabbage stack up based on a one-cup serving:

Vitamin A

Red cabbage contains 10 times more vitamin A than green cabbage. Vitamin A helps prevent early stage age-related macular degeneration from progressing due to lutein and zeaxanthin, which function mainly as eye-supporting antioxidants. It may also aid aid in keeping the skin and immune system healthy. Vitamin A can help maintain healthy teeth, skeletal tissue and mucous membranes. (13)

Vitamin K

Green cabbage contains almost twice as much vitamin K as red cabbage. Vitamin K regulates bone mineralization by increasing bone density and helps the blood to coagulate.

Vitamin C

Both contain a good amount of vitamin C, which provides antioxidants and collagen protein. The body needs vitamin C to help repair wounds and injuries as well as keeping bones, cartilage and teeth strong and healthy.

Iron

Red cabbage has double the iron of green cabbage. Iron delivers oxygen to your cells, which helps your muscles perform well during exercise and general day-to-day activities. Lack of iron in your diet could cause anemia, leading to fatigue.

Anthocyanins: Only in Red Cabbage

Red cabbage is the winner when it comes to antioxidants. Red cabbage contains anthocyanin pigment, which is not found in green cabbage. The purple color in red cabbage comes from anthocyanins, and these nutrients provide further evidence of the cancer-fighting flavonoids it contains. Anthocyanins are noted in research studies for protection against various types of memory loss, as well as other disease-preventing benefits like the ones I discussed above. (14, 15)


The Science and History Behind the Red Cabbage

As I mentioned above, the purple color of red cabbage is thanks to the anthocyanin pigments in contains. Depending on the acidity of the soil in which a plant containing anthocyanin is grown, this pigment can look red, purple or even blue.

While green cabbage still offers great aids to health, the color of red cabbage is what makes it the clear winner in overall antioxidant load. Plant geneticists at Cornell University believe that since “the amount of total anthocyanins in red cabbage was found to be a direct correlation to the total antioxidant power it provides, [this implicates] the potential health benefit of red cabbage to human health.” (16)

Red cabbage has a rich and well-documented history dating back to the height of Roman and Greek society, although some sources believe it’s been cultivated thousands of years even before those cultures wrote about it. The original version of the wild cultivar of red cabbage was grown originally in the Mediterranean region.

Many figures in history have contributed to the popularity of cabbage, including the Roman statesman, Cato, who is probably the person responsible for creating the cole slaw dish when he insisted on eating raw cabbage with vinegar. Pliny the Elder, a famous Roman citizen who served in the military, wrote philosophy and recorded common health practices of the ancient Romans, wrote about cabbage in Natural History, noting its medicinal properties both as a food and in poultice form. (17)

Although the first official record of cabbage didn’t appear until 1536 in Europe, it’s thought the Celts of the central and western parts of Europe may be even more responsible for the booming cabbage business dating back even before the Romans and Greeks. People in the southern parts of the Mediterranean probably developed cultivars of cabbage that could stand warmer temperatures than its original home.

Jacques Cartier likely brought cabbage to the Americas in the 1540s, where it was re-planted by colonists in the United States. However, it was 1669 before this plant would be written about in pre-United States records. Native Americans and United States citizens alike were known to plant and eat this valuable veggie by the 18th century.

The original shape of cabbage, referred to as “round-headed,” has given way through the years to a number of other cabbage shapes, including flat-headed, egg-shaped, conical and pointed. (18)


How to Use Red Cabbage

There are numerous ways to prepare red cabbage, such as red cabbage slaw, braised red cabbage, steamed red cabbage or simply eating it raw in salads. When cooking, red cabbage normally turns blue. However, if you want to retain the red color, you need to add apple cider vinegar or acidic fruit to the pot.

Like most plants that we eat, once heated, the nutritional benefits begin to diminish. A study was conducted showing just how this works with red cabbage. The results of this comparison of the difference between steaming, microwaving, boiling and stir-frying cabbage found that every cooking method decreased the overall nutrition and anthocyanin capacity of red cabbage. Steaming, though, did help retain a good amount of other antioxidants and vitamin C.

According to these researchers, Asian cooking methods may be your best bet if you do choose to cook cabbage. While eating it raw will avoid any loss of nutritive value, by using less water and shorter cooking times (particularly using a steaming method, not microwaving or boiling the cabbage), can still provide you plenty of nutritional punch. (19)

Also, lightly rinsing but not scrubbing the cabbage totally clean allows you to retain important gut-enhancing bacteria that come from eating dirt.


Red Cabbage Recipes

You can integrate red cabbage into many different types of recipes. Try the following red cabbage recipes to reap the nutritional rewards:


Final Thoughts

Red cabbage is a cruciferous vegetable that has many proven benefits, including:

  1. Boosts the immune system
  2. Fights inflammation & arthritis
  3. Improves bone strength & reduces osteoporosis risk
  4. Combats chronic disease
  5. Strengthens gut health

While both red and green cabbage are good for you, red cabbage packs a more powerful nutritional profile and more overall antioxidants. For example, red cabbage contains about 85 percent of the daily vitamin C our bodies need, while the green version provides 47 percent.

Eating raw red cabbage is the best way to get the full impact of its nutrition; however, if you choose to cook it, I recommend steaming with as little water as possible for a short cooking time.

Источник: https://draxe.com/nutrition/red-cabbage/

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Red cabbage is healthy and scores highly

Ingredients for marinated red cabbage

  • 1 medium-sized red cabbage (approx. 600g)
  • 2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tbsp. water
  • 1 tbsp. agave syrup
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. cumin or caraway

Also needed

  • 4-6 tortillas (your preference)
  • 1 bunch of spring onions
  • 1 bunch of parsley (flat-leaf)
  • 3 tbsp. walnuts (chopped)
  • 2 tbsp. pistachios (chopped and unsalted)

Pear hummus

Method: Place 2-3 tbsp. chickpeas aside for decoration. Place the rest of the chickpeas in a powerful mixer. Wash the pear, halve and remove the core. Dice the pear roughly and place in the mixer. Add tahini, olive oil, cumin, salt and lemon juice and blend at high-speed into a creamy hummus.

Ingredients:

  • 250g chickpeas, cooked
  • 1 pear
  • 2 tbsp. tahini
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp. cumin
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 garlic clove (crushed)
  • 1- 2 tbsp. lemon juice
Источник: https://www.css.ch/en/private-customers/my-health/nutrition/healthy-recipes/red-cabbage-healthy.html
A close up picture of a variety of cabbages, at the top of the vertical frame are dark green curly vegetables, to the right is a light green variety with white stems, and to the bottom a red variety cut in half. Across the center and bottom of the frame is white and green text.

Despite looking a lot like lettuce, cabbage is actually a member of the Brassica genus of vegetables, along with broccoli, kale, cauliflower, and brussels sprouts.

A close up picture of a variety of cabbages, at the top of the vertical frame are dark green curly vegetables, to the right is a light green variety with white stems, and to the bottom a red variety cut in half. Across the center and bottom of the frame is white and green text.

We link to vendors to help you find relevant products. If you buy from one of our links, we may earn a commission.

There are several varieties, which can come frontier bank of texas different colors including purple, red, white, and green. The leaf shapes can also differ as some are smooth while others, like savoy are crinkly.

And while it isn’t as trendy as kale or cauliflower, it is surprisingly nutritious.

Nutritional Composition

As with many other cruciferous vegetables, this one is low in calories, yet high in many important vitamins and minerals.

Three cabbages, on their side, cut in half, with the other half sliced finely. To the left of the frame is a green variety, in the center a savoy, and to the right is a purple variety. The background is a wooden surface with bright light.

For example, 1 cup of raw cabbage provides approximately:

  • 22 calories
  • 2 grams of fiber
  • 85% of the recommended daily value (DV) for vitamin K
  • 54% of the DV for vitamin C

Vitamin K is important as it plays a role in bone health and helps with blood clotting.

Vitamin C works to keep your immune system strong and supports the growth of bone, collagen, and other important tissues. It’s also needed for the body to be able to absorb iron.

It is a good source of folate and vitamin B6 as well, both of which are needed for energy metabolism and nervous system functioning.

It’s also rich in minerals – potassium, calcium, and magnesium.

A close up of a green cabbage head, lightly splashed with water droplets. In the center, the leaves are a pale green, almost yellow, and the outer leaves are a deeper green with light green veins.

Not too shabby for just 22 calories.

And we can’t forget about fiber. Cabbage is high in both insoluble and soluble fibers.

While both are important for our health, they have different roles:

  • Soluble fiber supports healthy gut bacteria and heart health, and slows digestion.
  • Insoluble fiber keeps the digestive system running smoothly and regularly, and can help to prevent or treat constipation.

Plus, we haven’t even mentioned that it’s also high in several disease-fighting antioxidants, including beta-carotene, flavonoids, and sulfur compounds.

It’s worth noting that while all cabbage is a good source of antioxidants, purple and red varieties are particularly rich in anthocyanins – a pigment with antioxidant properties that is found in other red-purple plant-based foods including blueberries and black rice.

Fermented Cabbage May Be Good for Gut Health

In addition to coleslaw and soups, this vegetable is also commonly found in fermented foods such as sauerkraut and kimchi.

A dark wood surface with a slate serving board. On the board is a black dish containing white shredded cabbage, with a whole and two half cabbages behind. To the left of the bowl is a small glass bowl with coarse salt, and a mason jar containing some of the chopped vegetable. The image is taken from above in bright light.

Sauerkraut is a fermented German dish made by combining shredded cabbage, salt, and caraway seeds in a jar or fermentation crock. Over the course of 2-5 weeks, beneficial Lactobacillus bacteria begin to grow, resulting in a tart, slightly sour taste.

Another popular fermented condiment is kimchi.

Commonly found in Korean cuisine, the popular paechu kimchi has a few more ingredients than sauerkraut. Usually made with Napa cabbage, it may also contain fish sauce, soy sauce, ginger, garlic, red pepper flakes, scallions, and shrimp. However, instead of requiring a few weeks, kimchi usually takes just 1-5 days to ferment.

Both of these fermented condiments result in the growth of beneficial bacteria known as probiotics.

A close up of half of a green cabbage, with slices of the vegetable in front of it, on a wooden chopping board. The background is in soft focus.

When you eat them, these probiotics help to promote the growth of even more healthy bacteria in your gut, which has been associated with a range of benefits from better digestive health to reduced risk of chronic diseases and improved mental health.

Boosting beneficial bacteria may also improve absorption of several nutrients and promote the production of vitamin K and B-vitamins.

You can read more about healthy fermented foods on our sister site, Foodal.

Does Cooking Affect the Nutrient Content?

Do you prefer your cabbage raw or cooked?

While the raw vegetable is a staple ingredient in coleslaw and salads, many people find cooking it more appealing, as some varieties can be quite bitter.

A gray surface with a dark bowl containing freshly chopped red cabbage, pictured from above, with a celery sprig on top. To the right of the bowl is the other half of the vegetable and a celery leaf.
However, cooking does more than just reducing bitterness. It can also lead to some nutritional losses.

A study published in the Journal of Food Chemistry in 2014 found that the raw purple variety had significantly higher amounts of antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals compared to steamed, stir-fried, boiled or microwaved.

This vegetable also contains sulfur compounds which have also been shown to decrease when cooked. This is also why when it’s cooking it can start to have an unpleasant smell, best funny movies on amazon prime the sulfur compounds are being released.

But what if you prefer it cooked? Steaming was found to retain the most antioxidants and vitamin C compared to other cooking methods, making this a good option if you don’t like it raw.

A gray bowl with chopped red cabbage, carrots, and sprinkled with herbs. To the right of the frame is a fork, with half a piece of bread next to it, above that is a white plate with bread. To the left of the frame is a water glass, a celery frond, a dark bowl with chopped herbs and a small bowl with rice. The background is a gray fabric on a light gray surface.

Additionally, for those who find raw cabbage difficult to digest, cooking it and eating smaller portions may help prevent or reduce GI side effects.

Overall, if you choose to cook it, the shorter the cooking time and less water used, the more nutrients it will retain.

If you need inspiration for what to do with raw cabbage, try the delicious homemade coleslaw recipe from our sister site, Foodal. Or check out this recipe on Foodal for salmon tacos with red slaw.

A Versatile Vegetable

Growing your own  cabbage is an easy and budget-friendly way to get more nutrition on your plate.

And while it’s easy to add to salads or soups, it is a versatile ingredient that can be incorporated into a variety of cuisines.

Are you a fan of raw cabbage? Share your favorite ways to enjoy it in the comments below.

Inspired to get growing? You’ll need these guides:

© Ask the Experts, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. See our TOS for more details. Uncredited photos: Shutterstock. Additional writing and editing by Clare Groom and Allison Sidhu.

The contents of this article have been reviewed and verified by a registered dietitian for informational purposes only. This article should not be construed as personalized or professional medical advice. Gardener’s Path and Ask the Experts, LLC assume no liability for the use or misuse of the material presented above. Always consult with a medical professional before changing your diet, or using supplements or manufactured or natural medications.

About Kelli McGrane, MS, RD

Kelli McGrane is a Denver-based registered dietitian with a lifelong love of food. She holds a master’s degree in nutrition science from Boston University. As a registered dietitian, Kelli believes in the importance of getting to know our food better, including where it comes from and its benefits for our bodies.

Categories VegetablesTags Brassica icici bank online login, Cabbage, Cruciferous Vegetables, Mustard & Cabbage Family (Brassicaceae)Источник: https://gardenerspath.com/plants/vegetables/how-nutritious-is-raw-cabbage/

Superfood Spotlight: Red Cabbage

THE “WHAT”

Red cabbage is a dark purplish/red, cruciferous veggie that is tasty raw, cooked, or fermented #ProbioticsGalore! It’s also known as purple cabbage, red kraut, or even blue kraut (after being prepared with heat). Of the two cabbage varieties, red cabbage is a bit more peppery, smaller, and denser than green cabbage heads. The purple color comes from the pH levels of the soil in which it’s grown as is white cabbage good for you as the pigment that comes from the nutritionally valuable anthocyanins it contains.

THE “WHY”

Eat the rainbow… and we don’t mean ! Bright + beautiful vegetable sources are walmart supercenter orlando fl for being nutrition powerhouses. Red cabbage is one of those with a great dose of Vitamin C, making it an antioxidant-rich, immune booster. In comparison to green cabbage, red cabbage contains 10x more vitaminscancer-fighting flavonoids, and a winning amount of antioxidants which improve eye, teeth, bone, & immune health. Research suggests that flavonoids also aid in weight loss due to the release of hormones that can metabolize fat and may suppress appetite. Red cabbage also fights inflammation and arthritis with its powerful phytonutrient content! A study published in Research in Pharmaceutical Science showed that when testing the effects of cabbage extracts on the immune response, there was a reduction in swelling. Red cabbage is also Vitamin-K rich, which is essential in maintaining bone health and preventing osteoporosis in women & men alike. Last but not least, fermented red cabbage (also known as kimchi) helps heal the gut by providing beneficial probiotics that the GI tract loves! Other gut health functionalities of kimchi include constipation relief, colorectal health promotion, cholesterol reduction, antioxidative and anti-aging properties, brain health promotion, immune promotion, and skin health promotion.

THE “HOW”

As with any vegetable, some nutrition is white cabbage good for you lost upon heating, steaming, microwaving, etc. This is even more significant with red cabbage due to being an anthocyanin-rich plant. Therefore, raw uncooked cabbage will yield the most nutrition overall if you’re looking to get a nutrition-packed punch from this incredible veggie. If you decide to cook your cabbage, try using less water, lower heat, + less cooking time. All of these will help to retain the optimum benefits of the nutrients within! Enjoy cabbage raw on a fresh summer salad, braised with a savory protein source, simply steamed + salted, or fermented to receive the gut-healing nutrients from the live probiotics!

THE “80” WAY

At Eat the 80, we loooove red cabbage! This yummy, nitrified veg pops up in many of our meals such as our Ginger Beef Stir Fry, Jamaican Jerk Chicken (our absolute fave meal), and Roasted Chicken with Savoy Cabbage Almondine!

References:

  1. https://draxe.com/red-cabbage
  2. http://www.livestrong.com/article/410758-what-are-the-health-benefits-of-red-cabbage-vs-green-cabbage/

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Источник: https://www.eatthe80.com/superfood-spotlight-red-cabbage/

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Red cabbage is healthy and scores highly

Ingredients for marinated red cabbage

  • 1 medium-sized red cabbage (approx. 600g)
  • 2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tbsp. water
  • 1 tbsp. agave syrup
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. cumin or caraway

Also needed

  • 4-6 tortillas (your preference)
  • 1 bunch of spring onions
  • 1 bunch of parsley (flat-leaf)
  • 3 tbsp. walnuts (chopped)
  • 2 tbsp. pistachios (chopped and unsalted)

Pear hummus

Method: Place 2-3 tbsp. chickpeas aside for decoration. Place the rest of the chickpeas in a powerful mixer. Wash the pear, halve and remove the core. Dice the pear roughly and place in the mixer. Add tahini, olive oil, cumin, salt and lemon juice and blend at high-speed into a creamy hummus.

Ingredients:

  • 250g chickpeas, cooked
  • 1 pear
  • 2 tbsp. tahini
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp. cumin
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 garlic clove (crushed)
  • 1- 2 tbsp. lemon juice
Источник: https://www.css.ch/en/private-customers/my-health/nutrition/healthy-recipes/red-cabbage-healthy.html

Red Cabbage: The Disease-Fighting, Gut-Healing Superfood

Fact Checked

This Dr. Axe content is medically reviewed or fact checked to ensure factually accurate information.

With strict editorial sourcing guidelines, we only link to academic research institutions, reputable media sites and, when research is available, medically peer-reviewed studies. Note that the numbers in parentheses (1, 2, etc.) are clickable links to these studies.

The information in our articles is NOT intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

This article is based on scientific evidence, written by experts and fact checked by our trained editorial staff. Note that the numbers in parentheses (1, 2, etc.) are clickable links to medically peer-reviewed studies.

Our team includes licensed nutritionists and dietitians, certified health education specialists, as well as is white cabbage good for you strength and conditioning specialists, personal trainers and corrective exercise specialists. Our team aims to be not only thorough with americas best wings baltimore research, but is white cabbage good for you objective and unbiased.

The information in our articles is NOT intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

By Rebekah Edwards

March 20, 2018

Red cabbage - Dr. Axe

Just about everyone has eaten cabbage at one point or another in his or her life, whether as a New Year’s tradition or is white cabbage good for you part of the regular diet. But did you know that not all cabbage is the same? It’s true. Red cabbage buy red ryder bb gun not the same as green cabbage, and I’m not just talking about color.

Red cabbage, also known as purple cabbage, is a cruciferous vegetable that’s delicious both raw and cooked. It’s often eaten raw in salads, steamed, braised or sautéed with other vegetables. It’s also referenced as red kraut or blue kraut and can provide the much-needed benefits of probiotics in this form due to the fermentation process. In addition, the insoluble fiber from red cabbage is known to prevent constipation, lower the risk of developing diverticular disease and may help relieve symptoms of some gastrointestinal conditions, such as IBS symptoms.

But that’s not all: Red cabbage benefits extend even further, as you’ll learn below — and why you want to include this tasty veggie in your rotation.


Red Cabbage Benefits

1. Boosts the Immune System

Red cabbage contains ever-so-important vitamin C, a crucial antioxidant all target locations near me in order for our bodies to have strong immune systems. It stimulates the activity of white blood cells, forming the first line of defense for the immune system. Nutrient-dense antioxidants such as is white cabbage good for you C are known to have high antioxidant potency to assist in minimizing harmful effects of reactive species. As one of the top vitamin C foods on the planet, red cabbage is a major immune system booster.

The immune system is extremely vulnerable to oxidant and antioxidant balance, as uncontrolled free radical production can impair its function and defense mechanism. These free radicals can form in the body and promote tissue damage. However, antioxidants are the perfect defense mechanisms for the immune system and can help fight off intruders, including cancer. Additionally, vitamin C is important in the formation of collagen, commonwealth bank and trust hours keeps our bodies and cells connected and solid. (1)

Due in large part to its vitamin C content, red cabbage is a high-antioxidant food that fights free radical damage and strengthens the immune system.

2. Fights Inflammation and Arthritis

Red cabbage contains phytonutrientsthat may help reduce chronic inflammation. (2) One compound in red cabbage that may be responsible is sulforaphane (found in many cruciferous vegetables), a potent inflammation killer. (3)

According to The Arthritis Foundation, eating a diet filled with anthocyanin-rich fruits and vegetables like red cabbage should be a part of an arthritis patient’s daily regimen. These type of anti-inflammatory foods may help naturally treat arthritis inflammation and arthritic complications. (4)

3. Aids Healthy Bones and Reduces the Risk of Osteoporosis

Red cabbage is a vitamin K-rich food, and we know that vitamin K increases the amount of a specific protein required to maintain bone calcium, thus reducing the risk of osteoporosis. Women, in particular, seem to have higher bone density when eating a diet high in vitamin K. (5)

Some research indicates vitamin K supplementation may effectively promote new bone fractures and help sustain bone density, which is why red cabbage cub tcf near me a good addition to an osteoporosis diet. (6)

During the first twenty or so years of life, skeletal tissue continues to form. From that point until about age 40, your body maintains the bone mass you have at 20. Women experiencing menopause will then experience a rapid decline in the density of their bones, with men finally joining in around age 70. The less strong your bones become, the more likely you are to experience fractures. These fractures debilitate older people and are among the leading causes of lost mobility (becoming bedridden), which can then drastically decrease the ability to live a healthy life. That’s why vitamin K-rich foods like red cabbage are so important to help maintain bone health and delay or prevent osteoporosis. (7)

4. Combats Chronic Disease

During the course of the normal human life, cell degeneration will happen no matter how healthy you live. However, by filling your diet with foods high in antioxidants, you can give your body the best chance possible at preventing and combating serious chronic diseases. As a Brassica vegetable, red cabbage is one of those antioxidant-rich foods, with an ORAC value of 2,496 when raw and 3,145 when boiled. Brassica vegetables like red cabbage, kale and broccoli are thought to aid the body in preventing chronic diseases like cancer, heart disease and diabetes. (8)

In a laboratory study from the University of Auckland in New Zealand, researchers compared antioxidant potential of six plants high in anthocyanins (flavonoid pigments that give plants a blue, red or violet hue). Red cabbage, along with four of the other five plants, had significant antioxidant activity and successfully protected against one type of internal DNA damage caused by a specific colon cancer cell line, suggesting red cabbage may be a cancer-fighting food. (9)

5. Promotes a Healthy Gut

We know that probiotic foods provide a good dose of much-needed good bacteria that our digestive systems crave, but what does that have to do with red cabbage? I’m sure you have heard of kimchi. Most kimchi is made from green cabbage, but kimchi made from red or purple cabbage is becoming more popular. Kimchi is a traditional Korean fermented food — in fact, it’s one of the alabama power pay your bill popular vegetable probiotic foods in the world.

Probiotic-rich foods like kimchi support gut health by supporting the growth of www prudential com structured settlements bacteria, protecting against leaky gut syndrome and boosting immunity. According to scientists at Pusan National University in Korea, kimchi may also protect against obesity, blood clots, age-related degeneration, neurodegeneration and even skin issues. (10)

Related: Tatsoi: The Immune-Boosting, Heart-Healthy Benefits of ‘Vitamin Green’

Red cabbage benefits - Dr. Axe

Related: Iceberg Lettuce: Healthy Leafy Green or Nutrient-Poor Filler?


Red Cabbage Nutrition

One cup (89 grams) of chopped, raw red cabbage has about: (11)

  • 28 calories
  • 7 grams carbohydrates
  • 1 grams protein
  • 2 grams fiber
  • 50.7 milligrams vitamin C (85 percent DV)
  • 34 micrograms vitamin K (42 percent DV)
  • 993 IU vitamin A (20 percent)
  • 0.2 milligram manganese (11 percent DV)
  • 0.2 milligram vitamin B6 (9 percent DV)
  • 216 milligrams potassium (6 percent DV)
  • 0.1 milligram thiamine (4 percent DV)
  • 0.1 milligram riboflavin (4 percent DV)
  • 16 micrograms folate (4 percent DV)
  • 40 milligrams calcium (4 percent DV)
  • 0.7 milligram iron (4 percent DV)
  • 14.2 milligrams magnesium (4 percent DV)

Red Cabbage vs. Green Cabbage

While both red and green cabbage are good for you, red cabbage packs a more powerful nutritional profile. For example, red cabbage contains about 85 percent of the daily vitamin C our bodies need, while the green variety provides 47 percent. In fact, red cabbage has more vitamin C than oranges, believe it or not.

Red and green cabbage are two different cabbage varieties, but they have a similar flavor. Red cabbage tends to be more peppery and is usually smaller and denser than green cabbage federal home loan bank of atlanta grant. The leaves of the red cabbage are dark purple or reddish, which comes from the pH levels of the soil in which it’s grown, as well as the pigment that comes from the nutritionally valuable anthocyanins in contains.

In acidic soils, the leaves usually grow more reddish, while in neutral soils, they grow more purple. This explains why the same plant is known by different colors in various is white cabbage good for you. Red cabbage needs well-fertilized soil and sufficient humidity to grow at its best. It’s a seasonal plant, seeded in spring and harvested in late fall.

It’s also important to note that red cabbage is ranked fifth in the Clean 15 on the Environmental Working Group’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce, noted as one of the fruits and vegetables with the lowest amount of pesticide residues. However, if you are concerned at all about pesticide use, go for organic cabbage. (12)

Here’s a little more on how red and green cabbage stack up based on a one-cup serving:

Vitamin A

Red cabbage contains 10 times more vitamin A than green cabbage. Vitamin A helps prevent early stage age-related macular degeneration from progressing due to lutein and zeaxanthin, which function mainly as eye-supporting antioxidants. It may also aid aid in keeping the skin and immune system healthy. Vitamin A can help maintain healthy teeth, skeletal tissue and mucous membranes. (13)

Vitamin K

Green cabbage contains almost twice as much vitamin K as red cabbage. Vitamin K regulates bone mineralization by increasing bone density and helps the blood to coagulate.

Vitamin C

Both contain a good amount of vitamin C, which provides antioxidants and collagen protein. The body needs vitamin C to help repair wounds and injuries as well as keeping bones, cartilage and teeth strong and healthy.

Iron

Red cabbage has double the iron of green cabbage. Iron delivers oxygen to your cells, which helps your muscles perform well during exercise and general day-to-day activities. Lack of iron in your diet could cause anemia, leading to fatigue.

Anthocyanins: Only in Red Cabbage

Red cabbage is the winner when it comes to antioxidants. Red cabbage contains anthocyanin pigment, which is not found in green cabbage. The purple color in red cabbage is white cabbage good for you from anthocyanins, and these nutrients provide further evidence of the cancer-fighting flavonoids it contains. Anthocyanins are noted in research studies for protection against various types of memory loss, as well as other disease-preventing benefits like the ones I discussed above. (14, 15)


The Science and History Behind the Red Cabbage

As I mentioned above, the purple color of red cabbage is thanks to the anthocyanin pigments in contains. Depending on the acidity of the soil in which a plant containing anthocyanin is grown, this pigment can look is white cabbage good for you, purple or even blue.

While green cabbage still offers great aids to health, the color of red cabbage is what makes it the clear winner in overall antioxidant load. Plant geneticists at Cornell University believe that since “the amount of total anthocyanins in red cabbage was found to be a direct correlation to the total antioxidant power it provides, [this implicates] the potential health benefit of red cabbage to human health.” (16)

Red cabbage has a rich and well-documented history dating back to the height of Roman and Greek society, although some sources believe it’s been cultivated thousands of years even before those cultures wrote about it. The original version of the wild cultivar of red cabbage was grown originally in the Mediterranean region.

Many figures in history have contributed to the popularity of cabbage, including the Roman statesman, Cato, who is probably the person responsible for creating the cole slaw dish when he is white cabbage good for you on eating raw cabbage with vinegar. Pliny the Elder, a famous Roman citizen who served in the military, wrote philosophy and recorded common health practices of the ancient Romans, wrote about cabbage in Natural History, noting its medicinal properties both as a food and in poultice form. (17)

Although the first official record of cabbage didn’t appear until 1536 in Europe, it’s thought the Celts of the central and western parts of Europe may be even more responsible for the booming cabbage business dating back even before the Romans and Greeks. People in the southern parts of the Mediterranean probably developed cultivars of cabbage that could stand warmer temperatures than its original home.

Jacques Cartier likely brought cabbage to the Americas in the 1540s, where it was re-planted by colonists in the United States. However, it was 1669 before this plant would be written about in pre-United States records. Native Americans and United States citizens alike were known to plant and eat this valuable veggie by the 18th century.

The original shape of cabbage, referred to as “round-headed,” has given way through the years to a number of other cabbage shapes, including flat-headed, egg-shaped, conical and pointed. (18)


How to Use Red Cabbage

There are numerous ways to prepare red cabbage, such as red cabbage slaw, braised red cabbage, steamed red cabbage or simply eating it raw in salads. When cooking, red cabbage normally turns blue. However, if you want to retain the red color, you need to add apple cider vinegar or acidic fruit to the pot.

Like most plants that we eat, once heated, the nutritional benefits begin to diminish. A study was conducted showing just how this works with red cabbage. The results of this comparison of the difference between steaming, microwaving, boiling and stir-frying cabbage found that gate city bank wahpeton cooking method decreased the overall nutrition and anthocyanin capacity of red cabbage. Steaming, though, did help retain a good amount of other antioxidants and vitamin C.

According to these researchers, Asian cooking methods may be your best bet if you do choose to cook cabbage. While eating it raw will avoid any loss of nutritive value, by using less water and shorter cooking times (particularly using a steaming method, not microwaving or boiling the cabbage), can still provide you plenty of nutritional punch. (19)

Also, lightly rinsing but not scrubbing the cabbage totally clean allows you to retain important gut-enhancing bacteria that come from eating dirt.


Red Cabbage Recipes

You can integrate red cabbage into many different types of recipes. Try the following red cabbage recipes to reap the nutritional rewards:


Final Thoughts

Red cabbage is is white cabbage good for you cruciferous vegetable that has many proven benefits, including:

  1. Boosts the immune system
  2. Fights inflammation & arthritis
  3. Improves bone strength & reduces osteoporosis risk
  4. Combats chronic disease
  5. Strengthens gut health

While both red and green cabbage are good for you, red cabbage packs a more powerful nutritional profile and more overall antioxidants. For example, red cabbage contains about 85 percent of the daily vitamin C our bodies need, while the green version provides 47 percent.

Eating raw red cabbage is the best way to get the full impact of its nutrition; however, if you choose to cook it, I recommend steaming with as little water as possible for a short cooking time.

Источник: https://draxe.com/nutrition/red-cabbage/

Top 5 health benefits of red cabbage

Discover our full range of health benefit guides or check out some of our best red cabbage recipes, from traditional ways to serve it – such as our cider-braised cabbage wedges – to new twists on this popular vegetable, like our red cabbage & pickled chilli slaw.

Nutritional benefits of red cabbage

An 80g portion (boiled) provides:

  • 12kcal / 49kj
  • 0.6g protein
  • 0.2g fat
  • 1.8g carbohydrate
  • 1.8g fibre
  • 104mg potassium
  • 25mcg folate
  • 26mg vitamin C

Just 80g of red cabbage counts as central ford in ahoskie north carolina portion of your five-a-day. Discover more with our five-a-day infographic.

Traditional braised red cabbage recipes often combine the peppery flavours of cabbage with sweeter ingredients like apples, sugar, cider, port or wine. Lightly braising cabbage helps release beneficial carotenoids, adding whole fruit like apples naturally sweetens the dish, but be aware that when you add ingredients like sugar or certain types of alcohol you’ll be increasing free sugars, the type we are advised to cut back on.

Top 5 health benefits of red cabbage

1. Rich in antioxidants

Anthocyanins give purple-coloured fruits and vegetables, including red cabbage, their beautiful colour. They have protective antioxidant properties and as a result, there’s a lot of research evaluating just how these compounds benefit our health. For example, there are growing links between the use of dietary anthocyanins to help improve obesity and obesity-related diseases, such as type-2 diabetes.

Brassica vegetables are especially rich in anthocyanins as well as other antioxidant nutrients like vitamins The lesser key of solomon audiobook, E and the carotenoids.

2. May support heart health

A 2019 study indicates growing evidence that anthocyanins play a positive role in cardiovascular health and that those who eat foods rich in them (like red cabbage) have a lower risk of heart attacks and heart-disease-related death.

3. May help fight inflammation

A key component of brassica vegetables like red cabbage is a phytochemical known as sulforaphane. Animal studies report that sulforaphane may be responsible for the anti-inflammatory properties of these vegetables.

4. Contain anti-cancer is white cabbage good for you there are no ‘superfoods’ that can prevent cancer – and certain risk factors for cancer are unrelated to diet – there is evidence that eating a healthy diet can reduce your cancer risk. Being rich in compounds like sulforaphane and anthocyanins puts red cabbage in a strong position if you’re considering a brassica vegetable to add to your diet. That’s because these beneficial compounds appear to prevent oxidative damage and possibly act in protective way against cancer, including colorectal cancer.

5. May support gut health

Including red cabbage in your diet may support gut wellness. It’s a good source of fibre, including the insoluble variety which promotes regularity. The fibre in cabbage is also a prebiotic, which means it’s the type of fibre that acts as a fuel source for the beneficial bacteria that live in the gut. Compounds in red cabbage called isothiocyanates appear to be particularly beneficial because they encourage the gut bacteria to produce short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) – valuable compounds that have a far-reaching influence on our gut and wider health.

Is red cabbage safe for everyone?

Although safe for most, it is possible to be allergic to cabbage because of cross reactivity or ‘pollen food syndrome’, which also includes plants such as aubergine, beetroot, celery and peppers. A mild reaction may include symptoms such as itching mouth or tongue, sneezing or a runny nose. If you experience these symptoms after eating cabbage, speak to your GP. If a more serious allergic reaction occurs, call for an ambulance immediately.

Read more from the NHS about allergic reactions.

If you have a thyroid issue, you may be advised to minimise the amount of brassica vegetables you eat. This is because these vegetables may interfere with the absorption of iodine, which is needed for the production of thyroid hormones. However, it’s worth bearing in mind that you would need to eat a reasonable amount on a consistent basis for this to be an issue.

Cabbage is a high-fibre food, which for most of us is highly beneficial – it supports the digestive process and provides a fuel source for the healthy bacteria that reside in our gut. However, for some people, high-fibre foods may cause bloating and gas. This is especially relevant for those with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis.

If you are on blood-thinning medication such as warfarin, your GP or registered dietitian may suggest you monitor the vitamin K foods (like cabbage) in your diet to ensure you eat similar amounts consistently. If in doubt, consult your GP before making any significant changes to what and how much you eat.

How to buy the best red cabbage

Ideally, buy red cabbage when it is in season in the UK, in the autumn months. It should be heavy and firm and there should be little damage to the outer leaves. It’s okay if there is a little tear or mark, as normally the first few outer leaves are thrown away before eating, but don’t buy any red cabbage that has large cuts in it, is black or going mouldy or soggy.

Healthy red cabbage recipes

Discover our top-rated healthy red cabbage recipes in our collection.

Now read…

The health benefits of chestnuts
Is smoked salmon healthy?
The health benefits of cinnamon


This article was reviewed on 15 October 2021 by Kerry Torrens.

Nicola Shubrook is a nutritional therapist pho hoang restaurant fort smith ar 72901 works with both private clients and the corporate sector. She is an accredited member of the British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) and the Complementary & Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC). Find out more at urbanwellness.co.uk.

All open free online checking account without opening deposit content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other healthcare professional. If you have any concerns about your general health, you should contact your great wall south boston rd healthcare provider. See our zions bank pocatello hours and conditions for more information.

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